Category: FYI

FYI

FYI June 06, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1822 – Alexis St. Martin is accidentally shot in the stomach, leading to William Beaumont’s studies on digestion.
Alexis Bidagan St. Martin (April 8, 1802[a] – June 24, 1880) was a Canadian voyageur who is known for his part in experiments on digestion in humans, conducted on him by the American Army physician William Beaumont between 1822 and 1833.

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Born On This Day

1841 – Eliza Orzeszkowa, Polish author and publisher (d. 1910)
Eliza Orzeszkowa (June 6, 1841 – May 18, 1910) was a Polish novelist and a leading writer[1] of the Positivism movement during foreign Partitions of Poland. In 1905, together with Henryk Sienkiewicz she was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

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FYI

By Alaska Airlines: Alaska simplifies boarding process: Here’s how ‘Group Boarding’ will make life easier

 
 
 
 

How would you stop the vehicle?

By Tom McKay: Soldier Leads Virginia Police on Bonkers Mid-Speed Chase in Stolen Armored Vehicle
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Watch A Car With A Suspected Blown Transmission Bizarrely Drive More Than A Mile In Reverse
 
 
 
 
By Laura Wagner: California Voters Boot Judge Who Sentenced Brock Turner To Only Six Months In Stanford Rape Case
 
 
 
 
Emmitt Smith: So that’s why they call it an “oldbitchuary.”
By Dom Consentino: This Obituary Is Ruthless
 
 
 
 
If you have your own totes, what brand do you use and how do you remember to bring them with you?
By Ian Graber-Stiehl: Are Reusable Bags Really Better For the Planet?
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The Lost Lingo of NYC’s Soda Jerks During the 1930s and 1940s, half a million “soda jerks” were employed at tens of thousands of soda fountains across the U.S. Their linguistic concoctions were as much of a draw as the sweet treats they served up, Goofy Buildings California’s novelty architecture is more than just a gimmick. These buildings are cultural artifacts of a period that changed the landscape of America, and more ->
 
 
 
 

Beyond Bylines Julian Dossett: The New Bots Beat: A Look Inside Journalism’s Automated Helpers
 
 
 
 
By Laura Hazard Owen: All the news that’s fit for you: The New York Times’ “Your Weekly Edition” is a brand-new newsletter personalized for each recipient
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Entrepreneur convinces California town to let him buy hospital in hopes of saving it with remote lab-services billing
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Study shows rural broadband’s return on investment
 
 
 
 

Ideas

laire at Pillarboxblue Hometalker: A Gorgeous Succulent Garden You Can’t Kill
 
 
 
 
Anam – Delicious And DIY Hometalker Los Angeles, CA: DIY MARBLED WALL CLOCK
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: The Easiest Ways to Grow a Bumper Crop of Tomatoes
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 31 Ways To Get Privacy Inside And Outside Your Home
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #90)
 
 
 
 

The Interior Frugalista: Talk Of The Town Party 126
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 05, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1817 – The first Great Lakes steamer, the Frontenac, is launched.
Frontenac was a steamboat, the first paddle steamer launched on the Canadian side of the Great Lakes, in 1816.

Built in Ernesttown, Ontario, by American contractors for Kingston businessmen during 1816 at a cost of ₤15,000, she entered service in spring 1817. Frontenac conducted regular runs across Lake Ontario between Kingston, York (now Toronto), and Niagara-on-the-Lake. The round trip fare between Kingston and York was $18 ($12 one way) in cabin class.

Frontenac typically generated about 50 horsepower (using the original Boulton and Watt formula), which was too little for a ship of her size, and she was often outperformed by sailing craft. She rarely managed to make money in eight years; the provincial population was simply too small.

Frontenac was sold for ₤1550 to John Hamilton in 1824, who persisted two more unsuccessful years before selling her for scrap at Niagara in 1827. Before she could be scrapped, she burned to the waterline due to arson. Parts of her engines were salvaged and used later in the Alciope on Lake Ontario and Adelaide on Lake Erie.
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1646 – Elena Cornaro Piscopia, Italian mathematician and philosopher (d. 1684)
Elena Lucrezia Cornaro Piscopia, also Helen Cornaro (Italian: [pisˈkɔːpja]; 5 June 1646 – 26 July 1684), was a Venetian philosopher of noble descent, who was one of the first women to receive an academic degree from a university[4] and in 1678 she became the first woman in the world to receive a Ph.D. degree.[5]


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FYI

Kate Valentine (born Katherine Noel Brosnahan; December 24, 1962 – June 5, 2018)

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National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Call 1-800-273-8255

 
 
 
 
By Andrew Liszewski: Watch This Pilot’s Frantic Dash to Save His Dying Drone From Drowning in a Lake
 
 
 
 
By Kurt Bradley: My Porsche 964 Road Trip Went Very South In West Texas
 
 
 
 
Deborah Epstein: I’m done helping the NFL pay lip service to domestic violence prevention
 
 
 
 

The Edge: Bonding with Your Algorithm A Conversation With Nicolas Berggruen
The relationship between parents and children is the most important relationship. It gets more complicated in this case because, beyond the children being our natural children, we can influence them even beyond.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Finding Europe’s Last Fairytale Forests, Debunking Lift Music, Your Hidden Tunnels We asked readers to share local stories of secret underground spaces, and they went deep. And more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Colin Marshall: Winston Churchill’s List of Tips for Surviving a German Invasion: See the Never-Distributed Document (1940)
 
 
 
 
Debra Lynn Dadd: *GIANT ISSUE*: Sunscreen, kiddie pools, products for men, and much much more…
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: BBQ Menu, Magnet, Utensil Holder, Tray, & More
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 15 Kitchen DIY Ideas That Will Come In Handy
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

By ButterMyBiscuits: Easy Dog Treats With Three Ingredients
 
 
 
 
By Tye Rannosaurus: 100% Edible Life Sized Violet Crystal Encrusted Sugar Skull


 
 

 
 

FYI June 04, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1760 – Great Upheaval: New England planters arrive to claim land in Nova Scotia, Canada, taken from the Acadians.
The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island— parts of an area also known as Acadia.[5] The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years’ War)[6] and was part of the British military campaign against New France. The British first deported Acadians to the Thirteen Colonies, and after 1758 transported additional Acadians to Britain and France. In all, of the 14,100 Acadians in the region, approximately 11,500 Acadians were deported[7][8] (a census of 1764 indicates that 2,600 Acadians remained in the colony, presumably having eluded capture[9]).

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the British captured Port Royal, the capital of the colony, in a siege. The 1713 Treaty of Utrecht, which concluded the conflict, ceded the colony to Great Britain while allowing the Acadians to keep their lands. Over the next forty-five years, however, the Acadians refused to sign an unconditional oath of allegiance to Britain. During the same period, some also participated in various military operations against the British, and maintained supply lines to the French fortresses of Louisbourg and Fort Beauséjour.[10] As a result, the British sought to eliminate any future military threat posed by the Acadians and to permanently cut the supply lines they provided to Louisbourg by removing them from the area.[11][12]

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Born On This Day

1923 – Elizabeth Jolley, English-Australian author and academic (d. 2007)
Monica Elizabeth Jolley AO (4 June 1923 – 13 February 2007) was an English-born writer who settled in Western Australia in the late 1950s and forged an illustrious literary career there. She was 53 when her first book was published, and she went on to publish fifteen novels (including an autobiographical trilogy), four short story collections and three non-fiction books, publishing well into her 70s and achieving significant critical acclaim. She was also a pioneer of creative writing teaching in Australia, counting many well-known writers such as Tim Winton among her students at Curtin University.[1]

Her novels explore “alienated characters and the nature of loneliness and entrapment.”[2]

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FYI

By Elizabeth Werth: The First Woman To Ever Race Was A Rothschild Who Called Herself ‘Snail’
 
 
Baroness Hélène van Zuylen van Nijevelt van de Haar or Hélène de Zuylen de Nyevelt de Haar, née de Rothschild (21 August 1863 – 17 October 1947), was a French socialite, author, a sporting figure in Parisian life and a member of the prominent Rothschild banking family of France.[1][2]

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The 1959 Ford Country Squire Camper Is Perfect For All Your Summer Road Trip Needs


By Elizabeth Werth: The 1959 Ford Country Squire Camper Is Perfect For All Your Summer Road Trip Needs
 
 
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: Small Asteroid Strikes Africa Just Hours After It Was Spotted
 
 
 
 

By Joe Tonelli: Group FaceTime Is Finally a Thing
 
 
 
 
By Bryan Menegus: Couple Who Scammed Amazon Out of $1.2 Million in Electronics Sentenced to Nearly Six Years in Prison
 
 
 
 
By Noel Murray: The Mr. Rogers documentary Won’t You Be My Neighbor? is a tearjerker with a purpose
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The Vermont town with too many (musical) organs, Birds on the Move, IRAN Towering Minaret and more ->
 
 
 
 
Glacier Hub Weekly Newsletter: An exploration of how the design and construction of huts was a milestone in the scientific exploration of the Alps, and more ->
 
 
 
 
Beyond Bylines Christine Cube: Blog Profiles: Summer Camp Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Senators challenge FCC rural broadband map accuracy
 
 
 
 
By Jessica Yu Doodle Team Lead: Meet the national finalists of our 10th annual Doodle 4 Google contest
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy: 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCXC): An essential resource, Fading Battlefields of World War I, The oldest working Hollywood actor and more ->
 
 
 
 
Western Gold Mining Boomtown: 23 photographs by Laura Titsworth
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Now Available: Slides From Rob Sanderson’s Europeana Tech Keynote on Design Principles for Linked Open Usable Data (LOUD)

Ideas

Rebecca at Soap Deli News Blog: Frugal Laundry Tips to Help You Save Money & Go Green! Easy Holistic Beauty & Skin Care Recipes and more ->
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: Sprinkler Mister House – Fun for Everyone!
 
 
 
 
Garden Up Green – Carole Hometalker Cooper, TX: How to Remove Garden Rodents
 
 
 
 
The Chirping Frog Hometalker Glen Carbon, IL: Concrete Patio Table
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 03, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1781 – Jack Jouett begins his midnight ride to warn Thomas Jefferson and the Virginia legislature of an impending raid by Banastre Tarleton.
John “Jack” Jouett, Jr. (December 7, 1754 – March 1, 1822) was a politician and a hero of the American Revolution, known as the “Paul Revere of the South” for his late night ride to warn Thomas Jefferson, then the governor of Virginia, and the Virginia legislature of the approach of British cavalry, who had been sent to capture them. Jouett was the father of Matthew Harris Jouett, who became a famous painter based in Kentucky.

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Born On This Day

1926 – Flora MacDonald, Canadian banker and politician, 10th Canadian Minister of Communications (d. 2015)
Flora Isabel MacDonald, PC CC OOnt ONS (June 3, 1926 – July 26, 2015) was a Canadian politician and humanitarian. Canada’s first female foreign minister, she was also one of the first women to vie for leadership of a major Canadian political party, the Progressive Conservatives. She became a close ally of Prime Minister Joe Clark, serving in his cabinet from 1979 to 1980, as well as in the cabinet of Prime Minister Brian Mulroney from 1984 to 1988. In her later life, she was known for her humanitarian work abroad.

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FYI

By Phoebe Bradford: Celebrating Mastectomy Scars With a Henna Necklace
 
 
 
 
By William Hughes: D&D’s most F’d-up new monster was designed by a Make-A-Wish recipient
 
 
 
 

Brian Levee Product Manager: G Suite Save time with new custom templates in Docs, Sheets, Slides and Forms
 
 
 
 
By Josh Rhoten, Wyoming Tribune Eagle: Endurance hiker Jennifer Pharr Davis to speak at Laramie County Library
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Pythagoras on the Purpose of Life and the Meaning of Wisdom, Sojourners in Space: Annie Dillard on What Mangrove Trees Teach Us About the Human Search for Meaning in an Unfeeling Universe and more ->
 
 
 
 

1954 Datsun 6147


Barn Finds by Scotty Gilbertson: The Only One Left? 1954 Datsun 6147
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Use this technique to make murals? Then you just have one or more sheets of plywood to move around.
Pam Edwards Tutorial Team Columbus, IN: Painted Porch Rug
 
 
 
 
Kammy’s Korner Hometalker Parma, MI: Dresser Drawer Upcyle: Window Boxes
 
 
 
 
Terry Hometalker Jupiter, FL: Easy Patio Table
 
 
 
 
DIY Nearby Hometalk Team Houston, TX: Episode 6: Home Office Goes From Totally Dull to Magazine-worthy
 
 
 
 
By belsey: How to Clean a Bathroom (with 6 DIY Cleaning Product Recipes!)
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


By Josh Katz: Cauliflower Shawarma with Pomegranate, Pine Nuts and Rose


 
 

 
 

Two Nerdy History Girls: Breakfast Links: Week of May 28, 2018

Source: Breakfast Links: Week of May 28, 2018

Breakfast Links are served! Our weekly round-up of fav links to other web sites, articles, blogs, and images via Twitter.
• The “Flying Mountains”, an 18thc roller coaster in Catherine the Great’s gardens at Tsarskoe Selo.
• Cleopatra Selene, the only daughter of Cleopatra and Antony, was an important ruler in her own right.
• The modernity of the Victorian men’s white dress shirt.
• It’s not always the daughter who elopes: rebellious son Philip Jeremiah Schuyler did (and dropped out of college, too) in 1788.
• Image: A 1953 advertisement featuring travel-friendly synthetic fibers.
• Frederick Marryat and the ghostly Brown Lady of Raynham Hall.
• Spalted wood and the lost Renaissance art of intarsia.
• Sweet death: honey and bees in death rituals.
• Image: The 1958 Smart Witch: a “smart bike for smart girls.”

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FYI June 02, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1966 – Surveyor program: Surveyor 1 lands in Oceanus Procellarum on the Moon, becoming the first U.S. spacecraft to soft-land on another world.

Surveyor 1 was the first lunar soft-lander in the unmanned Surveyor program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA, United States). This lunar soft-lander gathered data about the lunar surface that would be needed for the manned Apollo Moon landings that began in 1969. The successful soft landing of Surveyor 1 on the Ocean of Storms was the first by an American space probe on any extraterrestrial body, occurring on the first attempt and just four months after the first Moon landing by the Soviet Union’s Luna 9 probe.

Surveyor 1 was launched May 30, 1966, from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at Cape Canaveral, Florida, and it landed on the Moon on June 2, 1966. Surveyor 1 transmitted 11,237 still photos of the lunar surface to the Earth by using a television camera and a sophisticated radio-telemetry system.

The Surveyor program was managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Los Angeles County, California, but the Surveyor space probe was designed by Gary Mizuhara of EOS (Electrical Optical Systems, Covina, Ca.) and built by the Hughes Aircraft Company in El Segundo, California.

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Born On This Day

1924 – June Callwood, Canadian journalist, author, and activist (d. 2007)

June Rose Callwood, CC OOnt (June 2, 1924 – April 14, 2007) was a Canadian journalist, author and social activist. She was born in Chatham, Ontario and grew up in nearby Belle River.[1][2]

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FYI

Just A Car Guy: This is Ireland’s President Michael D. Higgins on a freaking bmx, one road in Nebraska looks a lot like most I saw there when I drove through, better than most stop lights!, humor found on Reddit and more ->
 
 
 
 

Vector’s World: Six cat gifs, Hard core Jeep racing and more ->
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy: Fantastic French Publicity Caravans of Yesteryear
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Scott Myers: Saturday Hot Links
 
 
 
 
By Michael Cavna Washington Post: Library of Congress acquires its largest donation of comic books ever
 
 
 
 
Industry & Advocacy News Authors Guild and RWA Prevail in Court Defending Authors in “Cocky” Trademark Dispute
 
 
 
 

By Gary Price: New Findings From Pew Research : “YouTube, Instagram and Snapchat are the Most Popular Online Platforms Among Teens; 95% of Teens Have Access to a Smartphone (Teens, Social Media & Technology 2018 Report)
 
 
 
 
Great comments including an ouch~ joke!
Barn Finds: Netflix Stars: Trio of Checkers
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Stoddard Dayton Roadster: William E. Scripps Detroit News President
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: South Boston: Traffic Jam on the Southeast Expressway
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk Hits: 15 Things To Do With Scrap Material One man’s trash is another man’s treasure
 
 
 
 
Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: Tomato Cages to Cocktail Tables
 
 
 
 
Ariel Noel Hometalker Washington, DC: DIY City Patio
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 01, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1660 – Mary Dyer is hanged for defying a law banning Quakers from the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
Mary Dyer (born Marie Barrett; c. 1611 – 1 June 1660) was an English and colonial American Puritan turned Quaker who was hanged in Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony, for repeatedly defying a Puritan law banning Quakers from the colony. She is one of the four executed Quakers known as the Boston martyrs.


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Born On This Day

1796 – Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot, French physicist and engineer (d. 1832)
Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot (French: [kaʁno]; 1 June 1796 – 24 August 1832) was a French military engineer and physicist, often described as the “father of thermodynamics”. Like Copernicus, he published only one book, the Reflections on the Motive Power of Fire (Paris, 1824), in which he expressed, at the age of 27 years, the first successful theory of the maximum efficiency of heat engines. In this work he laid the foundations of an entirely new discipline, thermodynamics. Carnot’s work attracted little attention during his lifetime, but it was later used by Rudolf Clausius and Lord Kelvin to formalize the second law of thermodynamics and define the concept of entropy.

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FYI

 
 
 
 
By Monica Burton: Chefs Pay Tribute to NOLA Restaurant Legend Ella Brennan
 
 
 
 
Introducing Firefox Pioneer
Mozilla wants to better understand the health of the web, how users interact with it, and how people use their browsers.

We think that browsers could do so much more through a better understanding of user behavior. By using the experience of people at human-scale, we can give you content that enriches your life. Pioneer will help us understand and build those experiences, but we can’t do it alone!

In order to achieve this, we need to collect and analyze data about web browsing habits. We would like to identify a group of users willing to share this information with us. Data collection will happen in the background while you use Firefox, and your browser may occasionally change behavior slightly.

Participation in Firefox Pioneer is strictly voluntary.
 
 
 
 
By Jonathan Klein: Escaping Hell In A Miata
 
 
 
 
By Michael Ballaban: The Ram TRX Is A Beast That’s Coming To Eat Your Raptor
 
 
 
 
By Andrew Liszewski: Skyscraper Window Replacement Goes Horribly, Horribly Wrong
 
 
 
 
By Maddie Stone: In a Single Generation, Alaska’s Landscapes Have Transformed
 
 
 
 
Tillamook County Pioneer Association Meeting June 3rd at Swiss Hall – Tillamook County Pioneer
 
 
 
 
By Beyond Bylines Team: Targeted News Releases: 7 Easy Steps For Journalists and Bloggers
 
 
 
 
By Laura Hazard Owen: NPR is getting rid of some of its news blogs (with more blog “changes” to come)
 
 
 
 
By Phoebe Wall Howard, Detroit Free Press: Storing car keys inside a metal coffee can thwarts hack attacks
 
 
 
 

By Scotty Gilbertson Barn Finds: Cornbinder Camper: 1954 International R-120
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Ivylore Hometalker Trenton, MI: Simple Garden Patio for a Small Space
 
 
 
 

By Hometalk Hits: Copy One Of These Lovely Lattice Ideas For Your Home
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 18 Ideas to Keep You From Feeling Blue
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes



 
 

 
 

FYI May 31, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1790 – The United States enacts its first copyright statute, the Copyright Act of 1790.
The Copyright Act of 1790 was the first federal copyright act to be instituted in the United States, though most of the states had passed various legislation securing copyrights in the years immediately following the Revolutionary War. The stated object of the act was the “encouragement of learning,” and it achieved this by securing authors the “sole right and liberty of printing, reprinting, publishing and vending” the copies of their “maps, charts, and books” for a term of 14 years, with the right to renew for one additional 14-year term should the copyright holder still be alive.

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Born On This Day

1827 – Kusumoto Ine, first Japanese female doctor of Western medicine (d. 1903)[1]
Kusumoto Ine (楠本 イネ, 31 May 1827 – 27 August 1903; born Shiimoto Ine 失本 稲) was a Japanese physician. She was the daughter of Kusumoto Taki, who was a courtesan from Nagasaki; and the German physician Philipp Franz von Siebold, who worked on Dejima, an island foreigners were restricted to during Japan’s long period of seclusion from the world. Ine was also known as O-Ine and later in life took the name Itoku (伊篤). In Japanese she is often called Oranda O-Ine (“Dutch O-Ine”) for her association with Dejima and its Dutch-language Western learning. She was the first female doctor of Western medicine in Japan.[1]

Siebold was banished from Japan in 1829 but managed to provide for Ine and her mother and arranged for his students and associates to care for them. Ine’s reputation grew after she became a doctor of Western medicine, and she won the patronage of the feudal lord Date Munenari. She studied in various parts of Japan under numerous teachers, one of whom impregnated her—likely having raped her—resulting in her only daughter; she never married. She settled in Tokyo after the country ended its seclusion, and assisted in the birth by one of Emperor Meiji’s concubines in 1873. Since her death Ine has been the subject of novels, plays, comics, and musicals in Japan.

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FYI

 
 
 
 
Romance Writers of America: RWA Report on Diversity and Inclusion
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Data Publishing and Curation Alliance: California Digital Library & Dryad Digital Repository Announce Strategic Partnership
 
 
 
 
June 1st
By Emily Petsko: Where to Score Free Treats on National Doughnut Day
 
 
 
 
By Ali Wunderman: Antarctica will hold its first-ever Pride Month event in June
 
 
 
 
By BECCA PUGLISI: Build Character Empathy in Your First Few Pages
 
 
 
 
Romance Writers of America: RWA Report on Diversity and Inclusion
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Erin Reed: DIY Farmhouse Etched Mini Vase Decor
 
 
 
 
Alexis @ Chemistry Cachet Hometalker Granbury, TX: Cheap & Easy Homemade Ant Spray
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: Keep Pests Out Of Your Garden
 
 
 
 
Brittany @by Brittany Goldwyn Hometalker Frederick, MD: My Finished Tiny Backyard Space
 
 
 
 
Gail Bixler Hometalker Houston, TX: Mosaic Catio (Cat Patio) Project
 
 
 
 
By jessyratfink: How and When to Water Your Houseplants
 
 
 
 
By funelab: Arduino Air Bonsai Levitation
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By mikeasaurus: Sliced Cable Resin Coasters
 
 
 
 
By ThirdEarthDesign: Simple Raspberry Pi Camera Trap Made From a Food Container
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 15 DIY Projects That Will Make You Say “WOW!” Now, these are impressive.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI May 30, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1868 – Decoration Day (the predecessor of the modern “Memorial Day”) is observed in the United States for the first time (by “Commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic” John A. Logan’s proclamation on May 5).
Memorial Day or Decoration Day is a federal holiday in the United States for remembering the people who died while serving in the country’s armed forces.[1] The holiday, which is currently observed every year on the last Monday of May, will be held on May 28, 2018. The holiday was held on May 30 from 1868 to 1970.[2] It marks the unofficial start of the summer vacation season,[3] while Labor Day marks its end. The holiday, from latest to earliest, is slightly more likely to fall on May 30, May 28 or May 25 (58 in 400 years each) than on May 27 or May 26 (57), and slightly less likely to occur on May 31 or May 29 (56).

Many people visit cemeteries and memorials, particularly to honor those who have died in military service. Many volunteers place an American flag on each grave in national cemeteries.

Memorial Day is not to be confused with Veterans Day – Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who died while serving, whereas Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans.[4]

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Born On This Day

1927 – Joan Birman, American mathematician
Joan Sylvia Lyttle Birman (born May 30, 1927 in New York City[1]) is an American mathematician, specializing in braid theory and knot theory. Her book, Braids, Links, and Mapping Class Groups, has become a standard introduction, with many of today’s researchers learning the subject through it. Birman is currently Research Professor Emerita at Barnard College, Columbia University, where she has been since 1973.

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FYI

By Alex Kane: Ted Dabney, Atari Co-Founder and Video Game Industry Pioneer, Dies at 81
 
 

Samuel Frederick “Ted” Dabney Jr. (May 15, 1937 – May 26, 2018) was an American electrical engineer, and the co-founder, alongside Nolan Bushnell, of Atari, Inc.

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By Megan Reynolds: I’m Inspired By These Incredibly Agile Circus-Performing Cats
 
 
 
 
By Stef Schrader: Stuffing A Dirt Bike Engine In A Power Wheels Mustang Is My Kind Of 72 MPH Deathtrap
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Andrew Liszewski: A Spare Tire Made From Countless Rolls of Duct Tape Is Surprisingly Durable
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Maddie Stone: Wyoming’s Grizzly Bear Hunt Won’t Happen Without a Fight
 
 
 
 
By Rhett Jones: Ominous ‘Civil Emergency’ Alert Sent to Oregon Residents Due to ‘Technology Issue’
 
 
 
 
Beyond Bylines Stephanie Donovan: Blog Profiles: Mountain Biking Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Plan to put huge array of solar panels on a mined mountaintop could depend on more mining
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: McConnell wants legal hemp and no food-stamp work requirements in Senate version of Farm Bill
 
 
 
 
By Lorie Lewis Ham: KRL Celebrates 8 Years By Launching New Podcast
Lorie Lewis Ham is our Editor-in-Chief and a contributor to various sections, coupling her journalism experience with her connection to the literary and entertainment worlds. Explore Lorie’s mystery writing at Mysteryrat’s Closet.
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Josh Jones: Explore 7,600 Works of Art by Edvard Munch: They’re Now Digitized and Free Online
 
 
 
 
By Mitch Smith & Julie Bosman: Eric Greitens, Missouri Governor and Rising Republican Star, Resigns Amid Scandal
 
 
 
 
By Adele Peters: Solar is starting to replace the largest coal plant in the western U.S
 
 
 
 
Ed Higginbotham: You Need This: A Freaking WWII Tank
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk Hits: These Are the Coolest PVC Pipe Ideas We’ve Ever Seen (Honestly)
 
 
 
 
Kim Hometalk Helper Racine, WI: Very Sturdy But Cute Hose Guards
 
 
 
 
Doubt I’d want the planters directly overhead~

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI May 29, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1733 – The right of settlers in New France to enslave natives is upheld at Quebec City.
Despite slavery’s widespread existence in New France, the practice of enslavement in Canada has long been glossed-over by the Canadian historical consciousness. Substantive recognition and study of this past history of slavery did not begin until the 1960s. This institution, which endured for almost two centuries, affected the destiny of thousands of men, women, and children descended from Indigenous and African peoples.

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Born On This Day

1926 – Katie Boyle, Italian-English actress and television host (d. 2018)
Caterina Irene Elena Maria Boyle, Lady Saunders (née Imperiali dei Principi di Francavilla; 29 May 1926 – 20 March 2018), usually known as Katie Boyle and also credited as Catherine Boyle and Catherine Boyl, was a British actress, writer, radio announcer, television personality, game-show panellist and animal rights activist. She became best known for presenting the Eurovision Song Contest on four occasions, in 1960, 1963, 1968 and in 1974; the first three in London and the last presentation in Brighton, England. She was once an agony aunt, answering problems that had been posted to the TVTimes by readers.

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FYI

By Stef Schrader: Rallycross Driver Finishes Second After Driving Most Of A Race With His Hood Up
 
 
 
 
Great photo’s!
The Bohemian Blog: Soviet Monuments in Armenia
 
 
 
 

By Kristina Gaddy: The Forgotten Woman Behind a Legendary Monster
 
 
 
 
By Dan Peleschuk: The Self-Declared American Emperor Everyone Loved

Joshua Abraham Norton (February 4, 1818[3] – January 8, 1880), known as Emperor Norton, was a citizen of San Francisco, California, who in 1859 proclaimed himself “Norton I, Emperor of the United States”. He later assumed the secondary title of “Protector of Mexico”.[4]

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Car Hunter: THIS IS PART 1 If you find yourself driving on I81 in Virginia, 1st watch your speed as a 12 miles over the limit is reckless driving and holds the same weight as a DWI, then get off and checkout Duncan Import Cars in Christiansburg! http://www.duncanimports.com/
 
 
 
 
Open Culture DC: The Device Invented to Resuscitate Canaries in Coal Mines (Circa 1896)
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Hometalk Highlights: 16 Storage Container Ideas Under $10

 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 18 Heartwarming DIY Gift Ideas For Your Dad On His Big Day
 
 
 
 
Cari Dunn Hometalker Smithville, OH: Bug Repellent Candle Melts
 
 
 
 
By solelord: Brick Barbecue
 
 
 
 
By Megsta: Hand Spun Newspaper Yarn
 
 
 
 
By Charlie Chumrats: Turn an Old Artificial Christmas Tree Into a Giant Wreath
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Shounaz Mekky: Ramadan recipes: My Egyptian grandmother’s old school kunafa
 
 
 
 
By IJustLikeMakingThings: Ultimate Guide to Cheesecake