Category: FYI

FYI

FYI February 16, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1978 – The first computer bulletin board system is created (CBBS in Chicago).
A bulletin board system or BBS is a computer server running software that allows users to connect to the system using a terminal program. Once logged in, the user can perform functions such as uploading and downloading software and data, reading news and bulletins, and exchanging messages with other users through email, public message boards, and sometimes via direct chatting. Many BBSes also offer on-line games in which users can compete with each other, and BBSes with multiple phone lines often provide chat rooms, allowing users to interact with each other. Bulletin board systems were in many ways a precursor to the modern form of the World Wide Web, social networks, and other aspects of the Internet. Low-cost, high-performance modems drove the use of online services and BBSes through the early 1990s. Infoworld estimated that there were 60,000 BBSes serving 17 million users in the United States alone in 1994, a collective market much larger than major online services such as CompuServe.

The introduction of inexpensive dial-up internet service and the Mosaic web browser offered ease of use and global access that BBS and online systems did not provide, and led to a rapid crash in the market starting in 1994. Over the next year, many of the leading BBS software providers went bankrupt and tens of thousands of BBSes disappeared. Today, BBSing survives largely as a nostalgic hobby in most parts of the world, but it is still an extremely popular form of communication for Taiwanese youth (see PTT Bulletin Board System) and in China.[1] Most BBSes are now accessible over Telnet and typically offer free email accounts, FTP services, IRC and all of the protocols commonly used on the Internet. Some offer access through packet switched networks or packet radio connections.

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Born On This Day

1920 – Anna Mae Hays, American general (d. 2018)
Anna Mae Violet McCabe Hays (February 16, 1920 – January 7, 2018) was an American military officer who served as the 13th chief of the U.S. Army Nurse Corps. She was the first woman in the U.S. Armed Forces to be promoted to a General Officer rank; in 1970, she was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General.[2]

Early life
Hays was born in 1920 in Buffalo, New York as the middle of three children in the family.[3][2] Her father’s name was Daniel Joseph McCabe II (1881–1939),[4][5] who was from Ballymurphy, County Carlow, Ireland,[4] while her mother’s name was Mattie Florence Humphrey (1885–1961),[4][6][7] who was of Welsh descent;[8] both her parents were members of The Salvation Army.[2] During Hays’ childhood the family moved several times in the western New York and eastern Pennsylvania areas, but settled in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, in 1932.[2][9] She had an elder brother, Daniel Joseph and a younger sister, Katherine Evangeline.[4][7] Hays attended Allentown High School, now William Allen High School, graduating with honours in 1938.[10][11] Hays had a love of music, playing the piano, the organ and the French horn, and wanted to go to Juilliard School to study music but due to a lack of funds for tuition she decided to pursue nursing instead.[2]

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FYI

By Kristen Lee: This Is The Most Disastrous Attempt At Road Rage I’ve Ever Seen
 
 
 
 
Alaska Highway News: Free Wi-Fi for truckers and motorists in the North
It says free Wi-Fi has been installed at 24 inspection stations across B.C.

In the Northeast, that includes stations at 13350 Highway 2 in Dawson Creek, 9011 Alaska Highway North at Charlie Lake, and 2809 Alaska Highway North in Fort Nelson.

“The Wi-Fi-enabled inspection stations will allow commercial drivers to check DriveBC for highway delays or closures affecting their route, obtain transport permits for future trips, and stay connected to friends, family and colleagues back home,” the ministry said in an announcement.
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall: Joan Didion Creates a Handwritten List of the 19 Books That Changed Her Life
 
 
 
 
By Alana Semuels: Why Amazon Pays Some of Its Workers to Quit
On Monday, Amazon reportedly began a series of rare layoffs at its headquarters in Seattle, cutting several hundred corporate employees. But this week, something quite different is happening at the company’s warehouses and customer-service centers across the country: Amazon will politely ask its “associates”—full-time and part-time hourly employees—if they’d prefer to quit. And if they do, Amazon will pay them as much as $5,000 for walking out the door.
 
 
 
 
The Ginger Nomad: A short drone series of my travels around the world
 
 
 
 
BBC News: Wildlife Photographer of the Year – People’s Choice
 
 
 
 
By Alan Taylor: Winners of the 2018 Underwater Photographer of the Year Contest
 
 
 
 
By Karen Rosen: 5-Time Olympian Kelly Clark Looks Back On Her Career And Influence On The Next Generation Of Snowboarders
 
 
 
 
By Myke Cole: When you make a mistake you have to own it
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband (SHLB) Coalition Releases New Fiber Cost Estimate and a Strategy to Connect Rural Communities
 
 
 
 
By Morgan Gstalter: Student arrested after grandmother finds journal detailing massacre plans: reports
 
 
 
 
By Abbie M Hometalk Team Brooklyn, NY: 11 Brilliant Ways to Organize With Cooling Racks
 
 
 
 
By Michael Ballaban: Here’s How You Test An Unsinkable Boat
 
 
 
 
By Brian Kahn: Take an Exhilarating Trip on the Back of a Minke Whale
 
 
 
 
By Dan Colman: Animation Brings to Life “Man as Industrial Palace,” the 1926 Lithograph Depicting the Human Body as a Modern Factory

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

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Phil Are Go!: Learn karate at home faster this easy picture way!

Learn karate at home faster this easy picture way!
You at reading! Yes you! Stop read and get karate at home and learn this easy picture way! Not words way! Self should be defend against all! Words bad! Go karate on words, POW!

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FYI February 15, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1925 – The 1925 serum run to Nome: The second delivery of serum arrives in Nome, Alaska.
The 1925 serum run to Nome, also known as the Great Race of Mercy, was a transport of diphtheria antitoxin by dog sled relay across the U.S. territory of Alaska by 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs 674 miles (1,085 km) in five and a half days, saving the small town of Nome and the surrounding communities from an incipient epidemic.

Both the mushers and their dogs were portrayed as heroes in the newly popular medium of radio, and received headline coverage in newspapers across the United States. Balto, the lead sled dog on the final stretch into Nome, became the most famous canine celebrity of the era after Rin Tin Tin, and his statue is a popular tourist attraction in New York City’s Central Park. The publicity also helped spur an inoculation campaign in the U.S. that dramatically reduced the threat of the disease.

The sled dog was the primary means of transportation and communication in subarctic communities around the world, and the race became both the last great hurrah and the most famous event in the history of mushing, before the first aircraft in the 1930s and then the snowmobile in the 1960s drove the dog sled almost into extinction. The resurgence of recreational mushing in Alaska since the 1970s is a direct result of the tremendous popularity of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, which honors the history of dog mushing.

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Born On This Day

1850 – Sophie Bryant, Irish mathematician, academic and activist (d. 1922)
Sophie Willock Bryant (15 February 1850, Sandymount, Dublin – 29 August 1922, Chamonix, France) was an Anglo-Irish mathematician, educator, feminist and activist.[1]

Early life and education

Bryant was born Sophie Willock in Dublin in 1850. Her father was Revd Dr William Willock DD, Fellow and Tutor of Trinity College, Dublin. She was educated at home, largely by her father. As a teenager she moved to London, when her father was appointed Professor of Geometry at the University of London in 1863, and she attended Bedford College. At the age of nineteen she married Dr William Hicks Bryant, a surgeon ten years older than she was, who died of cirrhosis within a year.[2][3]

Career
In 1875 Bryant became a teacher and was invited by Frances Mary Buss to join the staff of North London Collegiate School. In 1895 she succeeded Miss Buss as headmistress of North London Collegiate, serving until 1918.[2][3]

When the University of London opened its degree courses to women in 1878, she became one of the first women to obtain First Class Honours, in Mental and Moral Sciences, together with a degree in mathematics in 1881, and three years later was awarded the degree of Doctor of Science. In 1882 she was the third woman to be elected to the London Mathematical Society, and was the first active female member, publishing her first paper with the Society in 1884.[2][3] Together with Charles Smith, Bryant edited three volumes of Euclid’s Elements of Geometry, for the use of schools (Euclid’s Elements of Geometry, books I and II (1897); Euclid’s Elements of Geometry, books III and IV (1899); Euclid’s Elements of Geometry, books VI and IX (1901)).[4]

Sophie Bryant was a pioneer in education for women. She was the first woman to receive a DSc in England; one of the first three women to be appointed to a Royal Commission, the Bryce commission on Secondary Education in 1894–1895; and one of the first three women to be appointed to the Senate of the University of London. When Trinity College Dublin opened its degrees to women, Bryant was one of the first to be awarded an honorary doctorate. She was also instrumental in setting up the Cambridge Training College for Women, now Hughes Hall, Cambridge.[2][3] She is also said to have been one of the first women to own a bicycle.[2]

She was interested in Irish politics, wrote books on Irish history and ancient Irish law (Celtic Ireland (1889), The Genius of the Gael (1913)), and was an ardent Protestant Irish nationalist. She was president of the Irish National Literary Society in 1914. She supported women’s suffrage but advocated postponement until women were better educated.[2][3][5]
Later life and death

Bryant loved physical activity and the outdoors. She rowed, cycled, and swam, and twice climbed the Matterhorn.[6] She died in a hiking accident in the Alps in 1922, age 72.[2][3]

 
 
 
 

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FYI February 14, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1778 – The United States flag is formally recognized by a foreign naval vessel for the first time, when French Admiral Toussaint-Guillaume Picquet de la Motte renders a nine gun salute to USS Ranger, commanded by John Paul Jones.

Count Toussaint-Guillaume Picquet de la Motte (born 1 November 1720 in Rennes; died 10 June 1791 in Brest) was a French admiral.

Aged fifteen, he joined the navy as a midshipman and served in Morocco, the Baltic Sea, the Caribbean Islands and in India. Noted for his strategic skills, he was called to Paris in 1775 to help the Secretary of State prepare the order to reorganise the Navy. In 1778, as a Squadron Commander, he took part in the Battle of Ouessant on the Saint-Esprit, and then cruised the English seas. During one month, he captured thirteen ships.

During the American Revolutionary War, Picquet de la Motte distinguished himself as a member of Admiral d’Estaing’s squadron in Martinique, during the Battle of Grenada, and the Siege of Savannah.

On 18 December 1779, he attacked a British squadron under the command of Admiral Hyde Parker that was attempting to blockade a French convoy; such was the success of his “Combat de la Martinique”, that Hyde Parker sent him a letter of congratulation:
“ The conduct of your Excellency in the affair of the 18th of this month fully justifies the reputation which you enjoy among us, and I assure you that I could not witness without envy the skill you showed on that occasion. Our enmity is transient, depending upon our masters; but your merit has stamped upon my heart the greatest admiration for yourself. [1] ”

In 1781, as commander of a nine-vessel squadron that included three frigates, Picquet de la Motte intercepted the fleet of Admiral Rodney en route from St. Eustatius which the British had captured in February 1781. Picquet de la Motte captured 26 British ships, along with Rodney’s plunder in the amount of 5 million sterling. Soon afterwards he was promoted to Lieutenant General of the Naval Armies.

Picquet de la Motte died in 1791, after fifty-two years of service. Four vessels of the French Navy have been named in his honour, the most recent being the first-rank frigate Lamotte-Picquet. The Paris Métro station La Motte-Picquet – Grenelle in the 15th arrondissement of Paris was also named after him. Lastly, there is a street in the 7th arrondissement of Paris named after him, l’Avenue de la Motte-Picquet.
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1452 – Pandolfo Petrucci, tyrant of Siena (d. 1512)
Pandolfo Petrucci (14 February 1452 – 21 May 1512) was a ruler of the Italian Republic of Siena during the Renaissance.

Biography
Born and raised in Siena, a member of an aristocratic family, Petrucci was exiled from his home in 1483 for being a member of the city’s Noveschi political faction, which had fallen out of favor with the rulers of Siena. When the Noveschi returned to prominence, Petrucci became their chief and returned to Siena in 1487. He later became captain of the city guard in 1495. When his brother Giacoppo (one of Siena’s most powerful residents) died in 1497, Petrucci assumed all of his offices and seized control of his fortune. His power and wealth increased even further with his marriage to Aurelia Borghese, daughter of the powerful Niccolò Borghese. With his father-in-law’s backing, Petrucci assumed a number of public offices and gained a vast amount of political power. He subsequently used this power to sell public offices or to give them to his lackeys, a strategy which allowed him to become the most powerful man in Siena. However, Petrucci’s power and his organization of followers in Siena’s government gained him many enemies, including his father-in-law. Niccolò and other influential citizens of Siena conspired to assassinate Petrucci, but Petrucci uncovered the plot and had Niccolò murdered in 1500.

With his enemies out of the way, Petrucci ruled as absolute tyrant over Siena. Petrucci subsequently stopped selling public offices in order to consolidate his own power. Although a brutal authoritarian and absolutist, Petrucci was careful to pacify the people of Siena by improving the city’s economy and encouraging the advancement of art. He also managed to avoid a war with Florence, which had been at odds with Siena for over a century due to a dispute over Siena’s control of Montepulciano. When France and Spain invaded the Italian Peninsula, Petrucci became involved in a number of political intrigues. During this time period, Petrucci tried to gain the powerful Cesare Borgia’s trust by diplomatically procuring French-controlled Piombino for Borgia. However, he secretly plotted against Borgia in the hopes of increasing his own power. Borgia, who had never trusted Petrucci, learned of the Sienese tyrant’s plans and invited him to a meeting at Senigallia in 1502, where Petrucci would have been executed along with Cesare’s other enemies. Petrucci suspected his life was in danger and avoided the meeting, but nevertheless fled Siena in January 1503 in order to appease Borgia. He subsequently resided in Lucca. With the assistance of his ally King Louis XII of France, however, Petrucci was returned to power two months later.

With Borgia’s death in 1507, Petrucci became one of the most powerful men in Italy. In his final years, Petrucci supported Pisa militarily in its war against Florence. However, Pope Julius II and Spain obliged Petrucci to make peace with Florence, to which he reluctantly gave the territory of Montepulciano in 1512. In return, the pope made Petrucci’s nephew a cardinal. Later that year, Petrucci handed control of Siena over to his son, Borghese, and died shortly afterwards in San Quirico d’Orcia, Italy. Before his death, Petrucci was known to have plotted in secret with Spain and Pope Julius II against his old allies, the French. He was also rumoured to have had Pope Pius III poisoned in 1503.

Following Pandolfo’s death, the Petrucci family ruled Siena until 1524.

 
 
 
 

FYI

Name that route!
Vector’s World: Coming in HOT
 
 
 
 
By Barry Petchesky: I Am Very Satisfied By This Video Of A Kid Jumping On A Frozen Trampoline
 
 
 
 
By Ari Phillips: Here Are Some Animals That Deserve to Bone This Valentine’s Day
 
 
 
 
By Ari Phillips: The People’s Choice Wildlife Photography Winners Will Make You Feel Warm Inside
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: States expand authority of nurse practitioners and physicians assistants to increase health care in rural areas
 
 
 
 
By Jim Milliott: B&N to Save $40 Million Following New Layoffs
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Digital Collections: University of Iowa Libraries Makes Avant-Garde Works Accessible to the World
 
 
 
 

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FYI February 13, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1867 – Work begins on the covering of the Senne, burying Brussels’s primary river and creating the modern central boulevards.
The covering of the Senne (French: Voûtement de la Senne, Dutch: Overwelving van de Zenne) was the covering and later diverting of the main river of Brussels, and the construction of public buildings and major boulevards in its place. It is one of the defining events in the history of Brussels.

The Senne/Zenne (French/Dutch) was historically the main waterway of Brussels, but it became more polluted and less navigable as the city grew. By the second half of the 19th century, it had become a serious health hazard and was filled with pollution, garbage and decaying organic matter. It flooded frequently, inundating the lower town and the working class neighbourhoods which surrounded it.

Numerous proposals were made to remedy this problem, and in 1865, the mayor of Brussels, Jules Anspach, selected a design by architect Léon Suys to cover the river and build a series of grand boulevards and public buildings. The project faced fierce opposition and controversy, mostly due to its cost and the need for expropriation and demolition of working-class neighbourhoods. The construction was contracted to a British company, but control was returned to the government following an embezzlement scandal. This delayed the project, but it was still completed in 1871. Its completion allowed the construction of the modern buildings and boulevards which are central to downtown Brussels today.

In the 1930s, plans were made to cover the Senne along its entire course within the greater Brussels area, which had grown significantly since the covering of the 19th century. The course of the Senne was changed to the downtown’s peripheral boulevards. In 1976, the disused tunnels were converted into the north-south axis of Brussels’ underground tram system, the premetro. Actual purification of the waste water from the Brussels-Capital Region was not completed until March 2007, when two treatment stations were built, thus finally cleansing the Senne after centuries of problems.

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Born On This Day

1926 – Fay Ajzenberg-Selove, American nuclear physicist (d. 2012)
Fay Ajzenberg-Selove (February 13, 1926 – August 8, 2012) was an American nuclear physicist. She was known for her experimental work in nuclear spectroscopy of light elements, and for her annual reviews of the energy levels of light atomic nuclei. She was a recipient of the 2007 National Medal of Science.[1][2]

Early life and education
She was born Fay Ajzenberg on 13 February 1926 in Berlin, Germany to a Jewish family from Russia. Her father, Mojzesz Ajzenberg, was a mining engineer who studied at the St. Petersburg School of Mines and her mother, Olga Naiditch Ajzenberg, was a pianist and mezzo-soprano who studied at the St. Petersburg Academy of Music. In 1919, they fled the Russian Revolution and settled in Germany, where her father became a wealthy investment banker.[3]

They were bankrupted by the Great Depression, so the family moved to France in 1930. Her father worked as a chemical engineer in a sugar beet factory owned by her uncle Isaac Naiditch in Lieusaint, France in the department of Seine-et-Marne. Ajzenberg attended the Lycée Victor Duruy in Paris and Le Collège Sévigné. In 1940, the family fled Paris prior to the Nazi invasion of France. They took a tortuous route through Spain, Portugal, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba before they settled in New York City in April 1941.[3][4]

Ajzenberg graduated from Julia Richman High School in 1943. Her father had encouraged her interest in engineering.[5] She attended the University of Michigan, where she was friends with the later notorious Haitian dictator “Papa Doc”.[6] She graduated in 1946 with a BS in engineering, the only woman in a class of 100. After briefly doing graduate work at Columbia University and teaching at the University of Illinois at Navy Pier, she began doctoral studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

At Wisconsin she worked with the nuclear physicist Hugh Richards who was studying nuclear reaction energies and classifying the energy levels of light atoms.[7] She found a method of creating 6Li targets by converting the sulphate to a chloride and electroplating it to the target. She also demonstrated that the excited states of the 10B nucleus were not evenly spaced as previously thought.[3] She received her MS in 1949 and her PhD in physics in 1952 with a dissertation titled “Energy levels of some light nuclei and their classification.”[5]

She was an atheist.[8]

Physics career
She did postdoctoral work with Thomas Lauritsen at the California Institute of Technology. Together they would publish Energy Levels of Light Nuclei, a compilation of the field’s best yearly research regarding nuclear structure and decay of nuclei with an atomic mass number A from 5 to 20. Since 1973 Ajzenberg published them herself.[3] Eventually Ajzenberg would publish 26 of these papers, primarily in the journal Nuclear Physics, until 1990. They have been called “the nuclear scientists’ bible.”[4]

Following graduation, Ajzenberg was a lecturer at Smith College and a visiting fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was hired as an assistant professor of physics at Boston University, but the dean lowered her salary 15 percent when he learned Ajzenberg was a woman. Ajzenberg refused the position until the initial salary was restored.[3]

While at Boston University, she met Harvard University physicist Walter Selove and they married in December 1955.[3] In 1962, using the bubble chamber at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, he discovered a meson he named the fayon (f2) after her.[9] Ajzenberg-Selove and her husband were honored with a symposium about their work at the University of Pennsylvania in 2005.[10] Selove died in 2010.[9]

In the 1960s, she worked at Haverford College, where she was the first full-time female faculty member.[4] In 1970, Ajzenberg-Selove began teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, where Selove had taught since 1957. In 1972, she applied for one of three tenured positions there.[3][4] She was not hired; the reasons cited were age and “inadequate research publications”.[3][4] Ajzenberg-Selove was only 46, had a citation count higher than everyone in the physics department except for Nobel laureate J. Robert Schrieffer, and was Nuclear Physics Section chair of the American Physical Society.[3][4] She filed complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission and in 1973 the University of Pennsylvania was ordered to give her a tenured professorship.[3][4] She became only the second female professor in the university’s School of Arts and Sciences.[3][4]

Publications
In 1994, she published a memoir, A Matter of Choices: Memoirs of a Female Physicist.[10]

Honors and awards
Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Fellow, American Physical Society
Chair, American Physical Society Division of Nuclear Physics (1973-1974)
Award for Distinguished Teaching, Christian and Mary Lindbeck Foundation (1991)
Nicholson Medal for Humanitarian Service, American Physical Society (1999)
Distinguished Alumni Fellow Award, University of Wisconsin Department of Physics (2001)

 
 
 
 

FYI

By Heather Chapman: Kansas’ likely oldest working journalist dies at 102
When Protection Press community columnist Bonnie Brown gathered news for “Bonnie’s Blog” in the weekly paper, she went on foot; she gave up driving when she was 98. And in her eight years of writing for the Press, she only missed two deadlines — one last year when Protection was evacuated for wildfires, and a few weeks ago when she caught a cold. But the upbeat woman who many think was Kansas’ oldest working columnist was found dead in her apartment Saturday morning, just 11 days before her 103rd birthday. Her son, Rodney Brown, said her cold had turned into pneumonia. “In her last column, published this past week, Mrs. Brown wrote that she wasn’t feeling ‘up to par yet but hope I am on the last mile … If all goes well, I may make it for my next birthday. One never knows what’s in store for any of us,'” Beccy Tanner reports for The Wichita Eagle.
 
 
 
 
By Katelyn Caralle: Obama adviser pleaded guilty to trying to take pictures up women’s skirts on the train
The former executive director of the White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education, who was also a Department of Education official, attempted to take photographs and videos up women’s skirts at least four times while using his government issued iPhone in July 2016.
 
 
 
 
By Sandee LaMotte, CNN: ‘I looked at it, and it was moving’: Worm in woman’s eye leads to unique discovery
Growing up on a ranch in Brookings, Oregon, surrounded by cattle and horses, Beckley loved the outdoors. She also had a burning desire to travel. So, in July 2016, she jumped at a chance to combine the two by working on a commercial salmon fishing boat in Craig, Alaska. It was only a couple of weeks into the job that the symptoms started.
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall: Watch Edith+Eddie, an Intense, Oscar-Nominated Short Film About America’s Oldest Interracial Newlyweds
 
 
 
 
WalkingandhikingIreland: Walking Ireland’s Iconic Mountains – Number 6: Croagh Patrick
 
 
 
 
Driving in an ice storm is the first problem…
By David Tracy: Towing An Old Jeep Through An Ice Storm With A 707 HP Jeep Grand Cherokee Trackhawk Was Truly Terrifying
 
 
 
 
By Yessenia Funes: The 2018 Underwater Photography Winners Are Otherworldly
 
 
 
 
By Patrick Reford: Bike Race Course Goes Directly Through Man’s Living Room
 
 
 
 
By Kate Bernot: Last Call: Katharine Hepburn and contemplating mortality
 
 
 
 
Heart shaped pancakes? Get divorced at…?
By Gwen Ihnat: Pancake lovers can get married at Denny’s in Vegas on Valentine’s Day for $99
 
 
If a pancake wedding is just not your jam, no worries: The Taco Bell in Las Vegas just started offering weddings this past August. That ceremony is a bit pricier at $600—but it does include a “sauce packet bouquet” for the bride “to borrow.” Could McDonald’s be next? After all, it’s already got the ring.
 
 
By Jen Harper: 6 Valentine’s Day Books for Strong, Smart, and Savvy Girls
 
 
 
 
By Lisa Campbell: Lets Get Cooking! 10 New and Tasty Cookbooks
 
 
 
 

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FYI February 12, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1593 – Japanese invasion of Korea: Approximately 3,000 Joseon defenders led by general Kwon Yul successfully repel more than 30,000 Japanese forces in the Siege of Haengju.

The Japanese invasions of Korea comprised two separate yet linked operations: an initial invasion in 1592, a brief truce in 1596, and a second invasion in 1597. The conflict ended in 1598 with the withdrawal of the Japanese forces[1][2] from the Korean Peninsula after a military stalemate[3] in Korea’s southern coastal provinces.[20]

The invasions were launched by Toyotomi Hideyoshi with the intent of conquering the Korean Peninsula and China, which were ruled by the Joseon and by the Ming dynasty, respectively. Japan quickly succeeded in occupying large portions of the Korean Peninsula, but the contribution of reinforcements by the Ming,[21][22][23] as well as the disruption of Japanese supply fleets along the western and southern coasts by the Joseon Navy[24][25][26][27][28] forced a withdrawal of Japanese forces from Pyongyang and the northern provinces to the south, where the Japanese continued to occupy Hanseong (now Seoul) and the southeastern regions. Afterwards, with guerrilla warfare waged against the Japanese with righteous armies (Joseon civilian militias)[29] and supply difficulties hampering both sides, neither the Japanese nor the combined Ming and Joseon forces were able to mount a successful offensive or gain any additional territory, resulting in a military stalemate in the areas between Hanseong and Kaesong. The first phase of the invasion lasted from 1592 until 1596, and was followed by ultimately unsuccessful peace negotiations between Japan and the Ming between 1596 and 1597.

In 1597, Japan renewed its offensive by invading Korea a second time. The pattern of the second invasion largely mirrored that of the first. The Japanese had initial successes on land, capturing several cities and fortresses, only to be halted and forced to withdraw to the southern coastal regions of the peninsula. The pursuing Ming and Joseon forces, however, were unable to dislodge the Japanese from their remaining fortresses and entrenched positions in the southern coastal areas,[30][31][32] where both sides again became locked in a ten-month long military stalemate.

With Hideyoshi’s death in 1598, limited progress on land, and continued disruption of supply lines by the Joseon navy, the Japanese forces in Korea were ordered to withdraw back to Japan by the new governing Council of Five Elders. Final peace negotiations between the parties followed afterwards and continued for several years, ultimately resulting in the normalization of relations.[33]

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Born On This Day

1788 – Carl Reichenbach, German chemist and philosopher (d. 1869)
Baron Dr. Carl (Karl) Ludwig von Reichenbach (full name: Karl Ludwig Freiherr von Reichenbach) (February 12, 1788 – January 1869) was a notable chemist, geologist, metallurgist, naturalist, industrialist and philosopher, and a member of the prestigious Prussian Academy of Sciences. He is best known for his discoveries of several chemical products of economic importance, extracted from tar, such as eupione, waxy paraffin, pittacal (the first synthetic dye) and phenol (an antiseptic). He also dedicated himself in his last years to research an unproved field of energy combining electricity, magnetism and heat, emanating from all living things, which he called the Odic force.[1]

Life
Reichenbach was educated at the University of Tübingen, where he obtained the degree of doctor of philosophy. At the age of 16 he conceived the idea of establishing a new German state in one of the South Sea Islands, and for five years he devoted himself to this project.

Afterwards, directing his attention to the application of science to the industrial arts, he visited manufacturing and metallurgical works in France and Germany, and established the first modern metallurgical company, with forges of his own in Villingen and Hausach in the Black Forest region of Southern Germany and later in Baden.

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FYI

By Emma Roller: Jeff Sessions Let His Racism Peek Through a Little More Than He May Have Intended To
On Monday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions addressed a gathering of the nation’s sheriffs, where he once again committed to his job of making subtext text.

Sessions was speaking before the National Sheriffs Association, a trade association representing roughly 20,000 law enforcement officials across the country.

“The office of Sheriff is a critical part of the Anglo-American heritage of law enforcement,” Sessions told the conference attendees. “We must never erode this historic office.”
 
 
 
 
By Ari Phillips: Ryan Zinke Is Actually Trying to Improve Public Lands For a Change
 
 
 
 
By Brenden Seibel: He showed up to photography school before he owned a camera; now his work can be seen in galleries.
 
 
 
 
Seth’s Blog: What motivates you to take action?
What motivates you to take action?

School taught us to answer a simple question, “will this be on the test?” If the answer is no, we’ve got no time for it.

Work taught us to fear the boss and the review and our performance ranking. And we are motivated to do the work if we get paid for it, because, after all, that’s why we call it work. Do the least, because you’re always going to get asked to do more.
 
 
 
 

By Gary Price: Electronic Frontier Foundation Posts The John Perry Barlow Library (A Collection of His Writings & Documents About Him) Electronic Frontier Foundation Posts The John Perry Barlow Library (A Collection of His Writings & Documents About Him)
 
 
 
 
Charity Water On The Importance Of Storytelling
 
 
 
 
By Lydia Dishman: “Wear More Lipstick”: What I Heard As My State’s First Female Treasurer
Years before the #MeToo movement gained steam and incited women in all sectors to speak out against harassment, before the 2016 presidential election inspired a wave of women to run for elected office across the U.S., Janet Cowell was working her way up in politics–first as a member of the Raleigh City Council in North Carolina, then as state senator, and later rising to become state treasurer in 2007.
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Appalshop arts-and-culture co-op is spotlighted in first installment of new PBS NewsHour series on U.S. artists
Appalshop has helped build a regional support network to encourage economic development, “with more than a dozen businesses and organizations in the area,” Brown reports. When Gwen Johnson’s Hemphill Community Center was in danger of closing because of a decline in coal taxes, “with encouragement and support from Appalshop, including $5,000 in seed money, Johnson was able to start a catering company to help pay the bills,” and it hires inmates from the local drug court. Johnson said of Appalshop, “They’re friends who kind of stepped up to the plate and began to think outside the box, and sometimes they think bigger than some of us have ever been allowed to think.”
 
 
 
 
Blog Profiles: Wine Blogs
 
 
 
 

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My French Twist – a year of making beautiful things

Wooden bead key chains & necklaces
There’s a misconception in DIY land that a craft must be difficult in order to be awesome. Not true. Just take a look at … More wooden bead key chains & necklaces »
 
 
 
 

French-inspired desserts for valentine’s day
With Valentine’s Day approaching, I want to try my hand at some creative & yummy desserts. I’ve rounded up some of my favorites, and … More french-inspired desserts for valentine’s day »
 
 
 
 

Graceful tablescape for my galentine’s party
Posted on 02/06Categories 52 acts of creating, DIY, entertaining, holidays, tutorials, Uncategorized

When invited to join this tablescape blog hop showcasing “romantic tables for two,” I intended to do just that. You know, arrange an intimate, … More graceful tablescape for my galentine’s party »
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
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Atlas Obscura: February 11, 2018


Where Old, Unreadable Documents Go to Be Understood
For hundreds of years, history was handwritten. However, sometimes our ancestors’ handwriting was very bad. From her Isle of Man home, Linda Watson transcribes illegible historical documents that stump average readers.


Kissing Chicken
Last year, 23 percent of Americans who reported contracting salmonella from homegrown fowl had recently kissed or snuggled their birds.


Atlas Obscura TripsIn Search of Tiny Owls
This June, hike into the Wasatch Mountains and observe a secretive owl species with Atlas Obscura and an expert avian biologist.

Read complete newsletter -> Where Old, Unreadable Documents Go to Be Understood

GlacierHub: February 2018 

Natalie Belew: Photo Friday: Black History Month & Expedition Denali
In honor of Black History Month, this Photo Friday showcases the first all-African American team of climbers to ascend the highest point in North America, the daunting and mesmerizing Denali in Alaska. Sponsored by the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), Expedition Denali aimed to inspire minority communities to look outdoors for life-enriching experiences. Another goal was to bridge the “adventure gap,” that is how “minority populations are much less likely to seek recreation, adventure, and solace in our wilderness spaces,” according to the Joy Trip Project.
 
 
 
 
Roundup: Microbial Mats, Hidden Heat, and Tree Infection
In this week’s roundup, read about the development of microbial mats in glacier meltwater, geothermal heat hidden beneath the Greenland ice sheet, and blister infection on the Whitebark pine in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.
 
 
 
 
Hunting for History through the Eyes of the Ice
Climate change is melting ice sheets and glaciers, causing panic among the climate scientist community. Yet, to historians and anthropologists, these melting events provide an opportunity to glimpse into the past. Glacier archaeology is mainly concentrated in Scandinavia, the Alps and North America. Those in this field sleuth for artifacts precipitating out from glacial ice. A prominent example is Lars Pilø, co-director of the Glacier Archaeology Program at Oppland County Council in Norway. His team recently published a paper in the Royal Society Open Science Journal on the chronology of reindeer hunting in Jotunheimen, Norway.
 
 
 
 
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Imagine a world awakened by grateful living

Gratitude doesn’t send you out shopping to find satisfaction; it comes as a gift rather than a commodity.
Robin Wall Kimmerer
 
 
 
 
Nicos Hadjicostis: Love Is As Love Does
 
 
 
 
By Elaine Mansfield: When Gratitude Holds Hands with Grief
 
 
 
 
Welcome to our online sanctuary where you can nourish and deepen your gratitude awareness. Join us to discover daily practices.

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