Category: FYI

FYI

FYI May 07, 2020

On This Day

1487 – The Siege of Málaga commences during the Spanish Reconquista.
The Siege of Málaga (1487) was an action during the Reconquest of Spain in which the Catholic Monarchs of Spain conquered the city of Mālaqa from the Nasrid Kingdom. The siege lasted about four months.[1] It was the first conflict in which ambulances, or dedicated vehicles for the purpose of carrying injured persons, were used.[2][a]

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Born On This Day

1909 – Dorothy Sunrise Lorentino, Native American teacher (d. 2005) [14]
Dorothy Sunrise Lorentino (May 7, 1909 – August 4, 2005) was a Comanche teacher from Oklahoma. As a child, she won a landmark education judgement against the Cache Consolidated School District of Comanche County, Oklahoma for Native American children to attend public schools rather than government mandated Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools. It was a precursor case to both the Alice Piper v. Pine School District (1924) which allowed Native American children to attend school in California and Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which decided separate schooling based on race was unconstitutional. Language from her judgement was incorporated into the Indian Citizenship Act (1924). Having won the right to attend public school, she went on to earn credentials as a special education teacher and taught for over forty years. In 1997, she was the first Native American and the first Oklahoman to be inducted into the National Teachers Hall of Fame.

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FYI

Before volunteering check the State’s Tax Laws. Do not be punished financially or held fiscally responsible for your acts of kindness.
By Jillian Olsen, WTSP: Health care workers who volunteered to come to NY will have to pay state income tax, Gov. Cuomo says Anyone from outside of New York who stayed to help fight the coronavirus pandemic for more than 14 days will be subject to pay.

WPIX-TV reports the issue of outside health care workers being required to pay state income tax was uncovered when a temporary hospital in Central Park was being erected by Samaritan’s Purse.

“Our financial comptroller called me and he said, ‘Do you know that all of you are going to be liable for New York state income tax?” Ken Isaacs, a vice president of the organization, said to WPIX.

“I said, ‘What?'” Isaacs continued. “[The comptroller] said, ‘Yeah, there’s a law. If you work in New York State for more than 14 days, you have to pay state income tax.'”
 
 
 
 
Digital Inclusion Fellowship
Earlier this week, our partner, NTEN launched applications for its sixth cohort of Digital Inclusion Fellows. The Fellowship program supports organizations serving communities impacted by the digital divide and who want to launch or expand digital literacy programs. In this time of social distancing and the urgent need to get more of our neighbors online, the program can be a resource to more organizations than we ever imagined when we first started.

Google Fiber is proud to have co-founded this program with NTEN in 2015. We’ve sponsored 68 Fellows over the first five years, driving meaningful work to address digital equity in their communities and establishing themselves as national leaders. Google Fiber-sponsored Fellows have provided almost 80,000 training hours for nearly 20,000 people across the country. They’ve built a legion of 1,200 expert volunteers who can help their neighbors navigate technology when they need a guiding hand.
 
 
 
 

By Neal Wyatt, Book Pulse: Camino Winds by John Grisham tops the bestseller lists. Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, reads Duck! Rabbit! in support of Save the Children’s coronavirus efforts. More ->
 
 
 
 
By Luke Fater, Atlas Obscura: How to Turn a Walk in the Woods Into an Ancient Indigenous Kitchen Staple Easy foraging can add a touch of the forest to your tea, stews, and even bath.
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Launching Spaceship Earth The true, stranger-than-fiction, adventure of eight visionaries who spent two years quarantined inside of a self-engineered replica of Earth’s ecosystem called Biosphere 2. Premiering May 8th.
 
 
 
 
By Jess Montgomery: Whimsy, Decadent Chocolate Pie… and a (Virtual) Book Club Just for You!
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By JackmanWorks: Wavy Vase

 
 

Recipes

By Advaym: Simple Substitutions Guide for Baking
 
 
By Unbottled: Soft Flour Tortillas Without Shortening : Tortillas Sin Manteca Y Rexal
 
 
By Amelia Rampe, The Kitchn: Amelia’s “Restaurant” Potatoes with Frizzled Onions
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Healthy COPYCAT Chick-Fil-A with Raising Cane’s sauce
 
 
By Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Venison Fajitas
 
 
Betty Crocker Kitchens: Dump-and-Go Dinners and Desserts
 
 
By Isadora Baum, The Kitchn: Um, Did You Know You Can Make Light and Airy Pavlova in Your Slow Cooker?
 
 

By Emily Racette Parulski, Taste of Home: 4-Ingredient Desserts We Could Make Every Week
 
 

By Chocolate Covered Katie: Healthy Mothers Day Recipes
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 06, 2020

On This Day

1527 – Spanish and German troops sack Rome; many scholars consider this the end of the Renaissance.[1]
The Sack of Rome, then part of the Papal States, on 6 May 1527 was carried out by the mutinous troops of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor during the War of the League of Cognac. The largely Protestant German Landsknechts, mutinying over unpaid wages, entered the city of Rome and sacked it in a manner reminiscent of the barbarian pillages committed 1,100 years earlier. Spanish soldiers and Italian mercenaries also took part in the sack.[1] The sack debilitated the League of Cognac, an alliance formed by France, Milan, Venice, Florence and the Papacy against Charles V. Pope Clement VII took refuge in Castel Sant’ Angelo, where he remained until a ransom was paid to the pillagers. Benvenuto Cellini, eyewitness to the events, described the sack in his works.

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Born On This Day

1929 – Rosemary Cramp, English archaeologist and academic
Dame Rosemary Jean Cramp, DBE, FSA, FBA (born 6 May 1929) is a British archaeologist and academic specialising in the Anglo-Saxons. She was the first female professor appointed at Durham University and was Professor of Archaeology from 1971 to 1990. She served as President of the Society of Antiquaries of London from 2001 to 2004.

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FYI

Vector’s World: Happy Times and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Harmeet Kaur, CNN: The Irish are sending relief to Native Americans, inspired by a donation from a tribe during the Great Famine
 
 
 
 
By Anna Chan, Billboard: Kraftwerk Co-Founder Florian Schneider Dies at Age 73
 
 
 
 

The National: Female reporters highlight challenges in the newsroom
 
 
 
 

By Elizabeth Yuko, LifeHacker: Virtually Visit a New Historic Spot Every Day This Month
 
 
 
 

By Sarah Pruitt, History: What V-E Day Looked Like Around the World How five different countries greeted the end of World War II in Europe.
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Kroger buys 200,000 gallons of milk to give to food banks
 
 
 
 
By Washington Post Staff, The Seattle Times: Homesteading: Tips for being more self-sufficient
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 


Murder Hornets in May…
Deadly Grizzlegators coming in June!

Recipes

The Food Network: Meals You Can Make with 7 Ingredients or Less
 
 
Happy Deal Happy Day: 5 Ingredient Easy Shortbread Cookie Recipe
 
 
By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: Our 10 Best Banana Recipes (That Go Way Beyond Banana Bread)
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Cheesecake Stuffed Strawberries


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 05, 2020

On This Day

1809 – Mary Kies becomes the first woman awarded a U.S. patent, for a technique of weaving straw with silk and thread.
Mary Dixon Kies (March 21, 1752 – 1837) was an American inventor. On May 5, 1809, her patent for a new technique of weaving straw with silk and thread to make hats was signed by President James Madison.[1] She was the first woman to receive a U.S. Patent.[2][3][4][5]

Biography
Family life

Mary’s father, John Dixon, was a farmer born in 1679 in Ulster, Ireland. Her mother, Janet Kennedy, was John Dixon’s third wife. They had married in Voluntown, Connecticut on August 7, 1741. Mary Dixon was born in Killingly, Connecticut on March 21, 1752. She married Isaac Pike I, and in 1770 they had a son, Isaac Pike II.[6] After his death she married John Kies (1750–1813) who died on August 18, 1813 at age 63. She then lived with her second son, Daniel Kies, in Brooklyn, New York, until her death at age 85 in 1837.[7]

Career
Because of the Napoleonic Wars, the United States embargoed all trade with France and Great Britain, creating a need for American-made hats to replace European millinery. The straw-weaving industry filled the gap, with over $500,000 ($9 million in today’s money) worth of straw bonnets produced in Massachusetts alone in 1810.[8]

Mary Kies was not the first American woman to innovate in hat-making. In 1798, New Englander Betsy Metcalf invented a method of braiding straw. Her method became very popular, and she employed many women and girls to make her hats. The method created a new industry for girls and women because the straw bonnets could be made at home from local resources, so the women and girls could do work for themselves. Thus, Betsy Metcalf started the American straw-hat industry. Under the Patent Act of 1790 she could have sought a patent, but like most women at the time, who could not legally hold property, she chose not to. Mary Kies, however, broke that pattern on May 5, 1809. Dolley Madison was so pleased by Kies’ innovation that she sent a personal letter applauding her.[9]

Kies’ technique proved valuable in making cost-effective work bonnets. In so doing, she bolstered New England’s hat economy, which had been faltering due to the Embargo Act of 1807. However, a change in the fashion of the day made her unable to profit from her invention and she died penniless in 1837.[7] Her original patent file was destroyed in an 1836 fire at the United States Patent Office.[10]

Legacy
In 2006, she was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.[11]

 
 

Born On This Day

1900 – Helen Redfield, American geneticist (d. 1988)[15]
Helen Redfield (born May 5, 1900 in Archbold, Ohio,[1] died 1988[2]), was an American geneticist. Redfield graduated from Rice University in 1920,[1] followed by earning her Ph.D. in zoology[1] from the University of California, Berkeley in 1921.[3] While at Rice, she worked in the mathematics department.[1] She joined the faculty of Stanford University in 1925[3] and that same year she became a National Research Fellow at Columbia University.[1][4] In 1926 she married Jack Schultz, the couple would have two children.[1][3][4] Redfield retained her maiden name upon her marriage.[3][4] In 1929 she worked as a teaching fellow at New York University. Ten years later she worked as a geneticist in the Kirchoff Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology. Starting in 1942, during World War II, she worked as a lab scientist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory during the summer. From 1951 until 1961 she served as a research associate at the Institute for Cancer Research.[1]

Publications
“A Comparison of Triploid and Diploid Crossing over for Chromosome II of Drosophila Melanogaster.” Genetics. 17.2 (1932): 137-152.
“Crossing over in the third chromosomes of triploids of Drosophila melano gaster.” Genetics. 15.3 (1930): 205-252.
“Delayed Mating and the Relationship of Recombination to Maternal Age in Drosophila Melanogaster.” Genetics. 53.3 (1966): 593-607.
“Egg Mortality and Interchromosomal Effects on Recombination.” Genetics. 42.6 (1957): 712-728.
with Jack Schultz. “Interchromosomal effects on crossing over in drosophila.” Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biology. 16 (1951): 175-197.
“The maternal inheritance of a sex-limited lethal effect in Drosophila melanogaster.” Genetics. 11.5 (1926): 482-502.
“Recombination Increase due to Heterologous Inversions and the Relation to Cytological Length.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 41.12 (1955): 1084-1091.

 
 

FYI

Kings River Life Magazine: May 02, 2020
 
 
 
 

By Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead: 27 Amazing Indoor Herb Garden Ideas
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Ali Griswold, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Daily Obsession: Knitting: A crafty craft
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: ‘Never Be Afraid’: William Faulkner’s Speech to His Daughter’s Graduating Class in 1951
 
 
 
 

49 Writer’s Blog: Writing the Distance: Ray Ball
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: E-book VAT: the other side of the story and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Mayukh Sen, Atlas Obscura: How America Rediscovered a Cookbook From the Harlem Renaissance Arturo Schomburg’s work is still inspiring researchers and cooks today and more ->
 
 
 
 
Free Printables
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Meghan Telpner: 15 Cooking Projects You Can Do At Home
 
 
Betty Crocker Kitchens: Weeknight Dinners You Can Make with Tex-Mex Staples
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Desserts That Get Better with Every Layer
 
 
By Marve48: Ginger Snaps


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 04, 2020

On This Day

1886 – Haymarket affair: A bomb is thrown at policemen trying to break up a labor rally in Chicago, United States, killing eight and wounding 60. The police fire into the crowd.
The Haymarket affair (also known as the Haymarket massacre, Haymarket riot, or Haymarket Square riot) was the aftermath of a bombing that took place at a labor demonstration on May 4, 1886, at Haymarket Square in Chicago.[2] It began as a peaceful rally in support of workers striking for an eight-hour work day, the day after police killed one and injured several workers.[3] An unknown person threw a dynamite bomb at the police as they acted to disperse the meeting, and the bomb blast and ensuing gunfire resulted in the deaths of seven police officers and at least four civilians; dozens of others were wounded.

In the internationally publicized legal proceedings that followed, eight anarchists were convicted of conspiracy. The evidence was that one of the defendants may have built the bomb, but none of those on trial had thrown it.[4][5][6][7] Seven were sentenced to death and one to a term of 15 years in prison. Illinois Governor Richard J. Oglesby commuted two of the sentences to terms of life in prison; another committed suicide in jail rather than face the gallows. The other four were hanged on November 11, 1887. In 1893, Illinois Governor John Peter Altgeld pardoned the remaining defendants and criticized the trial.[8]

The Haymarket Affair is generally considered significant as the origin of International Workers’ Day held on May 1.[9][10] According to labor studies professor William J. Adelman:

No single event has influenced the history of labor in Illinois, the United States, and even the world, more than the Chicago Haymarket Affair. It began with a rally on May 4, 1886, but the consequences are still being felt today. Although the rally is included in American history textbooks, very few present the event accurately or point out its significance.[11]

The site of the incident was designated a Chicago landmark in 1992,[12] and a sculpture was dedicated there in 2004. In addition, the Haymarket Martyrs’ Monument was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1997 at the defendants’ burial site in Forest Park.[13]

Reads more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1916 – Jane Jacobs, American-Canadian journalist, author, and activist (d. 2006)
Jane Jacobs OC OOnt (née Butzner; 4 May 1916 – 25 April 2006) was an American-Canadian journalist, author, and activist who influenced urban studies, sociology, and economics. Her book The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961) argued that “urban renewal”/”slum clearance” did not respect the needs of city-dwellers.[1][2]

Jacobs organized grassroots efforts to protect neighborhoods from “urban renewal”/”slum clearance”, in particular Robert Moses’ plans to overhaul her own Greenwich Village neighborhood. She was instrumental in the eventual cancellation of the Lower Manhattan Expressway,[3] which would have passed directly through SoHo, Manhattan and Little Italy, Manhattan. She was arrested in 1968 for inciting a crowd at a public hearing on that project.[4] After moving to Toronto in 1968, she joined the opposition to the Spadina Expressway and the associated network of expressways in Toronto planned, and under construction.[5][6]

As a mother and a writer who criticized experts in the male-dominated field of urban planning,[7][8] Jacobs endured scorn from established figures[who?]. She was described as a housewife first.[9] She did not have a college degree or any formal training in urban planning, and her lack of credentials was seized upon as grounds for criticism.[10][11]

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FYI

By Erik Ortiz, NBC News: Greg Zanis, Illinois carpenter who built crosses for mass shooting victims, dies Zanis had built some 27,000 handmade white crosses to honor the victims killed in U.S. mass shootings, other acts of terror and natural disasters.
 
 
 
 
CBS News: Don Shula, legendary Miami Dolphins head coach, has died at age 90
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: H.B. ‘Brandy’ Ayers, standout small-daily publisher, dies
 
 
 
 
By Chloe Melas, CNN: Cady Groves, pop and country singer, dead at 30
 
 
 
 
By Jamie Carter, Senior Contributor Science: How And When To See The ‘Super Flower Moon’ Rise This Week, The Fourth And Final Supermoon Of 2020
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Art of the New Deal: Why the Federal Government Funded the Arts During the Great Depression
 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Stevie Borrello, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Daily Obsession: Microwave ovens: Fast food
 
 
 
 

By Rocky Parker, Blog Profiles: Asian American Mom Bloggers
 
 
 
 

Glacier Hub Newsletter May 04, 2020: Bonnie McCay was on her brief annual stay at her Newfoundland home in early March when coronavirus shut the world down. After spring arrived in the Northern Hemisphere, the sea ice melted and it wasn’t long before icebergs began showing up off Fogo Island. And more ->
 
 
 
 
MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDXCXI): The 1956 Inter 175A Berline Micro Car; The AKAT-1, a Polish made analog computer from the 1960s; Abandoned somewhere in France; Slavic Cossack dancing known as Hopak; That time a Saudi Prince Bought Plane Tickets for His 80 Falcons; Just a Squirrel, Eating at a Cheers Bar and more ->
 
 
 
 

Maria Popva’s Brain Pickings: The Cosmic Miracle of Trees: Astronaut Leland Melvin Reads Pablo Neruda’s Love Letter to Earth’s Forests
 
 
 
 
By Lauren Masur, The Kitchn: More than 2 Decades Later, Robin Davis’ Star Wars Cookbook Delights Fans of All Ages

Recipes

Betty Crocker Kitchens: Quick-Fix Skillet Dinners
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 03, 2020

On This Day

1616 – Treaty of Loudun ends French civil war.
The Treaty of Loudun was signed on 3 May 1616 in Loudun, France, and ended the war that originally began as a power struggle between queen mother Marie de Medici’s favorite Concino Concini (recently made Marquis d’Ancre) and Henry II de Condé, the next in line for Louis XIII’s throne.[1] The war gained religious undertones when rebellious Huguenot princes joined Condé’s revolt.

Negotiations and terms
Negotiations between the court and Condé took place at Loudun between February and May and were conducted by the secretary of state, Nicolas de Neufville, Marquis de Villeroy.[2] Père Joseph, a confidant of Armand-Jean du Plessis (at the time Bishop of Luçon and Queen Anne’s grand almoner, later to become Cardinal Richelieu and first minister), also took part.[3] The treaty was signed by Marie and Condé on 3 May 1616 and officially ended the revolts by many nobles in France at the cost of royal concessions and reparations to Condé and others.[1] Based on the terms of the treaty, the Huguenots were allowed to unite their churches in France with those in Béarn.[4] Moreover, the treaty granted amnesty to Condé along with others and made Condé head of the council of state.[1] Concini was removed as lieutenant-general of Picardy and governor of Amiens, while Condé received one and a half million livres.[2]

Aftermath
Concini remained with quite a bit of power as the favorite of Marie, who eventually made Condé also give his support. Du Plessis, a supporter of Concini, was made conseiller d’état late in May, and Concini got Villeroy removed from his post as councillor in June (although this did not take full effect until 9 August). Concini was also made lieutenant-general in Normandy and governor of Caen and received a sweetener of 300,000 livres.[2] He was widely unpopular for being a foreigner (an Italian from Florence), and his receipt of these emoluments again inspired many nobles to think of revolting.

Condé meanwhile forsook good governance in an attempt for increased personal power and the throne.[5] After Condé told Concini that he could not longer protect him from the nobles, Marie decided to take steps to protect her favorite. Louis XIII went along with Marie’s plan to arrest Condé, inviting Condé to a small chat and using palace guards to arrest him on 1 September 1616.[1] Condé’s followers then fled from Paris. Thus, the peace was broken and war broke out again between the supporters of Concini and Condé’s followers. The war ended with Louis XIII’s coup d’état of 24 April 1617, when Concini was arrested, but reportedly resisted and was killed. Marie and her entourage, including du Plessis, were exiled to the Château de Blois on 3 May.[6]

 
 

Born On This Day

1906 – Anna Roosevelt Halsted, American journalist and author (d. 1975)
Anna Eleanor Roosevelt Dall Boettiger Halsted (May 3, 1906 – December 1, 1975) was an American writer who worked as a newspaper editor and in public relations. She was the eldest child and only daughter of the U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt and assisted him in social and administrative duties at the White House. She wrote two children’s books published in the 1930s.

She worked with her second husband Clarence John Boettiger at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, serving as editor of the women’s pages for several years. She later worked in public relations for universities. Beginning in 1963, she was appointed to presidential commissions by John F. Kennedy, serving on the Citizen’s Advisory Council on the Status of Women for several years, and as vice-chairman of the President’s Commission for the Observance of Human Rights.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Pranav Baskar, NPR Goats & Soda: A Flying Photographer Looks Down On Earth In Awe And Sorrow
 
 
 
 
By Nina Totenberg, NPR: Listen Live: Supreme Court Arguments Begin Monday
Wednesday, May 6: Birth control access & Robocalls

10 a.m. ET: Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania consolidated with Trump v. Pennsylvania
The court considers a Trump administration rule that would allow employers with religious or moral objections to birth control to limit their employees’ access to free birth control under the Affordable Care Act.

11 a.m. ET: Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants
In 1991, Congress passed a law that prohibits most robocalls. In 2015, Congress created an exception for government debt collection. Political groups, which want to use robocalls to raise money and turn out voters, are challenging the act as a violation of their First Amendment free speech rights.
Monday, May 11: Native American land & Religious freedom

10 a.m. ET: McGirt v. Oklahoma
On the surface, this case is about whether states, like Oklahoma, can prosecute members of Native American tribes for crimes committed in the historical bounds of tribal land. But it has implications for state power over thousands of miles of land in Oklahoma that has historically belonged to Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Chickasaw and Choctaw tribes.
 
 
 
 
By Pia Ceres, Wired: I Can’t Stop Escaping Into Google Photos’ Nostalgia Vortex I got the app for its easy photo backups. I didn’t realize it would become a precious window to the past—or a lifeline in a time of existential despair.
 
 
 
 
By Louise Matsakis, Wired: Zoom Not Cutting It for You? Try Exploring a Virtual World If you’re craving more from your video chats, think outside the box. From Second Life to Online Town, there are plenty of places to gather while staying at home.
 
 
 
 
By Brian Lada, AccuWeather meteorologist and staff writer: How Halley’s Comet will spark Monday night’s meteor shower
 
 
 
 
By Jake Rosen, Mental Floss: The Man Who Built a 40-Foot Spite Fence Around His Neighbor’s Home When Nicholas Yung wouldn’t sell his land to railroad baron Charles Crocker, Crocker built a 40-foot fence around his house and blotted out the sun.
In retrospect, the Yung/Crocker feud would ultimately prove pointless. In 1906, an earthquake and related fire swept through San Francisco, gutting the Crocker mansion and neighboring buildings. Rather than rebuild, the family decided to donate the block to charity.

In a strange twist, the place where Crocker had once built a monument to spite and malice became a home for compassion and warmth. In donating the site, the Crockers opened an opportunity to erect Grace Cathedral, an Episcopalian place of worship.
 
 
 
 
By Jóhanna Katrín Friðriksdóttir, History Today: The Rise of the Valkyries Life and death in a Viking battle depended not on military prowess, but on the favour of the valkyries. Why were these mythical figures, who decided a warrior’s fate, female?
 
 
 
 

By Mike Baker, The New York Times: ‘Murder Hornets’ in the U.S.: The Rush to Stop the Asian Giant Hornet
 
 
 
 
By Deana Bianco, Pocket: The Unsung Black Musician Who Changed Country Music
 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Sam O’Brien, Atlas Obsura: How to Make a 5,000-Year-Old Energy Bar Eat like ancient Great Plains hunters with this simple recipe.
 
 
Taste of Home: Creamy Coleslaw
Test Kitchen Tips
Greek yogurt can be used instead of sour cream for less fat and more protein.
If you like your coleslaw tart, add 1/4 cup vinegar or lemon juice or maybe even a julienned Granny Smith apple.
 
 
Taste of Home: Burrito Bake
 
 
By Amy, My Recipe Treasures: Authentic Homemade Mexican Horchata
 
 
By Amy, My Recipe Treasures: Double Chocolate Muffins


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 02, 2020

On This Day

1918 – General Motors acquires the Chevrolet Motor Company of Delaware.
General Motors Company,[1] commonly referred to as General Motors (GM), is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Detroit that designs, manufactures, markets, and distributes vehicles and vehicle parts, and sells financial services, with global headquarters in Detroit’s Renaissance Center. It was originally founded by William C. Durant on September 16, 1908 as a holding company. The company is the largest American automobile manufacturer, and one of the world’s largest.[7] As of 2019, General Motors is ranked #13 on the Fortune 500 rankings of the largest United States corporations by total revenue.[8]

General Motors manufactures vehicles in 15 countries;[9] its core automobile brands include Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, and Cadillac. It also either owns or holds a significant stake in foreign brands such as Holden, Wuling, Baojun, and Jiefang.[10] Annual worldwide sales volume reached a milestone of 10 million vehicles in 2016.[11][12][13]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1813 – Caroline Leigh Gascoigne, English novelist and poet (d. 1883)[4]
Caroline Leigh Gascoigne (gas-koin′; 2 May 1813 – 11 June 1883) was a 19th-century English poet and novelist. She published Temptation (1839), Evelyn Harcourt (1842), Dr. Harold’s Note-Book (1869), and other works in prose and verse.[1]

Early years

Caroline Leigh Smith was born 2 May 1813 in London, England. She was the daughter of MP John Smith, and his third wife Emma Leigh. Her early years were spent at her father’s estate, Dale Park in Sussex.[2] Her father was a rich banker but he was accidentally poisoned by his wife who gave him an overdose of laudanum.[3] Her elder half brothers were the MPs John Abel Smith and Martin Tucker Smith.[4]

Career
Gascoigne began writing fiction and poetry at an early age. In 1834, she married Lt.Col. (later, General) Ernest Frederick Gascoigne, MP for Liverpool, and there were three children from this union.[2] She died on 11 June 1883.[5]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI


One bullet.

By Melissa Luck, YakTriNews: First woman ever held at McNeil Island facility for violent sexual predators released, living in eastern WA
 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Eleanor Cummins, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Daily Obsession: Overton window: View from the future
 
 
 
 

By, Jerry Cohen, Ebbetts Fields Flannels: Jackie Robinson – The Later Years
 
 
 
 

Fast Company Compass: Is this Zoom on? A club crawl through the brave new world of live comedy online and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Ronnie Schreiber, Hagerty: These 3 rooftop test tracks will blow your mind

 
 
 
 
The Awesomer: Inspector Gadget for 8 Cellos; Last Night on Conan O’Brien; Snoop Dogg: From Crook to Cook and more ->
 
 
 
 

Gastro Obscura: The triumphant return of France’s ‘forgotten vegetables’ and more ->
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 


 
 


 
 

Ideas

Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead; How to Make Dandelion Infusion and Tincture
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Jill Nystul, One Good Thing: Everything You Need To Make 10 Homemade Spice Mixes In Under An Hour No filler ingredients or mysterious chemicals here!


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 01, 2020

On This Day

880 – The Nea Ekklesia is inaugurated in Constantinople, setting the model for all later cross-in-square Orthodox churches.
The Nea Ekklēsia (Greek: Νέα Ἐκκλησία, “New Church”) was a church built by Byzantine Emperor Basil I the Macedonian in Constantinople between 876 and 880. It was the first monumental church built in the Byzantine capital after the Hagia Sophia in the 6th century, and marks the beginning of the middle period of Byzantine architecture. It continued in use until the Palaiologan period. Used as a gunpowder magazine by the Ottomans, the building was destroyed in 1490 after being struck by lightning. In English usage, the church is usually referred to as “The Nea”.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1831 – Emily Stowe, Canadian physician and activist (d. 1903)
Emily Howarde Stowe (née Jennings, May 1, 1831 – April 30, 1903) was the first female physician to practise in Canada, the second licensed female physician in Canada[1] and an activist for women’s rights and suffrage.[2] Stowe helped found the women’s suffrage movement in Canada and campaigned for the country’s first medical college for women.[3]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Vector’s World: Safe and more ->
 
 
 
 
Hooked: Hearing Voices

 
 
 
 

Bloomin Thyme: Vinegar & Salt Weed Control
Learn something new every day. Just when I thought I’d found the perfect solution to the weed problem in my organic garden, I realize I’ve been hoodwinked. You might have heard that vinegar is a natural weed killer. Add table salt and you have yourself a double whammy ultimate weed-killing solution to your garden woes.

Maybe not. According to Southern Living, pouring a solution of household vinegar and table salt on the weeds in your garden will cause more harm than good. Vinegar affects the leaves only doing nothing to stop the roots from continuing to grow and flourish beneath the surface. Salt permeates the soil and kills the roots, but it also kills healthy microbes and earthworms. ACK. These are absolutely essential to a healthy organic garden!

 
 
 
 

Sahara Foley: May 2020 Discounted & Free Multi Genre eBooks–1st to 15th

 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: How to Publish an Ebook: A 9-Step Guide for Success and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Ted Mills, Open Culture: The Library of Congress Makes Its Archives Free for DJs to Remix: Introducing the “Citizen DJ” Project
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: The Stay At Home Museum: Your Private, Guided Tours of Rubens, Bruegel & Other Flemish Masters
 
 
 
 
By Lisa, Dr.Bronner: Updated April 2020 – Because it’s been 8 years since I first published this and things have only gotten simpler.
 
 
 
 
That’s What She Read: What’s not to love about a story with monsters and monster hunters?
 
 
 
 
Chuck Wendig, Terrible Minds: Disjecta Membra: 6
 
 
 
 
By Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead: How to Set Up a Brooder for Your Chicks
 
 
 
 

Recipes

The Frayed Apron: How to Make Chamoy
 
 
A Taste of Alaska: The Accidental Cracker
 
 
By Matt Soniak, Mental Floss: How to Make Miles Davis’s Famous Chili Recipe One of the most influential musicians of the 20th century was also pretty handy in the kitchen.
 
 
By Jacqueline Weiss, Taste of Home: 0 Recipes for Authentic Mexican Food
 
 
By Jill Nystul, One Good Thing: 11 Easy Recipes You Can Depend On When You Need A Break
 
 

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 31 Dinners to Welcome Warmer Weather
 
 
By Carol Wynot, Taste of Home: South Dakota Frito Treats


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI April 30, 2020

On This Day

1863 – A 65-man French Foreign Legion infantry patrol fights a force of nearly 2,000 Mexican soldiers to nearly the last man in Hacienda Camarón, Mexico.
The Battle of Camarón (French: Bataille de Camerone) which occurred over ten hours[1]:21 on 30 April 1863 between the French Foreign Legion and the Mexican army, is regarded as a defining moment in the Foreign Legion’s history. A small infantry patrol, led by Captain Jean Danjou and Lieutenants Clément Maudet and Jean Vilain, numbering just 65 men[1]:5 was attacked and besieged by a force that may have eventually reached 3,000 Mexican infantry and cavalry, and was forced to make a defensive stand at the nearby Hacienda Camarón, in Camarón de Tejeda, Veracruz, Mexico. The conduct of the Legion, who refused to surrender, led to a certain mystique, and the battle of Camarón became synonymous with bravery and a fight-to-the-death attitude.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1866 – Mary Haviland Stilwell Kuesel, American pioneer dentist (d. 1936)
Mary Haviland Stilwell Kuesel sometimes spelled Stillwell-Kuesel (April 30, 1866 – June 22, 1936) was a pioneer American dentist.[1] She was the founder of the Women’s Dental Association of the United States, which she founded in 1892 with 12 charter members.[2]

Biography
Mary Haviland Stilwell was born April 30, 1866 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1892, she founded the Women’s Dental Association of the U.S. with 12 charter members.[2][3][4] In 1902, she married Dr. George C. Kuesel,[5] a medical doctor.[6] They were associate members of the Fairmount Park Art Association.[7] She died June 22, 1936 in Philadelphia of coronary thrombosis.[5] Her correspondence is held in a collection by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.[8]

 
 

FYI

Sahabzasde Irfan Ali Khan (7 January 1967 – 29 April 2020),[2] known professionally as Irrfan Khan or simply Irrfan, was an Indian actor who worked in Hindi cinema as well as British and American films. Cited in the media as one of the finest actors in Indian cinema,[3][4] Khan’s career spanned over 30 years and earned him numerous accolades, including a National Film Award, an Asian Film Award, and four Filmfare Awards. In 2011, he was awarded the Padma Shri, India’s fourth highest civilian honour.[5]

Khan made his film debut with a small role in Salaam Bombay! (1988), which was followed by years of struggle. After starring in the British film The Warrior (2001), he had his breakthrough with starring roles in the dramas Haasil (2003) and Maqbool (2004). He went on to gain critical acclaim for his roles in The Namesake (2006), Life in a… Metro (2007), and Paan Singh Tomar (2011). For portraying the title character in the last of these, he won the National Film Award for Best Actor. Further success came for his starring roles in The Lunchbox (2013), Piku (2015), and Talvar (2015) and he had supporting roles in the Hollywood films The Amazing Spider-Man (2012), Life of Pi (2012), Jurassic World (2015), and Inferno (2016).[6][7] His other notable roles were in Slumdog Millionaire (2008), New York (2009), Haider (2014), and Gunday (2014), and the television series In Treatment (2010).[8][9] His highest-grossing Hindi film release came with the comedy-drama Hindi Medium (2017), which won him the Filmfare Award for Best Actor, and his final film appearance was in its sequel Angrezi Medium (2020).[10]

As of 2017, his films had grossed $3.6 billion at the worldwide box office.[11] In 2018, Khan was diagnosed with a neuroendocrine tumour.[12][13] He died at the age of 53 on 29 April 2020 due to a colon infection.[2] Khan was described by Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian as “a distinguished and charismatic star in Hindi- and English-language movies whose hardworking career was an enormously valuable bridge between South Asian and Hollywood cinema”.[7]

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

The Rural Blog: Reporters Committee offers guidance for journalists on dealing with HIPAA when reporting on covid-19 cases
 
 
 
 

By Alexander McNamara, PA Science: ‘River monster’ first-known dinosaur to have lived in water
 
 
 
 

By Chris Ciaccia | Fox News: 66M-year-old ‘crazy beast’ discovered in Madagascar: An ‘animal for which we don’t have any real parallels’
 
 
 
 

By Marlene Lenthang For Dailymail.com: Georgia governor says new drivers will be able to take to the road with just a note from their parents
 
 
 
 
By Ron Fein, McSweeney’s: “Who’s Laughing Now, Assholes?” A Letter from Henry David Thoreau to Literature Faculties at Cushy Liberal Arts Schools
 
 
 
 

https://youtu.be/oDynbZsnjwo
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By diyhuntress: DIY Resin Ocean Serving Tray
 
 
By oxerdam: Felting a Hippopotamus
 
 

Recipes

By Caroline Stanko, Taste of Home: 48 Amazing Recipes You’re Not Making In Your Slow Cooker
 
 
By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: Easy 3-Ingredient Pasta Salad Ideas for Whatever You Have in Your Pantry
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 12 Creative Pancakes We’re Flipping Over
 
 
By Sadie Davis-Suskind, Special to The Seattle Times: Homemade buttercream is the stuff of dreams | Cooking with Sadie
 
 
By Food Network Kitchen: Our Very Best Rhubarb Recipes
 
 
By JoopB1: Layered Birthday Cake for Your Dog!
 
 
By bakingenvy: Pantry Staples Chocolate Fudge Cake


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI April 29, 2020

On This Day

1953 – The first U.S. experimental 3D television broadcast showed an episode of Space Patrol on Los Angeles ABC affiliate KECA-TV.
3D television (3DTV) is television that conveys depth perception to the viewer by employing techniques such as stereoscopic display, multi-view display, 2D-plus-depth, or any other form of 3D display. Most modern 3D television sets use an active shutter 3D system or a polarized 3D system, and some are autostereoscopic without the need of glasses. As of 2019, most 3D TV sets and services are no longer available.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1858 – Georgia Hopley, American journalist, temperance advocate, and the first woman prohibition agent (d. 1944)
Georgianna Eliza Hopley (1858–1944) was an American journalist, political figure, and temperance advocate. A member of a prominent Ohio publishing family, she was the first woman reporter in Columbus, and editor of several publications. She served as a correspondent and representative at the 1900 Paris Exposition and the 1901 Pan-American Exposition. She was active in state and national politics, serving as vice-president of the Woman’s Republican Club of Ohio and directing publicity for Warren G. Harding’s presidential campaign.

In 1922 Hopley became the first woman prohibition agent of the United States Bureau of Prohibition, where she was involved in education and publicity. She resigned among criticism of the costs of her publicity and the scope of her duties.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Marisa Abeyta, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Running Blogs
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Program to train future community newspaper owners picks first five fellows for its new online master’s degree program and more ->
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Midweek pick-me-up:Rosanne Cash on how science saved her, the source of creative power & her stirring reading of Adrienne Rich’s homage to Marie Curie
 
 
 
 

BookGorilla: Your free and bargain ebook alert for Wednesday
 
 
 
 

Ideas

The Kitchen Garten: Mason Jar Herb Planter

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI April 28, 2020

On This Day

1253 – Nichiren, a Japanese Buddhist monk, propounds Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō for the very first time and declares it to be the essence of Buddhism, in effect founding Nichiren Buddhism.
Namu Myōhō Renge Kyō (南無妙法蓮華經; sometimes truncated phonetically as Nam Myōhō Renge Kyō)[1] (English: ”Devotion to the Mystic Law of the Lotus Sutra” / “Glory to the Dharma of the Lotus Sutra”)[2][3] are religious words chanted within all forms of Nichiren Buddhism.

The words Myōhō Renge Kyō refer to the Japanese title of the Lotus Sūtra. The mantra is referred to as Daimoku (題目)[4] or, in honorific form, O-daimoku (お題目) meaning title and was first publicly declared by the Japanese Buddhist priest Nichiren on 28 April 1253 atop of Mount Kiyosumi, now memorialized by Seichō-ji temple in Kamogawa, Chiba prefecture, Japan.[5][6]

The practice of prolonged chanting is referred to as Shōdai (唱題) while mainstream believers claim that the purpose of chanting is to reduce sufferings by eradicating negative karma along with reducing karmic punishments both from previous and present lifetimes,[7] with the goal to attain perfect and complete awakening.[8]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1912 – Odette Hallowes, French soldier and spy (d. 1995)
Odette Sansom GC, MBE (1912 – 1995), also known as Odette Churchill and Odette Hallowes, code named Lise, was an agent for the United Kingdom’s clandestine Special Operations Executive (SOE) in France during the Second World War. The purpose of SOE was to conduct espionage, sabotage, and reconnaissance in occupied Europe against the Axis powers, especially Germany. SOE agents allied themselves with resistance groups and supplied them with weapons and equipment parachuted in from England. Sansom was the first woman to be awarded the George Cross by the United Kingdom and was awarded the Légion d’honneur by France.

Sansom arrived in France on 2 November 1942 and worked as a courier with the Spindle network (or circuit) of SOE headed by Peter Churchill (who she later married). In January 1943, to evade arrest, Churchill and Sansom moved their operations to near Annecy in the French Alps. She and Churchill were arrested there on 16 April 1943 by spy-hunter Hugo Bleicher. She spent the rest of the war imprisoned in Ravensbrück Concentration Camp.

Her wartime experiences and endurance of a brutal interrogation and imprisonment, which were chronicled in books and a motion picture, made her one of the most celebrated members of the SOE and one of the few to survive Nazi imprisonment.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Stephen Guise: My Favorite ONLINE Board Games to Play With Friends in Quarantine
Quarantine can present two big problems: boredom and loneliness.

Neither one is good, and I have a solution for both. If you feel cold and isolated from friends and family, but you like games, you’re in luck! I’ve recently discovered some amazing online game websites (which are almost all FREE) that you can play with others. I made a video explaining them, and no, it’s not sponsored. These are just games I enjoy!

The best way to do it is to start a video chat simultaneously, and chat as you play the game. If you have a big monitor or multiple monitors, simply put the game and chat on the same computer. Or you can put one on a phone or ipad and another on a laptop. The combinations are endless!

There are two recommendations in the video below. One recommendation is because the site works well and has a LOT of free games. The other is because it’s just a fantastic game, especially with a larger group of people. I recently played it with 10+ people! We all joined a zoom chat (zoom.us) and played the game together.

What are the two recommendations?

boardgamearena.com
horsepaste.com (the greatest website name in history)
 
 
 
 
Lisa from DebraLynnDadd.com: New Air Purifier Reviews: Air Doctor, Airpura and More!

 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Chase Purdy, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Daily Obsession: Voicemail: Leave a message
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Quarantine
 
 
 
 
Michael Dexter Hankins: FAKE, SHAKE, ‘n BAKE “One day when she was at work, I grabbed some Kellogg’s Corn Flakes and ground them up along with a concoction of various herbs and spices.”
 
 
 
 

The Awesomer: Hipster Coffee Shop National Anthem
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By RefiningDesigning: How to Sculpt a Coral Reef Mermaid Crown
 
 
 
 

Recipes

Recipe Tin Eats: Pupcakes! (Dog cupcakes with “frosting”)
 
 
By Patty Catalano, The Kitchn: 5-Minute Banana Bread Mug Cake
 
 
By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: I Tried the Peanut Butter Bread That Reddit Is Obsessed With (and It’s Worth the Hype)
 
 
By Naomi Tomky, The Kitchn: People Were So Excited About Ina Garten’s Overnight Mac and Cheese Recipe That They Crashed Her Website
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Butternut Squash Soup – RV cooking
 
 
By Jodie Lawrence, Grandma’s Things: BAILEY’S IRISH CREAM MINI-CHEESECAKES