FYI January 31, 2017

 

On this day:

1747 – The first venereal diseases clinic opens at London Lock Hospital.
The London Lock Hospital, which opened on 31 January 1747[citation needed], was the first venereal disease clinic and the most famous and first of the Lock Hospitals which were developed for the treatment of syphilis following the end of the use of lazar hospitals, as leprosy declined.[1][2] The hospital later developed maternity and gynaecology services before being incorporated into the National Health Service in 1948, and finally closed in 1952.
1930 – 3M begins marketing Scotch Tape.
Richard Gurley Drew (June 22, 1899 – December 14, 1980) was an American inventor who worked for Johnson and Johnson, Permacel Co., and 3M in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he invented masking tape and cellophane tape.[1]
Biography

When Drew joined 3M in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1920, it was a modest manufacturer of sandpaper. While testing their new Wetordry sandpaper at auto shops, Drew was intrigued to learn that the two-tone auto paintjobs so popular in the Roaring Twenties were difficult to manage at the border between the two colors. In response, after two years of work in 3M’s labs, Drew invented the first masking tape (1922), a two-inch-wide tan paper strip backed with a light, pressure-sensitive adhesive.[2]

The first tape had adhesive along its edges but not in the middle. In its first trial run, it fell off the car and the frustrated auto painter growled at Drew, “take this tape back to those Scotch bosses of yours and tell them to put more adhesive on it!”[3] (By “Scotch,” he meant “parsimonious”.) The nickname stuck, both to Drew’s improved masking tape, and to his 1930 invention, Scotch Brand cellulose tape.

In 1925 he came up with the world’s first transparent cellophane adhesive tape (called sellotape in the UK and Scotch tape in the United States). In the aftermath of the Wall Street Crash of 1929, people began using tape to repair items rather than replace them. This was the beginning of 3M’s diversification into all manner of marketplaces and helped them to flourish in spite of the Great Depression.

Drew died in 1980 in Santa Barbara, California.[4]

 

 
1949 – These Are My Children, the first television daytime soap opera is broadcast by the NBC station in Chicago.
These Are My Children is an American television soap opera which ran on NBC from January 31, 1949, to February 25, 1949. The show was broadcast live from Chicago, Illinois, airing fifteen minutes a day, five days a week, at 5:00 p.m. EST. It is widely credited as the first soap opera broadcast on television.[1][2] It may be more accurately described as the first daytime drama or the first soap opera strip, as it was preceded by DuMont series Faraway Hill in 1946 and Highway to the Stars in 1947, both of which are described as soap operas but aired later in the evenings and broadcast only once a week.

Created by Irna Phillips and directed by Norman Felton, the show was based in large part on Phillips’ early radio soaps Today’s Children and Painted Dreams. Children centered on an Irish widow, Mrs. Henehan and her struggles to run a boarding house as well as help her three children and new daughter-in-law Jean. Critics were not impressed; Television World ended their review with: “There is no place on television for this type of program, a blank screen is preferable.”[3]

Phillips later created many popular daytime dramas, and Felton produced primetime soaps Dr. Kildare and Executive Suite.

 

 

1971 – The Winter Soldier Investigation, organized by the Vietnam Veterans Against the War to publicize war crimes and atrocities by Americans and allies in Vietnam, begins in Detroit.
The “Winter Soldier Investigation” was a media event sponsored by the Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) from January 31, 1971 – February 2, 1971. It was intended to publicize war crimes and atrocities by the United States Armed Forces and their allies in the Vietnam War. The VVAW challenged the morality and conduct of the war by showing the direct relationship between military policies and war crimes in Vietnam. The three-day gathering of 109 veterans and 16 civilians took place in Detroit, Michigan. Discharged servicemen from each branch of military service, as well as civilian contractors, medical personnel and academics, all gave testimony about war crimes they had committed or witnessed during the years of 1963–1970.[1][2][3]

With the exception of Pacifica Radio, the event was not covered extensively outside Detroit. However, several journalists and a film crew recorded the event, and a documentary film called Winter Soldier was released in 1972. A complete transcript[4] was later entered into the Congressional Record by Senator Mark Hatfield, and discussed in the Fulbright Hearings in April and May 1971, convened by Senator J. William Fulbright, chair of the United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.

The purpose of the Winter Soldier Investigation was to show that American policies in Vietnam had led to war crimes. In the words of one participant veteran, Donald Dzagulones,

“We gathered not to sensationalize our service but to decry the travesty that was Lt. William Calley’s trial for the My Lai Massacre. The U.S. had established the principle of culpability with the Nuremberg trials of the Nazis. Following those principles, we held that if Calley were responsible, so were his superiors up the chain of command — even to the president. The causes of My Lai and the brutality of the Vietnam War were rooted in the policies of our government as executed by our military commanders.”

The name “Winter Soldier Investigation” was proposed by Mark Lane,[14] and was derived from Thomas Paine’s first American Crisis paper, written in December 1776. When future Senator and Secretary of State John Kerry, then a decorated Lieutenant in the Naval Reserve (Inactive), later spoke before a Senate Committee, he explained,

“We who have come here to Washington have come here because we feel we have to be winter soldiers now. We could come back to this country; we could be quiet; we could hold our silence; we could not tell what went on in Vietnam, but we feel because of what threatens this country, the fact that the crimes threaten it, not reds, and not redcoats but the crimes which we are committing that threaten it, that we have to speak out.[15]

 

Born on this day:

1854 – David Emmanuel, Romanian mathematician and academic (d. 1941)
David Emmanuel (31 January 1854 – 4 February 1941) was a Romanian Jewish mathematician and member of the Romanian Academy, considered to be the founder of the modern mathematics school in Romania.

He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Paris (Sorbonne) in 1879 with a thesis on Study of abelian integrals of the third species, becoming the second Romanian to have a Ph.D. in mathematics from the Sorbonne (the first one was Spiru Haret). David Emmanuel was the president of the first Romanian Congress of Mathematics held in 1929.

In 1882, David Emmanuel became a professor of superior algebra and functions theory at the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Bucharest. Here, in 1888, he held the first courses on group theory and on Galois theory. Among his students were Gheorghe Țițeica, Traian Lalescu and Simion Stoilow. Emmanuel had an important role in the introduction of modern mathematics and of the rigorous approach to mathematics in Romania.

 

1902 – Nat Bailey, Canadian businessman, founded White Spot (d. 1978)
Nathaniel Ryal Bailey (January 31, 1902 – March 27, 1978), better known as Nat Bailey, was an American-born Canadian restaurateur best known for building the first drive-in restaurant in Canada, in 1928, and developing the first car-hop tray. His chain of White Spot restaurants continues to thrive today.
Biography

Born in St. Paul, Minnesota, Bailey moved to Vancouver, British Columbia in 1913. He started his business career selling peanuts during games at the Vancouver Forum. He expanded his business by adding hot drinks and hamburgers. When the Forum’s roof collapsed in 1934, he built a type of log cabin White Spot at 70th and Granville in Vancouver’s Marpole district.

The logs were painted white and the ends painted green. This was the first drive-in in Canada. The car-hops wore green uniforms with Naugahyde captain’s caps, and a white stripe down the pant leg. Nat’s specially designed tray fit between the car’s window sills. He became famous for his hamburgers, which used Nat’s “secret sauce”, which was rumoured to be Thousand Island dressing mixed with mayonnaise, but he never revealed the recipe.

It has been reported that, as the condiments used came in large containers, he poured the excess dill pickle juice into the depleted mayonnaise jars, then put this mixture into the depleted ketchup containers, then added the relish from the depleted relish containers, to which was added the juice and residue from the slicing of tomatoes, adding the resultant mixture to a commercial Thousand Island dressing.

When a customer desired extra sauce on their burger, the waiter/car-hop would squiggle three O’s on the order slip to notify the kitchen. This has evolved into the current copyrighted “Triple-O Sauce” and Triple-O’s Restaurants owned by White Spot Restaurants.

Later, Nat became famous for his “Chicken Pickens” and “Chicken In The Straw.” This was long before the Colonel and KFC were on the scene. Nat built several of the drive-ins throughout Vancouver and Victoria. He sold the chain to General Foods when he retired as a famous restaurateur and community sports supporter.

Bailey was a Freemason, and supporter of the Marpole Rotary Club, as well as the Chamber of Commerce.

Bailey was also a supporter of little league baseball in the city of Vancouver and was a part owner of the Vancouver Mounties professional team. His love of the game was commemorated with the renaming of Capilano Stadium to Nat Bailey Stadium after his death in 1978. The reasons for his death are unknown. Nat Bailey Stadium is currently the home of the Vancouver Canadians, a short season Single-A affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays.

 

FYI:

Ellie Shechet: Did Paul Ryan Just Call This Press Conference a ‘Waste of My F’ng Time’?

 

‘Time Machine’ Mini Jukebox by Allan D Murray

 

Designing the dress of my dreams. by Laura Mae

 

Casey Chan: I Love These Clouds That Airplane Wings Make on Takeoff and Landing

 

 

Remember these? 

 

907 Updates January 31, 2017

Lisa Demer: New brand of borough aimed at cheaper energy, but critics worry it could do more harm than good

 

Comments?  Lobbyists, good work if you can get it, eh?
Nathaniel Herz: Is it time for a lobbyist union? Lawmaker proposes industry tax

 

Congratulations Ron Doubt and Michael Mahoney
Studying the sea: How one Mt. Edgecumbe educator works to prepare students for life
Presented by BP SPONSORED: Finding students’ interests and passions drive them to explore beyond the classroom.

 

When politicians are not sure how to vote I often think they are waiting to figure out how it effects their re-election possibilities.
Alaskans crowd Murkowski’s Anchorage office to protest DeVos education nomination

Shorpy January 31, 2017

November 1938. Mobile, Alabama. “House with unusual staircase.” 35mm nitrate negative by Russell Lee for the Resettlement Administration.

 

 

Spring 1942. “El Centro, California (vicinity). Young people at the Imperial County Fair.” Photo by Russell Lee for the Office of War Information.

Quotes January 31, 2017

And in life, it is all about the choices we make. And how the direction of our lives comes down to the choices we choose.
Catherine Pulsifer

 

 

Life is a choice – as is how you handle the pitfalls along its bumpy road.
Julie Donner Andersen

 

 

We are partners by fate. We become friends by choice.
Jacquie McTaggart

 

If you don’t have the information you need to make wise choices, find someone who does.
Lori Hil

 

 

“Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort.”
Franklin Roosevelt
(1882-1945)

 

 

“Constant kindness can accomplish much. As the sun makes ice melt, kindness causes misunderstanding, mistrust and hostility to evaporate.”
Albert Schweitzer
(1875-1965)

 

 

“I believe the unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality.”
Martin Luther King, Jr.
(1929-1968)

 

 

“Leaders aren’t born, they are made. They are made by hard effort, which is the price which all of us must pay to achieve any goal which is worthwhile.”
Vince Lombardi
(1913-1970)

 

 

“The ideals which have lighted my way, and time after time have given me new courage to face life cheerfully, have been kindness, beauty, and truth.”
Albert Einstein
(1879-1955)

 

“Life is a series of experiences, each of which makes us bigger, even though it is hard to realize this. For the world was built to develop character, and we must learn that the setbacks and griefs which we endure help us in our marching onward.”
Henry Ford
(1863-1947)

 

 

“A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination.”
Nelson Mandela
(1918-2013)

 

“The hardest decisions in life are not between good and bad or right and wrong, but between two goods or two rights.”
Joe Andrew

 

“Choose your life’s mate carefully. From this one decision will come 90 percent of all your happiness or misery.”
H. Jackson Brown Jr.

 

 

“When we find inspiration, we need to take action for ourselves and for our communities. Even if it means making a hard choice, or cutting out something and leaving it in your past.”
Aron Ralston

 

 

When bad things happen to you, focus on what you can learn from it. If you focus on the bad, you’re doomed to repeat it.
Mel Robbins

 

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. The fears are paper tigers. You can do anything you decide to do. You can act to change and control your life; and the procedure, the process is its own reward.”
Amelia Earhart

 

“This is as true in everyday life as it is in battle: we are given one life and the decision is ours whether to wait for circumstances to make up our mind, or whether to act, and in acting, to live.”
Omar Bradley

 

 

“Each person has a choice; the choice to do as one may wish and as one wants remains with the individual. If a person sees no benefit to change, they will not change.”
Byron Pulsifer

 

 

“We are the creative force of our life, and through our own decisions rather than our conditions, if we carefully learn to do certain things, we can accomplish those goals.”
Stephen Covey

 

“Did you know that to worry about a situation you are making a conscious choice to do so?”
Mike C. Adams

FYI January 30, 2017

 

On this day:

1661 – Oliver Cromwell, Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, is ritually executed more than two years after his death, on the 12th anniversary of the execution of the monarch he himself deposed.
Some Christians believed that the resurrection of the dead on judgement day requires that the body be buried whole facing east so that the body could rise facing God.[1][2] If dismemberment stopped the possibility of the resurrection of an intact body, then a posthumous execution was an effective way of punishing a criminal.[3][4]

In England Henry VIII granted the annual right to the bodies of four hanged felons. Charles II later increased this to six … Dissection was now a recognised punishment, a fate worse than death to be added to hanging for the worst offenders. The dissections performed on hanged felons were public: indeed part of the punishment was the delivery from hangman to surgeons at the gallows following public execution, and later public exhibition of the open body itself … In 1752 an act was passed allowing dissection of all murderers as an alternative to hanging in chains. This was a grisly fate, the tarred body being suspended in a cage until it fell to pieces. The object of this and dissection was to deny a grave … Dissection was described as “a further terror and peculiar Mark of Infamy” and “in no case whatsoever shall the body of any murderer be suffered to be buried”. The rescue, or attempted rescue of the corpse was punishable by transportation for seven years.
— Dr D. R. Johnson, Introductory Anatomy.[5]

 

1826 – The Menai Suspension Bridge, considered the world’s first modern suspension bridge, connecting the Isle of Anglesey to the north West coast of Wales, is opened.
The Menai Suspension Bridge (Welsh: Pont Grog y Borth) is a suspension bridge to carry road traffic between the island of Anglesey and the mainland of Wales. The bridge was designed by Thomas Telford and completed in 1826 and is a Grade I listed building.[1]

Before the bridge was completed in 1826, the island had no fixed connection to the mainland and the primary means of access to and from Anglesey was by ferry across the fast flowing and dangerous waters of the Menai Strait. The main source of income on Anglesey was from the sale of cattle, and to move them to the markets of the mainland, including London, they had to be driven into the water and encouraged to swim across the Strait, a dangerous practice which often resulted in the loss of valuable animals.[2] With Holyhead as the closest point to, and thus one of the principal ports for ferries to Dublin, Engineer Thomas Telford was engaged to complete a survey of the route from London to Holyhead, and he proposed that a bridge should be built over the Menai Strait from a point near Bangor on the mainland to the village of Porthaethwy (which is now also known as Menai Bridge) on Anglesey.[2]

Because of the high banks and fast flowing waters of the Strait, it would have been difficult to build piers on the shifting sands of the sea-bed and, even if it could be done, they would have obstructed the navigation. Also, the bridge would have to be high enough to allow the passage of the tall ships of the day. In view of this, Telford proposed that a suspension bridge should be built and his recommendation was accepted by Parliament.[2]

Construction of the bridge, to Telford’s design, began in 1819 with the towers on either side of the strait. These were constructed from Penmon limestone and were hollow with internal cross-walls. Then came the sixteen huge chain cables, each made of 935 iron bars, that support the 176-metre (577 ft) span.[3] To avoid rusting between manufacture and use, the iron was soaked in linseed oil and later painted.[4] The chains each measured 522.3 metres (1,714 ft) and weighed 121 long tons (123 t; 136 short tons). Their suspending power was calculated at 2,016 long tons (2,048 t; 2,258 short tons).[2] The bridge was opened to much fanfare on 30 January 1826.[2]

 

 

1969 – The Beatles’ last public performance, on the roof of Apple Records in London. The impromptu concert is broken up by the police.
Apple Records is a record label founded by the Beatles in 1968, as a division of Apple Corps Ltd. It was initially intended as a creative outlet for the Beatles, both as a group and individually, plus a selection of other artists including Mary Hopkin, James Taylor, Badfinger, and Billy Preston. In practice, by the mid-1970s, the roster had become dominated with releases by the former Beatles as solo artists. Allen Klein managed the label from 1969 to 1973. It was then managed by Neil Aspinall on behalf of the four Beatles and their heirs. He retired in 2007 and was replaced by Jeff Jones.

Apple has blocked the concert: This video contains content from Apple Corps Ltd, who has blocked it on copyright grounds.

 

Born on this day:

1754 – John Lansing, Jr., American lawyer and politician (d. 1829)
John Ten Eyck Lansing Jr. (January 30, 1754 in Albany, New York – vanished December 12, 1829 in New York City), was an American lawyer and politician. He was the uncle of Gerrit Y. Lansing.
Lansing studied law with Robert Yates in Albany, NY and was admitted to practice in 1775.[1]

From 1776 until 1777 during the Revolutionary War Lansing served as a military secretary to General Philip Schuyler. Afterwards he was a member of the New York State Assembly from 1780 to 1784, in 1785-86, and 1788–89, being its speaker during the latter two terms. He served New York as a member of the Confederation Congress in 1785. In 1786, he was appointed Mayor of Albany. He represented New York as one of three representatives at the Constitutional Convention in 1787. His intentions at the convention were to follow the wishes of the New York Legislature which had elected him to attend. He was authorized only to amend the existing Articles of Confederation. As the convention progressed, Lansing became disillusioned because he believed it was exceeding its instructions. Lansing believed the delegates had gathered together simply to amend the Articles of Confederation and was dismayed at the movement to write an entirely new constitution. His desire was to see the Articles strengthened giving it a source of revenue, the power to regulate commerce, and to enforce treaties. He joined other prominent Anti-Federalists that strongly opposed Alexander Hamilton, James Wilson and James Madison’s notions of a strong centralized national government to replace the Articles. He, Luther Martin of Maryland, George Mason of Virginia and Robert Yates also of New York strongly opposed the newly proposed United States Constitution because they thought it was fundamentally flawed and should be rejected because it infringed on the sovereignty of the independent States and did not do enough to guarantee individual liberty. Both he and Robert Yates walked out after 6 weeks and explained their departure in a joint letter to New York Governor George Clinton.[2] Lansing and Yates never signed the constitution. At the New York Ratifying Convention that followed, he along with Melancton Smith took the lead in the debates as the leaders of the Anti-Federalist majority. Their attempts to prevent ratification ultimately failed by a narrow vote of 30 to 27. He was appointed a Justice of the New York State Supreme Court in 1790 and on 15 February 1798 he was elevated to the post Chief Justice. In 1801, he also became the second Chancellor of New York, succeeding Robert R. Livingston. In 1814 he became a regent of the University of New York.

 

 

1899 – Max Theiler, South African-American virologist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1972)
Max Theiler (30 January 1899 – 11 August 1972) was a South African-American virologist and doctor. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1951 for developing a vaccine against yellow fever in 1937, becoming the first African-born Nobel laureate.

Born in Pretoria, Theiler was educated in South Africa through completion of his degree in medical school. He went to London for post-graduate work at St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School, King’s College London and at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, earning a 1922 diploma in tropical medicine and hygiene. That year he moved to the United States to do research at the Harvard University School of Tropical Medicine. He lived and worked in that nation the rest of his life. In 1930 he moved to the Rockefeller Institute in New York, becoming director of the Virus Laboratory.

After passing the yellow fever virus through laboratory mice, Theiler found that the weakened virus conferred immunity on Rhesus monkeys.[1] The stage was set for Theiler to develop a vaccine against the disease. Theiler first devised a test for the efficacy of experimental vaccines. In his test, sera from vaccinated human subjects was injected into mice to see if it protected the mice against Yellow Fever virus. This “mouse protection test,” was used with variations as a measure of immunity until after World War II.[1] Subculturing the particularly virulent Asibi strain from West Africa in chicken embryos, a technique pioneered by Ernest Goodpasture, the Rockefeller team sought to obtain an attenuated strain of the virus that would not kill mice when injected into their brains. It took until 1937, and more than one hundred subcultures in chicken embryos, for Theiler and his colleague Hugh Smith to obtain an attenuated strain, which they named “17D”. Animal tests showed the attenuated 17D mutant was safe and immunizing. Theiler’s team rapidly completed the development of a 17D vaccine, and the Rockefeller Foundation began human trials in South America. Between 1940 and 1947, the Rockefeller Foundation produced more than 28 million doses of the vaccine and finally ended yellow fever as a major disease.

For this work Theiler received the 1951 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Theiler also was awarded the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene’s Chalmers Medal in 1939, Harvard University’s Flattery Medal in 1945, and the American Public Health Association’s Lasker Award in 1949.
Theiler’s Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV)
In 1937, Max Theiler discovered a filterable agent that was a known cause for paralysis in mice. He found the virus was not transmittable to Rhesus monkeys, and that only some mice developed symptoms.[2] The virus is now referred to as Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus. The virus has been well characterized, and now serves as a standard model for studying multiple sclerosis.

 

 

FYI:

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Brian Ashcraft: Namco’s Founder Has Died At Age 91

 

Emily Price: At San Francisco’s New Cafe X, a Robot Makes Your Coffee Just The Way You Like It

 

Justin T. Westbrook: Please Consider Never Putting The Roof Down On Your Mazda Miata RF

 

Images January 30, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 19, 2017 last quarter moon and bright planet Jupiter, with several of Jupiter’s moons visible, via Karl Diefenderfer in Quakertown, Pennsylvania.

 

 

 


Kaylyn Messer, photographer: Gargantuan ice disc spins in the current of the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River.