Category: FYI

FYI

Henrik Edberg, The Positivity Blog: 30 Ways to Come Alive, and Not Just Exist

30 Ways to Come Alive, and Not Just Exist

Gems in the Attic: Pinterest You Had Me At My First Pin by @lcrandallwriter

Gems in the Attic: Pinterest You Had Me At My First Pin by @lcrandallwriter

FYI October 29, 2017


1921 – The Link River Dam, a part of the Klamath Reclamation Project, is completed.
The Link River Dam is a concrete gravity dam on the Link River in the city of Klamath Falls, Oregon. It was built in 1921 by the California Oregon Power Company (COPCO), the predecessor of PacifiCorp, which continues to operate the dam. The dam is owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.[1]

Link River Dam’s reservoir, Klamath Lake, has a capacity of 873,000 acre feet (1.077×109 m3). The project provides flood control, generates hydro power, and stores most of the water used for irrigation in the Klamath Reclamation Project. The dam is 22 feet (7 m) high and 435 feet (133 m) long.

Its two channels can allow one outflow of 3,000 ft³/s (85 m³/s) with 1,000 ft³/s (28 m³/s) through the Ankeny Canal, and another outflow of 290 ft³/s (8 m³/s) through the Keno Canal. Those channels feed PacifiCorp’s two hydroelectric turbines located downstream and generate 151 MW. All the flow is ultimately diverted down the Link River into Lake Ewauna.

In 2004 PacifiCorp announced the Link River power projects would be abandoned, as the cost to repair the canal and pipeline supplying the power turbines is too high to be economically viable. As of 2014 the company intends to continue to run the plant, in the short term and at reduced output. [2]

History
In 1878, five years after the Modoc Wars, residents of Linkville formed the “Linkville Water Ditch Company.” They dug a low capacity canal that connected their homes with the Link River. A William Steele extended the ditch by 15 miles in 1884. After his death in 1888 the Klamath Falls Irrigation Company took over the canal. It is now known as the Ankeny Canal.

Charles and Rufus Moore dug a canal on the other side of the Link River in 1877 to power a sawmill and transport logs from Upper Klamath Lake. This later became known as the Keno Canal.

On February 24, 1917, officials from the USBR and COPCO reached an agreement to lease the Keno Canal for ten years at a rate of $1,000 per annum. The agreement also allowed the power company to regulate the outflows of Klamath Lake. In 1919, COPCO placed a temporary low-crib dam near what is now Putnam’s Point in 1919. Construction began on the dam on July 29, 1920.

Senator George E. Chamberlain of Oregon telegraphed Secretary of the Interior John B. Payne on August 20, 1920, requesting he halt dam construction long enough to determine the legality of the 1917 contract. Payne issued a supplemental contract on December 10, and California-Oregon Power restarted construction on May 15, 1921, finishing it on October 29.

Current operations
As a 50-year contract between the USBR and PacifiCorp reached its expiration in 2006,[3] the company proposed closing down hydroelectric generation at Link River. It cited the high costs of complying with fish passage remediation. This proposal would have left the dam in place for water storage and flood control. (The proposal was distinct from the proposed removal of four other dams, operated by the same company in the same watershed.)

As of 2014 the company intends to continue to generate electricity at Link River, in the short term and at reduced output. PacifiCorp implemented changes of operation are intended to reduce the destruction of two endangered species, the Lost River sucker and Shortnose sucker, by some 90%. [4] Further decomissioning discussion remain pending with the governing agency, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

 
 
 
 


1930 – Bertha Brouwer, Dutch sprinter (d. 2006)
Bertha “Puck” Brouwer (since 1953 van Duyne; 29 October 1930 – 6 October 2006) was a Dutch sprinter.

Brouwer accomplished her first international notable result in 1950, when she won the silver medal at the European Championships, being part of the 4×100 metres relay team alongside Fanny Blankers-Koen. She competed at the 1952 Summer Olympics in the 100 m, 200 m and 4×100 m relay, and won a silver medal in the 200 m. A third silver medal was added in 1954, when she finished second on the 100 m at the European Championships in Bern. She also was a member of the Dutch team for the 1956 Summer Olympics; however the Dutch decided to boycott the Games, and Van Duyne, who was already in Melbourne, had to go home. Disappointed, she shortly afterwards retired from competitions.[1]

 
 
 
 


Maria Popova Brain Pickings: Love Found: A Diverse Illustrated Collection of Classic Poems Celebrating Desire, Longing, and Devotion
 
 
 
 
Written by William H. Thiesen, Ph.D.: The Long Blue Line: Cutters Sea Cloud and Hoquiam—Barrier-breaking ships in U.S. Desegregation
 
 
 
 
By Carol Tice: How to Improve Your Writing: My Top 7 Fast-Acting Methods
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Digital/Online Archive From Ireland’s National Broadcaster (RTÉ) Begins Rollout of TV News Collection
 
 
 
 
By Chris Thompson: Deadspin Up All Night: Grisly Reminder
 
 
 
 
By Mike Vago: Alongside spaghetti Westerns, Italy was also making “spaghetti thrillers” in the ’60s
 
 
 
 
By Tom McKay: Apple Reportedly Fires Engineer After Daughter’s iPhone X Video Goes Viral
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By scoochmaroo: Halloween Food
 
 
 
 
By eamonwalshdiy: DIY Log Cabin Bird House

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Kinja Deals Jillian Lucas: Sunday’s Best Deals: Instant Pot Mini, Refurb Macbooks, Philips OneBlade, and More


 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 

Just A Car Guy: I had not known P 47s had nose art too, here are some, and a tribute to George Rarey, a pilot, artist, and nose art specialist for the 379 Fighting Squadron’s P 47s

Just A Car Guy: I had not known P 47s had nose art too, here are some, and a tribute to George Rarey, a pilot, artist, and nose art specialist for the 379 Fighting Squadron’s P 47s

Just A Car Guy: Miss Lace, a character from a comic strip by the artist who made Terry and the Pirates, was graciously conferred by the artist to a Lt who requested its use for his B 17

Just A Car Guy: Miss Lace, a character from a comic strip by the artist who made Terry and the Pirates, was graciously conferred by the artist to a Lt who requested its use for his B 17

Just A Car Guy: Salute of the day to Green Bay Police Officer Daryl Robinson

Just A Car Guy: Salute of the day to Green Bay Police Officer Daryl Robinson

Just A Car Guy: While over Japan, the inboard propeller spun off and took out the outboard propeller, they had to fly 700 miles home on two engines, it could have been worse

Just A Car Guy: While over Japan, the inboard propeller spun off and took out the outboard propeller, they had to fly 700 miles home on two engines, it could have been worse

The Sunday Bulletin is Here: Finding Courage


Finding the courage to do anything can be difficult. Trying new things can be scary. Traveling to new places can be scary. But most people push through their fear and find that they’ve enjoyed their new experience.

What about finding the courage to leave an abusive relationship? That’s probably the most difficult thing for anyone to do. Fear can cripple you. Make you think you absolutely need to stay with your abuser. It can make you worry that you won’t find anyone else. That you’re not worthy of anyone else. Finding the courage to leave is one of the bravest things a person can do. Not only do you have to learn to be on your own, but you also have to learn to start your life over again. You have to learn to trust again. To love again.

The Sunday Bulletin is Here: Finding Courage

Mattis: U.S. Will Not Accept Nuclear-Armed North Korea

Mattis: U.S. Will Not Accept Nuclear-Armed North Korea

FYI October 28, 2017


1628 – French Wars of Religion: The Siege of La Rochelle, which had lasted for 14 months, ends with the surrender of the Huguenots.
The French Wars of Religion, or Huguenot Wars of the 16th century, are names for a period of civil infighting, military operations and religious war primarily fought between Roman Catholics and Huguenots (Reformed Protestants) in the Kingdom of France. The conflict involved several independent principalities: the Duchy of Lorraine, the Duchy of Savoy, the Kingdom of Navarre, and parts of Burgundy which have since been incorporated into France. And it occasionally spilled beyond the French region, for instance in the war with Spain, from 1595-1598, into northern Italy, some of the German states of the Holy Roman Empire, and the Duchy of Burgundy possessions in the Low Countries.

Approximately 3,000,000 people perished as a result of violence, famine, and disease in what is accounted as the second deadliest European religious war (behind the Thirty Years’ War, which took 8,000,000 lives in present-day Germany).[1] Although the war was religious in nature, it was undergirded by feuds among immensely rich and powerful noble families of France and its surrounding principalities: the ambitious and fervently Roman Catholic House of Guise (a branch of the House of Lorraine) and their ally Anne de Montmorency, Constable of France (i.e., commander in chief of the French armed forces) versus the less wealthy House of Condé (a branch of the House of Bourbon), who were in the direct line of succession to the French throne and sympathetic to Calvinism. Foreign governments also provided financing and other assistance to both sides, with Hapsburg Spain and the Duchy of Savoy supporting the Guises, and England supporting the Protestant side led by the Condés and by the Protestant Jeanne d’Albret, wife of Antoine de Bourbon, King of Navarre, and her son, Henry of Navarre.

Moderates, primarily associated with the French monarchy and its advisers, tried to balance the situation and avoid an open bloodshed. This group (pejoratively known as Politiques) put their hopes in the ability of a strong centralized government to maintain order and harmony. In contrast to the previous hardline policies of Henri II and Francis I, they began introducing gradual concessions to Huguenots. A most notable moderate, at least initially, was the queen mother, Catherine de’ Medici. Catherine, however, later hardened her stance and, at the time of the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre in 1572, sided with the Guises. This pivotal historical event involved a complete breakdown of state control resulting in series of riots and massacres in which Catholic mobs killed between 5,000 and 30,000 Protestants over a period of weeks throughout the entire kingdom.

At the conclusion of the conflict in 1598, the Protestant Henry of Navarre, heir to the French throne, converted to Catholicism and was crowned Henry IV of France. He issued the Edict of Nantes, which granted Huguenots substantial rights and freedoms though this did not end Catholic hostility towards them or towards him, personally.

The wars of religion threatened the authority of the monarchy, already fragile under the rule of Francis II and then Charles IX. Though he would be assassinated in 1610 Henry IV’s wise governance and selection of able administrators did leave a legacy of a strong centralized government, stability, and economic prosperity that has gained him the reputation as France’s best and most beloved ruler.

More on wiki:
 
 
 
 

1864 – Adolfo Camarillo, American-Mexican rancher and philanthropist (d. 1958)
Adolfo Camarillo (October 28, 1864 – December 10, 1958) was a prominent land owner, horse breeder, rancher, and philanthropist in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the Ventura County area of California in the United States. Adolfo, along with his brother Juan, Jr., owned much of what later became the town known by their family name, Camarillo.[1] Adolfo also donated the land for Adolfo Camarillo High School.[2] The horse breed Camarillo White Horse was named for Camarillo. He began breeding them in 1921 and the line continues today. Because of Adolfo’s philanthropy in 1950, Pope Pius XII named Adolfo a Knight of St. Gregory the Great.[3]

Biography
Adolfo was born to Juan Camarillo (1812–1880) and Martina Camarillo (1826–1898). He had four sisters and one brother.[1] When Juan Camarillo died in 1880, one of the last remaining Mexican land grants, Rancho Calleguas, was purchased from the Ruiz family in 1875 and was later willed to his wife. Upon Juan’s death, Adolfo took over operations of the family ranch at age 16. His brother Juan was more interested in religion. The ranch is almost 10,000 acres.[4]

In 1885 Adolfo graduated from International Business College at (Woodbury University). After that he took over full-time management of the ranch at age 21. In 1888 Adolfo married Isabella Menchaca (1861–1936). He and Isabel raised seven children: Frank, Isabel, Minerva, Rosa, Carmen, Ave Marie, and Martina.[4] Upon the death of Martina Camarillo, she bequeathed Rancho Calleguas to her sons, Adolfo and Juan, Jr.[1] This would later go on to become Camarillo Ranch and later the city of Camarillo. Adolfo ran the Camarillo Ranch until his death in 1958.

The ranch grew from a mostly cattle operation to both cattle and crops. Adolfo focused mainly in developing crops and became a leading innovator bringing in lima beans, plus barley, corn, alfalfa, walnuts, and citrus.[4]

Adolfo Camarillo had a love of fiestas, horses, rodeos and barbecues. Adolfo kept a stable of a dozen pure white horses of Arabian and Morgan descent. His horses often participated in parades in California.

Adolfo died of pneumonia December 10, 1958, and is interred in the family crypt beneath St. Mary Magdalen Church in Camarillo, alongside his parents, his wife, sisters and brothers.[5]

More on wiki:

Camarillo Ranch House
Camarillo Ranch House, also known as Rancho Calleguas and Adolfo Camarillo House, is a Queen Anne-style Victorian house in Camarillo, California. Built in 1892, the 6,000-square-foot (560 m2) house was designed by architects Herman Anlauf and Franklin Ward., Adolfo Camarillo operated the ranch for 78 years, changing the operations from mostly cattle to crops. He was a leading innovator growing lima beans, barley, corn, alfalfa, walnuts, citrus and eucalyptus trees. The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

More on wiki:
 
 
 
 

By William Hughes: R.I.P. Oscar-winning Star Wars costume designer John Mollo
 
 
 
 

By Elle Keck: In Remembrance of Miranda Neville
 
 
 
 
Which means what?
By Gary Price: Privacy: The New York Times Now Available as a Tor Onion Service
Today we are announcing an experiment in secure communication, and launching an alternative way for people to access our site: we are making the nytimes.com website available as a Tor Onion Service
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall: Three Huge Volumes of Stoic Writings by Seneca Now Free Online, Thanks to Tim Ferriss
 
 
 
 
New Life on a Homestead: Raising Ducks – The Ultimate Guide
 
 
 
 
By Chris Thompson: Small UFO Obliterated By Oklahoma City’s Chartered Plane
 
 
 
 
By Yessenia Funes: Houston’s Athletes Offer Beacon of Hope After Hurricane Harvey
NFL player Justin J. Watt, aka J.J. Watt, isn’t giving up on his city. The Houston Texans’ linebacker raised more than $37 million for Hurricane Harvey relief when he announced a fundraiser back in August. His goal was just $200,000.

Now, he’s making sure these dollars go directly into the community.
 
 
 
 
By Kelsey J. Waite, A.A. Dowd, and Alex McLevy: A song, an album, and a way to listen
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Women Taking Delivery of a New Ford Speedster and Touring Car at Laramie Auto Company
 
 
 
 

By Erica Offutt: Saturday’s Best Deals: Men’s Pants, Portable Crock-Pot, Wi-Fi Router, and More