FYI Universities, Ivory Towers and Common Sense? September 13, 2016

College Rape
The victim(s) are raped physically and mentally, then raped again by the authorities.  Would it be appropriate to have victims of rape and/or parents of raped children in authoritative capacities at colleges?

What about rating a college, and the city as to how fair they are to both the victim and accused?

 
Stassa Edwards: After Richmond Student Writes Viral Essay About Her Rape Case, the University Calls Her a Liar

Cecilia Carreras referred to her rapist as “Richmond’s Brock Turner,”

On Thursday, Carreras responded with another post headlined, “Richmond, all I wanted was for you to say sorry. But instead you called me a liar. So, here are the receipts,” also published in the Huffington Post. In the post, Carreras provides screenshots of emails between her and Richmond dean, Daniel Fabian, as well as transcripts from a preliminary Title IX hearing in which Fabian acknowledges that the alleged rapist changed his story multiple times.

“No one denied, however, that [my rapist] penetrated me without consent,” Carreras wrote. Rather, she alleges that Fabian argued that the length of the assault was justified because he, “thought it was reasonable for [the accused] to penetrate you for a few more minutes if he was going to finish.”

 

In 2006, The Duke University Lacrosse Team of Durham did not receive fair treatment.

In 2007, Seligmann, Finnerty, and Evans sought unspecified damages and called for new criminal justice reform laws in a federal civil rights lawsuit against the City of Durham. (See below)

Falsely Accused of Rape
The Duke lacrosse case was a 2006 criminal case in which three members of the Duke University men’s lacrosse team were falsely accused of rape. The case evoked varied responses from the media, faculty groups, students, the community, and others. The case’s resolution sparked public discussion of racism, media bias, and due process on campuses, and ultimately led to the resignation and disbarment of the lead prosecutor, Durham County District Attorney Mike Nifong.

In March 2006, Crystal Gail Mangum, a black student at North Carolina Central University[1][2] who worked as a stripper,[3] dancer and escort, falsely accused three white Duke University students – all members of the Duke Blue Devils men’s lacrosse team – of raping her. The rape was alleged to have occurred at a party held at the house of two of the team’s captains in Durham on March 13, 2006. Many people involved in or commenting on the case, including District Attorney Nifong, stated or suggested that the alleged rape was a hate crime.[4][5][6][7]

In response to the allegations, Duke University suspended the lacrosse team for two games on March 28, 2006. The following week, on April 5, Duke lacrosse coach Mike Pressler was forced to resign under threat by athletic director Joe Alleva, and Duke President Richard Brodhead canceled the remainder of the 2006 season.

Law reform:
In 2007, Seligmann, Finnerty, and Evans sought unspecified damages and called for new criminal justice reform laws in a federal civil rights lawsuit against the City of Durham.

Claire Ballentine and Samantha Neal: Where are they now?
A look at the main characters involved in the lacrosse case

 

Is this censorship or common sense? How does having high profile alumni  and/or  faculty in a radical, criminal negative light affect a school?   Does it make a difference if a school is named after a historical figure?
University of Oregon to remove former KKK leader’s name
The University of Oregon’s Board of Trustees voted unanimously to strip the name of former Frederic Dunn from a campus dorm because of his past as an “exalted cyclops” in the Klu Klux Klan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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