Category: FYI

FYI

FYI May 29, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1733 – The right of settlers in New France to enslave natives is upheld at Quebec City.
Despite slavery’s widespread existence in New France, the practice of enslavement in Canada has long been glossed-over by the Canadian historical consciousness. Substantive recognition and study of this past history of slavery did not begin until the 1960s. This institution, which endured for almost two centuries, affected the destiny of thousands of men, women, and children descended from Indigenous and African peoples.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1926 – Katie Boyle, Italian-English actress and television host (d. 2018)
Caterina Irene Elena Maria Boyle, Lady Saunders (née Imperiali dei Principi di Francavilla; 29 May 1926 – 20 March 2018), usually known as Katie Boyle and also credited as Catherine Boyle and Catherine Boyl, was a British actress, writer, radio announcer, television personality, game-show panellist and animal rights activist. She became best known for presenting the Eurovision Song Contest on four occasions, in 1960, 1963, 1968 and in 1974; the first three in London and the last presentation in Brighton, England. She was once an agony aunt, answering problems that had been posted to the TVTimes by readers.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

By Stef Schrader: Rallycross Driver Finishes Second After Driving Most Of A Race With His Hood Up
 
 
 
 
Great photo’s!
The Bohemian Blog: Soviet Monuments in Armenia
 
 
 
 

By Kristina Gaddy: The Forgotten Woman Behind a Legendary Monster
 
 
 
 
By Dan Peleschuk: The Self-Declared American Emperor Everyone Loved

Joshua Abraham Norton (February 4, 1818[3] – January 8, 1880), known as Emperor Norton, was a citizen of San Francisco, California, who in 1859 proclaimed himself “Norton I, Emperor of the United States”. He later assumed the secondary title of “Protector of Mexico”.[4]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Car Hunter: THIS IS PART 1 If you find yourself driving on I81 in Virginia, 1st watch your speed as a 12 miles over the limit is reckless driving and holds the same weight as a DWI, then get off and checkout Duncan Import Cars in Christiansburg! http://www.duncanimports.com/
 
 
 
 
Open Culture DC: The Device Invented to Resuscitate Canaries in Coal Mines (Circa 1896)
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Hometalk Highlights: 16 Storage Container Ideas Under $10

 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 18 Heartwarming DIY Gift Ideas For Your Dad On His Big Day
 
 
 
 
Cari Dunn Hometalker Smithville, OH: Bug Repellent Candle Melts
 
 
 
 
By solelord: Brick Barbecue
 
 
 
 
By Megsta: Hand Spun Newspaper Yarn
 
 
 
 
By Charlie Chumrats: Turn an Old Artificial Christmas Tree Into a Giant Wreath
 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Shounaz Mekky: Ramadan recipes: My Egyptian grandmother’s old school kunafa
 
 
 
 
By IJustLikeMakingThings: Ultimate Guide to Cheesecake
 
 
 
 


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

FYI May 28, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1802 – In Guadeloupe, 400 rebellious slaves, led by Louis Delgrès, blow themselves up rather than submit to Napoleon’s troops
Louis Delgrès (August 2, 1766 – May 28, 1802) was a mulatto leader of the movement in Guadeloupe resisting reoccupation (and thus the reinstitution of slavery) by Napoleonic France in 1802.[1]

Delgrès was born free in Saint-Pierre, Martinique.[2] An experienced military officer who had a long background fighting Great Britain in the many wars that country had with Revolutionary France, Delgrès took over the resistance movement from Magloire Pélage after it became evident that Pélage was loyal to Napoleon. Delgrès believed that the “tyrant” Napoleon had betrayed both the ideals of the Republic and the interests of France’s colored citizens, and intended to fight to the death.

The French army led by Richepanse drove Delgrès into Fort Saint Charles, which was held by the slaves. After realizing that they could not overcome the French forces and refusing to surrender, Delgrès left with 400 men and some women. At the Battle of Matouba on May 28, 1802, Delgrès and his followers ignited their gunpowder stores, committing suicide in the process, in an attempt to kill as many of the French troops as possible.[3]

In April 1998, Delgrès was officially admitted to the French Panthéon, although the actual location of his remains is unknown.[1] Delgrès’ memorial is opposite that of Toussaint Louverture, leader of the Haitian Revolution, the location of whose remains is also a mystery.
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1858 – Carl Richard Nyberg, Swedish inventor and businessman, developed the blow torch (d. 1939)

Carl Richard Nyberg (May 28, 1858, – 1939) was the founder of Max Sieverts Lödlampfabrik, then one of the largest industries in Sundbyberg, Sweden. Nyberg was born in Arboga. After school he started working for a jeweller[1] and later he moved to Stockholm and worked with various metalworks. He later got work at J. E. Eriksons mekaniska verkstad (later renamed to “Mekanikus”).[1]

It was while working there that he formulated the idea of the blowtorch. He later worked on the idea and created a blowtorch with strong, directed heat and also with several safety measures built in. He quit his work at Mekanikus in 1882 and set up a workshop at Luntmakargatan in Stockholm making blowtorches. However the business didn’t work well because it took too long to both manufacture and sell them. For a time he made a living selling rings supposedly for curing gout.[1] In 1884 he moved his workshop to Sundbyberg. In 1886, he met Max Sievert at a country fair and Sievert became interested in Nyberg’s blowtorch and started selling it. After encouragement by the owner of Sundbyberg gård he started AB Alpha and after encouragement from L. M. Ericsson he started producing wire.[1]

After Primus started producing blowtorches he also decided to make paraffin oil/kerosene cookers. The first model, called Viktoria, wasn’t very successful, but the later Svea did better.[1] He delivered many to Russia and soon he produced 3000 per week. In 1906 the company was changed into a stock company. He was quite generous towards his workers and often gave them stock in the company. The workers became known as “Nybergs snobbar” (Nyberg’s snobs) because they were generally better off than those who worked in other places.[1] In 1922 the company was sold to Max Sievert who continued to own it until 1964 when it was bought by Esso.

Nyberg also worked on many other inventions, for instance steam engines, aeroplanes, boat propellers and various other machines. He was most famous as an aviation pioneer and he became known as “Flyg-Nyberg” (Flying-Nyberg). From 1897 and onward until around 1910, outside his home in Lidingö he built and tested his Flugan (The Fly) on a circular wood track in his garden and on the ice during the wintertime. However, due the lack of small effective gasoline engines at that time[citation needed], he only managed a few short jumps. He worked hard with the help of professor J.E. Cederblom at KTH in the development of wing profiles but did not succeed to get The Fly in the air. He also designed and built his own wind tunnel to be able to make test of small wing models. The Fly had a wingspan of 5 meters, and the surface area of the wings was 13 m². The engine was a steam engine of his own design, with a boiler heated by four of his blowtorches. It produced a maximum of 10 hp (7 kW) at 2000 rpm. The total weight of the plane was 80 kg.

 
 
 
 

FYI

Messy Nessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol CCLXXXIX): Morro Bay Antiques Located in California, Rotary telephone compacts, originally designed by Elsa Schiaparelli and Salvador Dali, 1935, Native Americans at the White House for Citizenship in the 1920s, Before Facebook, the military tried to make an all knowing ‘cyberdiary’ called LifeLog and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Reversing the Slide in Voter Support for Libraries, Meet Ms. Got Proof, the Lebron James of the Legal World and more ->
 
 
 
 
Sara Hendren: not in any particular order, and not exactly a gospel, but…

“The people you spend time with literally co-create who you are, down to the near-cellular level. You’re building a life. The ones you build it with will be critical to your professional success, not because they’ll be in your field, but because they’ll be in your corner. The good ones will give you a kind of emotional buoyancy and a head-shrinking perspective that will nourish the person you’re trying to become—and yeah, that’ll enhance your job performance immeasurably.”

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Jon Setzen: Creative Mornings
 
 
 
 
Rebekah Barnett: What advice do you wish you’d gotten when you graduated from college? 25 TED speakers answer.

It’s traditional at graduation to offer neat, packaged stories of triumph over difficulties. But life isn’t like that — it’s open-ended, subject to a million contingencies and constant change. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t make plans. But it does mean you should be alert to all the changes in the world and in yourself that could render your plan suddenly obsolete, unattractive or perverse. Be open to change. Be prepared to experiment. Take risks. Keep learning. Make your life your own.”
Margaret Heffernan
Article: Life advice from 25 TED speakers
 
 
 
 
The Gratefulness Team: Commencement Speeches to Inspire
 
 
 
 

By Gray chapman: How The Internet Is Changing The Way Dogs Find Homes
 
 
 
 
Tristan Baurick The Times-Picayune: Florida brewery unveils six-pack rings that feed sea turtles rather than kill them
 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: Playing With Your Food, Hidden Tunnels, TULSA, OKLAHOMA Bright White Arrow, SEATTLE, WASHINGTON Grate Artwork and more ->
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World
 
 
 
 
Kim Willsher The Guardian: ‘Spider-Man’ of Paris to get French citizenship after child rescue President Macron thanks Malian migrant who climbed four storeys to save boy
Gassama said he asked the child how he came to be hanging from the balcony in the 18th arrondissement in the north of Paris.

“He didn’t answer. I asked where his mother was and he said she had gone to a party,” he told journalists.

The father of the child was detained overnight for alleged parental neglect, and is to appear in court in September. Police said the child’s mother was not in Paris at the time of the incident and the boy was now in the care of social services.
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday: Patti Smith, The Godmother of Punk, Is Now Putting Her Pictures on Instagram
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk HIts: 15 Stencil Patterns You’ll Wish You’d Seen Sooner
 
 
Marcela Pena Hometalker Argentina: A Romantic Vanity Dresser
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: Easy Way To Color Glass!
 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

FYI May 27, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1907 – Bubonic plague breaks out in San Francisco.
The San Francisco plague of 1900–1904 was an epidemic of bubonic plague centered on San Francisco’s Chinatown. It was the first plague epidemic in the continental United States.[1] The epidemic was recognized by medical authorities in March 1900, but its existence was denied for more than two years by Henry Gage, the Governor of California. His denial was based on business reasons: the wish to keep the reputations of San Francisco and California clean and to prevent the loss of revenue from trade stopped by quarantine. The failure to act quickly may have allowed the disease to establish itself among local animal populations.[2] Federal authorities worked to build a case to prove that there was a major medical health problem, and they isolated the affected area. Proof that an epidemic was occurring served to undermine the credibility of Gage, and he lost the governorship in the 1902 elections. The new governor, George Pardee, quietly implemented a medical solution and the epidemic was stopped in 1904. There were 121 cases identified, including 119 deaths.[3][4]

After the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, much of urban San Francisco was destroyed by fire, including all of the Chinatown district. The process of rebuilding began immediately but took several years. While reconstruction was in full swing, a second plague epidemic hit San Francisco in May and August 1907 but it was not centered in Chinatown. Rather, cases occurred randomly throughout the city, including cases identified across the bay in Oakland. San Francisco’s politicians and press reacted very differently this time, wanting the problem solved speedily.[5] Health authorities worked quickly to assess and eradicate the disease.[6] To control one of the disease’s vectors, some $2 million was spent between 1907 and 1911 to kill as many rats as possible in the city.[7]

By the end of the second plague outbreak, in June 1908, 160 more cases had been identified, including 78 deaths, a much lower mortality rate than 1900–1904.[8] This time, all of the infected people were Caucasian.[7] Shortly thereafter, the California ground squirrel was identified as another vector of the disease.[6] The initial denial and obstructionist response to the 1900 infection may have allowed the pathogen to gain its first toehold in North America, from which it spread sporadically to other states in the form of sylvatic plague (rural plague). However, it is possible the squirrel population infection predated 1900.[2][9][10][11][12]

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1898 – David Crosthwait, African-American engineer, inventor and writer (d. 1976)
David Crosthwait (May 27, 1898 – February 25, 1976) was an African-American mechanical and electrical engineer, inventor, and writer. He was born in the city of Nashville, Tennessee. He grew up in Kansas City, Missouri. Once he completed high school he received a Bachelor of Science (1913) and a Masters of Engineering (1920) from Purdue University. He was granted an honorary doctoral degree in 1975[2] but died one year later.[1]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

By AJ Dellinger: Astronaut Alan Bean, the Fourth Man to Walk on the Moon, Has Died at 86

Alan LaVern Bean (March 15, 1932 – May 26, 2018) was an American naval officer and naval aviator, aeronautical engineer, test pilot, and NASA astronaut; he was the fourth person to walk on the Moon. He was selected to become an astronaut by NASA in 1963 as part of Astronaut Group 3.

Read more ->
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
By Bradley Brownell: Will Power Wins The Indianapolis 500 10 Years After His First Try
 
 
 
 
By Don Wooten: Say so long, sing a song of Wundram
 
 
 
 
The Media School Report: Through the Gates talks with documentarian Ruth O’Reilly
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Singularity: Poet Marie Howe’s Beautiful Tribute to Stephen Hawking and Our Belonging to the Universe, How to Befriend the Universe: Philosopher and Comedian Emily Levine on the Art of Meeting Reality on Its Own Terms, Life, Loss, and the Wisdom of Rivers and more->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Julien K., Hometalk Team Hometalker Fairfield, CT: Erupting Ice Chalk for Playtime
 
 
 
 
Laci Jane DIY Hometalker Indianapolis, IN: DIY OUTDOOR TABLE WITH STORAGE / TABLETOP TIC TAC TOE
 
 
 
 
By makendo: Plot a Hike on Google Earth
 
 
 
 
By drewmosser: Really Easy Crock Pot Super Soap
 
 
 
 
By DWSciSouth: Iridescent Art
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
 
 
By jprussak: Citric Acid Gets a Shaker
 
 
 
 
By Claire Lower: You Can Make These Smoky, Sous-Vide Ribs Without a Grill or Smoker

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

FYI May 26, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1908 – At Masjed Soleyman in southwest Persia, the first major commercial oil strike in the Middle East is made. The rights to the resource are quickly acquired by the Anglo-Persian Oil Company.
The Anglo-Persian Oil Company (APOC) was a British company founded in 1908 following the discovery of a large oil field in Masjed Soleiman, Iran. It was the first company to extract petroleum from Iran. In 1935 APOC was renamed the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company (AIOC) and in 1954 it was renamed again to the British Petroleum Company (BP), one of the antecedents of the modern BP public limited company, while its assets in Iran were nationalised and taken over by the National Iranian Oil Company.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1883 – Mamie Smith, American singer, actress, dancer, and pianist (d. 1946)
Mamie Smith (née Robinson; May 26, c. 1883 – September 16, 1946) was an American vaudeville singer, dancer, pianist and actress. As a vaudeville singer she performed in various styles, including jazz and blues. In 1920, she entered blues history as the first African-American artist to make vocal blues recordings. Willie “The Lion” Smith (no relation) described the background of that recording in his autobiography, Music on My Mind (1964).

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

FYI

Richard Wayne Peck (April 5, 1934 – May 23, 2018) was an American novelist known for his prolific contributions to modern young adult literature. He was awarded the Newbery Medal in 2001 for his novel A Year Down Yonder (the sequel to A Long Way From Chicago).[2] For his cumulative contribution to young-adult literature, he received the Margaret A. Edwards Award from the American Library Association in 1990.[3][a]

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Brooklands’ Sweetheart Was The First Female Works Driver Who Almost Nailed A Grand Prix Season

Kathleen Coad “Kay” Petre (née Defries; 10 May 1903 – 10 August 1994) was an early motor racing star. She was born in York, Ontario, now part of Toronto.
Read more ->
 
 
 
 
By Owen Laukkanen: Five Remarkable Women Who Changed the Course of Maritime History -> Grace O’Malley, Mary Patten, Eliza Thorrold, Jan Tiura and Kate McCue
 
 
 
 
By Andrew Belonsky: 11 Types of Log Cabins That Weren’t Homes
 
 
 
 
Signature: Our 25 Favorite Opening Lines in Literature
 
 
 
 
By Brigit Katz: Rare Sighting of Small, Critically Endangered Deer Reported in Vietnam The camera trap images of two large-antlered muntjacs offer a glimmer of hope for the species
 
 
 
 

The Old Motor: Parking Lot Series: Texas National Guard Camp Brownwood
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall: Discover the Lost Early Computer Art of Telidon, Canada’s TV Proto-Internet from the 1970s
 
 
 
 
Open Cultur Josh Jones: The Map of Philosophy: See All of the Disciplines, Areas & Subdivisions of Philosophy Mapped in a Comprehensive Video
 
 
 
 
Beautiful!

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Pillar Box Blue: Upcycled Terrarium With DIY Plastic Bottle Faux Succulents
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 14 Amazing Fairy Light Ideas We’re Definitely Going to Copy
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits:13 Bird Feeders From Upcycled Items
 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

J. D. Roth: Does the American Dream require a big American home?

FYI May 25, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1935 – Jesse Owens of Ohio State University breaks three world records and ties a fourth at the Big Ten Conference Track and Field Championships in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

James Cleveland “Jesse” Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an American track and field athlete and four-time Olympic gold medalist in the 1936 Games.

Owens specialized in the sprints and the long jump and was recognized in his lifetime as “perhaps the greatest and most famous athlete in track and field history”.[3] His achievement of setting three world records and tying another in less than an hour at the 1935 Big Ten track meet in Ann Arbor, Michigan, has been called “the greatest 45 minutes ever in sport”[4] and has never been equalled. At the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany, Owens achieved international fame by winning four gold medals: 100 meters, 200 meters, long jump, and 4 × 100 meter relay. He was the most successful athlete at the Games and, as a black man, was credited with “single-handedly crushing Hitler’s myth of Aryan supremacy”, although he “wasn’t invited to the White House to shake hands with the President, either”.[5]

The Jesse Owens Award is USA Track and Field’s highest accolade for the year’s best track and field athlete. Owens was ranked by ESPN as the sixth greatest North American athlete of the twentieth century and the highest-ranked in his sport.[6][7] In 1999 he was on the six-man shortlist for the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Century.[8]

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1818 – Louise de Broglie, Countess d’Haussonville, French essayist and biographer (d. 1882)
Louise de Broglie, Countess d’Haussonville (25 May 1818 – 21 April 1882) was a French essayist and biographer, and a member of the House of Broglie, a distinguished French family. Her 1845 portrait by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, which took three years to complete, has been exhibited in the Frick Collection in New York City since the 1930s.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

BY KATE CONGER: How to Download Your Data With All the Fancy New GDPR Tools
 
 
 
 
By Dvora Meyers: The First Woman To Do A Triple Axel Is Still Skating
 
 
Midori Ito or Midori Itō is a Japanese former figure skater. She is the 1989 World champion and the 1992 Olympic silver medalist. She is the first woman to land a …
 

Read more ->

 

 
 
 
 
By Dan Neilan: Some maniac set the entirety of Rush’s “2112” to old Peanuts clips
 
 
 
 
Messy Nessy Francky Knapp: A Guide to the Secret Bee Villages of NYC
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Vinyl Wraps!
 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

Joanna Rothkopf: This Memorial Day Weekend, Make 1 of These Dips, The Food of God Herself

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

FYI May 24, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1930 – Amy Johnson lands in Darwin, Northern Territory, becoming the first woman to fly solo from England to Australia (she left on May 5 for the 11,000 mile flight).
Amy Johnson CBE (1 July 1903 – 5 January 1941) was a pioneering English aviator who was the first female pilot to fly alone from Britain to Australia.

Flying solo or with her husband, Jim Mollison, she set numerous long-distance records during the 1930s. She flew in the Second World War as a part of the Air Transport Auxiliary and died during a ferry flight.[1]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1878 – Lillian Moller Gilbreth, American psychologist and engineer (d. 1972)
Lillian Evelyn Moller Gilbreth (May 24, 1878 – January 2, 1972) was an American psychologist, industrial engineer, consultant, and educator who was an early pioneer in applying psychology to time-and-motion studies. She was described in the 1940s as “a genius in the art of living.”[2] Gilbreth, one of the first female engineers to earn a Ph.D., is considered to be the first industrial/organizational psychologist. She and her husband, Frank Bunker Gilbreth, were efficiency experts who contributed to the study of industrial engineering, especially in the areas of motion study and human factors. Cheaper by the Dozen (1948) and Belles on Their Toes (1950), written by two of their children (Ernestine and Frank Jr.) tell the story of their family life and describe how time-and-motion studies were applied to the organization and daily activities of their large family.[3] Both books were later made into feature films.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

Norman Eugene “Clint” Walker (May 30, 1927 – May 21, 2018) was an American actor and singer. He was perhaps best known for his starring role as cowboy Cheyenne Bodie in the ABC/Warner Bros. western series Cheyenne from (1955–1963).

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
By John Eligon and Michael D. Shear: Trump Pardons Jack Johnson, Heavyweight Boxing Champion
 
 
 
 
By Jake Buehler: The Practically-Extinct Northern White Rhino Just Got Some Good News
 
 
 
 
The Tombstone House was built with 2200 discarded gravestones

 
 
 
 
Beyond Bylines Team: 8 Steps: How to Run Your Blog Like a Magazine Editor and Boost Your Following
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Rural strategy helps former Marine fighter pilot win Democratic primary for Kentucky congressional seat
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: How six small papers joined forces to cover the opioid crisis in Long Island with the East End News Project
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Bills filed to boost telemedicine, help opioid addicts
 
 
 
 
By Tara Haelle: Free online courses from CDC, WHO and NIH can enhance medical research reporting
 
 
 
 
The California Weather Blog: Wrap-up of California’s dry/warm winter; “May Gray” along the coast and persistent mountain showers continue
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk Hits: 30 Creative Ceiling Ideas That Will Transform Any Room You’ve done the accent wall, but have you thought about that big, blank canvas over your head?
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 22 Ideas To Make Your Terra Cotta Pots Look Oh-So-Pretty Copy one of these ideas to dress up those plain pots of yours!
 
 
 
 
Amanda C, Hometalk Team Hometalker Brooklyn, NY: Why Everyone’s Copying This Ice Dye Technique
 
 
 
 
By Yukon Julie: Hike Like a Pro With These 6 Tips
 
 
 
 
Lolly Jane: farmhouse bathroom remodel + sources
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

By MaddieJ3: Elegant Cake in a Crock-pot!

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

FYI May 23, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1829 – Accordion patent granted to Cyrill Demian in Vienna, Austrian Empire.
Accordions (from 19th-century German Akkordeon, from Akkord—”musical chord, concord of sounds”[1]) are a family of box-shaped musical instruments of the bellows-driven free-reed aerophone type, colloquially referred to as a squeezebox. A person who plays the accordion is called an accordionist. The concertina and bandoneón are related; the harmonium and American reed organ are in the same family.

The instrument is played by compressing or expanding the bellows while pressing buttons or keys, causing pallets to open, which allow air to flow across strips of brass or steel, called reeds. These vibrate to produce sound inside the body. Valves on opposing reeds of each note are used to make the instrument’s reeds sound louder without air leaking from each reed block.[notes 1] The performer normally plays the melody on buttons or keys on the right-hand manual, and the accompaniment, consisting of bass and pre-set chord buttons, on the left-hand manual.

The accordion is widely spread across the world. In some countries (for example Brazil,[2][3] Colombia and Mexico) it is used in popular music (for example Forró, Sertanejo and B-pop in Brazil), whereas in other regions (such as Europe, North America and other countries in South America) it tends to be more used for dance-pop and folk music and is often used in folk music in Europe, North America and South America. In Europe and North America, some popular music acts also make use of the instrument. Additionally, the accordion is used in cajun, zydeco, jazz music and in both solo and orchestral performances of classical music. The piano accordion is the official city instrument of San Francisco, California.[4] Many conservatories in Europe have classical accordion departments. The oldest name for this group of instruments is harmonika, from the Greek harmonikos, meaning “harmonic, musical”. Today, native versions of the name accordion are more common. These names refer to the type of accordion patented by Cyrill Demian, which concerned “automatically coupled chords on the bass side”.[5]

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1606 – Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz, Spanish mathematician and philosopher (d. 1682)
Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz (Juan Caramuel de Lobkowitz, May 23, 1606 in Madrid — September 7 or 8, 1682 in Vigevano) was a Spanish Catholic scholastic philosopher, ecclesiastic, mathematician and writer.

Life
He was a precocious child, early delving into serious problems in mathematics and even publishing astronomical tables at the age of ten. After receiving a superficial education at college, where his unusual ability brought rapid advancement, this prodigy turned his attention to the Asiatic languages, especially Chinese. He was received into the Cistercian Order at the monastery of La Espina, in the diocese of Palencia, and after ordination entered upon a varied and brilliant career.

His sermons attracted the favorable attention of the Infante Ferdinand, Governor of the Low Countries, while he was attached to the monastery of Dunes in Flanders, and in 1638 he was honored with the degree of Doctor of Theology by the University of Leuven. When he was obliged to leave the Electorate of the Palatinate, Philip IV of Spain made him his envoy to the court of Emperor Ferdinand III. He was in turn Abbot of Melrose, Scotland (Scotland), Abbot-Superior of the Benedictines of Vienna, and Grand-Vicar to the Archbishop of Prague.

In 1648, when the Swedes attacked Prague, he armed and led a band of ecclesiastics who did yeoman service in the defence of the city. His bravery on this occasion merited for him a collar of gold from the emperor. Soon after he became Bishop of Satrianum, then Campagna, and at his death was Bishop of Vigevano.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

FYI

Open Culture Josh Jones: Philip Roth (RIP) Creates a List of the 15 Books That Influenced Him Most
 
 
 
 
Why is she even alive? Maybe she’ll decide to kill rape/incest victims. Maybe she’ll decide to murder those who place astronomical prices on life saving pharmaceuticals (epi pens).
By Stassa Edwards: Anti-Abortion ‘Terrorist’ Shelley Shannon Has Been Released From Federal Prison
Abortion clinics across the country have been alerted about Shannon’s release. She has been transported to a halfway house in Oregon where she will serve the remainder of her sentence. Her final release date is November 7.
 
 
 
By David Tracy: The Disruptive Ford F-150 Supplier Fire Had An Explosion That Threw An Employee Through The Air
 
 
 
 
By Kristen Lee:The Tatra 77a Was A Czech ‘Secret Weapon’ Because It Was So Good At Killing Nazis
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Annual National Rural Assembly focuses on civic courage in the building of an inclusive nation, offers lots of stories
 
 
 
 
Beyond Bylines Jennifer Flynn: Native Advertising: The Balancing Act Between Editorial Needs and Ad Revenue Goals
 
 
 
 
Blogger: It’s spring cleaning time for Blogger
 
 
 
 
By Nick Douglas: Password Formulas Don’t Fool Hackers
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Pterodactyls Probably Didn’t Fly Like We Think They Did
 
 
 
 
Holland American Line: O, The Oprah Magazine Editors Join New York Times Bestselling Author, Psychologist and Sound Therapist on Holland America Line’s Aug. 11 Adventure of Your Life Cruise to Alaska
Fares on the Aug. 11 Adventure of Your Life Cruise to Alaska start at $1,219 per person, double occupancy. Taxes, fees and port expenses are additional.
 
 
 
 

Michael Williams for Governor of Georgia 2018


 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Research Tools: Maps: Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal Adds New Collection of 1,000 Interactive Commercial Fishing Maps
 
 
 
 
Miriam Webster: Vocabulary Thrives in Darkness Words borne from the dying of the light
 
 
 
 
By David Frank: World’s Largest Street Rod: 1951 White Moving Van
 
 
 
 
By Eater Staff: 16 Real-Deal Fried Chicken Spots in Portland, Mapped Find the best fried chicken in restaurants across the city
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Chas’ Crazy Creations: Keep Pests Out Of Your Garden
 
 
 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Solar Plant Pot Water Fountain In Under 15 Minutes
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

FYI May 22, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1856 – Congressman Preston Brooks of South Carolina severely beats Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts with a cane in the hall of the United States Senate for a speech Sumner had made regarding Southerners and slavery.
Charles Sumner (January 6, 1811 – March 11, 1874) was an American politician and United States Senator from Massachusetts. As an academic lawyer and a powerful orator, Sumner was the leader of the anti-slavery forces in Massachusetts and a leader of the Radical Republicans in the U.S. Senate during the American Civil War. He worked hard to destroy the Confederacy, free all the slaves, and keep on good terms with Europe. During Reconstruction, he fought to minimize the power of the ex-Confederates and guarantee equal rights to the freedmen. He fell into a dispute with fellow Republican President Ulysses Grant on the question of taking control of Santo Domingo. Grant’s allies stripped Sumner of his power in the Senate in 1871, and he joined the Liberal Republican movement in an effort to defeat Grant’s reelection in 1872.

Sumner changed his political party several times as anti-slavery coalitions rose and fell in the 1830s and 1840s before coalescing in the 1850s as the Republican Party, the affiliation with which he became best known. He devoted his enormous energies to the destruction of what Republicans called the Slave Power, the influence over the federal government of Southern slave owners who sought the continuation and expansion of slavery.[1] In 1856, a South Carolina Congressman, Democrat Preston Brooks, nearly killed Sumner on the Senate floor two days after Sumner delivered an intensely anti-slavery speech called “The Crime Against Kansas.”[2] In the speech, Sumner characterized the attacker’s cousin,[3][4] South Carolina Senator Andrew Butler, a Democrat, as a pimp for slavery.[5] The episode played a major role in the coming of the Civil War. During the war, Sumner was a leader of the Radical Republican faction that criticized President Abraham Lincoln for being too moderate on the South. One of the most learned statesmen of the era, he specialized in foreign affairs, and worked closely with Abraham Lincoln to keep the British and the French from intervening on the side of the Confederacy during the Civil War. Sumner’s expertise and energy made him a powerful chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.

As the chief Radical leader in the Senate during Reconstruction, Sumner fought hard to provide equal civil and voting rights for the freedmen on the grounds that “consent of the governed” was a basic principle of American republicanism, and to block ex-Confederates from power so they would not reverse the gains made from the Union’s victory in the Civil War. Sumner, teaming with House leader Thaddeus Stevens, battled Andrew Johnson’s reconstruction plans and sought to impose a Radical program on the South. Although Sumner forcefully advocated the annexation of Alaska in the Senate, he was against the annexation of the Dominican Republic, then known by the name of its capital, Santo Domingo. After leading Senators to defeat President Ulysses S. Grant’s Santo Domingo Treaty in 1870, Sumner broke with Grant, and denounced him in such terms that reconciliation was impossible. In 1871, President Grant and his Secretary of State Hamilton Fish retaliated; through Grant’s supporters in the Senate, Sumner was deposed as head of the Foreign Relations Committee. Sumner had become convinced that Grant was a corrupt despot and that the success of Reconstruction policies called for new national leadership. Sumner bitterly opposed Grant’s reelection by supporting the Liberal Republican candidate Horace Greeley in 1872 and lost his power inside the Republican Party. Less than two years later, he died in office.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1909 – Margaret Mee, English illustrator and educator (d. 1988)
Margaret Ursula Mee, MBE (22 May 1909 – 30 November 1988)[1] was a British botanical artist who specialised in plants from the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest. She was also one of the first environmentalists to draw attention to the impact of large-scale mining and deforestation on the Amazon Basin.

Early life
Margaret Ursula Brown was born in Whitehill, Chesham in 1909. She attended Dr Challoner’s Grammar School, Amersham, followed by The School of Art, Science and Commerce, Watford. After a short period of teaching in Liverpool she decided to travel abroad.

While in Berlin in 1933, Brown witnessed the burning of the Reichstag and subsequent Jewish boycott, which confirmed her left-wing views. During the Second World War she worked in Hatfield as a draughtswoman at the de Havilland aircraft factory.[2]

Personal life
Mee married Reginald Bruce Bartlett in January 1936.[3] Like her husband, she became a committed trade union activist for the Union of Sign, Glass and Ticket Writers and joined the Communist Party.[4] Mee addressed the TUC in 1937, proposing the raising of the school-leaving age and was subsequently offered, but declined, a job with Ernest Bevin. The marriage to Bartlett was not happy and, after a long separation, ended in divorce in 1943.[5] She later married Greville Mee, who was also attending Saint Martin’s School of Art, in the late 1940s.

Career as artist
After the war Mee studied art at Saint Martin’s School of Art in London. In 1950 she attended the Camberwell School of Arts and Crafts, where she learnt her style of illustration, and received a national diploma in painting and design in 1950. She moved to Brazil with Greville Mee in 1952 to teach art in the British school of São Paulo. Her first expedition was in 1956 to Belém in the Amazon Basin. She then became a botanical artist for São Paulo’s Instituto de Botanica in 1958, exploring the rainforest and more specifically Amazonas state from 1964, painting the plants she saw, some new to science, as well as collecting some for later illustration. She created 400 folios of gouache illustrations, 40 sketchbooks, and 15 diaries.[citation needed]

Mee travelled to Washington D. C., USA in 1964 and briefly to England in 1968 for the exhibition and publication of her book, Flowers of the Brazilian Forests. She returned to Brazil and joined protests to draw international attention to the deforestation of the Amazon region.[2]

Death
Mee died following a car crash in Seagrave, Leicestershire on 30 November 1988. She was 79. In January 1989 a memorial to her life, botanical work and environmental campaigning took place in Kew Gardens.[2]

Recognition and honours

In 1976 Mee was awarded the MBE for services to Brazilian botany and a fellowship of the Linnean Society in 1986. She also received recognition in Brazil including an honorary citizenship of Rio in 1975, the Brazilian order of Cruzeiro do Sul in 1979, In her honour, after her death the Margaret Mee Amazon Trust was founded to further education and research in Amazonian plant life and conservation, by providing scholarships for Brazilian botanical students and plant illustrators who wish to study in the United Kingdom or conduct field research in Brazil.[2]

In 1990 Mee was recognised for her environmental achievements by The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and added to its Global 500 Roll of Honour.[citation needed]

The Diaries of Margaret Mee, written between 1956 and 1988, were published posthumously in 2004 and included an illustrated account of Mee’s expeditions to the Amazonian rainforest.[6] Most of her illustrations are now part of the Kew Gardens collection.[7]

 
 
 
 

FYI

By Alex Goy: How To Become The Ron Burgundy Of Auto Journalism
 
 
 
 
By Patrick Redford: Japanese College Football World Rocked After Player Reveals He Was Ordered To Injure Opposing QB
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Barker: How An Inner-City Minnesota High School Built a Girls’ Badminton Dynasty
 
 
 
 
By Danette Chavez: Tig Notaro does a victory lap in the exultant Happy To Be Here
 
 
 
 
By Jake Buehler: France is Being Invaded By Giant Killer Worms
 
 
 
 
If you design the game for where you live, what would it have?
By Mark Wilson: 50% of people cheat at Monopoly, so Hasbro redesigned it for them “We were literally sitting around thinking, ‘what would really corrupt Monopoly?’ And someone said, ‘what if we cheated?’”
 
 
 
 
By Celia Storey: OLD NEWS: 100 years ago, Arkansas Democrat let teens run paper for the day
 
 
 
 
By Juan Manuel Harán: 14 free online courses about computer security Get a better understanding of cybersecurity with this list of free online courses that you can take to become more cyber-aware
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Fleeing the suburbs for the farm saved this writer’s marriage
 
 
 
 
By Rachel Alexander: Diary of a Local Data Reporter Telling the story of health care workers dying from opioid overdoses in Spokane, Washington
 
 
 
 
Official YouTube Blog: YouTube Music starts rolling out today: 6 reasons you’re gonna like it
 
 
 
 
By Kelly Jensen: A Librarian’s Guide To Finding Diverse Books Before They’re Published (& How To Nominate Them for LibraryReads)
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: When Peas Doubled as Alarm Clocks In the 19th century and well into the 20th, a human alarm clock known as a “knocker-up” would wake people up in time for work in parts of England and Ireland. Armed with sticks—or a pea shooter—they tapped on windows or blasted them with dried peas. A Glass of Kiwi Wine Naara-Aaba is one of the few companies throughout the world that bottles kiwi wine. Located in a remote and rugged part of India, its founding is a rescue mission: Kiwis are an important local crop, but were often left to rot due to competition with imported fruits. And more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Whistle While You Hack The Cap’n Crunch Bo’sun whistle appeared in cereal boxes in the mid-1960s. This tiny toy soon became popular among phone phreakers, early hackers who played certain tones through their telephones to bypass AT&T’s analog system and get free long-distance phone calls. The whistle easily played at 2600Hz, the perfect tone to capture a phone line. When a Swiss International Airlines flight was stranded in a northern Canadian territory in the dead of winter, engineers had to find a way to fix it. And more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: South Georgia Island’s Rat-Sniffing Dogs, Bad Birdies In the U.K., ravens have been seen as having a military duty to the Crown. But when birds misbehave, they can be dismissed from their posts., MOOSE, WYOMING Photogenic Barn and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tansbusch: Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: True Crime Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Daisy Meager: 14 of the Best Buns in London From Chelsea to bao, it’s time to bring out the big buns
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By buck2217: Rough and Ready Veg Storage
 
 
 
 
By spookydonuts: Color Changing Fiber Optic Fabric
 
 
 
 
By bekathwia: Free Online Solar Class
 
 
 
 
By Adam Clarke Estes: This Guy Built a Gorgeous Camera From Scratch
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

FYI May 21, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1934 – Oskaloosa, Iowa, becomes the first municipality in the United States to fingerprint all of its citizens.

Research needed ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1799 – Mary Anning, English paleontologist (d. 1847)

Mary Anning (21 May 1799 – 9 March 1847[2]) was an English fossil collector, dealer, and paleontologist who became known around the world for important finds she made in Jurassic marine fossil beds in the cliffs along the English Channel at Lyme Regis in the county of Dorset in Southwest England.[3] Her findings contributed to important changes in scientific thinking about prehistoric life and the history of the Earth.

Anning searched for fossils in the area’s Blue Lias cliffs, particularly during the winter months when landslides exposed new fossils that had to be collected quickly before they were lost to the sea. She nearly died in 1833 during a landslide that killed her dog, Tray. Her discoveries included the first ichthyosaur skeleton correctly identified; the first two more complete plesiosaur skeletons found; the first pterosaur skeleton located outside Germany; and important fish fossils. Her observations played a key role in the discovery that coprolites, known as bezoar stones at the time, were fossilised faeces. She also discovered that belemnite fossils contained fossilised ink sacs like those of modern cephalopods. When geologist Henry De la Beche painted Duria Antiquior, the first widely circulated pictorial representation of a scene from prehistoric life derived from fossil reconstructions, he based it largely on fossils Anning had found, and sold prints of it for her benefit.

Anning did not fully participate in the scientific community of 19th-century Britain, who were mostly Anglican gentlemen. She struggled financially for much of her life. Her family was poor, and her father, a cabinetmaker, died when she was eleven.

She became well known in geological circles in Britain, Europe, and America, and was consulted on issues of anatomy as well as about collecting fossils. Nonetheless, as a woman, she was not eligible to join the Geological Society of London and she did not always receive full credit for her scientific contributions. Indeed, she wrote in a letter: “The world has used me so unkindly, I fear it has made me suspicious of everyone.”[4] The only scientific writing of hers published in her lifetime appeared in the Magazine of Natural History in 1839, an extract from a letter that Anning had written to the magazine’s editor questioning one of its claims.[5]

After her death in 1847, her unusual life story attracted increasing interest. An uncredited author in All the Year Round, edited by Charles Dickens, wrote of her in 1865 that “[t]he carpenter’s daughter has won a name for herself, and has deserved to win it.”[4] It has often been claimed that her story was the inspiration for the 1908 tongue-twister “She sells seashells on the seashore” by Terry Sullivan.[6][7] In 2010, one hundred and sixty-three years after her death, the Royal Society included Anning in a list of the ten British women who have most influenced the history of science.[8]

Read more->

 
 
 
 

FYI

By Stef Schrader: I Have A New Favorite Two-Wheel Motorsport: Vespacross
 
 
 
 
By Stef Schrader: Barbie Jeep Racing Down Virginia International Raceway Looks Like Way Too Much Fun
 
 
 
 
By Messy Nessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol CCLXXXVIII): NASA’s Giant Wind Tunnels, The Marlboro Man has nothing on these pioneering cowgirls and more ->
 
 
 
 
Classic Motorsports Magazine: Pretty in Pink: An Unlikely Austin-Healey Story and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk Highlights: 16 Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do With Chicken Wire
 
 
 
 
Wanda @ From House To Home Hometalker Inman, SC: The Best Inexpensive and Non-Toxic DIY Deck Cleaner
 
 
 
 
By jessyratfink: How to Increase Humidity for Houseplants
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

By audreyobscura: Free Online Bread Class

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

FYI May 20, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1631 – The city of Magdeburg in Germany is seized by forces of the Holy Roman Empire and most of its inhabitants massacred, in one of the bloodiest incidents of the Thirty Years’ War.

Magdeburg (German pronunciation: [ˈmakdəbʊɐ̯k] (About this sound listen); Low Saxon: Meideborg, [ˈmaˑɪdebɔɐ̯x]) is the capital city and the second largest city of the state of Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. Magdeburg is situated on the Elbe River.

Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor and founder of the archbishopric of Magdeburg, was buried in the town’s cathedral after his death. Magdeburg’s version of German town law, known as Magdeburg rights, spread throughout Central and Eastern Europe. The city is also well known for the Sack of Magdeburg, which sparked outrage across the Protestant world and became the worst massacre of the Thirty Years’ War. Prior to it, Magdeburg was one of the largest and most prosperous German cities, and a notable member of the Hanseatic League. Magdeburg was destroyed twice in its history. Though aerial bombing by the Allies destroyed much of the city in 1945, it suffered a much greater damage at the hands of Catholics in 1631.

Magdeburg is the site of two universities, the Otto-von-Guericke University and the Magdeburg-Stendal University of Applied Sciences.[2]

Nowadays Magdeburg is a traffic junction as well as an industrial and trading centre. The production of chemical products, steel, paper and textiles are of particular economic significance, along with mechanical engineering and plant engineering, ecotechnology and life-cycle management, health management and logistics.

In 2005 Magdeburg celebrated its 1200th anniversary. In June 2013 Magdeburg was hit by record breaking flooding.[3]

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1882 – Sigrid Undset, Danish-Norwegian novelist, essayist, and translator, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1949)

Sigrid Undset (20 May 1882 – 10 June 1949) was a Norwegian novelist who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1928.[2]

Undset was born in Kalundborg, Denmark, but her family moved to Norway when she was two years old. In 1924, she converted to Catholicism. She fled Norway for the United States in 1940 because of her opposition to Nazi Germany and the German invasion and occupation of Norway, but returned after World War II ended in 1945.

Her best-known work is Kristin Lavransdatter, a trilogy about life in Scandinavia in the Middle Ages, portrayed through the experiences of a woman from birth until death. Its three volumes were published between 1920 and 1922.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

Open Culture Josh Jones: Hear a 12-Hour Playlist of Experimental Symphonic Noise Rock by Avant-Garde Guitarist and Composer Glenn Branca (RIP)
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: DataCite Offers a Look at DOI Registrations for Software (58,301 DOIs Registrations as of May 16th)
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: The Television Academy Foundation Launches New Portal For “The Interviews: An Oral History of Television”
 
 
 
 

The Public Domain Review Latest Newsletter: Exquisite Rot: Spalted Wood and the Lost Art of Intarsia, Maps Showing California as an Island, Mnemonic Alphabet of Jacobus Publicius (1482) and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Diana Hockley: The Odd Cat Sanctuary
Recently Diana discovered a wonderful and very special cat sanctuary, the Odd Cat Sanctuary in Salem, Massachusetts. So she took some time to chat with it’s founder Tara Kay.
 
 
 
 
By Seth Ferranti: The Morphine Queen Who Defied the Nazis
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Two Hundred Years of Blue Cerulean splendor from Goethe, Thoreau, Virginia Woolf, Vladimir Nabokov, Rachel Carson, Toni Morrison, and other literary masters.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

New Life on a Homestead: Homemade Toys Part 1: How To Make a Fairy Dollhouse
 
 
 
 
By Penelopy Bulnick: Easy Crochet Dishcloth / Washcloth
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars