Category: FYI

FYI

FYI May 01 & 02, 2019

On This Day

 
 
880 – The Nea Ekklesia is inaugurated in Constantinople, setting the model for all later cross-in-square Orthodox churches.
The Nea Ekklēsia (Greek: Νέα Ἐκκλησία, “New Church”) was a church built by Byzantine Emperor Basil I the Macedonian in Constantinople between 876 and 880. It was the first monumental church built in the Byzantine capital after the Hagia Sophia in the 6th century, and marks the beginning of the middle period of Byzantine architecture. It continued in use until the Palaiologan period. Used as a gunpowder magazine by the Ottomans, the building was destroyed in 1490 after being struck by lightning. In English usage, the church is usually referred to as “The Nea”.

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1885 – Cree and Assiniboine warriors win the Battle of Cut Knife, their largest victory over Canadian forces during the North-West Rebellion.
The Battle of Cut Knife, fought on May 2, 1885, occurred when a flying column of mounted police, militia, and Canadian army regular army units attacked a Cree and Assiniboine teepee settlement near Battleford, Saskatchewan. First Nations fighters forced the Canadian forces to retreat, with losses on both sides.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1751 – Judith Sargent Murray, American poet and playwright (d. 1820)
Judith Sargent Murray (May 1, 1751 – June 9, 1820) was an early American advocate for women’s rights, an essay writer, playwright, poet, and letter writer. She was one of the first American proponents of the idea of the equality of the sexes—that women, like men, had the capability of intellectual accomplishment and should be able to achieve economic independence. Among many other influential pieces, her landmark essay “On the Equality of the Sexes” paved the way for new thoughts and ideas proposed by other feminist writers of the century.

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1843 – Elijah McCoy, Canadian-American engineer (d. 1929)
Elijah J. McCoy (May 2, 1844 [2] – October 10, 1929) was a Canadian-born African-American inventor and engineer who was notable for his 57 U.S. patents, most having to do with the lubrication of steam engines. Born free in Canada, he came to the United States as a young child when his family returned in 1847, becoming a U.S. resident and citizen.

Early life
Elijah J. McCoy was born free in 1844 in Colchester, Ontario, Canada to George and Mildred (Goins) McCoy. They were fugitive slaves who had escaped from Kentucky to Canada via helpers through the Underground Railroad. George and Mildred arrived in Colchester Township, Essex, Ontario Canada in 1837 via Detroit. Elijah McCoy had eleven siblings. Ten of the children were born in Canada from Alferd (1839) to William (1859). Based on 1860 Tax Assessment Rolls, land deeds of sale, and the 1870 USA Census it can be determined the George McCoy family moved to Ypsilanti, Washtenaw, Michigan in 1859-60.

Elijah McCoy was educated in black schools of Colchester Township due to the 1850 Common Schools act which segregated the Upper Canadian schools in 1850. At age 15, in 1859, Elijah McCoy was sent to Edinburgh, Scotland for an apprenticeship and study. After some years, he was certified in Scotland as a mechanical engineer. After his return, he rejoined his family. By this time, the George McCoy family had established themselves on the farm of John and Maryann Starkweather in Ypsilanti. George used his skills of a tobacconist to establish a tobacco and cigar business.

Career
When Elijah McCoy arrived in Michigan, he could find work only as a fireman and oiler at the Michigan Central Railroad. In a home-based machine shop in Ypsilanti, Michigan McCoy also did more highly skilled work, such as developing improvements and inventions. He invented an automatic lubricator for oiling the Steam engines of locomotives and ships, patenting it in 1872 as “Improvement in Lubricators for Steam-Engines” (U.S. Patent 129,843).

Similar automatic oilers had been patented previously; one is the displacement lubricator, which had already attained widespread use and whose technological descendants continued to be widely used into the 20th century. Lubricators were a boon for railroads, as they enabled trains to run faster and more profitably with less need to stop for lubrication and maintenance.[3]

McCoy continued to refine his devices and design new ones; 50 of his patents dealt with lubricating systems. After the turn of the century, he attracted notice among his black contemporaries. Booker T. Washington in Story of the Negro (1909) recognized him as having produced more patents than any other black inventor up to that time. This creativity gave McCoy an honored status in the black community that has persisted to this day. He continued to invent until late in life, obtaining as many as 57 patents. Most of these were related to lubrication, but others also included a folding ironing board and a lawn sprinkler. Lacking the capital with which to manufacture his lubricators in large numbers, he usually assigned his patent rights to his employers or sold them to investors. Lubricators with the McCoy name were not manufactured until 1920, near the end of his career. He formed the Elijah McCoy Manufacturing Company to produce his works.[3]

Historians have not agreed on the importance of McCoy’s contribution to the field of lubrication. He is credited in some biographical sketches with revolutionizing the railroad or machine industries with his devices. Early twentieth-century lubrication literature barely mentions him; for example, his name is absent from E. L. Ahrons’ Lubrication of Locomotives (1922), which does identify several other early pioneers and companies of the field.

Regarding the phrase “The real McCoy”
Main article: The real McCoy

This popular expression, typically meaning the real thing, has been associated with Elijah McCoy’s oil-drip cup invention. One theory is that railroad engineers looking to avoid inferior copies would request it by name,[4] and inquire if a locomotive was fitted with “the real McCoy system”.[5][6] This theory is mentioned in Elijah McCoy’s biography at the National Inventors Hall of Fame.[7] It can be traced to the December 1966 issue of Ebony in an advertisement for Old Taylor bourbon whiskey: “But the most famous legacy McCoy left his country was his name.”[8] A 1985 pamphlet printed by the Empak Publishing Company also notes the phrase’s origin but does not elaborate.[9] Other possibilities for its origin have been proposed[3] and while it has undoubtedly been applied as an epithet to many other McCoys, its association with Elijah has become iconic[10] and remains topical.[11][12]

The expression, “The real McCoy”, was first published in Canada in 1881, but the expression, “The Real McKay”, can be traced to Scottish advertising in 1856. In James S. Bond’s The Rise and Fall of the “Union Club”: or, Boy Life in Canada, a character says, “By jingo! yes; so it will be. It’s the ‘real McCoy,’ as Jim Hicks says. Nobody but a devil can find us there.”[13]

Marriage and family

McCoy married Ann Elizabeth Stewart in 1868; she died four years later.

He married for the second time in 1873 to Mary Eleanor Delaney. The couple moved to Detroit when McCoy found work there. Mary McCoy (b. – d. 1922) helped found the Phillis Wheatley Home for Aged Colored Men in 1898.[14]

Elijah McCoy died in the Eloise Infirmary in Nankin Township, now Westland, Michigan, on October 10, 1929, at the age of 85, after suffering injuries from a car accident seven years earlier in which his wife Mary died.

He is buried in Detroit Memorial Park East in Warren, Michigan.[15]

In popular culture
1966, an ad for Old Taylor bourbon cited Elijah McCoy with a photo and the expression “the real McCoy”, ending with the tag line, “But the most famous legacy McCoy left his country was his name.”[16]
2006, Canadian playwright Andrew Moodie’s The Real McCoy portrayed McCoy’s life, the challenges he faced as an African American, and the development of his inventions. It was first produced in Toronto[6] and has also been produced in the United States, for example in Saint Louis, Missouri, in 2011, where it was performed by the Black Rep Theatre.
In her novel Noughts and Crosses, Malorie Blackman describes a racial dystopia in which the roles of black and white people are reversed; Elijah McCoy is among the black scientists, inventors, and pioneers mentioned in a history class that Blackman “never learned about in school”.[17]

Legacy
1974, the state of Michigan put an historical marker (P25170) at the McCoys’ former home at 5720 Lincoln Avenue,[18] and at his gravesite.[19]
1975, Detroit celebrated Elijah McCoy Day by placing a historic marker at the site of his home. The city also named a nearby street for him.[20]
1994, Michigan installed a historical marker (S0642) at his first workshop in Ypsilanti, Michigan.[18]
2001, McCoy was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in Alexandria, Virginia.[7]
2012, the Elijah J. McCoy Midwest Regional U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (the first USPTO satellite office) was opened in Detroit, Michigan.[21][22][23][A]

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FYI

 
 
By Erienne Muldoon: World Press Freedom Day: Celebrating the Importance of Journalism
 
 
 
 
Affordability, reliability/durability and on and on… A Ford F450 starts at $90,000 and you get a wonderful 3 yr/36,000 mile warranty.
By Elizabeth Blackstock: Car Sales Just Keep Plummeting
Charlie Chesbrough, senior economist for Cox Automotive, told AutoNews that he has a working hypothesis. Mainly, it costs more to buy a car these days, and it’s tough to borrow the money to do it. It’s pretty tough to sell to a market that doesn’t have the means to buy.
 
 
 
 
Great comments!
By Justin T. Westbrook: 124 Wheels Stolen Off Cars at Louisiana Dealership in One Night
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: This Jeepney Driver’s Hands-Free Manual Transmission Shifting Technique Is Absurd
 
 
 
 
By Andrew Liszewski: This Inflatable Curtain Turned a Bath Tub Into the Most Spacious Shower in my Home
 
 
 
 
By Andrew Liszewski: Microsoft’s Solitaire Is Finally Getting Honored in the Video Game Hall of Fame
 
 
 
 
By Ryan Goldberg: Why Are Good Young Racehorses Ending Up As Meat 7,000 Miles Away?
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: Running Dinosaur Robot Reveals a Possible Way Dinos May Have Evolved Flight; Narwhal Genome Reveals Another Way That Narwhals Are Weird; This Fish Has Evolved to Thrive in Intensely Polluted Water and more ->
 
 
 
 
They willingly exchanged the painting in return for their lives. The German government later reimbursed them. Where is their case? Interesting that the Nazi’s were willing to accept the painting and let them go free…. I suspect there is more to this case.
By Paulina Dedaj: Spanish museum can keep Nazi-looted painting, Los Angeles judge rules
The painting, valued at more than $30 million, was completed in 1897 and purchased by Cassirer’s father-in-law directly from Pissarro’s art dealer. He left it to her and her husband when he died but Cassirer was forced to trade it to the Nazis in 1939 in exchange for exit visas for herself, her husband and her grandson.

The post-World War II German government, thinking the work was lost, paid her $13,000 in reparations in 1958.
 
 
 
 
By Olivia Raimonde: Instagram now makes it easy for users to shop directly from celebrity posts
 
 
 
 
By Sean Keane: NASA was sold bad aluminum in 19-year scam that caused $700M in failures The space agency linked it to mission failures in 2009 and 2011.
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Llorente | Fox News: Texas House passes bill allowing unlicensed handgun owners to carry in public during disaster
 
 
 
 

By Katherine Lam: New Jersey ‘pooperintendent’ who defecated on another high school’s field sues police over mug shot release
 
 
 
 
By Janelle Griffith: Teacher caught on video kicking 5-year-old could face criminal charges “Had I not pushed to find information on my own, the safety of all those students could still be at risk,” the girl’s mother said.
 
 
 
 
By Amanda Kooser: Millipede trapped in amber for 99 million years gets its moment to shine Behold all of its tiny legs, gloriously preserved.
 
 
 
 
Spreadsheet Journalism: Philadelphia Police Complaints, Part 1: One Civilian’s Review
 
 
 
 
By Ben Kesslen: Family of slain UNC Charlotte student: We’re ‘beyond proud’ of his actions “We are just beyond proud of what he was able to do,” Riley Howell’s mother told “Today.” “While kids were running one way, our son turned and ran towards the shooter.”

 
 

By Laurel Wamsley: Florida Approves Bill Allowing Classroom Teachers To Be Armed
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Alabama reporter up for an award for year-long investigation of corrupt rural law enforcement; Small daily newspaper tackles a tough topic, youth suicide, by first working with the community; How climate change is affecting 11 American crops and more ->
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI April 30, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1863 – A 65-man French Foreign Legion infantry patrol fights a force of nearly 2,000 Mexican soldiers to nearly the last man in Hacienda Camarón, Mexico.
The Battle of Camarón (French: Bataille de Camerone) which occurred over ten hours[1]:21 on 30 April 1863 between the French Foreign Legion and the Mexican army, is regarded as a defining moment in the Foreign Legion’s history. A small infantry patrol, led by Captain Jean Danjou and Lieutenants Clément Maudet and Jean Vilain, numbering just 65 men[1]:5 was attacked and besieged by a force that may have eventually reached 3,000 Mexican infantry and cavalry, and was forced to make a defensive stand at the nearby Hacienda Camarón, in Camarón de Tejeda, Veracruz, Mexico. The conduct of the Legion, who refused to surrender, led to a certain mystique — and the battle of Camarón became synonymous with bravery and a fight-to-the-death attitude.[2] In June 2017, the Warfare History Network declared this battle as one of the 17 greatest last stands in military history.[3]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1866 – Mary Haviland Stilwell Kuesel, American pioneer dentist (d. 1936)
Mary Haviland Stilwell Kuesel sometimes spelled Stillwell-Kuesel (April 30, 1866 – June 22, 1936) was a pioneer American dentist.[1] She was the founder of the Women’s Dental Association of the United States.
Biography
Mary Haviland Stilwell was born April 30, 1866 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1892, she founded the Women’s Dental Association of the U.S.[2][3] In 1902, she married Dr. George C. Kuesel,[4] a medical doctor.[5] They were associate members of the Fairmount Park Art Association.[6] She died June 22, 1936 in Philadelphia of coronary thrombosis.[4] Her correspondence is held in a collection by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.[7]

 
 

FYI

Good!
By Associated Press: Texas stops sharing death row inmate’s final written statements The Texas Department of Criminal Justice now says the agency will only publicly relay verbal statements made in the execution chamber.
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Blackstock: Insurance Companies Are Monitoring Your Phone to See How Much You Use It While Driving
 
 
 
 
By Elisa Shoenberger: Three Mushers, One Impenetrable Blizzard, And The World’s Hardest Dog Sled Race
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Jackie Bischof, edited by Jessanne Collins, and produced by Luiz Romero Quartz Obsession Ellipses: Wait for it…
 
 
 
 
Welcome to Compass, Fast Company’s new newsletter: NEW! This is why Google’s stock is tanking; $102 billion That’s what the sleep aid industry is estimated to be worth in 2023.; The father of electronic music’s lost instrument has finally been built and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Joshua Benton: A doorbell company owned by Amazon wants to start producing “crime news” and it’ll definitely end well Because what good is a panopticon if you can’t generate some clicks?
Amazon is currently looking to hire someone with the title “Managing Editor, News.” But it’s not for the entire Amazon empire — it’s for the small slice of it that makes security-focused doorbells, Ring. (Amazon bought Ring last year for more than $1 billion.)

 
 
 
 
By Carmen Heredia Rodriguez: Summer Bummer: A Young Camper’s $142,938 Snakebite
 
 
 
 
The Car Hunter: CHATTANOOGA CRUISE IN,GUNG HO-ASSAN MOTORS, 1961 DODGE FLITE WING AND WATIDIZ?
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: How a candy craze almost wiped out the barrel cactus; Candy Inventor and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: How one Italian farmer is helping chickens rediscover their wild side; McMansion; Mexican Hamburger and more ->

Atlas Obscura: The promise and perils of resurrecting Native Americans’ lost crops; Cow Beauty Shots and more ->
 
 

 
 

The Rural Blog: New Ky.-based publication aims to bring nuanced coverage of justice, environment and culture in the rural South; Elk introduced in former surface mined land in Central Appalachia to help restore ecosystems and local economies; Widely available rural broadband could boost U.S. economy by $47 billion a year, USDA says in report and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Malware Crosses the Streams; Facebook Gets a New Look; The Dictionary of Difficult Words and more ->
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI April 29, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1944 – World War II: British agent Nancy Wake, a leading figure in the French Resistance and the Gestapo’s most wanted person, parachutes back into France to be a liaison between London and the local maquis group.
Nancy Grace Augusta Wake, AC, GM (30 August 1912 – 7 August 2011) was a secret agent during the Second World War. Living in Marseilles with her French industrialist husband when the war broke out, Wake slowly became enmeshed with French efforts against the Germans, and worked to get people out of France. Later she became a leading figure in the maquis groups of the French Resistance and was one of the Allies’ most decorated servicewomen.

After the fall of France in 1940, she became a courier for the French Resistance and later joined the escape network of Captain Ian Garrow.[1] By 1943, Wake was the Gestapo’s most wanted person with a 5-million-franc price on her head. Therefore, it became necessary for her to leave France.

After reaching Britain, Wake joined the Special Operations Executive. On March 1, 1944,[2] she parachuted into occupied France near Auvergne, becoming a liaison between London and the local maquis group headed by Captain Henri Tardivat in the Forest of Tronçais. From April 1944 until the liberation of France, her 7,000+ maquisards fought the Germans in many different ways. At one point, being aware of this large group of Maquis, the Germans sent in 22,000 soldiers to wipe them out. However, due to Wake’s extraordinary organizing abilities, her Maquisards were able to defeat them causing 1,400 German deaths, while suffering only 100 among themselves.[3] [4] Wake’s Maquisards thus accounted for about 70 % of the about 2,000 Germans killed by the French resistance during the liberation of France, while their fatalities made up only 1 % of the about 8,000 French resistance fighters killed in action. A comparison with other contemporary engagements (e.g. the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, in which the Allies suffered 10,000+ casualties including 4,414 confirmed dead vs. 4,000 – 9,000 casualties on the German side, or the Battle of Arnhem, in which there were 1,984 British vs. 1,300 – 1,725 German battle deaths) makes Wake’s achievement look even more outstanding. However, there are several sources about Nancy Wake in which this exploit is not mentioned.[5] [6] [7] [8]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1858 – Georgia Hopley, American journalist, temperance advocate, and the first woman prohibition agent (d. 1944)
Georgianna Eliza Hopley (1858–1944) was an American journalist, political figure, and temperance advocate. A member of a prominent Ohio publishing family, she was the first woman reporter in Columbus, and editor of several publications. She served as a correspondent and representative at the 1900 Paris Exposition and the 1901 Pan-American Exposition. She was active in state and national politics, serving as vice-president of the Woman’s Republican Club of Ohio and directing publicity for Warren G. Harding’s presidential campaign.

In 1922 Hopley became the first woman prohibition agent of the United States Bureau of Prohibition, where she was involved in education and publicity. She resigned among criticism of the costs of her publicity and the scope of her duties.

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FYI

 
 
By Shannon Miller: John Singleton’s family confirms that they will pull him off of life support today
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Eye on you; Bondo queen and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Blackstock: Toyota Built Its Very Own Mini-Nürburgring Right in Its Backyard
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Blackstock: Fire Extinguisher Holder Proves He’s the Most Important Member of the Pit Crew
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: Astronomers Make Movie of Black Hole Spinning Like a Top; We Have to Do Something About Outdoor Cats and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: First Grants For Independent Research on Social Media’s Impact on Democracy Using Facebook Data; New Digital Collection Now Online From Library of Congress: Classic Works of Children’s Books Published More Than 100 Years Ago and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The Drovers Inn; Spineless Cacti; 22 Deserted Places and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Katharine Schwab: Mozilla thinks cities can help save the internet from Big Tech
 
 
 
 
By Stephanie Donovan: Blog Profiles: Vacation Planning Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Tom Shackelford: Woodstock 50th Anniversary Festival Canceled
 
 
 
 
By CNBC.com Staff: Watch Boeing’s annual shareholder meeting
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Iowa utility urges law to penalize solar customers – similar battles going on in other states; Fact-checking the role of cow farts in climate change; Access to life-saving care increasingly challenging for rural women, write women’s health advocates and more ->
 
 
 
 
Barn Finds: No Reserve HJ47 1984 Toyota Land Cruiser Truck; Stored 41 Years 1967 International 1200 Travelette; Chop Top Wagon 1979 AMC Pacer and more ->
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCCXLX): Anyone like this idea of Notre Dame’s roof as a greenhouse?; America’s Grandest Movie Palaces Find Strange New Lives; Sealed away in an attic, a New Orleans safety deposit vault from 1880s is being emptied; A Homemade Meal . . . From a Vending Machine and more ->
 
 
 
 
GlacierHub.org Weekly Newsletter 4-29-19: Glaciers

Ideas

By Muhaiminah Faiz: DIY Llama Plushie
 
 
By Momos75: Take-along Tiny Soaps
 
 
By RCEM: Bacon Infused Fire Lighters
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By curryandvanilla: Rustic Tomato-Ricotta Tart/Pie
 
 
By Katrienn: Easy Gorgeous Rhubarb Strawberry Pie With Coconut Whipped Cream
 
 
By misko13: Smalec, the Polish’s Best Friend


 
 

 
 

FYI April 28, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1253 – Nichiren, a Japanese Buddhist monk, propounds Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō for the very first time and declares it to be the essence of Buddhism, in effect founding Nichiren Buddhism.
Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō (南無妙法蓮華經) (also pronounced Nam Myōhō Renge Kyō)[1] (English: Devotion to the Mystic Law of the Lotus Sutra or Glory to the Sutra of the Lotus of the Supreme Law)[2][3] is the central mantra chanted within all forms of Nichiren Buddhism.

The words Myōhō Renge Kyō refer to the Japanese title of the Lotus Sūtra. The mantra is referred to as daimoku (題目)[4] or, in honorific form, o-daimoku (お題目) meaning title and was first revealed by the Japanese Buddhist priest Nichiren on the 28th day of the fourth lunar month of 1253 at Seichō-ji (also called Kiyosumi-dera) in present-day city of Kamogawa, Chiba prefecture, Japan.[5][6]

The practice of prolonged chanting is referred to as shōdai (唱題) while the purpose of chanting daimoku is to reduce sufferings by eradicating negative karma along with reducing karmic punishments both from previous and present lifetimes,[7] with the goal to attain perfect and complete awakening.[8]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1854 – Hertha Marks Ayrton, Polish-British engineer, mathematician, and physicist. (d. 1923)
Phoebe Sarah Hertha Ayrton (28 April 1854 – 26 August 1923[1]) was a British engineer, mathematician, physicist and inventor, and suffragette. Known in adult life as Hertha Ayrton, born Phoebe Sarah Marks, she was awarded the Hughes Medal by the Royal Society for her work on electric arcs and ripples in sand and water.

Early life and education
Hertha Ayrton was born Phoebe Sarah Marks in Portsea, Hampshire, England, on 28 April 1854. She was the third child of a Polish Jewish watchmaker named Levi Marks, an immigrant from Tsarist Poland; and Alice Theresa Moss, a seamstress, the daughter of Joseph Moss, a glass merchant of Portsea.[2][3] Her father died in 1861, leaving Sarah’s mother with seven children and an eighth expected. Sarah then took up some of the responsibility for caring for the younger children.

At the age of nine, Sarah was invited by her aunts, who ran a school in northwest London, to live with her cousins and be educated with them.[1] She was known to her peers and teachers as a fiery, occasionally crude personality.[4] Her cousins introduced Ayrton to science and mathematics. By age 16, she was working as a governess.[5]

At Girton, Ayrton studied mathematics and was coached by physicist Richard Glazebrook. George Eliot supported Ayrton’s application to Girton College. During her time at Cambridge, Ayrton constructed a sphygmomanometer (blood pressure meter), led the choral society, founded the Girton fire brigade, and, together with Charlotte Scott, formed a mathematical club.[1] In 1880, Ayrton passed the Mathematical Tripos, but Cambridge did not grant her an academic degree because, at the time, Cambridge gave only certificates and not full degrees to women. Ayrton passed an external examination at the University of London, which awarded her a Bachelor of Science degree in 1881.[6][7]

Mathematics and electrical engineering work

Upon her return to London, Ayrton earned money by teaching and embroidery, ran a club for working girls, and cared for her invalid sister.[1] She also put her mathematical skills to practical use – she taught at Notting Hill and Ealing High School, and was also active in devising and solving mathematical problems, many of which were published in “Mathematical Questions and Their Solutions” from the Educational Times. In 1884 Ayrton patented[8] a line-divider, an engineering drawing instrument for dividing a line into any number of equal parts and for enlarging and reducing figures.[2][1] The line-divider was her first major invention and, while its primary use was likely for artists for enlarging and diminishing, it was also useful to architects and engineers. Ayrton’s patent application was financially supported by Louisa Goldsmid and feminist Barbara Bodichon, who together advanced her enough money to take out patents; the invention was shown at the Exhibition of Women’s Industries and received much press attention. Ayrton’s 1884 patent was the first of many – from 1884 until her death, Hertha registered 26 patents: five on mathematical dividers, 13 on arc lamps and electrodes, the rest on the propulsion of air.

In 1884 Ayrton began attending evening classes on electricity at Finsbury Technical College, delivered by Professor William Edward Ayrton, a pioneer in electrical engineering and physics education and a fellow of the Royal Society. On 6 May 1885 she married her former teacher, and thereafter assisted him with experiments in physics and electricity.[1] She also began her own investigation into the characteristics of the electric arc.[3]

In the late nineteenth century, electric arc lighting was in wide use for public lighting. The tendency of electric arcs to flicker and hiss was a major problem. In 1895, Hertha Ayrton wrote a series of articles for the Electrician, explaining that these phenomena were the result of oxygen coming into contact with the carbon rods used to create the arc. In 1899, she was the first woman ever to read her own paper before the Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE).[1] Her paper was entitled “The Hissing of the Electric Arc”. Shortly thereafter, Ayrton was elected the first female member of the IEE; the next woman to be admitted to the IEE was in 1958.[1] She petitioned to present a paper before the Royal Society but was not allowed because of her sex and “The Mechanism of the Electric Arc” was read by John Perry in her stead in 1901.[4] Ayrton was also the first woman to win a prize from the Society, the Hughes Medal, awarded to her in 1906 in honour of her research on the motion of ripples in sand and water and her work on the electric arc.[3] By the late nineteenth century, Ayrton’s work in the field of electrical engineering was recognised more widely, domestically and internationally. At the International Congress of Women held in London in 1899, she presided over the physical science section. Ayrton also spoke at the International Electrical Congress in Paris in 1900.[2] Her success there led the British Association for the Advancement of Science to allow women to serve on general and sectional committees.

In 1902, Ayrton published The Electric Arc, a summary of her research and work on the electric arc, with origins in her earlier articles from the Electrician published between 1895 and 1896. With this publication, her contribution to the field of electrical engineering began to be cemented. However, initially at least, Ayrton was not well received by the more prestigious and traditional scientific societies such as the Royal Society. In the aftermath of the publication of The Electric Arc, Ayrton was proposed as a Fellow of the Royal Society by renowned electrical engineer John Perry in 1902. Her application was turned down by the Council of the Royal Society, who decreed that married women were not eligible to be Fellows.[9] However, in 1904, she became the first woman to read a paper before the Royal Society when she was allowed to read her paper “The Origin and Growth of Ripple Marks” and this was later published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society.[4][7][10] In 1906, she was awarded the Royal Society’s prestigious Hughes Medal “for her experimental investigations on the electric arc, and also on sand ripples.”[7] She was the fifth recipient of this prize, awarded annually since 1902, in recognition of an original discovery in the physical sciences, particularly electricity and magnetism or their applications, and as of 2018, one of only two women so honoured,[7] the other being Michele Dougherty in 2008.[11]

Support for women’s suffrage
As a teenager, Ayrton became deeply involved in the women’s suffrage movement, joining the WSPU in 1907 after attending a celebration with released prisoners. In 1909 Ayrton opened the second day of the Knightsbridge “Women’s Exhibition and Sale of Work in the Colours” which included new model bicycles painted in purple, white and green and raised from 50 stalls and tea etc. £5,664 for the movement.[12] Ayrton was with the delegation that went with Mrs Emily Pankhurst to see the Prime Minister and met his private secretary instead on 18th November 1910 (Black Friday). Ayrton permitted Christabel Pankhurst to transfer sums to her bank account to avoid confiscation in 1912, and hosted Mrs Pankhurst in times of recovery from imprisonment and force feeding. One attempt to re-arrest Mrs Pankhurst on 29th April 1913 to continue her sentence, was driven back by suffragettes picketing outside, but Mrs Pankhurst was eventually re-arrested outside Ayrton’s home on her way to the funeral of Emily Davison (who was killed after running in front of the King’s horse at the Derby)[12]. It was through suffrage activism, she met suffragist and co-founder of Cambridge’s Girton College, Barbara Bodichon.[13] Bodichon helped make it financially possible to attend Girton, and would go on to financially support Ayrton throughout her education and career including by bequeathing her estate to Ayrton.[14]

Later life and research

Ayrton delivered seven papers before the Royal Society between 1901 and 1926, the last posthumously. [15][16][17][18][19][20][21] She also presented the results of her research before audiences at the British Association and the Physical Society. Ayrton’s interest in vortices in water and air inspired the Ayrton fan, or flapper, used in the trenches in the First World War to dispel poison and foul gas. Ayrton fought for its acceptance which took a year from her offering it to the War Office to being used in the forces in 1916,[12] and organised its production, over 100,000 being used on the Western Front.[1][22]

Ayrton helped found the International Federation of University Women in 1919 and the National Union of Scientific Workers in 1920. She died of blood poisoning (resulting from an insect bite) on 26 August 1923 at New Cottage, North Lancing, Sussex.[1]

Personal life
Hertha Ayrton was agnostic. In her teens she adopted the name “Hertha” after the eponymous heroine of a poem by Algernon Charles Swinburne that criticised organised religion.[23]

In 1885, Ayrton married the widower William Edward Ayrton, a physicist and electrical engineer who was supportive of her scientific endeavours. Ayrton honoured Barbara Bodichon by naming her first child, a daughter born in 1886, Barbara Bodichon Ayrton (1886–1950). The daughter was called “Barbie”, and she later became a member of parliament for the Labour Party.[4] Her daughter’s son was the artist, Michael Ayrton.
Ayrton’s house at 41 Norfolk Square in Paddington received an English Heritage blue plaque in 2007.

Commemoration
Two years after her death in 1923, Ayrton’s lifelong friend Ottilie Hancock endowed the Hertha Ayrton Research Fellowship at Girton College.[7] This fellowship continues today.[24]
A blue plaque unveiled in 2007 commemorates Ayrton at 41 Norfolk Square in Paddington.[25]
In 2009, the Panasonic Trust inaugurated the Hertha Marks Ayrton Fellowship to mark the trust’s 25th anniversary. Its purpose is to promote the further education of under-represented groups in the engineering profession by supporting a suitably qualified engineer to study a full-time master’s degree course specifically related to sustainable development or some other environmental technology.[26]
In 2010, a panel of female Fellows of the Royal Society and science historians selected Ayrton as voted one of the ten most influential British women in the history of science.[27]
In 2015, the British Society for the History of Science created the Ayrton Prize for web projects and digital engagement in history of science. It awarded the inaugural prize to Voices of Science, a project of the British Library.[28]
On 28 April 2016, Google commemorated Ayrton’s 162nd birthday with a Google Doodle on its homepage.[29]
In 2016 the Council of the University of Cambridge approved the use of Ayrton’s name to mark a physical feature of the North West Cambridge Development.[30]
In 2017 Sheffield Hallam University named their new STEM centre after Ayrton.[31]
In February 2018, a Blue Plaque was unveiled in Ayrton’s honour on Queen Street, Portsmouth.[32][33][34] The city also boasts a street named after her on The Hard, in postcode PO1 3DS.[35][32]

 
 

FYI

By Daniel Hurst: Japan’s ‘revolutionary’ Emperor Akihito to abdicate, leaving imposing legacy for his son Akihito, 85, will step down Tuesday after more than 30 years on the Chrysanthemum Throne.
 
 
 
 
By Adam Wren: Current State of the NRA, According to Its Own Members: ‘They’re F*cked’ Amid the ouster of Lt. Col. Oliver North and a New York Attorney General investigation, NRA members say the organization has lost focus on its original mission.
Becker told me he had instead joined Gun Owners of America, the advocacy organization that seemed to him to be more focused on protecting the Second Amendment. He said he sent them $20, and received his membership package in a no-frills white envelope. He had to write his own membership number on his membership card—something he didn’t begrudge. “They’re not wasting money,” he said.

As for the NRA, he said: “They lost their way—period.” He added: “They’re f*cked.”
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life: NFL Quarterback Derek Carr’s Altar Conference Preaches Faith and Family to the Central Valley; KRL News & New Podcast Ep Featuring Kathi Daley!; RHS Teacher Profile: Anthony Fernandez and more ->
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Amanda Palmer’s Haunting Reading of Adrienne Rich’s Poem About Love, Perspective, and the Hubble Space Telescope and more ->
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
New Life On A Homestead: Cardamom Honey Coffee Recipe – Quick and Easy
 
 
New Life On A Homestead: How To Preserve Eggs In Mineral Oil
 
 
New Life On A Homestead: How to Freeze Eggs in 2 Easy Steps

The Kitchn: Garlic Butter Pasta Loaded with Spring Greens; Next Week’s Meal Plan: A Week of Mediterranean Diet Dinners and more ->


 
 

 
 

FYI April 27, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1865 – The steamboat Sultana is destroyed by boiler explosions and fire near Memphis, Tennessee, killing over 1,100, mostly Union prisoners of war returning North.
Sultana was a Mississippi River side-wheel steamboat, which exploded on April 27, 1865, in the worst maritime disaster in United States history.

Constructed of wood in 1863 by the John Litherbury Boatyard [1] in Cincinnati, she was intended for the lower Mississippi cotton trade. The steamer registered 1,719 tons[2] and normally carried a crew of 85. For two years, she ran a regular route between St. Louis and New Orleans, and was frequently commissioned to carry troops.

Although only designed with a capacity of only 376 passengers, she was carrying 2,137 when three of the boat’s four boilers exploded and she burned to the waterline and sank near Memphis, Tennessee, killing 1,168. [3] The disaster was overshadowed in the press by events surrounding the end of the American Civil War, including the killing of President Lincoln’s assassin John Wilkes Booth just the day before, and no one was ever held accountable for the tragedy.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1882 – Jessie Redmon Fauset, American author and poet (d. 1961)
Jessie Redmon Fauset (April 27, 1882 – April 30, 1961) was an African-American editor, poet, essayist, novelist, and educator. Her literary work helped sculpt African-American literature in the 1920s as she focused on portraying a true image of African-American life and history.[1] Her black fictional characters were working professionals which was an inconceivable concept to American society during this time[2] Her story lines related to themes of racial discrimination, “passing”, and feminism. From 1919 to 1926, Fauset’s position as literary editor of The Crisis, a NAACP magazine, allowed her to contribute to the Harlem Renaissance by promoting literary work that related to the social movements of this era. Through her work as a literary editor and reviewer, she discouraged black writers from lessening the racial qualities of the characters in their work, and encouraged them to write honestly and openly about the African-American race.[1] She wanted a realistic and positive representation of the African-American community in literature that had never before been as prominently displayed. Before and after working on The Crisis, she worked for decades as a French teacher in public schools in Washington, DC, and New York City. She published four novels during the 1920s and 1930s, exploring the lives of the black middle class. She also was the editor and co-author of the African-American children’s magazine The Brownies’ Book.[3] She is known for discovering and mentoring other African-American writers, including Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Countee Cullen, and Claude McKay.

Read more ->
 
 

FYI

Open Culture: Why Do Sad People Like to Listen to Sad Music? Psychologists Answer the Question in Two Studies; Steve Jobs Shares a Secret for Success: Don’t Be Afraid to Ask for Help and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Brian Lada, AccuWeather meteorologist and staff writer: May 2019: 3 things stargazers should look for in the night sky
 
 
 
 
By Gabriela Saldivia: Archdiocese Of New York Names 120 Clergy ‘Credibly Accused’ Of Child Sex Abuse
 
 
 
 
By Robert Gearty: Ohio boy, 8, saves sister from car thief in harrowing escape caught on camera
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: I Don’t Think There’s Any Such Thing as an Apolitical Writer; Private Libraries That Inspire; Does Linda Fairstein Deserve a Literary Honor? Critics Say Her past as a Prosecutor Sullies Her Art.; Consumer Use of Audiobooks Continues to Rise
 
 
 
 
By Robert Gearty: Barking dog leads searchers to her missing owner after he died on hike
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI April 26, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1956 – SS Ideal X, the world’s first successful container ship, leaves Port Newark, New Jersey for Houston, Texas.
SS Ideal X, a converted World War II T-2 oil tanker, was the first commercially successful container ship.

Built by The Marinship Corporation during World War II as Potrero Hills, she was later purchased by Malcom McLean’s Pan-Atlantic Steamship Company.[5][6][7] In 1955, the ship was modified to carry shipping containers and rechristened Ideal X. During her first voyage in her new configuration, on April 26, 1956,[8] the Ideal X carried 58 containers from Port Newark, New Jersey, to Port of Houston, Texas, where 58 trucks were waiting to be loaded with the containers.[9] It was not the first container ship, however. The Clifford J. Rodgers, operated by the White Pass and Yukon Route, made its debut in 1955.

In 1959, the vessel was acquired by Bulgarian owners, who rechristened her Elemir. The Elemir suffered extensive damage during heavy weather on February 8, 1964, and was sold in turn to Japanese breakers. She was finally scrapped on October 20, 1964, in Hirao, Japan.

 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1710 – Thomas Reid, Scottish philosopher and academic (d. 1796)
Thomas Reid FRSE (/riːd/; 7 May (O.S. 26 April) 1710 – 7 October 1796) was a religiously trained Scottish philosopher. He was the founder of the Scottish School of Common Sense and played an integral role in the Scottish Enlightenment. In 1783 he was a joint founder of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. A contemporary of David Hume, Reid was also “Hume’s earliest and fiercest critic”.[6]

Life
He was born in the manse at Strachan, Aberdeenshire, on 26 April 1710 O.S., the son of Lewis Reid (1676–1762) and his wife Margaret Gregory, first cousin to James Gregory. He was educated at Kincardine Parish School then the O’Neil Grammar School in Kincardine.[7]

He went to the University of Aberdeen in 1723 and graduated MA in 1726 (the young age was normal at that time). He was licensed to preach by the Church of Scotland in 1731, when he came of age. He began his career as a minister of the Church of Scotland but ceased to be a minister when he was given a professorship at King’s College, Aberdeen, in 1752. He obtained his doctorate and wrote An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense (published in 1764). He and his colleagues founded the ‘Aberdeen Philosophical Society’ which was popularly known as the ‘Wise Club’ (a literary-philosophical association).[8] Shortly after the publication of his first book, he was given the prestigious Professorship of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow when he was called to replace Adam Smith. He resigned from this position in 1781, after which he prepared his university lectures for publication in two books: Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man (1785) and Essays on the Active Powers of the Human Mind (1788). Reid was buried at Blackfriars Church in the grounds of Glasgow College and when the university moved to Gilmorehill in the west of Glasgow, his tombstone was inserted in the main building. See separate article on Thomas Reid’s tombstone.

Philosophical work
Overview

Reid believed that common sense (in a special philosophical sense of sensus communis) is, or at least should be, at the foundation of all philosophical inquiry.[9] He disagreed with Hume, who asserted that we can never know what an external world consists of as our knowledge is limited to the ideas in the mind, and George Berkeley, who asserted that the external world is merely ideas in the mind. By contrast, Reid claimed that the foundations upon which our sensus communis are built justify our belief that there is an external world.

In his day and for some years into the 19th century, he was regarded as more important than Hume.[10] He advocated direct realism, or common sense realism, and argued strongly against the Theory of Ideas advocated by John Locke, René Descartes, and (in varying forms) nearly all Early Modern philosophers who came after them. He had a great admiration for Hume and had a mutual friend send Hume an early manuscript of Reid’s Inquiry. Hume responded that the “deeply philosophical” work “is wrote in a lively and entertaining matter,” but that “there seems to be some defect in method,” and criticized Reid for implying the presence of innate ideas.[11]

Thomas Reid’s theory of common sense
His theory of knowledge had a strong influence on his theory of morals. He thought epistemology was an introductory part to practical ethics: When we are confirmed in our common beliefs by philosophy, all we have to do is to act according to them, because we know what is right. His moral philosophy is reminiscent of Roman stoicism in its emphasis on the agency of the subject and self-control. He often quotes Cicero, from whom he adopted the term “sensus communis”. Reid’s answer to Hume’s sceptical and naturalist arguments was to enumerate a set of principles of common sense (sensus communis) which constitute the foundations of rational thought. Anyone who undertakes a philosophical argument, for example, must implicitly presuppose certain beliefs like, “I am talking to a real person,” and “There is an external world whose laws do not change,” among many other positive, substantive claims. For Reid, the belief in the truth of these principles is not rational; rather, reason itself demands these principles as prerequisites, as does the innate “constitution” of the human mind. It is for this reason (and possibly a mocking attitude toward Hume and Berkeley) that Reid sees belief in the principles of common sense as a litmus test for sanity. For example, in The Intellectual Powers of Man he states, “For, before men can reason together, they must agree in first principles; and it is impossible to reason with a man who has no principles in common with you.” One of the first principles he goes on to list is that “qualities must necessarily be in something that is figured, coloured, hard or soft, that moves or resists. It is not to these qualities, but to that which is the subject of them, that we give the name body. If any man should think fit to deny that these things are qualities, or that they require any subject, I leave him to enjoy his opinion as a man who denies first principles, and is not fit to be reasoned with.”

Reid also made positive arguments based in phenomenological insight to put forth a novel mixture of direct realism and ordinary language philosophy. In a typical passage in the Intellectual Powers he asserts that when he has a conception of a centaur, the thing he conceives is an animal, and no idea is an animal; therefore, the thing he conceives is not an idea, but a centaur. This point relies both on an account of the subjective experience of conceiving an object and also on an account of what we mean when we use words. Because Reid saw his philosophy as publicly accessible knowledge, available both through introspection and the proper understanding of how language is used, he saw it as the philosophy of common sense.

Read more ->
 
 

FYI

 
 

John Joseph “Hondo” Havlicek (/ˈhævlɪtʃɛk/ HAV-li-chek; April 8, 1940 – April 25, 2019)[1] was an American professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA championships, four of them coming in his first four seasons.

In the National Basketball Association, only teammates Bill Russell and Sam Jones won more championships during their playing careers, and Havlicek is one of three NBA players with an unsurpassed 8–0 record in NBA Finals series outcomes.[2] Havlicek is widely considered to have been one of the greatest players in the history of the game and was inducted as a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1984. He was a three-sport athlete at Bridgeport High School in Bridgeport, Ohio.

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By Kate Smith: Abortion will be legal in Kansas even if Roe v. Wade falls, the state Supreme Court just ruled
 
 
 
 
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gg phillips: Location! Location! Location! Picking A Spot To Start A Garden.

Ideas

 
 
By Shabbyfufu: How To Make Realistic Paper Garden Flowers
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI April 25, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1916 – Anzac Day is commemorated for the first time on the first anniversary of the landing at ANZAC Cove.
Anzac Day (/ˈænzæk/) is a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand that broadly commemorates all Australians and New Zealanders “who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations” and “the contribution and suffering of all those who have served”.[1][2] Observed on 25 April each year, Anzac Day was originally devised to honour the members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who served in the Gallipoli Campaign, their first engagement in the First World War (1914–1918).

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Born On This Day

 
 
1892 – Maud Hart Lovelace, American author (d. 1980)
Maud Hart Lovelace (April 25, 1892 – March 11, 1980) was an American author best known for the Betsy-Tacy series.

Early life
Maud Palmer Hart was born in Mankato, Minnesota to Tom Hart, a shoe store owner, and his wife, Stella (née Palmer). Maud was the middle child; her sisters were Kathleen (Julia in the Betsy-Tacy books) and Helen (book character, Margaret). Maud reportedly started writing as soon as she could hold a pencil. She wrote in her high school’s essay contest during her junior and senior years.

She was baptized in a Baptist church but joined the Episcopal church as a teenager. She went on to the University of Minnesota but took a leave of absence to go to California to recover at her maternal grandmother’s home from an appendectomy. It was while in California that she made her first short story sale – to the Los Angeles Times Magazine. She returned to the university and worked for the Minnesota Daily, but did not graduate.[1]

While spending a year in Europe in 1914, she met Paolo Conte, an Italian musician (who later inspired the character Marco in Betsy and the Great World). Hart married Delos Lovelace when she was 25. Delos and Hart met in April 1917 and were married on Thanksgiving Day the same year. They lived apart until 1919, however, due to Delos’ military service in the First World War.[1]

Later, the couple divided their time between Minneapolis and New York (including Yonkers and Mount Vernon) for several years. After 1928, they lived in New York permanently until their retirement in Claremont, California.

They had one daughter, Merian (later Mrs. Kirchner; January 18, 1931—September 25, 1997), who was named for Delos’s friend Merian C. Cooper. (Delos had written the novelization of the film King Kong, directed by Cooper.)[2]

Literary career
Lovelace’s first book was The Black Angels, which was published in 1926 and is a historical novel set in Minnesota. She wrote several more historical novels, including the successful Early Candlelight (1929).

Lovelace is best known for her books for children. The Betsy-Tacy series started in 1938 after Lovelace told stories about her childhood to her own daughter Merian. The first book in the series, Betsy-Tacy, was published in 1940, and the last book, Betsy’s Wedding, was published in 1955. The first four books increase in reading difficulty so that the child can grow up along with Betsy-Tacy. The Betsy-Tacy books take place mostly in the fictional town of Deep Valley, Minnesota, which is based on Mankato.

There are also three loosely connected books set in Deep Valley: Winona’s Pony Cart, Emily of Deep Valley and Carney’s House Party, in which Betsy and Tacy have minor roles. The series has been enduringly popular. The city of Mankato declared Betsy-Tacy Day on October 7, 1961.[1]

Death
Lovelace spent her later years in Claremont, California, where she died in 1980.[3] She is buried in the Glenwood Cemetery in Mankato, with a monument dedicated to her.

Legacy
The Maud Hart Lovelace Book Award was established in 1980. Each year, a group of nominees is chosen in two categories: grades 3–5 and grades 6–8. Children who have read at least three books in the relevant category cast a vote for their favorite. Whoever gets the most votes wins the award and $100.[4] Details about her life and work can be found in The Betsy-Tacy Companion by Sharla Whalen.

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FYI

By Diana Moskovitz: The Long Shadow of Joe Biden’s Legacy on Violence Against Women
 
 
 
 
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By Matt Novak: Pentagon’s Independent Science Research Group, the Jasons, Is Set to Disband After 59 Years
 
 
 
 
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Excellent! I hope this brngs a measure of peace to Mr. Byrd’s loved ones.
By Samuel Chamberlain: ‘Avowed racist’ offers no last words before execution for dragging death of black man in Texas

 
 
 
 

By Eric Liu: This National Tell a Story Day, take a page from your Assistant
 
 
 
 
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By Shep McAllister: The Ninja Foodi Is Like An Instant Pot, An Air Fryer, And a Dehydrator In One, And It’s Never Been Cheaper

Ideas

Dan330 Hometalker Saint Paul, MN: DIY Potato Tower
 
 
By Cats Science Club: Tornado Tubes
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By misko13: Clarified Butter (Suitable for Lactose Intolerants)
 
 
By Momos75: Duck Leg Confit
 
 
Great comments!
By mattaw: Deep Fried Turkey
 
Great comments!
Alton Brown: How to Build a Derrick for Frying
Eyebolt instead of zip ties, flame retardant cord or wire, fire extinguishers, etc.
 
 
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Coleen’s Recipes: Microwave Velveeta Mac and Cheese


 
 

 
 

Music April 25, 2019

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

FYI April 24, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1914 – The Franck–Hertz experiment, a pillar of quantum mechanics, is presented to the German Physical Society.
The Franck–Hertz experiment was the first electrical measurement to clearly show the quantum nature of atoms, and thus “transformed our understanding of the world”.[attribution needed][1] It was presented on April 24, 1914, to the German Physical Society in a paper by James Franck and Gustav Hertz.[2][3] Franck and Hertz had designed a vacuum tube for studying energetic electrons that flew through a thin vapor of mercury atoms. They discovered that, when an electron collided with a mercury atom, it could lose only a specific quantity (4.9 electron volts) of its kinetic energy before flying away.[4] This energy loss corresponds to decelerating the electron from a speed of about 1.3 million meters per second to zero.[5] A faster electron does not decelerate completely after a collision, but loses precisely the same amount of its kinetic energy. Slower electrons merely bounce off mercury atoms without losing any significant speed or kinetic energy.

These experimental results proved to be consistent with the Bohr model for atoms that had been proposed the previous year by Niels Bohr. The Bohr model was a precursor of quantum mechanics and of the electron shell model of atoms. Its key feature was that an electron inside an atom occupies one of the atom’s “quantum energy levels”. Before the collision, an electron inside the mercury atom occupies its lowest available energy level. After the collision, the electron inside occupies a higher energy level with 4.9 electron volts (eV) more energy. This means that the electron is more loosely bound to the mercury atom. There were no intermediate levels or possibilities in Bohr’s quantum model. This feature was “revolutionary” because it was inconsistent with the expectation that an electron could be bound to an atom’s nucleus by any amount of energy.[4][6]

In a second paper presented in May 1914, Franck and Hertz reported on the light emission by the mercury atoms that had absorbed energy from collisions.[7] They showed that the wavelength of this ultraviolet light corresponded exactly to the 4.9 eV of energy that the flying electron had lost. The relationship of energy and wavelength had also been predicted by Bohr.[4] After a presentation of these results by Franck a few years later, Albert Einstein is said to have remarked, “It’s so lovely it makes you cry.”[1]

On December 10, 1926, Franck and Hertz were awarded the 1925 Nobel Prize in Physics “for their discovery of the laws governing the impact of an electron upon an atom”.[8]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1880 – Gideon Sundback, Swedish-American engineer and businessman, developed the zipper (d. 1954)
Gideon Sundback (April 24, 1880 – June 21, 1954) was a Swedish-American electrical engineer, who is most commonly associated with his work in the development of the zipper.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
By Shannon Miller: R.I.P. prolific American playwright Mark Medoff

Mark Medoff (March 18, 1940 – April 23, 2019) was an American playwright, screenwriter, film and theatre director, actor, and professor. His play Children of a Lesser God received both the Tony Award and the Olivier Award. He was nominated for an Academy Award and a Writers Guild of America Best Adapted Screenplay Award for the film script of Children of a Lesser God and for a Cable ACE Award for his HBO Premiere movie, Apology. He also received an Obie Award for his play When You Comin’ Back, Red Ryder?[citation needed] Medoff’s feature film Refuge[1] was released in 2010.

When You Comin’ Back, Red Ryder? was adapted into a film with a screenplay by Medoff in 1979.[2]

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
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Why you should care
Because she was fighting for universal healthcare more than 100 years before the concept existed.
 
 
 
 

By AJ Willingham: We stan: Merriam-Webster just added 640 new words
 
 
 
 
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Ideas

By Michael Wright: 19 Ways to Get Rid of Fruit Flies
 
 
Marion Owen: Guide to the 20 best benefits of lemon
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI April 23, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1348 – The founding of the Order of the Garter by King Edward III is announced on St. George’s Day.
The Order of the Garter (formally the Most Noble Order of the Garter) is an order of chivalry founded by Edward III in 1348 and regarded as the most prestigious British order of chivalry (though in precedence inferior to the military Victoria Cross and George Cross) in England and later the United Kingdom. It is dedicated to the image and arms of Saint George, England’s patron saint.

Appointments are made at the Sovereign’s sole discretion. Membership of the Order is limited to the Sovereign, the Prince of Wales, and no more than 24 living members, or Companions. The order also includes supernumerary knights and ladies (e.g., members of the British royal family and foreign monarchs). New appointments to the Order of the Garter are often announced on St George’s Day (23 April), as Saint George is the order’s patron saint.[2]

The order’s emblem is a garter with the motto Honi soit qui mal y pense (Middle French: “Shame on him who thinks ill of it”) in gold lettering. Members of the order wear it on ceremonial occasions.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1856 – Granville Woods, American inventor and engineer (d. 1910)
Granville Tailer Woods (April 23, 1856 – January 30, 1910) was an American inventor who held more than 60 patents.[1] He is also the first American of African ancestry to be a mechanical and electrical engineer after the Civil War.[2] Self-taught, he concentrated most of his work on trains and streetcars. One of his notable inventions was the Multiplex Telegraph, a device that sent messages between train stations and moving trains. His work assured a safer and better public transportation system for the cities of the United States.

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FYI

By Andrew P. Collins: WWII-Era Flying Wing Plane Has Fatally Crashed On State Prison Grounds
 
 
 
 
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Gary Price: Conference Paper: “Institution as Social Media Collector: Lessons Learned from the Library of Congress”; New Resource: OCR4all (Open Source Text Recognition Software for Historical Texts) and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Rocky Parker: Content Formatting: How to Structure Text to Keep Readers Engaged
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: A forgotten Lisa Frank factory pays tribute to its colorful and whimsical products; Moon Trees and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: How breweries helped keep Peru’s Wari Empire together; Coffee Cabinet and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Marjorie Suddard: Kings of The Road: Vintage Campers
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Hear Pink Floyd’s “Great Gig in the Sky” Played on the Theremin; The Daily Rituals of 143 Famous Female Creators: Octavia Butler, Edith Wharton, Coco Chanel & More and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Tune in for webinar — or head to regional workshops — on rural broadband grant and loan program; Op-ed writer offers suggestions for Democratic candidates looking to reconnect with rural voters; Supreme Court hears oral arguments in FOIA case to decide if SNAP payments to retailers are public record and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Jeff Beer: New podcast digs into all 846 episodes of “Cops” and its distorted reality of crime culture
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Adina Mayo: Paleo and Whole30 Tex Mex Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Paleo and Whole30 Tex Mex Stuffed Sweet Potatoes
 
 
By Tara Dodrill: Jam Cake Recipe – A Civil War Era Dessert Favorite