Category: FYI

FYI

FYI November 06, 2017


1935 – Edwin Armstrong presents his paper “A Method of Reducing Disturbances in Radio Signaling by a System of Frequency Modulation” to the New York section of the Institute of Radio Engineers.
FM broadcasting is a method of radio broadcasting using frequency modulation (FM) technology. Invented in 1933 by American engineer Edwin Armstrong, it is used worldwide to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. FM broadcasting is capable of better sound quality than AM broadcasting, the chief competing radio broadcasting technology, so it is used for most music broadcasts. FM radio stations use the VHF frequencies. The term “FM band” describes the frequency band in a given country which is dedicated to FM broadcasting.

More on wiki:

Edwin Howard Armstrong
Edwin Howard Armstrong (December 18, 1890 – January 31, 1954) was an American electrical engineer and inventor, best known for developing FM (frequency modulation) radio and the superheterodyne receiver system. He held 42 patents and received numerous awards, including the first Medal of Honor awarded by the Institute of Radio Engineers (now IEEE), the French Legion of Honor, the 1941 Franklin Medal and the 1942 Edison Medal. He was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame and included in the International Telecommunication Union’s roster of great inventors.

More on wiki:

 
 
 
 


1835 – Cesare Lombroso, Italian criminologist and physician, founded the Italian school of criminology (d. 1909)
Cesare Lombroso (Italian pronunciation: [ˈtʃeːzare lomˈbroːzo; -oːso]; born Ezechia Marco Lombroso; 6 November 1835 – 19 October 1909), was an Italian criminologist and physician, founder of the Italian School of Positivist Criminology, often referred to as the father of criminology. Lombroso rejected the established classical school, which held that crime was a characteristic trait of human nature. Instead, using concepts drawn from physiognomy, degeneration theory, psychiatry and Social Darwinism, Lombroso’s theory of anthropological criminology essentially stated that criminality was inherited, and that someone “born criminal” could be identified by physical (congenital) defects, which confirmed a criminal as savage or atavistic. These theories do not have widespread support by scientists in Western countries.

More on wiki:

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
[slideshare id=73812757&doc=nightstalkerstheriftwithvideotrailer-170328205644]
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Reference: “Repaired and Digitized World War I Illinois National Guard Maps Now Available Online”
Secretary of State and State Archivist Jesse White today announced that in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of America’s participation in World War I, the Illinois State Archives has repaired and digitized 57 maps used by the Illinois National Guard during the war.
 
 
 
 
Airmen Celebrate National American Indian Heritage Month
 
 
 
 
By Mike Allen: Scoop: Steve Brill’s new start-up
Steve Brill — founder of American Lawyer, Court TV, Brill’s Content, and the Yale Journalism Initiative — has almost finished raising $6 million to launch News Guard, which will rate news content so search and social-media platforms can help their users know what to trust.
 
 
 
 
By Tim Sommer: More Than the Deuce: A Recollection of Times Square in 1979
 
 
 
 
By Vittoria Traverso: How ‘Photo Detectives’ Have Helped Reveal Irish History
 
 
 
 
Monroe Washington: Wayside Chapel
 
 
 
 
By Jared Newman: Quip Wants To Make You More Productive By Killing Copy-And-Paste
 
 
 
 
Interesting question.
Helmets were issued to most attendee’s of the University of Southeast Asia 2-year program (aka Viet Nam veterans)

By Michael Green: Diplomas or Helmets
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Mammals Literally Came Out of the Dark Once the Dinos Were Gone
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Why Did Male Mammoths Get Stuck in Traps More Often Than Female Mammoths?

 
 
 
 

By David Tracy: Start Your Week With This Fascinating 1979 Jeep Wagoneer Crash Test Footage

 
 
 
 
By Kelly Faircloth: Nancy Friday, Chronicler of Women’s Sexual Fantasies in My Secret Garden, Has Died
 
 
 
 
By Natalia Lusinki: Britney Spears, wonderful human, opened a children’s cancer foundation campus in Las Vegas
 
 
 
 
By Aimée Lutkin: Here’s Late Actress Maureen O’Hara Talking About Sexual Harassment In 1945
 
 
 
 
By Celestine Chua: 42 Practical Ways To Improve Yourself
 
 
 
 
GoPro Alternative?

 
 
 
 

$1,200?

 
 
 
 
By Erica Offutt: Monday’s Best Deals: Smart Thermostat, Waterproof Speaker, iTunes Gift Card, and More


 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 

lennon, dylan, and harrison were nervous – 11/06/17

Today’s selection — from Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth. John Lennon and George Harrison experienced stage fright at their post-Beatles performances, as did Bob Dylan upon his return from an early-career…

lennon, dylan, and harrison were nervous – 11/06/17

Stranger Things, The Twilight Zone and Guns…Again :: Daily Grind #159 Ventipop

Stranger Things, The Twilight Zone and Guns…Again :: Daily Grind #159 Ventipop

Women and Women First – Prototypr

I and my two teammates, Julia Park and Amy Spengler, were given the task of creating a product based on a subject about which we feel passionate. My small team and I discussed several topics, such as travel, craft beer, and fashion before deciding upon Women Empowerment. As women ourselves, feminism and empowerment are important subjects for us.

We hypothesized that women would like to and could benefit from mentorship by other women. Though we wanted to create an app for all women, given our constraints, we decided to start small and expand over time.

Women and Women First – Prototypr

Soldier’s Solo Effort Defeats Dozens of Germans in WWII Battle | DoDLive

Army 1st Lt. Jack Montgomery

Army 1st Lt. Jack Montgomery was one of them. A Cherokee from Oklahoma, Montgomery grew up during the “Roaring ‘20s” and the Great Depression. He made his mark on the world during World War II, when he killed nearly a dozen enemy soldiers and took many more as prisoners in just a few hours – all by himself.

Soldier’s Solo Effort Defeats Dozens of Germans in WWII Battle | DoDLive

FYI November 05, 2017


1916 – The Everett massacre takes place in Everett, Washington as political differences lead to a shoot-out between the Industrial Workers of the World organizers and local police.
The Everett Massacre (also known as Bloody Sunday) was an armed confrontation between local authorities and members of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) union, commonly called “Wobblies”. It took place in Everett, Washington on Sunday, November 5, 1916. The event marked a time of rising tensions in Pacific Northwest labor history.

More on wiki:

 
 
 
 


1911 – Marie Osborne Yeats, American actress and costume designer (d. 2010)
Marie Osborne Yeats (November 5, 1911 – November 11, 2010) was the first major child star of American silent films. She was usually billed simply as Baby Marie.[1]

Early life and career
Born as Helen Alice Myres in Denver, Colorado, the daughter of Roy and Mary Myres. She soon became — under mysterious circumstances — the child of Leon and Edith Osborn, who called her Marie and added the “e” to the surname, apparently to obscure the adoption.[2] Her foster parents, the Osbornes, introduced their daughter to silent films when they left Colorado to work at Balboa Studios in Long Beach, California. Osborne made her debut in 1914’s Kidnapped in New York.

Signed to a lucrative contract with Balboa Films (and working with director Henry King and writer Clara Beranger), by the age of five she was starring in silent films, including her best remembered movie, Little Mary Sunshine from 1916 (see the film’s IMDb profile), one of her few films which still survive on celluloid. Some of her other films are Maid of the Wild (1915), Sunshine and Gold (1917), What Baby Forgot (1917), Daddy’s Girl (1918), The Locked Heart (1918), Winning Grandma (1918), The Sawdust Doll (1919), and Daddy Number Two (1919). At the age of eight, she completed her final film as a child star, Miss Gingersnap in 1919. In all, she was featured or starred in 29 films in a six-year period. Most of her films were produced at Diando Studios, the former Kalem Movie Studio in Glendale, California.

She returned to motion pictures 15 years later – at the request of director Henry King – to appear in his 1934 movie Carolina, starring Janet Gaynor and Lionel Barrymore. This movie also featured future child star Shirley Temple in a minor role. Over the next 16 years, Osborne worked as a film extra, additionally serving as a stand-in for actresses such as Ginger Rogers, Deanna Durbin, and Betty Hutton. After appearing in more than a dozen films, she made her last on-screen appearance in Bunco Squad (1950), starring Robert Sterling and Joan Dixon.

Later career
In the 1950s she started a new career as a costumer for Western Costume, a clothing supplier for the motion picture industry. Osborne worked on the wardrobes for such films as Around the World in 80 Days (1956), How to Murder Your Wife (1965), The Godfather: Part II (1974), and Harry and Walter Go to New York (1976). In 1963, Osborne worked as a special costumer for Elizabeth Taylor in the big-budget film, Cleopatra. Osborne retired in 1977, and moved to San Clemente, California.

Personal life
Osborne married Frank J. Dempsey on May 2, 1931. Dempsey was the father of Osborne’s only child, Joan (born May 13, 1932). They divorced in 1937. Osborne married 36-year-old actor Murray F. Yeats on June 14, 1945, and moved to Sepulveda, California. She remained married until his death on January 27, 1975.

Death
Marie Osborne Yeats died on November 11, 2010 in San Clemente, California, six days after her 99th birthday. She was interred at Mission San Luis Rey Cemetery. She was survived by her daughter, Joan, and five grandchildren.[3]

 
 
 
 


By Josh Jones: Female Samurai Warriors Immortalized in 19th Century Japanese Photos
 
 
 
 
[slideshare id=74771569&doc=sirrichardfrancisburton-170409213933]
 
 
 
 
By Mike Vago: Sean Connery’s most famous role was once spoofed by his non-actor brother in the film O.K. Connery
 
 
 
 
By Patrick George: This Is What Koenigsegg’s Record 278 MPH Nevada Speed Run Looked Like Behind The Wheel
 
 
 
 
By Catherine: DIY Budget Backyard Makeover
 
 
 
 
By HCIHPI: How to Connect PET Bottles for TrussFab Structures

 
 
 
 
RV Trip: Loveland, CO – Uraling to Carter Lake/Pinewood Reservoir
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Research Tools: National Transportation Library (NTL) Debuts ROSA P, a Repository and Open Science Data Portal
 
 
 
 
Nigella Lawson’s Turkish Eggs
 
 
 
 
By Claire Lower: How to Serve an Entire Thanksgiving Meal as a Casserole
 
 
 
 
By Katie Macdonald: A Super-Simple Trick for Fresh Apple Juice (No Machine Needed!)
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
By Shep McAllister: Sunday’s Best Deals: Luggage, Wake-Up Lights, Logitech Harmony, and More


 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 

Animal Rescue of Fresno: Heaven Can Wait Trip 6 | Kings River Life Magazine

by Wendy HunterFor some people who volunteer in the rescue world, taking care of dogs in their community is high priority. Since there are hundreds of organizations all over the country, many rescues prefer to stay close to home, getting dogs adopted out locally. A noble cause indeed. But at Animal….

Animal Rescue of Fresno: Heaven Can Wait Trip 6 | Kings River Life Magazine

Mental Yoga Sunday :: Issue No. 21 Ventipop

I think some of us need to retrain our attention spans to be longer than the time it takes for an Instagram post to load. Here are my favorite long read pieces of the week:

Mental Yoga Sunday :: Issue No. 21 Ventipop

The Sunday Bulletin is Here: Do you believe in second chances?

Have you ever made a mistake so huge, so upsetting, that you never thought that you would be able to get out of it? There is usually one, sometimes from childhood, sometimes from a moment in the office, when all you want to do is freeze time and run away. Sadly, that’s simply not an option!

The Sunday Bulletin is Here: Do you believe in second chances?

Sir Thomas Browne on the Transcendent Torture of Romantic Friendship – Brain Pickings

But as beautiful and vitalizing as such more-than-friendships can be, they tend to be inevitably dampened by an undercurrent of disappointment, a quiet undulating heartache that comes from the disconnect between the enormity one or both persons long for and the lesser-than reality permitted by the other person’s nature or the circumstances of one or both of their lives.

Sir Thomas Browne on the Transcendent Torture of Romantic Friendship – Brain Pickings