Category: FYI

FYI

FYI September 20, 2017


1848 – The American Association for the Advancement of Science is created.
The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an American international non-profit organization with the stated goals of promoting cooperation among scientists, defending scientific freedom, encouraging scientific responsibility, and supporting scientific education and science outreach for the betterment of all humanity.[1] It is the world’s largest general scientific society, with over 120,000 members,[2] and is the publisher of the well-known scientific journal Science, which had a weekly circulation of 138,549 in 2008.[3]

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1831 – Kate Harrington, American poet and educator (d. 1917)
Kate Harrington, born Rebecca Harrington Smith and later known as Rebecca Smith Pollard, was an American teacher, writer and poet.[1]

Biography
She was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania on September 20, 1831. She spent her most productive years in Iowa. Her father, Prof. N.R. Smith, was a playwright and an authority on Shakespeare. She was married to New York City poet and editor Oliver I. Taylor. Harrington was the anonymous author of Emma Bartlett, or Prejudice and Fanaticism, a fictional reply to Uncle Tom’s Cabin, intended to expose the hypocrisy of Know-Nothingism.

Harrington’s family moved to Ohio, then Kentucky, where Harrington worked as a teacher. Later, she taught in Chicago. Harrington lived in various Iowa cities, including Farmington, Keosauqua, Burlington, Ft. Madison and Keokuk. She began her writing career with the Louisville Journal, whose editor opposed secession and was an important influence in keeping Kentucky in the Union.

In her Letters from a Prairie Cottage, Harrington included a children’s corner with tales about taming and raising animals and of a cat who adopted orphan chicks. Harrington also wrote other children’s books, including a primer and a speller. Pollard’s work in the field of reading represented a pioneer effort in terms of creating a sequential reading program of intensive synthetic phonics, complete with a separate teacher’s manual and spelling and reading books, and moving into a broad based graded series of literature readers. Her series is important for its high correlation of spelling and reading instruction, for its concern for the interests of children, for its incorporation of music into the process of learning to read, and as the forerunner for other phonics systems. Her readers were used in every state in the Union and were still in use in Keokuk, Iowa, as late as 1937. Few women have single-handedly contributed so much to the field of reading.[2]

In 1869, she published a book of poems entitled Maymie, as a tribute to her ten-year-old daughter who died that year.

Emma Bartlett received mixed reviews when it was published in 1856. The Ohio Statesman gave her a very good review but the Cincinnati Times said, “We have read this book. We pronounce the plot an excellent one and the style charming, but she has failed to fulfill the intended mission of the book.” It accused her of also showing prejudice and fanaticism typical of the politicians that she tried to defend.

In 1870, Harrington published “In Memoriam, Maymie, April 6th, 1869”, a meditation on death and suffering, written on the occasion of the death of Harrington’s young daughter.[3]

In 1876, Harrington published “Centennial, and Other Poems,” to commemorate the one hundredth anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, and the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, the first official World’s Fair to be held in the United States. The volume included many poems about Iowa, as well as selected poems of Harrington’s father, Prof. N.R. Smith, and illustrations of the Centennial grounds in Philadelphia.

Kate Harrington, or Rebecca Harrington Smith Pollard wrote all of her life. She was 79 years old when she produced the poem, “Althea” or “Morning Glory,” which relates to Iowa. She died in Ft. Madison on May 29, 1917.

 
 
 
 

By Adele Peters: Switzerland Is Getting A Network Of Medical Delivery Drones
 
 
 
 
By Ainsley Harris: From Mexico To Mississippi: Why This Sofa Startup Is Now “Made In The USA”
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

By Jezebel Staff and Rise Magazine: ‘In One Day I Had Lost Everything That Mattered to Me’: Stories From Inside the Child Welfare System
 
 
 
 

By Erin Marquis: Show Me Better Artwork On A Vehicle, I Dare You
 
 
 
 
By Ken Saito: How To Find One Of Japan’s Best Driving Roads Just Two Hours Outside Tokyo
 
 
 
 
BY SAM BARSANTI: Taco Bell to open 350 locations without a drive-thru so it can finally sell more booze
 
 
 
 
DIY 3-Ingredient Tub and Tile Cleaner
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Beta Two of Elsevier’s DataSearch Tool Now Available, Search Across Multiple Repositories
 
 
 
 

Vermont Fall Foliage Runs


 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 

The Rural Blog: New book illuminates challenges of family farming by following a Nebraska family for a year

Source: The Rural Blog: New book illuminates challenges of family farming by following a Nebraska family for a year

FYI September 19, 2017 draft


1940 – Witold Pilecki is voluntarily captured and sent to Auschwitz to smuggle out information and start a resistance.
Witold Pilecki (13 May 1901 – 25 May 1948; Polish pronunciation: [ˈvitɔlt piˈlɛt͡skʲi]; codenames Roman Jezierski, Tomasz Serafiński, Druh, Witold) was a Polish cavalryman and intelligence officer. He served as a Rittmeister with the Polish Army during the Polish-Soviet War, Second Polish Republic and World War II. Pilecki was also a co-founder of the Secret Polish Army (Tajna Armia Polska) a resistance group in German-occupied Poland and was later a member of the underground Home Army (Armia Krajowa). He was the author of Witold’s Report, the first comprehensive Allied intelligence report on Auschwitz concentration camp and the Holocaust. He was a devout Catholic.[1]

During World War II, he volunteered for a Polish resistance operation that involved being imprisoned in the Auschwitz death camp in order to gather intelligence and later escape. While in the camp, Pilecki organized a resistance movement and, as early as 1941, informed the Western Allies of Nazi Germany’s Auschwitz atrocities. He escaped from the camp in 1943 after nearly two and a half years of imprisonment. Pilecki took part as a combatant in the Warsaw Uprising[2] in August–October 1944.[3] He remained loyal to the London-based Polish government-in-exile after the Soviet-backed communist takeover of Poland and was arrested for espionage in 1947 by the Stalinist secret police (Urząd Bezpieczeństwa) on charges of working for “foreign imperialism”, thought to be a euphemism for British Intelligence.[4] He was executed after a show trial in 1948. Until 1989, information about his exploits and fate was suppressed by the Polish communist regime.[4][5]

As a result of his efforts, he is considered as “one of the greatest wartime heroes”.[3][6][7] In the foreword to the book The Auschwitz Volunteer: Beyond Bravery,[8] Michael Schudrich, the Chief Rabbi of Poland, wrote as follows: “When God created the human being, God had in mind that we should all be like Captain Witold Pilecki, of blessed memory.”[1] In the introduction to that book Norman Davies, a British historian, wrote: “If there was an Allied hero who deserved to be remembered and celebrated, this was a person with few peers.”[1] At the commemoration event of International Holocaust Remembrance Day held in the US Holocaust Memorial Museum on 27 January 2013 Ryszard Schnepf, the Polish Ambassador to the US, described Pilecki as a “diamond among Poland’s heroes” and “the highest example of Polish patriotism”.[7][9]

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1889 – Sarah Louise Delany, American physician and author (d. 1999)
Sarah Louise “Sadie” Delany (September 19, 1889 – January 25, 1999) was an African-American educator and civil rights pioneer who was the subject, along with her younger sister Elizabeth “Bessie” Delany, of the New York Times bestselling oral history, Having Our Say, by journalist Amy Hill Hearth. Sadie was the first Black person permitted to teach domestic science at the high-school level in the New York public schools, and became famous, with the publication of the book, at the age of 103.

Biography
Delany was the second-eldest of ten children born to the Rev. Henry Beard Delany (1858–1928), the first Black person elected Bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States, and Nanny Logan Delany (1861–1956), an educator. Rev. Delany was born into slavery in St. Mary’s, Georgia. Nanny Logan Delany was born in a community then known as Yak, Virginia, seven miles from Danville.

Sadie Delany was born in what was then known as Lynch’s Station, Virginia, at the home of her mother’s sister, Eliza Logan. She was raised on the campus of St. Augustine’s School (now University) in Raleigh, North Carolina, where her father was the Vice-Principal and her mother a teacher and administrator. Delany was a 1910 graduate of the school. In 1916, she moved to New York City where she attended Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, then transferred to Columbia University where she earned a bachelor’s degree in education in 1920 and a master’s of education in 1925. She was a New York City schoolteacher until her retirement in 1960. She was the first black person permitted to teach domestic science on the high school level in New York City.[citation needed]

Delany died at the age of 109 in Mount Vernon, New York, where she resided the final decades of her life. She is interred at Mount Hope Cemetery in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The Delany Sisters
Main article: Having Our Say

In 1991, Delany and her sister Bessie were interviewed by journalist Amy Hill Hearth, who wrote a feature story about them for The New York Times. A New York book publisher read Hearth’s newspaper story and asked her to write a full-length book on the sisters. Ms. Hearth and the sisters worked closely for two years to create the book, an oral history called Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years, which dealt with the trials and tribulations the sisters had faced during their century of life. The book was on The New York Times bestseller lists for 105 weeks. It spawned a Broadway play in 1995 and a television film in 1999. Both the play and film adaptations were produced by Judith R. James and Dr. Camille O. Cosby.[citation needed]

In 1994, the sisters and Hearth published The Delany Sisters’ Book of Everyday Wisdom, a follow-up to Having Our Say. After Bessie’s death in 1995 at age 104, Sadie Delany and Hearth created a third book, On My Own At 107: Reflections on Life Without Bessie.

Her siblings were:
Lemuel Thackara Delany (1887–1956)
Annie Elizabeth (“Bessie”) Delany (1891–1995)
Julia Emery Delany (1893–1974)
Henry Delany, Jr. (1895–1991)
Lucius Delany (1897–1969)
William Manross Delany (1899–1955)
Hubert Thomas Delany (1901–1990)
Laura Edith Delany (1903–1993)
Samuel Ray Delany (1906–1965)

Delany was the aunt of science fiction writer Samuel R. Delany Jr., the son of her youngest brother. Living Relative Families: Delany, Mickey, Stent, and Graham Families

 
 
 
 

Wikipedia:Today’s featured article Egyptian temple
 
 

By Stafford Marquardt: View the world through someone else’s lens in Google Earth
 
 
 
 
By Steve Grove: Supporting local journalism with Report for America
 
 
 
 
by Laura Hazard Owen: Report for America wants to place (and help pay for) young reporters in local newsrooms that need them
 
 
 
 
Search engines your university offers?
ByGary Price: Reference: Middle Tennessee St. University Launches Searchable Encyclopedia About First Amendment (Free Access)
 
 
 
 
By David Lidsky: 9 Newsletters To Make You Smarter
 
 
 
 
By Max Farsoun: Project NHM
In our first group project (team of 4) at General Assembly we were tasked with making the experience of visiting the Natural History Museum (NHM) in London more engaging through an app or responsive website.
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Waters Exposed By Massive Antarctic Iceberg Now a Protected Area
 
 
 
 
By Alanis King: Here’s How The Newest Mazda Miata Really Compares To The Old One
 
 
 
 
By Kelly Faircloth: The Women Who Missed the Space Race
 
 
 
 

By DIY Hacks and How Tos: 36 Things to Cook in a Coffee Maker
 
 
 
 
By Bruce P28: Toy-Drop Camper
 
 
 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 

FROM DEBRA: Lessons from Irma, starting a toxic-free journey, and more….

Source: FROM DEBRA: Lessons from Irma, starting a toxic-free journey, and more….

Radiotopia: The Citizen: Producer Epitaphs and Inside the Studio with Ear Hustle🍂

Source: The Citizen: Producer Epitaphs and Inside the Studio with Ear Hustle🍂

Kindle September 18, 2017


 
 
 
 
By Jon Land: Thrillers Roundup: Dark journeys and high-stakes dramas

 
 
 
 

$1.99
Marine Sniper: 93 Confirmed Kills
by Charles Henderson (Author)
The explosive true story of Sergeant Carlos Hathcock, a legendary Marine sniper in the Vietnam War.

There have been many Marines. There have been many marksmen. But there has only been one Sergeant Carlos Hathcock.

He stalked the Viet Cong behind enemy lines—on their own ground. And each time, he emerged from the jungle having done his duty. His record is one of the finest in military history, with ninety-three confirmed kills.

This is the story of a simple man who endured incredible dangers and hardships for his country and his Corps. These are the missions that have made Carlos Hathcock a legend in the brotherhood of Marines. They are exciting, powerful, chilling—and all true.

INCLUDES PHOTOGRAPHS
 
 
 
 
$1.99
The Easy Indian Slow Cooker Cookbook: Prep-and-Go Restaurant Favorites to Make at Home
by Hari Ghotra (Author), Vivek Singh (Foreword)
Dinner is a naan issue with easy Indian slow cooker recipes.

It’s tempting to reach for the take-out menu when you think about how long it can take to make your favorite Indian dishes at home. But you don’t have to spend your day in the kitchen to enjoy a home-cooked, traditional curry or masala. The Easy Indian Slow Cooker Cookbook gives you quick prep recipes for your slow cooker so that you can enjoy all of the spices that Indian food has to offer without wasting any time. Fire up your taste buds, not your stove, with the speedy and spicy recipes in this Indian cookbook.
 
 
 
 
$2.99
No Witness but the Moon (A Jimmy Vega Mystery)
by Suzanne Chazin (Author)
On a clear, moonlit night in December, police detective Jimmy Vega races to the scene of a reported home invasion in an upscale New York community. As Vega arrives, he spots a Hispanic man who fits the description of the armed intruder, running from the victim’s estate. Vega chases him into the woods. When the suspect refuses to surrender—and reaches into his pocket—Vega has only seconds to make a life-or-death decision.

What begins as a tragic mistake takes an even darker turn when Vega uncovers disturbing links between the dead man and his own mother’s brutal, unsolved murder. Vega’s need for answers propels him back to his old Bronx neighborhood, where he is viewed as a disgraced cop, not a homegrown hero. It also puts him at odds with his girlfriend, Adele Figueroa, head of a local immigrant center, who must weigh her own doubts about his behavior.

When a shocking piece of evidence surfaces, it becomes clear that someone doesn’t want Vega to put all the pieces together—and is willing to do whatever it takes to bury the truth. Only by risking everything will Vega be able to find justice, redemption, and the most elusive goal of all: the ability to forgive himself.
 
 
 
 
$2.99
Watchers
by Dean Koontz (Author)
On his thirty-sixth birthday, Travis Cornell hikes into the foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains. But his path is soon blocked by a bedraggled Golden Retriever who will let him go no further into the dark woods.

That morning, Travis had been desperate to find some happiness in his lonely, seemingly cursed life. What he finds is a dog of alarming intelligence that soon leads him into a relentless storm of mankind’s darkest creation…

 
 
 
 

$1.99
Cold Cold Heart
by Tami Hoag
Dana Nolan was a promising young TV reporter until a notorious serial killer tried to add her to his list of victims. Nearly a year has passed, but the physical, emotional, and psychological scars run deep. Dana returns to her hometown in an attempt to begin to put her life back together. But home doesn’t provide the comfort she expects.

 
 
 
 
$0.99
Southern Fried (A Kenni Lowry Mystery Book 2)
by Tonya Kappes (Author)
In the South, it’s better when the food is fried and the secrets kept buried…After the dead body of a beloved Cottonwood resident is found tangled up in an electric fence, Sheriff Kenni Lowry has a hunch that somethin’ ain’t right. Her investigation heats up with a fierce cook-off competition, a euchre game where the intel is sweeter than the brownies, and a decades old family recipe that may just be the proof in the pudding.

The icing on the cake: Kenni is fighting an attraction to her recently sworn-in deputy sheriff, and election season is hot on her tail. When the killer comes after who she holds most dear, even her poppa’s ghostly guidance might not be enough to keep her and her own out of the frying pan.

 
 
 
 
$0.99
Fire in the Stars
By Barbara Fradkin
On learning of a close friend’s disappearance, strong-willed aid worker Amanda Doucette takes her trusted dog and sets off into the challenging Newfoundland wilderness in search of answers. “Readers of Tana French and Deborah Crombie may want to investigate” (Library Journal).

 
 
 
 
Free
The Mockingbird Drive
By A.C. Fuller
Disgraced journalist Alex Vane inherits a 50-year-old hard drive full of earth-shattering secrets — and quickly discovers that someone will do whatever it takes to get it back. “A talented new writer” (Robert Dugoni) delivers an explosive, twist-filled read!

FYI September 18, 2017


1838 – The Anti-Corn Law League is established by Richard Cobden.
The Anti-Corn Law League was a successful political movement in Great Britain aimed at the abolition of the unpopular Corn Laws, which protected landowners’ interests by levying taxes on imported wheat, thus raising the price of bread at a time when factory-owners were trying to cut wages.

Corn Laws
The Corn Laws were taxes on imported grain designed to keep prices high for cereal producers in Great Britain. The laws indeed did raise food prices and became the focus of opposition from urban groups who had far less political power than rural Britain. The corn laws imposed steep import duties, making it too expensive for anyone to import grain from other countries, even when food supplies were short. The laws were supported by Conservative landowners and opposed by Whig industrialists and workers. The League was responsible for turning public and elite opinion against the laws. It was a large, nationwide middle-class moral crusade with a utopian vision. Its leading advocate Richard Cobden, according to historian Asa Briggs, promised that repeal would settle four great problems simultaneously:

First, it would guarantee the prosperity of the manufacturer by affording him outlets for his products. Second, it would relieve the ‘condition of England question’ by cheapening the price of food and ensuring more regular employment. Third, it would make English agriculture more efficient by stimulating demand for its products in urban and industrial areas. Fourth, it would introduce through mutually advantageous international trade a new era of international fellowship and peace. The only barrier to these four beneficent solutions was the ignorant self-interest of the landlords, the ‘bread-taxing oligarchy, unprincipled, unfeeling, rapacious and plundering.'[1]

The League was founded in 1838 by Richard Cobden and John Bright. Cobden was the chief strategist; Bright was its great orator. The League was controlled by a handful of rich sponsors. The main tactic of the league was to defeat protectionists at by-elections by concentrating its financial strength and campaign resources. The idea was that it would gain nationwide publicity from a handful of election campaigns every year. The strategy resulted in numerous defeats, which the League blamed on the tyrannical power of the landlords. The tactic also required very expensive subsidies so that League supporters would have a 40 shilling freehold and thus become enfranchised. In any case the League had no capability of contesting 150–200 seats in a general election. Furthermore, Peel neutralized the League’s strategy by ramming repeal through Parliament without a general election. [2]

The League marked the emergence of the first powerful national lobbying group into politics, one with a centralized office, consistency of purpose, rich funding, very strong local and national organization, and single-minded dedicated leaders. It elected men to Parliament. Many of its procedures were innovative, while others were borrowed from the anti-slavery movement. It became the model for later reform movements.[3]

The League played little role in the final act in 1846 when Sir Robert Peel led the successful battle for repeal.[4] It then dissolved itself.[5] Many of its members continued their political activism in the Liberal Party, with the goal of establishing a fully free-trade economy.

 
 
 
 


1779 – Joseph Story, American lawyer, jurist, and politician (d. 1845)
Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 – September 10, 1845) was an American lawyer and jurist who served on the Supreme Court of the United States from 1811 to 1845. He is most remembered for his opinions in Martin v. Hunter’s Lessee and The Amistad case, and especially for his magisterial Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States, first published in 1833. Dominating the field in the 19th century, this work is a cornerstone of early American jurisprudence. It is the second comprehensive treatise on the provisions of the U.S. Constitution and remains a critical source of historical information about the forming of the American republic and the early struggles to define its law.

Story opposed Jacksonian democracy, saying it was “oppression” of property rights by republican governments when popular majorities began (in the 1830s) to restrict and erode the property rights of the minority of rich men.[1] R. Kent Newmyer presents Story as a “Statesman of the Old Republic” who tried to be above democratic politics and to shape the law in accordance with the republicanism of Alexander Hamilton and John Marshall and the New England Whigs of the 1820s and 1830s, including Daniel Webster.[2] Historians agree that Justice Joseph Story reshaped American law—as much or more than Marshall or anyone else—in a conservative direction that protected property rights.[3]

He was uniquely honored in the historical Steven Spielberg film Amistad when he was portrayed by retired Associate Justice of the U. S. Supreme Court Harry Blackmun. Justice Blackmun portrays Justice Story reading the Supreme Court’s decision in the case in which the film was based, and for which Justice Story was most widely remembered, United States v. The Amistad Africans, et al. This is the only time in known film history that an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court has portrayed another Associate Justice.

More on wiki:

 
 
 
 

By Matt Novak: Man Who Saved the World From Nuclear Armageddon in 1983 Dies at 77
Petrov reasoned that if the Americans were going to launch a first strike they’d send more than five missiles, despite the fact that they could still do an enormous amount of damage. He also believed that since the alert system was relatively new it seemed likely that it could be sending a false alarm.
 
 
Stanislav Yevgrafovich Petrov (Russian: Станисла́в Евгра́фович Петро́в; 9 September 1939 – 19 May 2017)
 
 
List of nuclear close calls
 
 
 
 

By Julie Zhuo: Addressing executive swoop-ins
 
 
 
 
By Bob Mayer: Survival Essentials for Under $50
 
 
 
 
Andy McNab: how I survived a polar bear encounter
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Reference: A Selection of Recently Published or Updated Data-Rich Reports Available on the Web
This roundup is under development (August 3, 2017). New items will added daily so please bookmark this page and check back often. The most recent completed roundup includes more than 100 items can be accessed here.
 
 
 
 
By Casey Michael: How Russia Created the Most Popular Texas Secession Page on Facebook
 
 
 
 
By Danny Bittman: Combating Sexism in Tech With Honesty: The Impact of Upload’s Silence
 
 
 
 
By Gregory Sadler: How Difficult Is It To Find An Aristotelian Friend?
The friendship of the good, however, is not predicated on profiting off each other, nor on simply passing time by having fun. Instead, your friend respects you for both who you are as a person and the way that you live. It is a mutual respect — one in which you do not deprive, condemn, or belittle one another. Rather, you push each other to be your best selves not for personal gain but for your friend’s sake. This friendship is not selfish, or clingy, or exploitative; it is a friendship of equals. You don’t just accept who they are, you celebrate it.
 
 
 
 
By Harry McKracken: Satya Nadella Rewrites Microsoft’s Code
Microsoft’s CEO has stopped infighting, restored morale, and created more than $250 billion in market value. All it took was focusing on what matters most.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
September 19, 2017:
By Brian Boone: Ye can celebrate Talk Like a Pirate Day with these authentic pirate words, me hearty (8 GIFs)


 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 

The Liberation of Prague — 9/18/17

The “Big Three” from left to right: Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Winston Churchill on the portico of the Russian Embassy during the Tehran Conference to discuss the European Theatre in 1943.

Today’s selection — from Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright. In 1943, Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill met in Tehran. There they agreed that the Soviets would be responsible for securing…

Source: The Liberation of Prague — 9/18/17

13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCLIII)

1. When People Accidentally Found Their Doppelgängers In MuseumsFound on Bored Panda. 2. This Fantabulous Forgotten Boy BandThe Fantabulous Jags ladies and gentlemen. Have a listen. 3. Matching Family Sleepwear of the SeventiesFound on Groovela and more…

Source: 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCLIII)

Top 10 Most Inspirational Bloggers In The World

If you’re an aspiring blogger or just looking for some inspiration in your life, here’s a list of the 10 most inspirational bloggers in the world to follow.

Source: Top 10 Most Inspirational Bloggers In The World