Category: FYI

FYI

Kindle FYI January 09, 2017

$1.99
Pale Kings and Princes
by Robert B. Parker
A hotshot reporter is dead. He’d gone to take a look-see at “Miami North”—little Wheaton, Massachusetts—the biggest cocaine distribution center above the Mason-Dixon line.

Did the kid die for getting too close to the truth . . . or to a sweet lady with a jealous husband?

 

$1.99
Dead Irish (Dismas Hardy Book 1)
by John Lescroart, bestselling author of The Fall and The Keeper
For former San Francisco cop Dismas Hardy, Guinness Stout with Bass Ale is the drink of choice, but a straight Irish whiskey will do anytime. The news of young Eddie Cochran’s death calls for a double. The cops think it’s suicide, but even to a lapsed Catholic like Hardy, it sounds wrong….

 

 

$1.99
Mcnally’s Secret
by Lawrence Sanders
Inveterate playboy Archy McNally gets paid to make discreet inquiries for Palm Beach’s power elite. But keeping their dirty little secrets buried will take some fancy footwork in McNally’s latest case. A block of priceless 1918 US airmail stamps has gone missing from a high-society matron’s wall safe. Lady Cynthia Horowitz, now on her sixth husband, is a nasty piece of work who lives in a mansion that looks like Gone With the Wind’s Tara transplanted to southern Florida. McNally’s search takes him into a thickening maze of sex, lies, scandal, and blackmail. When passion erupts into murder and McNally must dig even deeper to uncover the truth, he unearths a shocking secret that could expose his own family’s skeletons.

 

 

$0.99
He Came Back
By Lorhainne Eckhart | Mystery
One woman’s haunting journey when her husband returns home and everything she thought she knew about their life together has suddenly changed … Read More

 

 

$0.99
Mudwoman: A Novel
by Joyce Carol Oates
A riveting psychological thriller, taut with dark suspense, that explores the high price of repression in the life of a respected university president teetering on the precipice of a nervous breakdown. Mudwoman is a chilling page-turner that hinges on the power of the imagination and the blurry lines between the real and the invented….

 

 

Free
Raspberries And Vinegar
by Valerie Comer
Josephine Shaw: complex, yet single minded. A tiny woman with big ideas and, some would say, a mouth to match. But what does she really know about sustainable living as it relates to the real world? After all, she and her two friends are new to farming.

Zachary Nemesek is back only until his dad recovers enough to work his own land again. When Zach discovers three helpless females have taken up residence at the old farm next door, he expects trouble. But a mouse invasion proves Jo has everything under control. Is there anything she can’t handle? And surely there’s something sweet beneath all that tart.

 

Free
A Coffee Lover’s Guide to Coffee: All the Must – Know Coffee Methods, Techniques, Equipment, Ingredients and Secrets [Print Replica] Kindle Edition
by Shlomo Stern (Author)
A friendly guide to coffee with the valuable information any coffee lover must know.

Recent years have witnessed a quiet, almost unnoticeable revolution: all around the world, drip coffee has been replaced by espresso, macchiato, and cappuccino, with a similar quality to those served in the best Italian coffee shops. The technological developments of espresso machines, moka-pot, French-press and other newfangled equipment has allowed the flourishing coffee market to enter the domestic kitchen, turning coffee into an integral part of everyday, modern life. However, despite its huge popularity and expanding markets, coffee remains uncharted terrain, known only to connoisseurs. No more.

A Coffee Lover’s Guide is an accessible, comprehensive, easy-to-read and enjoyable guide, written with love and made especially for anyone drinking, making, selling or buying coffee. It is an easy, available, communicative and enjoyable way to learn and understand coffee and the coffee world better.
>>>A recommended gift for any coffee lover!

A Coffee Lover’s Guide includes a short, accessible and comprehensive synopsis of coffee’s history and origin, it’s types and varieties, different ways of brewing and grinding, coffee machinery, and even popular uses and traditions of coffee, including “coffee reading.”
>>>All the answers in one place: the perfect guide for any coffee lover!

Websites of Interest

Alaska Floats My Boat

 

Little House Big Alaska | Living Life in the Far North

 

FYI January 08, 2017

NATIONAL ENGLISH TOFFEE DAY

Saltine Toffee Cookies

English Toffee

 

On this day:

1889 – Herman Hollerith is issued US patent #395,791 for the ‘Art of Applying Statistics’ — his punched card calculator.
Herman Hollerith (February 29, 1860 – November 17, 1929) was an American inventor who developed an electromechanical punched card tabulator to assist in summarizing information and, later, accounting. He was the founder of the Tabulating Machine Company that was consolidated in 1911 with three other companies to form the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company, later renamed IBM. Hollerith is regarded as one of the seminal figures in the development of data processing.[2] His invention of the punched card tabulating machine marks the beginning of the era of semiautomatic data processing systems, and his concept dominated that landscape for nearly a century.[3][4]

List of pioneers in computer science

 

1973 – Watergate scandal: The trial of seven men accused of illegal entry into Democratic Party headquarters at Watergate begins.
Watergate was a major political scandal that occurred in the United States in the 1970s, following a break-in at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. in 1972 and President Richard Nixon’s administration’s attempted cover-up of its involvement. When the conspiracy was discovered and investigated by the U.S. Congress, the Nixon administration’s resistance to its probes led to a constitutional crisis.[1]

The term Watergate has come to encompass an array of clandestine and often illegal activities undertaken by members of the Nixon administration. Those activities included such “dirty tricks” as bugging the offices of political opponents and people of whom Nixon or his officials were suspicious. Nixon and his close aides also ordered investigations of activist groups and political figures, using the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

The scandal led to the discovery of multiple abuses of power by the Nixon administration, an impeachment process against the president that led to articles of impeachment,[2] and the resignation of Nixon. The scandal also resulted in the indictment of 69 people, with trials or pleas resulting in 48 being found guilty, many of whom were Nixon’s top administration officials.[3]

The affair began with the arrest of five men for breaking and entering into the DNC headquarters at the Watergate complex on Saturday, June 17, 1972. The FBI investigated and discovered a connection between cash found on the burglars and a slush fund used by the Committee for the Re-Election of the President (CRP), the official organization of Nixon’s campaign.[4][5] In July 1973, evidence mounted against the President’s staff, including testimony provided by former staff members in an investigation conducted by the Senate Watergate Committee. The investigation revealed that President Nixon had a tape-recording system in his offices and that he had recorded many conversations.[6][7]

After a protracted series of bitter court battles, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the president was obligated to release the tapes to government investigators, and he eventually complied. These audio recordings implicated the president, revealing he had attempted to cover up activities that took place after the break-in and to use federal officials to deflect the investigation.[5][8] Facing virtually certain impeachment in the House of Representatives and equally certain conviction by the Senate, Nixon resigned the presidency on August 9, 1974.[9][10] On September 8, 1974, his successor, Gerald Ford, pardoned him.

The name “Watergate” and the suffix “-gate” have since become synonymous with political scandals in the United States.[11][12][13][14][15]

 

1975 – Ella T. Grasso becomes Governor of Connecticut, the first woman to serve as a Governor in the United States other than by succeeding her husband.
Ella T. Grasso (May 10, 1919 – February 5, 1981) was an American politician and member of the Democratic Party who served as the 83rd Governor of Connecticut from 1975 to 1980. She was the first woman elected to this office and the first woman to be elected governor of a U.S. state without having been married to a former governor.

 

1982 – Breakup of the Bell System: AT&T agrees to divest itself of twenty-two subdivisions.
The breakup of the Bell System was mandated on January 8, 1982, by an agreed consent decree providing that AT&T Corporation would, as had been initially proposed by AT&T, relinquish control of the Bell Operating Companies that had provided local telephone service in the United States and Canada up until that point.[1] This effectively took the monopoly that was the Bell System and split it into entirely separate companies that would continue to provide telephone service. AT&T would continue to be a provider of long distance service, while the now independent Regional Bell Operating Companies (RBOCs) would provide local service, and would no longer be directly supplied with equipment from AT&T subsidiary Western Electric.

This divestiture was initiated by the filing in 1974 by the United States Department of Justice of an antitrust lawsuit against AT&T.[2] AT&T was, at the time, the sole provider of telephone service throughout most of the United States. Furthermore, most telephonic equipment in the United States was produced by its subsidiary, Western Electric. This vertical integration led AT&T to have almost total control over communication technology in the country, which led to the antitrust case, United States v. AT&T. The plaintiff in the court complaint asked the court to order AT&T to divest ownership of Western Electric.[3]

Feeling that it was about to lose the suit, AT&T proposed an alternative — the breakup of the biggest corporation in American history. It proposed that it retain control of Western Electric, Yellow Pages, the Bell trademark, Bell Labs, and AT&T Long Distance. It also proposed that it be freed from a 1956 anti-trust consent decree that barred it from participating in the general sale of computers.[4] In return, it proposed to give up ownership of the local operating companies. This last concession, it argued, would achieve the Government’s goal of creating competition in supplying telephone equipment and supplies to the operative companies. The settlement was finalized on January 8, 1982, with some changes ordered by the decree court: the regional holding companies got the Bell trademark, Yellow Pages, and about half of Bell Labs.

Effective January 1, 1984, the Bell System’s many member-companies were variously merged into seven independent “Regional Holding Companies”, also known as Regional Bell Operating Companies (RBOCs), or “Baby Bells”. This divestiture reduced the book value of AT&T by approximately 70%.

 

Born on this day:

1854 – Fanny Bullock Workman, American mountaineer, geographer, and cartographer (d. 1925)
Fanny Bullock Workman (/ˈwɒrkˌmæn/; January 8, 1859 – January 22, 1925) was an American geographer, cartographer, explorer, travel writer, and mountaineer, notably in the Himalayas. She was one of the first female professional mountaineers; she not only explored but also wrote about her adventures. She set several women’s altitude records, published eight travel books with her husband, and championed women’s rights and women’s suffrage.

Born to a wealthy family, Workman was educated in the finest schools available to women and traveled in Europe. Her marriage to William Hunter Workman cemented these advantages, and, after being introduced to climbing in New Hampshire, Fanny Workman traveled the world with him. They were able to capitalize on their wealth and connections to voyage around Europe, North Africa, and Asia. The couple had two children, but Fanny Workman was not a motherly type; they left their children in schools and with nurses, and Workman saw herself as a New Woman who could equal any man. The Workmans began their travels with bicycle tours of Switzerland, France, Italy, Spain, Algeria and India. They cycled thousands of miles, sleeping wherever they could find shelter. They wrote books about each trip and Fanny frequently commented on the state of the lives of women that she saw. Their early bicycle tour narratives were better received than their mountaineering books.

At the end of their cycling trip through India, the couple escaped to the Western Himalaya and the Karakoram for the summer months, where they were introduced to high-altitude climbing. They returned to this then-unexplored region eight times over the next 14 years. Despite not having modern climbing equipment, the Workmans explored several glaciers and reached the summit of several mountains, eventually reaching 23,000 feet (7,000 m) on Pinnacle Peak, a women’s altitude record at the time. They organized multiyear expeditions but struggled to remain on good terms with the local labor force. Coming from a position of American privilege and wealth, they failed to understand the position of the native workers and had difficulty finding and negotiating for reliable porters.

After their trips to the Himalaya, the Workmans gave lectures about their travels. They were invited to learned societies; Fanny Workman became the first American woman to lecture at the Sorbonne and the second to speak at the Royal Geographical Society. She received many medals of honor from European climbing and geographical societies and was recognized as one of the foremost climbers of her day. She demonstrated that a woman could climb in high altitudes just as well as a man and helped break down the gender barrier in mountaineering.

 

1862 – Frank Nelson Doubleday, American publisher, founded the Doubleday Publishing Company (d. 1934)
Frank Nelson Doubleday (January 8, 1862 – January 30, 1934), known to friends and family as “Effendi”, founded the eponymous Doubleday & McClure Company in 1897, which later operated under other names. Starting work at the age of 14 after his father’s business failed, Doubleday began with Charles Scribner’s Sons in New York.

His son Nelson Doubleday, son-in-law John Turner Sargent, Sr. and grandson Nelson Doubleday, Jr. all worked in the company and led it through different periods. In 1986, after years of changes in the publishing business, his grandson Nelson Doubleday, Jr. as president sold the Doubleday Company to the German group Bertelsmann.

 

1867 – Emily Greene Balch, American economist and author, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1961)
Emily Greene Balch (January 8, 1867 – January 9, 1961) was an American economist, sociologist and pacifist. Balch combined an academic career at Wellesley College with a long-standing interest in social issues such as poverty, child labor and immigration, as well as settlement work to uplift poor immigrants and reduce juvenile delinquency. She moved into the peace movement at the start of the World War I in 1914, and began collaborating with Jane Addams of Chicago. She became a central leader of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) based in Switzerland, for which she won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946.

 

 

FYI:

Derek Low: Across the USA by Train for just $213-

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kindle FYI January 08, 2017

$0.99
Kinfairlie Knights: The First Book in Each Series
by Claire Delacroix
Enter the enrapturing medieval Scottish estate of Kinfairlie in this must-read romance collection from a USA Today bestselling author. Stories of adventure, grandeur, and everlasting love!

 

$0.99
Splitsville.com (An Olivia Davis Paranormal Mini-Mystery Book 1)
by Tonya Kappes
**USA Today bestselling Author, Tonya Kappes, is an Amazon Movers and Shakers, and self-published International bestselling author. She writes humorous cozy mystery and women’s fiction that involves quirky characters in quirky situations.
Splitsville.com, the first novel in the Olivia Davis Mystery Series, is a double finalist in the Next Generation Indie Book Awards in the Mystery and Humorous Categories.***

 

Free
The Time Machine (Wisehouse Classics Edition)
by H. G. Wells
THE TIME MACHINE is a science fiction novella by H. G. Wells, published in 1895. Wells is generally credited with the popularization of the concept of time travel by using a vehicle that allows an operator to travel purposely and selectively forwards or backwards in time. The term “time machine”, coined by Wells, is now almost…
 

 

 

Free
Killer Thrillers Box Set: 3
by Nick Thacker
Three technothrillers and science fiction/action & adventure travel thrillers by up-and-coming thriller author Nick Thacker! Nearly 2,000 reviews on Amazon!
This omnibus box set includes three standalone thrillers — over 800 pages that are a great entry into Nick Thacker’s other books. Combining sci/fi thrills with action/adventure, Thacker’s books have been described as “National Treasure” meets “Indiana Jones” and “Jurassic Park” meets “Leviathan Wakes.” For fans of James Rollins, Dan Brown, or Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child, these books are perfect!

 

 

Free
Simply Fleece
by Bonnie Scott
Over 30 quick fleece projects and crafts to make in an hour or an evening. With both no sewing and sewing fleece patterns, you’ll find apparel and accessory ideas for everyone in the family. From outerwear for all ages, clothing and home fashions to comfortable accessories for your pets and gifts for all occasions, this book of easy patterns is perfect for everyone from novice sewer to professional seamstress.

 

 

Free
Crochet: Crochet Books: 20 Crochet Patterns And Projects For Every Season With The Essential Crochet Book! (crochet patterns on kindle free, crochet magazine)
by Anna Cross
★ ☆LIMITED TIME BONUS INCLUDED: FREE EBOOK Reveals The Basics EVERY Beginner Needs To Know Before They Crochet!★

Videos January 08, 2017

 

 

Beautiful Scenery

FYI January 07, 2017

NATIONAL BOBBLEHEAD DAY

 

NATIONAL TEMPURA DAY (Is beer battered halibut an acceptable substitute?)

 

On this day:

1610 – Galileo Galilei makes his first observation of the four Galilean moons: Ganymede, Callisto, Io and Europa, although he is not able to distinguish the last two until the following day.
Galileo Galilei (Italian pronunciation: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564[3] – 8 January 1642) was an Italian polymath: astronomer, physicist, engineer, philosopher, and mathematician, he played a major role in the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century.

He has been called the “father of observational astronomy”,[4] the “father of modern physics”,[5][6] the “father of scientific method”,[7] and the “father of science”.[8][9]

His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the discovery of the four largest satellites of Jupiter (named the Galilean moons in his honour), and the observation and analysis of sunspots. Galileo also worked in applied science and technology, inventing an improved military compass and other instruments.
1894 – William Kennedy Dickson receives a patent for motion picture film.
William Kennedy-Laurie Dickson (3 August 1860 – 28 September 1935) was a Scottish inventor who devised an early motion picture camera under the employment of Thomas Edison (post-dating the work of Louis Le Prince).[1][2]
In 1879 At age 19 William Dickson wrote a letter to Thomas Edison trying to seek employment with the inventor. He was turned down. That same year Dickson, his mother, and two sisters moved from Britain to Virginia.[3] In 1883 he was finally hired to work at Edison’s Menlo Park laboratory. In 1888, American inventor and entrepreneur Thomas Alva Edison conceived of a device that would do “for the Eye what the phonograph does for the Ear”. In October, Edison filed a preliminary claim, known as a caveat, with the US Patent Office (which shut down 1932 in the great depression) outlining his plans for the device. In March 1889, a second caveat was filed, in which the proposed motion picture device was given a name, the Kinetoscope. Dickson, then the Edison company’s official photographer, was assigned to turn the concept into a reality.

 

Louis Le Prince
Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince (French: [lwi lə pʁɛ̃s]; 28 August 1841 – vanished 16 September 1890) was a French inventor who shot the first moving pictures on paper film using a single lens camera.[1][2] He has been heralded as the “Father of Cinematography” since 1930.[3]

A Frenchman who also worked in the United Kingdom and the United States, Le Prince conducted his ground-breaking work in 1888 in the city of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England.[4] In October 1888, Le Prince filmed moving picture sequences Roundhay Garden Scene and a Leeds Bridge street scene using his single-lens camera and Eastman’s paper film.[5] These were several years before the work of competing inventors such as William Friese-Greene, Auguste and Louis Lumière and Thomas Edison.

He was never able to perform a planned public demonstration in the US because he mysteriously vanished from a train on 16 September 1890.[1] His body and luggage were never found, but, over a century later, a police archive was found to contain a photograph of a drowned man who could have been him.[5] Not long after Le Prince’s disappearance, Thomas Edison tried to take credit for the invention. But Le Prince’s widow and son, Adolphe, were keen to advance his cause as the inventor of cinematography. In 1898 Adolphe appeared as a witness for the defence in a court case brought by Edison against the American Mutoscope Company. (The suit claimed that Edison was the first and sole inventor of cinematography, and thus entitled to royalties for the use of the process). Adolphe Le Prince was not allowed to present his father’s two cameras as evidence (and so establish Le Prince’s prior claim as inventor) and eventually the court ruled in favour of Edison. However, a year later that ruling was overturned.[6]

 

1904 – The distress signal “CQD” is established only to be replaced two years later by “SOS”.
CQD (transmitted in Morse code as  – · – ·    – – · –    – · · ) is one of the first distress signals adopted for radio use. It was announced on 7 January 1904, by “Circular 57” of the Marconi International Marine Communication Company, and became effective, beginning 1 February 1904 for Marconi installations.

Land telegraphs had traditionally used “CQ” (“sécu”, from the French word sécurité)[1] to identify alert or precautionary messages of interest to all stations along a telegraph line, and CQ had also been adopted as a “general call” for maritime radio use. However, in landline usage there was no general emergency signal, so the Marconi company added a “D” (“distress”) to CQ in order to create its distress call. Thus, “CQD” is understood by wireless operators to mean, “All stations: distress.” Contrary to popular belief, CQD does not stand for “Come Quick, Danger”, “Come Quickly: Distress”, “Come Quick—Drowning!”, or “C Q Danger” (Seek You, Danger); these are backronyms.[citation needed]

 

Born on this day:

Jonas Alströmer (7 January 1685 – 2 June 1761) was a pioneer of agriculture and industry in Sweden.
Born Jonas Toresson (later changed to Alström) in the town of Alingsås in Västergötland, in 1707 he became a clerk for Stockholm merchant Alberg in London. Alberg’s business failed after about three years, but Alström became a shipbroker on his own, and did very well.

Eventually he desired to establish industry back home, and in 1724 established a woolen factory in his native village, which became profitable after some initial difficulties. He then established a sugar refinery in Gothenburg, encouraged improvements in potato cultivation, tanning, cutlery, and shipbuilding. His greatest success came with the introduction of sheep.

He was one of the six persons who founded the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1739.

The court honored him with a knighthood of the Order of the North Star in 1748, and soon after with letters of nobility, changing his name to Alströmer.

He was honored with a status in the Stockholm Exchange, and in 1961 a postage stamp marked the 200th anniversary of his passing.

Jonas Alströmer had four sons in two marriages, Patrik Alströmer, August Alströmer (father of Anna Margaretha Alströmer), Clas Alströmer and Johan Alströmer. His son Clas Alströmer was a noted naturalist.

 

1718 – Israel Putnam, American general (d. 1790)
Israel Putnam (January 7, 1718 – May 29, 1790) was an American army general officer, popularly known as Old Put, who fought with distinction at the Battle of Bunker Hill (1775) during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). His reckless courage and fighting spirit became known far beyond Connecticut’s borders through the circulation of folk legends in the American colonies and states celebrating his exploits.

He had previously served notably as an officer with Rogers’ Rangers during the French and Indian War, when he was captured by Mohawk warriors. He was saved from the ritual burning given to enemies by intervention of a French officer, with whom the Mohawk were allied.

 

1834 – Johann Philipp Reis, German physicist and academic, invented the Reis telephone (d. 1874)
Reis imagined electricity could be propagated through space, as light can, without the aid of a material conductor, and he performed some experiments on the subject. The results were described in a paper, “On the Radiation of Electricity”, which, in 1859, he mailed to Professor Poggendorff for insertion in the then well-known periodical, Annalen der Physik. The manuscript was rejected, to the great disappointment of the sensitive young teacher.[4]

Reis, like Bell would later do, had studied the organs of ear and the idea of an apparatus for transmitting sound by means of electricity had floated on his mind for years. Inspired by his physics lessons he attacked the problem, and was rewarded with success. In 1860, he constructed the first prototype of a telephone, which could cover a distance of 100 meters. In 1862, he again tried to interest Poggendorff with an account of his “telephon”, as he called it.[5] His second offering was also rejected, like the first. The learned professor, it seems, regarded the transmission of speech by electricity as a chimera; Reis bitterly attributed the failure to his being “only a poor schoolmaster.”[4]

Reis had difficulty interesting people in Germany in his invention despite demonstrating it to (among others) Wilhelm von Legat, Inspector of the Royal Prussian Telegraph Corps in 1862.[6] It aroused more interest in the United States In 1872, when Professor Vanderwyde demonstrated it in New York.

Prior to 1947, the Reis device was tested by the British company Standard Telephones and Cables (STC). The results also confirmed it could faintly transmit and receive speech. At the time STC was bidding for a contract with Alexander Graham Bell’s American Telephone and Telegraph Company, and the results were covered up by STC’s chairman Sir Frank Gill to maintain Bell’s reputation.[5]

 

1891 – Zora Neale Hurston, American anthropologist and author (d. 1960)
Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891[1][2] – January 28, 1960) was an American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, and anthropologist. Of Hurston’s four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays, she is best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

In addition to new editions of her work being published after a revival of interest in her in 1975, her manuscript Every Tongue Got to Confess (2001), a collection of folktales gathered in the 1920s, was published posthumously after being discovered in the Smithsonian archives.

 

1912 – Charles Addams, American cartoonist, created The Addams Family (d. 1988)
Charles Samuel “Chas” Addams[2] (January 7, 1912 – September 29, 1988) was an American cartoonist known for his darkly humorous and macabre characters. Some of the recurring characters, who became known as The Addams Family, have been the basis for spin-offs in several other forms of media.

 

1946 – Jann Wenner, American publisher, co-founded Rolling Stone
Jann Simon Wenner (born January 7, 1946) is the co-founder and publisher of the popular culture biweekly magazine Rolling Stone, as well as the current owner of Men’s Journal and Us Weekly magazines. Born in New York City, Wenner graduated from Chadwick School and later attended the University of California, Berkeley. He dropped out, but while at Berkeley he participated in the Free Speech Movement. Wenner, with his mentor Ralph J. Gleason, co-founded Rolling Stone in 1967 with the help of a loan from family members and his soon to be wife.[1] Later in his career, several musicians would allege that Wenner was unfairly biased against their work, thus hindering their induction into the Hall of Fame.[2][3][4] Wenner received the Norman Mailer Prize in 2010 for his work in the publishing industry.

 

 

FYI:

 

 

Marketwired Dec 9, 2016: Producers Sheila Johnson, Bo Derek and Mark Sennet Announce Pre-Production of the Historical Feature Film “W.A.S.P.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


COFFEE DRINKERS….THANK ME LATER….

Homemade Coffee Creamer

For each flavor of creamer, you start off with the same basic ‘base’ recipe.

14 oz sweetened condensed milk
1 3/4 cup milk or cream

Mix the ingredients together well. Add them to a mason jar and shake to thoroughly mix the contents.

POSSIBLE FLAVOR COMBINATIONS
French Vanilla Creamer
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Vanilla Bean Coffee Creamer
2 teaspoons vanilla bean paste

Chocolate
2-3 tablespoons chocolate syrup

Chocolate Almond
1 tablespoon cocoa powder
1 teaspoon almond extract

Strudel
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract

Vanilla Caramel
2 tablespoons caramel ice cream topping
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Chocolate Raspberry
2 teaspoons cocoa powder
2 tablespoons raspberry syrup

Irish Cream
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
1 teaspoon instant coffee
1-2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract

Coconut
2 teaspoons coconut extract

Chocolate / Caramel / Coconut
2 teaspoons coconut extract
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
2 tablespoons caramel ice cream topping

Peppermint Patty
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
1 teaspoon peppermint extract

Cinnamon Vanilla
2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Pumpkin Spice
3 tablespoons pureed pumpkin
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
4 tablespoons maple syrup
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Honey Vanilla
1/4 cup honey
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Almond Joy
1-2 teaspoons coconut extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup

Sweet Cream
Use 1 3/4 cups of heavy cream instead of the milk in the base recipe
2 teaspoons vanilla extract OR the inside of a vanilla bean, scraped
1 teaspoon almond extract

Chocolate Orange
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
1-2 teaspoons orange extract

Hazelnut
2 teaspoons hazelnut extract

Chocolate Hazelnut
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
2 teaspoons hazelnut extract

Cinnamon Cake
2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Salted Caramel
2-3 tablespoons caramel ice cream topping
1/2 teaspoon salt

Eggnog
replace milk in base recipe with equal amount of heavy cream
1 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 teaspoons rum extract
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Toasted Almond
2 teaspoons almond extract

Directions & Tips:
In all these recipes, anything that has a dry or thick ingredient (like cinnamon, honey, etc..) should be heated up with a small amount of your milk/cream from the base recipe so it can dissolve properly. Then, add the rest of the milk/cream along with the sweetened condensed milk.

If you want really creamy creamer, use heavy cream instead of milk in your base recipe.

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Videos January 07, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

FYI January 06, 2017

NATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DAY
Circle of 6
When talking about personal safety, this is a tool you might consider having.  It’s designed to quickly and discreetly get help in dangerous situations.  By simply tapping twice, pre-written messages are sent to designated recipients, GPS location included.

 

NATIONAL BEAN DAY
Garbanzo Bean Chocolate Cake (Gluten Free)

 

NATIONAL SHORTBREAD DAY
Best Scottish Shortbread Recipe
Shortbread Cookies

On this day:

1721 – The Committee of Inquiry on the South Sea Bubble publishes its findings.
The South Sea Company (officially The Governor and Company of the merchants of Great Britain, trading to the South Seas and other parts of America, and for the encouragement of fishing)[3] was a British joint-stock company founded in 1711, created as a public-private partnership to consolidate and reduce the cost of national debt. The company was also granted a monopoly to trade with South America, hence its name. At the time it was created, Britain was involved in the War of the Spanish Succession and Spain controlled South America. There was no realistic prospect that trade would take place and the company never realised any significant profit from its monopoly. Company stock rose greatly in value as it expanded its operations dealing in government debt, peaking in 1720 before collapsing to little above its original flotation price; this became known as the South Sea Bubble.

 

 
1893 – The Washington National Cathedral is chartered by Congress. The charter is signed by President Benjamin Harrison.
The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in the City and Diocese of Washington, operated under the more familiar name of Washington National Cathedral, is a cathedral of the Episcopal Church located in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.[1][2] Of Neo-Gothic design closely modeled on English Gothic style of the late fourteenth century, it is the sixth-largest cathedral in the world[citation needed], the second-largest in the United States,[3] and the highest as well as the fourth-tallest structure in Washington, D.C. The cathedral is the seat of both the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Michael Bruce Curry, and the Bishop of the Diocese of Washington, Mariann Edgar Budde. In 2009, nearly 400,000 visitors toured the structure. Average attendance at Sunday services in 2009 was 1,667, the highest of all domestic parishes in the Episcopal Church that year.[4]

 

1907 – Maria Montessori opens her first school and daycare center for working class children in Rome, Italy.
Maria Tecla Artemisia Montessori (Italian pronunciation: [maˈriːa montesˈsɔːri]; August 31, 1870 – May 6, 1952) was an Italian physician and educator best known for the philosophy of education that bears her name, and her writing on scientific pedagogy. Her educational method is in use today in some public and private schools throughout the world.

 

1912 – German geophysicist Alfred Wegener first presents his theory of continental drift.
Continental drift is the movement of the Earth’s continents relative to each other, thus appearing to “drift” across the ocean bed.[2] The speculation that continents might have ‘drifted’ was first put forward by Abraham Ortelius in 1596. The concept was independently and more fully developed by Alfred Wegener in 1912, but his theory was rejected by some for lack of a mechanism (though this was supplied later by Arthur Holmes) and others because of prior theoretical commitments. The idea of continental drift has been subsumed by the theory of plate tectonics, which explains how the continents move.[3]

In 1858 Antonio Snider-Pellegrini created two maps demonstrating how the American and African continents might have once fit together.

 

1912 – New Mexico is admitted to the Union as the 47th U.S. state.
New Mexico (Spanish: Nuevo México [ˈnweβo ˈmexiko]; Navajo: Yootó Hahoodzo [jò:txó hàhò:tsò]) is a state located in the southwestern region of the United States of America. It was admitted to the union as the 47th state on January 6, 1912. It is usually considered one of the Mountain States. New Mexico is fifth by area, the 36th-most populous, and the sixth-least densely populated of the 50 United States.

 

Born on this day:

1256 – Gertrude the Great, German mystic (d. 1302)
Gertrude the Great (or Saint Gertrude of Helfta) (Italian: Santa Gertrude) (January 6, 1256 – ca. 1302) was a German Benedictine, mystic, and theologian. She is recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church, and is inscribed in the General Roman Calendar, for celebration throughout the Latin Rite on November 16.

 

1412 – Joan of Arc, French martyr and saint (d. 1431)
Joan of Arc (French: Jeanne d’Arc,[5] IPA: [ʒan daʁk]; 6 January c. 1412[6] – 30 May 1431), nicknamed “The Maid of Orléans” (French: La Pucelle d’Orléans), is considered a heroine of France for her role during the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years’ War, and was canonized as a Roman Catholic saint. Joan of Arc was born to Jacques d’Arc and Isabelle Romée, a peasant family, at Domrémy in north-east France. Joan said she received visions of the Archangel Michael, Saint Margaret, and Saint Catherine of Alexandria instructing her to support Charles VII and recover France from English domination late in the Hundred Years’ War. The uncrowned King Charles VII sent Joan to the siege of Orléans as part of a relief mission. She gained prominence after the siege was lifted only nine days later. Several additional swift victories led to Charles VII’s coronation at Reims. This long-awaited event boosted French morale and paved the way for the final French victory.

 

 

FYI:

Cale Guthrie Weissman: 12 Apps to Help You Keep Your New Year’s resolutions

 

Jordan Todorov: Berlin’s Secret Cold War-Era Vineyard

 

Maggie McCracken: 11 Veggies You Never Knew You Could Make into Fries

 

Posted in Living By J.D. DiGiovanni: Arthur’s Cave Cabin By Miller Kendrick

 

 

 

Hana Glasser:  An Adorable Swedish Tradition Has Its Roots in Human Experimentation
How the Swedish custom of lördagsgodis, or Saturday candy, relates to tests at a 1940s mental institution.
In 1946, at a mental hospital outside of Lund, Sweden, researchers forced a group of patients to ingest 24 pieces of a sticky, light brown substance in a single day. These severely disabled patients were involuntary participants in a long-term study commissioned by the state medical board in cooperation with big industry, and this coerced feeding would continue for three years. The four to six doses that they consumed four times a day over that time were in some ways sweeter than their typical medicines—but also more troubling. No benefit to the patient was ever expected. Rather, the goal was to measure the damage inflicted by the substance over time and determine a dosage safe for public consumption.

 

FYI if you are thinking about buying a used Ferrari 355~

 

Videos January 06, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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