Category: 907 Updates

Alaska Info

The NaNoWriMo challenge

By Jacob Mann Frontiersman.com: The NaNoWriMo challenge

PALMER — The month of November has become an annual wave of words across the nation. Writers of all ages unite under the same challenge — to write a novel in 30 Days. The official challenge is sanctioned by the organization, National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). Caitlin Buxbaum is a Valley raised writer on the path to become an educator. As November approached, she gathered a group of children who accepted the challenge. Buxbaum combined forces with the like-minded educators in Colony Middle School English teacher, Sacha Pettit and Mat-Su Central English teacher, Tricia Kenney.

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907 Updates December 11, 2017

By Leroy Polk: Weekend homicide suspect arrested after Anchorage police deploys SWAT
 
 
 
 
By Liz Raines: Harassment in Alaska’s capitol building: HR perspective
 
 
 
 
One Alaska Update A Note From Gov. Walker…

Coming This Week: Walker-Mallott Budget for FY 2019

This week, the Walker-Mallott Administration will unveil the budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2019. Budgets are moral documents, as they reflect the values and priorities we have for our state. Governor Walker and Lt. Governor Mallott envision a Safer, Smarter, and Stronger Alaska that is thriving for future generations. We can only get there if we get our fiscal house in order.


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What Do I Know?: AIFF 2017: The Awards Ceremony – UPDATE: All Winners Announced (Unless They Surprise Me)
 
 
 
 
Craig Medred: Explainin’ the rainin’
8 p.m. on Sunday, the temperature at 1,000 feet above Anchorage was an unseasonable 40 degrees and rain was falling steadily.

The normal White Christmas season was already long washed away. All that was left was the ice that clung to the ground anywhere snow had been compressed over the course of the past week.

Far below at Ted Stevens International Airport, the National Weather Service was reporting 41 degrees and forecasting temperatures to climb above freezing all through the week with snow, if there is snow, mixed with more rain.

It was all very odd, but climate scientist Daniel Swain – a postdoctoral fellow in the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at the University of California, Los Angeles – thinks he has an answer to what is going on.

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Our Third Thirds: Driver Ed: Third Third Style
Driver Ed in our First Third: harrowing films of terrible car accidents, screeching breaks, bodies burnt to crisps.

Driver Ed in our Third Third: harrowing statistics like, “Seniors aged 65 and over are more than twice as likely as younger drivers to be killed when involved in a crash;” that we need 20 times more light to see at night at age 40 than at age 20; that deaths in crashes start increasing around ages 60-64.

I decided to click on all those AARP emails about saving 30% for a limited time only – with a promo code! – on the Smart Driver™ online course so I’d get an insurance discount. It looked easy enough: there were six units, and it would take about four hours. I could do it on my own schedule.

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Little Big House Alaska: Catch 49 Halibut Giveaway
This is a Sponsored Post on behalf of Catch 49 and the AMCC.
Catch 49 Halibut Giveaway

One of the best things about living in Alaska is the abundant access to sport fishing. Salmon, trout, halibut, you name it, you can get on a boat or go for a hike and try your luck at catching dinner. Or catch enough fish to stock your freezer for the season. It depends on time and ability and sometimes budget. But what about if you don’t have time to go fishing or maybe being on boats makes you sick or you cant afford a charter to get you out to where the halibut are hitting hard? Whatever the reasons you CAN’T get to where the fish are, Alaska’s fishermen have you covered. And sometimes I have you covered, like with this Catch 49 Halibut Giveaway. Read on for details!

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Little Big House Alaska: Friday Frenzy
What a wild holiday time of year, we’ve been going going going for two weeks now and we’ll probably keep right on through the New Year. I don’t mind though I enjoy being busy. My hands are busy making Christmas presents and we’re busy taking in all the free entertainment our community puts on this time of year. We’ve been to a Robotics Competition, A Holiday Market (where my son sold Handmade Christmas Crackers to raise funds to go to DC in the spring, a Christmas Concert and looking at Christmas lights. Today we’re celebrating Colony Christmas in Palmer, there’s lots of events going on and we’re going to view Gingerbread houses, tour a Colony House, make paper cranes, crack the Cookie Cypher and go to another concert where our kids are playing in the orchestra. Fireworks follow after the concert. This coming week we have more concerts, plays with kids, parties and even a Christmas Cookie baking day. In between all these events I’ll be cranking out handmade gifts left and right!

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SANDRA’S BANANA-OAT-CRAISIN COOKIES
 
 
 
 
Coleen’s Recipes: EASY SESAME CHICKEN
 
 
 
 
Moms Everyday Alaska: Meal under $10: Veggie frittata with easy fried potatoes

Craig Medred: Dog Rescue

By Craig Medred: Dog rescue

The August Foundation for Alaska’s Racing Dogs, an organization dedicated to finding homes for retired Alaska huskies, is calling on the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race to do more to ensure the event’s true athletes get a chance to enjoy life after competition.

The request comes at a time when the state’s trademarked “Last Great Race” is in discussions with mushers about how to improve sled-dog care beyond the two weeks it takes to traverse 1,000 miles of northern wilderness.

Somewhere in the neighborhood of 1,000 to 1,200 dogs participate in the race every year. Hundreds more train for the event, but don’t make it to the start line for various reasons. How many are retired each year is unknown.

Though sled dogs live well into their teens, most Iditarod dogs have athletic careers that last for only four to six years. As a result, they are destined to live most of their lives away from competition – if they live.

When an Iditarod dog’s racing days are over, the August Fund said in a media release, “a majority of mushers do right by their dogs by welcoming them into their homes” or placing the dogs with family, friends, fans or organizations that help the dogs find retirement homes.

But that is not always the case.

“Others drop them on already over-burdened local shelters, or worse dispatch them with a bullet or blow to the head,” the release said.

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907 Updates December 10, 2017

By Sean Maguire: The Mendeltna Creek Lodge near Glennallen is on fire
The lodge’s owners, Mabel and Russ Wimmer, are both fine but their pets, a cat and two mastiffs, both perished in the fire.
 
 
 
 
By AP: Weather Service cuts balloon launches amid staffing issue
The loss of any input data affects weather models, but the degree it hurts the accuracy of forecasts isn’t easy to quantify.

Weather Service Alaska Region Director Carven Scott says the Weather Service supplements data from weather balloons with data from satellites.
 
 
 
 
By Cameron Mackintosh: Snowmachiners practice for the worst with simulated crash course

On Saturday, a group of 25 snowmachiners put their search and rescue skills to the test, in a hands-on crash simulation organized by Learn to Return, a business that provides survival and first aid training.

Learn to Return director Brian Horner says he usually offers the course to employees in the construction industry or other similar fields. But Saturday’s class was comprised of people who work for events like the Iditarod, Iditasport and Iron Dog, as well as members of search and rescue groups and the Anchorage snowmachine club.
 
 
 
 
Another view: Wilderness Medical Training
By Scott Gross: New Anchorage course offers wilderness medical training

Alaskanomics: The Mat-Su Economy

Alaskanomics: The Mat-Su Economy

The Mat-Su Economy

In a recent issue of Trends, the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development highlighted the growth in the Mat-Su economy. The borough has seen a large increase in population, while the state saw a modest growth. Since 2010, population in the Mat-Su has grown by 15 percent, which is much higher than the 4 percent that was seen throughout the state in the same time frame. New home construction is also strong and even during the state’s recession, the Mat-Su saw job growth.

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907 Updates December 09, 2017

By Sean Maguire: AST: Suspect tried to run over State Trooper during high speed chase on Glenn Hwy
 
 
 
 
By Kyle Hopkins: ‘He should resign. It’s that simple.’ Woman who says she was groped by Alaska lawmaker says apology is not enough
 
 
 
 
By Leroy Polk: With theft on the rise, Fred Meyer’s grocery store looks to police for help
 
 
 
 
By Sean Maguire: Red Cross Alaska deploys 7 volunteers to assist with the California wildfires
 
 
 
 
By Heather Hintze: DOT buys properties, boards up buildings for Glenn Hwy expansion
 
 
 
 
One bullet.

By KTVA: Appeal denied for mom convicted in son’s death
 
 
 
 
By Scott Gross: Struggling Veterans gain some ‘peace of mind’ during holidays
 
 
 
 
By Sean Maguire: VIDEO: Alaska SeaLife Center seal released into the wild

907 Updates December 08, 2017

By Leroy Polk: Anchorage woman shot inside home by someone outside her window
 
 
 
 
By Leroy Polk: Alaska man chases 4-wheeler thieves on his snowmachine, kicks one off
 
 
 
 
By Associated Press: Alaska suffers resurgence of beetle that causes tree deaths
 
 
 
 
By Sean Maguire: Western Alaskan village placed on lockdown for 5 hours
Johnson is set to be remanded at the Yukon Kuskowkim Correctional Center. “Bail is set at $5,000 cash plus a court approved third party custodian,” say Troopers.
 
 
 
 
By Beth Verge: DOC, Salvation Army unveil new $2.2M plan to help end substance abuse
 
 
 
 
By Laurel Downing Bill: Story Time with Aunt Phil: Eskimo Scouts emerge after Pearl Harbor
 
 
 
 
By Beth Verge: Salute to Gold Star families: Alaska mountain peak naming proposal heads to D.C.

907 Updates December 07, 2017

By Leroy Polk & Cameron Mackintosh: UPDATE: Father allowed to plan son’s funeral outside of jail while facing charges
A U.S. magistrate judge has agreed to release Anthony Johnson from jail for a few days while his family plans the funeral of Johnson’s 5-year-old son.

Johnson is charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm, after his son found and fatally shot himself with a gun in the family’s master bedroom.
 
 
 
 
By Caslon Hatch: ‘Bathroom Bill’ enforcement, vehicle thefts discussed at Assembly public safety meeting
ANCHORAGE (KTUU) – At an Anchorage Assembly public safety committee meeting Wednesday, Anchorage Police Chief Justin Doll said it would be extremely difficult to enforce Proposition 1 if passed during the April Municipal election.
 
 
 
 
APD investigating armed robbery on Debarr Rd.
 
 
 
 
By Kalinda Kindle: Opponents of Pebble Mine plan speak out at town hall meeting
 
 
 
 
Bad news?
By Jack Carney: Age of Alaska’s fishermen on the rise
According to a study by the University of Fairbanks, the average age of an Alaska commercial fisherman is now 50 years old.

Paula Cullenburg, Director of Alaska’s Sea Grant Program at UAF, says that’s bad news for sustaining the state’s economy, especially for those in coastal communities.

 
 
 
 
By Lauren Maxwell: Property owners near Brother Francis Shelter say they’re staying put in the neighborhood
 
 
 
 
Moms Everyday Alaska: Chocolate popcorn reindeer

907 Updates December 06, 2017

By Leroy Polk: Richardson Highway closed following avalanche and extreme snow
 
 
 
 
By KTUU Staff: UPDATE: Man identified in Tuesday night shooting incident According to police, the suspect is Jeffery Cosgrove, 35.

 
 
 
 
Women In Safe Homes Receives $5,000 Basic Needs Grant
 
 
 
 
By Associated Press: Alaska edible pot maker suspended amid product testing probe
 
 
 
 
By Becky Bohrer: Alaska lawmaker takes fight over conflicts to the voters
Rep. Jason Grenn of Anchorage is helping lead a bipartisan effort to put a proposal on the 2018 ballot. It would provide greater scrutiny and limits on lawmakers’ conflicts of interest, travel and pay.
 
 
 
 
By KTVA Web Staff: Young named to key tax-bill role, takes prominent House title
 
 
 
 
One way to pay for government.
By Kyle Hopkins: What this cash-filled fish box says about the Alaska drug trade
The shipper, who is not being named here because he has not been charged with a crime, can fight the complaint and argue that the money is not subject to forfeiture. If the U.S. Attorney’s office succeeds, the city of Kodiak would be eligible to apply for up to 80 percent of the seized money for local government use.
 
 
 
 
Why not have a Girdwood Parking Authority? Less costly than a police officer.
By Rebecca Palsha: Voters may decide if Whittier Police can write parking tickets in Girdwood
 
 
 
 
Comments on your experience with Meth/toxic chemical infestation and removal?
By Kyle Hopkins: In some stolen cars, Anchorage laboratory finds invisible meth residue

 
 
 
 
Ordinance will take effect in 2021~
By Kalinda Kindle: Anchorage Assembly passes quicker clean-up time for homeless camps

 
 
 
 
Looking Back — Nov. 29, 2017
 
 
 
 
Moms Everyday Alaska: Holiday wreath popcorn treats

907 Updates December 05, 2017

On 12/05/17 12:24 a.m., Dispatch received a report of child death in the 5700 block of Rocky Mountain Court.

The preliminary investigation found the child died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The child found the gun inside the drawer of a bedroom nightstand.

The victim has been identified as Christian Johnnson (5-years-old).

This is a death investigation. The case will be referred to the Anchorage District Attorney’s office for possible charges.

This is a tragic reminder about gun safety and children. Don’t leave guns unattended and easily accessible, use a gun lock or secure guns in a safe.

APD Case: 17-49834
 
 
 
 
By Leroy Polk: Earthquake wakes Anchorage, Mat-Su residents early Tuesday
 
 
 
 
By Daniella Rivera: New details released in ‘chilling’ Mat-Su murder
Palmer Superior Court Judge Vanessa White referenced a case she presided over that recently gained media attention.

“It so happens, I just finished a trial for a young man who was charged with some assaults and slipped his very well-intentioned third parties in the middle of the night and went out and kidnapped and assaulted the same victim again, so, I’m sort of hyper-vigilant at this point, perhaps more hyper-vigilant than I’ve been in the past,” said White, while considering the arguments of both parties.

Jordan King awaits sentencing after re-victimizing the woman he originally assaulted after running away from his parents, who were serving as his third-party custodians.
 
 
 
 

By KTVA Web Staff: Stolen delivery truck crashes into Church of Love
 
 
 
 
By Chris Klint: Troopers investigating Anchorage man’s Jim Creek death
An online dispatch identified the man found Saturday as 36-year-old Weston Gladney
 
 
 
 
By Kalinda Kindle: A neighbor says she is worried about the crime in her community
 
 
 
 
By Wesley Early, Alaska Public Media: University of Alaska’s first Rhodes Scholar: A voracious reader with deep King Cove roots
 
 
 
 
By Beth Verge: Lawmakers, AGDC discuss latest in AKLNG developments
 
 
 
 
By Associated Press: Premera to reimburse Alaska state insurance program $25M
 
 
 
 
Nurse-Family partnership program
 
 
 
 
By Melissa Frey: Icy start for Anchorage as rain turns to evening snow
 
 
 
 
By Heather Hintze: ACS to lay off 30 people
 
 
 
 
Congratulations Natalia Sears!
By Megan Mazurek: Teacher of the Week: Natalia Sears
Natalia Sears sees math as a universal language that’s applicable in real-world situations.

“There’s no reason to be scared of math,” said Sears, a high school math teacher at Dimond. “I just want them to build the confidence in math, rather than just memorize formulas.”