Category: FYI

FYI

Court files help show how FDA enabled opioid epidemic

Approval of OxyContin, the drug that “arguably opened the floodgates of the opioid epidemic,” came with a misleading sentence that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowed in the drug’s official label, Caitlin Esch reported for Marketplace last month. Her report, based on court files she unearthed, was excerpted this week on West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s “Inside Appalachia.”

On page 15 of the 21-page official label FDA approved for OxyContin in 1995 was this sentence: “Delayed absorption as provided by Oxycotin tablets is believed to reduce the abuse liability of a drug.” A drug, not the drug; Purdue Pharma, its manufacturer, had done no research on its potential for addiction. Another sentence said addiction was rare under a doctor’s care, but the study wasn’t based on OxyContin.

Read more: Court files help show how FDA enabled opioid epidemic

Little Big House: Friday Frenzy

A Happy Snowy Friday Frenzy To YOU!

The Friday Frenzy is one of the best to link parties on the internet. We pin, share, comment and tweet ALL your posts to boost traffic back to you.

Read more: Friday Frenzy

Mickie’s Mutterings: FAKE Paella with REAL Ingredients –

Merriam-Webster online dictionary defines Paella as: a saffron-flavored dish containing rice, meat, seafood, and vegetables.   Urban Dictionary’s online definition number 4 for Fake: Something that isn’t real, even if you want it to be real through wishful thinking.   This is FAKE Paella. There is no saffron or meat, …

Continue reading: FAKE Paella with REAL Ingredients –

FYI January 26, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1564 – The Council of Trent establishes an official distinction between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism.
The Council of Trent (Latin: Concilium Tridentinum), held between 1545 and 1563 in Trent, or Trento, in northern Italy. It was an ecumenical council of the Catholic Church.[1] Prompted by the Protestant Reformation, it has been described as the embodiment of the Counter-Reformation.[2][3]

The Council issued condemnations of what it defined to be heresies committed by Protestantism and key statements and clarifications of the Church’s doctrine and teachings, including scripture, the Biblical canon, sacred tradition, original sin, justification, salvation, the sacraments, the Mass and the veneration of saints.[4] The Council met for twenty-five sessions between 13 December 1545 and 4 December 1563.[5] Pope Paul III, who convoked the Council, presided over the first eight sessions (1545–47), while the twelfth to sixteenth sessions (1551–52) were overseen by Pope Julius III and the seventeenth to twenty-fifth sessions (1562–63) by Pope Pius IV.

The consequences of the Council were also significant as regards the Church’s liturgy and practices. During its deliberations, the Council made the Vulgate the official example of the Biblical canon and commissioned the creation of a standard version, although this was not achieved until the 1590s.[2] In 1565, a year after the Council finished its work, Pius IV issued the Tridentine Creed (after Tridentum, Trent’s Latin name) and his successor Pius V then issued the Roman Catechism and revisions of the Breviary and Missal in, respectively, 1566, 1568 and 1570. These, in turn, led to the codification of the Tridentine Mass, which remained the Church’s primary form of the Mass for the next four hundred years.

More than three hundred years passed until the next ecumenical council, the First Vatican Council, was convened in 1869.

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Born On This Day

1892 – Bessie Coleman, American pilot (d. 1926)
Bessie Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926) was an American civil aviator. She was the first woman of African-American descent, and the first of Native American descent, to hold a pilot license.[2][3][4] She achieved her international pilot license in 1921.[3][4][5] Born to a family of sharecroppers in Texas, she went into the cotton fields at a young age but also studied in a small segregated school and went on to attend one term of college at Langston University. She developed an early interest in flying, but African Americans, Native Americans, and women had no flight-school opportunities in the United States, so she saved up money to go to France to become a licensed pilot. She soon became a successful air show pilot in the United States, and hoped to start a school for African-American fliers. She died in a plane crash in 1926 while testing her new aircraft. Her pioneering role was an inspiration to early pilots and to the African-American and Native American communities.

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FYI

State of the Union 2018, live on YouTube
Head to YouTube on Tuesday, January 30, at 6 p.m. PT / 9 p.m. ET to watch the action live.
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Wisconsin newspapers OK with bill to allow public notices in free papers because some areas no longer have a paper
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Weise and Charisse Jones: Walmart, Apple and Google go up against Amazon in a fight for readers (and listeners)
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: MIT’s New Master’s Program Admits Students Without College and High School Degrees … and Helps Solve the World’s Most Pressing Problems

Enrollment in the online MicroMasters courses began in February of last year (the next round starts on February 6, 2018), and the DEDP master’s program will start in 2019. “The world of development policy has become more and more evidence-based over the past 10-15 years,” explains MIT professor of economics Ben Olken, who co-created the program with economics professors Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee. “Development practitioners need to understand not just development issues, but how to analyze them rigorously using data. This program is designed to help fill that gap.”
 
 
 
 

By Dan Colman: How to Spot a Communist Using Literary Criticism: A 1955 Manual from the U.S. Military
Rather chillingly, the pamphlet also warned that Communists revealed themselves if and when they talked about “McCarthyism,” “violation of civil rights,” “racial or religious discrimination” or “peace.” In other words, they were guilty if they suggested that the government was overstepping its bounds.

According to Corliss Lamont’s book, Freedom Is As Freedom Does, the First Army withdrew the pamphlet after Murray Kempton slammed it in The New York Post and The New York Times wrote its own scathing op-ed. In 1955, the press could take those risks. The year before, Joseph Welch had faced up to Joe McCarthy, asking with his immortal words, “Have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last, have you left no sense of decency? A question someone will eventually dare to ask again.

 
 
 
 
By Scott Myers: Andrew Stanton TED Talk: “Clues to a Great Story”
 
 
 
 
By David Jesse, Detroit Free Press: Lou Anna Simon’s resignation from MSU comes with lifetime of perks
The contract also spells out a number of lifetime perks Simon and her husband will receive.

Parking passes for on-campus parking
Two free tickets to home football games for the Spartan Club suites
Two free tickets to women’s basketball games
The option to buy up to four men’s basketball tickets in the same location she currently has seats
Reduced-price tickets for bowl games and post-season play for football, men’s and women’s basketball and ice hockey
Parking pass for all home sporting and cultural events

“Other than the granting of emeritus status, we rarely see such benefits in any contracts,” Finkelstein said. “What is extremely unusual about these benefits is that so many of these are related to sporting events.
 
 
 
 

By Stan Schroeder: Apple will launch a redesigned iBooks app soon, report claims
 
 
 
 
By Matt Enis: Digital Science Launches Dimensions Platform with Free Discovery for OA, Citations
“Today, citation data is extremely expensive…. Our goal is to make that level of information, or better, available at no cost,” Stephen Leicht, co-founder of ÜberResearch and COO of Digital Science, Discovery and Analytics Group, told LJ. “Researchers don’t have to log in, they don’t have to have a .edu [email] address,” although users do have the option to create a free account in order to save searches and perform other basic research management functions, Leicht said.
 
 
 
 
By Matt Enis: Sterling Heights Incorporates Brain Training Software into Program for Seniors
Turgeon’s description of mental fitness exercise as an emerging trend may prove to be accurate, particularly as evidence of its effectiveness continues to emerge. Last week, Demco announced a partnership with the U.S. Department of Defense through the libraries of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marines to offer BrainHQ to active, reserve, and retired members of the armed services, as well as their families. In a prepared statement, Kristen Campbell, chief of the Air Force Libraries Division, said that the software was chosen “to help service members hone qualities such as lifelong learning, readiness, and resilience. This unique program will help our personnel improve their attention spans, decision making skills, and cognitive speed.”
 
 
 
 
By Alanis King: Owner Has To Explain That His Cats Love Riding On The Hood Of His Car After Someone Calls The Cops
 
 
 
 
By Raphael Orlove: Watch The World’s Best Drivers Struggle To Stay On The Road At Rallye Monte Carlo

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

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Art Camera – Google Arts & Culture

Working with museums around the world, Google has used its Art Camera system to capture the finest details of artworks from their collection.

Art Camera – Google Arts & Culture

An easy formula: 5 reasons to use Google Sheets

Import, export, email. Do it again? There are faster ways to report data insights.

Read more – An easy formula: 5 reasons to use Google Sheets

By David Harry: How Hackers are Hiding Content & Links via PNG Files

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Email WhatsApp Evernote SMS For nearly 7 years (of my 19 year SEO career) I did “forensic SEO”. From dealing with penalties, hacked sites to general traffic loss, sorting out why things are going wrong was my life. Over that time I’ve seen a lot of nasty hacks and negative […]

Read more – How Hackers are Hiding Content & Links via PNG Files

Media Insider: LA Times Journalists Vote to Unionize, Google Suspends Fact-Checking Feature, Tronc and Axios Talk Syndication Deal

ICYMI. 5 top media stories you need on your radar this week.
Read more – Media Insider: LA Times Journalists Vote to Unionize, Google Suspends Fact-Checking Feature, Tronc and Axios Talk Syndication Deal

FYI January 25, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1704 – The Battle of Ayubale results in the destruction of most of the Spanish missions in Florida.
The Apalachee massacre was a series of raids by English colonists from the Province of Carolina and their Indian allies against a largely pacific population of Apalachee Indians in northern Spanish Florida that took place during Queen Anne’s War in 1704. Against limited Spanish and Indian resistance, a network of missions was destroyed; most of the population either was killed or captured, fled to larger Spanish and French outposts, or voluntarily joined the English.

The only major event of former Carolina Governor James Moore’s expedition was the Battle of Ayubale, which marked the only large-scale resistance to the English raids. Significant numbers of the Apalachee, unhappy with the conditions they lived in under the Spanish, simply abandoned their towns and joined Moore’s expedition.[citation needed] They were resettled near the Savannah and Ocmulgee Rivers, where conditions were only slightly better.

Moore’s raiding expedition was preceded and followed by other raiding activity that was principally conducted by English-allied Creeks. The cumulative effect of these raids, conducted between 1702 and 1709, was to depopulate Spanish Florida beyond the immediate confines of Saint Augustine and Pensacola.

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Born On This Day

1755 – Paolo Mascagni, Italian physician and anatomist (d. 1815)
Paolo Mascagni (January 25, 1755 – October 19, 1815) was an Italian physician, known for his study of human anatomy, in particular for the first complete description of the lymphatic system.

Mascagni was born in Pomarance (in the Province of Pisa) to Aurelio Mascagni and Elisabetta Burroni, both belonging to old gentry families of Chiusdino (in the Province of Siena). He studied in Siena, where his teacher of anatomy was Pietro Tabarrini, and graduated in philosophy and medicine in 1778. Already in his last year of college he was appointed assistant to Tabarrini, then he became a professor in 1780.
Vasorum lymphaticorum corporis humani historia et ichnographia

As a young man Mascagni was interested in geological sciences, as evidenced by his several papers on the Lagoni (thermal springs) of Siena and Volterra. Once graduated, however, he turned his interest to the human lymphatic system. His many discoveries in this field led him in 1787 to the composition of Vasorum lymphaticorum corporis humani historia et iconographia, a work that soon made him famous throughout Europe. He was elected a corresponding member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1796, and president of the Accademia dei Fisiocritici in 1798.

During the French occupation of Tuscany he showed himself an enthusiastic jacobin. For this reason he had to spend seven months in prison after the French were expelled.

He was freed from prison by a motu proprio of the King of Etruria, who on October 22, 1801 appointed Mascagni a professor of anatomy at the University of Pisa, with the additional charge of lecturing twice a week at the Hospital of Santa Maria Nuova in Florence. Later Maria Luisa di Borbone, Duchess of Lucca appointed him a full professor at the University of Florence.

Mascagni employed Clemente Susini to make wax models of the human lymphatic system, which are still visible in a Bologna museum.[1] In 1801 the Sardinian anatomist Francesco Antonio Boi became a student of Mascagni. Mascagni and Boi entered into a close collaboration as well as a personal friendship. More wax models resulted from their collaboration; they are now held in the Museo archeologico nazionale in Cagliari.[2]

Mascagni died of pernicious fever during a stay in his estate of Castelletto in Chiusdino, (Siena), the place from which his family originated and where he spent much of his spare time.

Some decades after his death his statue was erected in the courtyard of the Uffizi.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]
 
 
 
 

FYI

By Elizabeth McLaughlin: History-making female Marine laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery
 
 
 
 
By Erik Shilling: Engineer In Deadly Amtrak Derailment Says He Planned To Brake Before Curve But Missed A Sign
 
 
 
 
By Tim Johnson: Here’s a tech problem to debug: Why are so few women in cybersecurity?
WASHINGTON

Ellison Anne Williams has a PhD in mathematics, vast experience at the den of wizards known as the National Security Agency, and entrepreneurial chops. She’s accomplished and smart.

So what happened to her at a recent business meeting left her dismayed, although it is far from uncommon for women in cybersecurity.

“I was in the room and the fellow walked in. He stopped dead in his tracks and the first words out of his mouth were, ‘You’re a girl.’ And I said, ‘Yes, what were you expecting?’” said Williams, founder and chief executive of Enveil, a Fulton, Maryland, data security company.

 
 
 
 
By Theo Douglas: Vehicle Licensing, Cybersecurity Top Priorities for New Minnesota CIO
Dayton announced at a press conference on Jan. 24 that Brig. Gen. Johanna Clyborne will begin serving as commissioner of Minnesota Information Technology Services (MNIT) and state chief information officer (CIO) effective Feb. 2.
 
 
 
 
By Dave Orrick: Can this brigadier general fix the DMV mess? Dayton says she can.

BRONZE STAR COMBAT VETERAN
She’s a combat veteran of the Iraq War, for which she was awarded the Bronze Star. She was the first female to command a brigade and earn the rank of brigadier general in the Minnesota National Guard.
 
 
 
 
Mark Spencer, forensic botanist
Mark Spencer is a forensic botanist. In other words, he helps police with criminal cases where plant-based evidence can make a difference. His visual identity, designed by London-based Fieldwork Facility, needed to be intelligent, simple, and memorably executed, and part of the challenge was to avoid any insensitivity to the gravity of Mark’s work.
 
 
 
 
Net Neutrality in your state?
By Kanyakrit Vongkiatkajorn: Montana Just Showed Every Other State How to Protect the Open Internet “We can’t wait for folks in Washington DC to come to their senses and reinstate these rules.”

The governor of Montana took a major step forward in the fight for a free and open internet on Monday, signing an executive order requiring internet service providers to abide by net neutrality rules if they want to contract with the state government. Though several states have proposed legislation to preserve net neutrality, the decision by Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock marks the first time a state has actually put a proposal into action.
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: A New Proof-of-Concept: Library of Congress Introduces a Virtual U.S. Copyright Office Card Catalog
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Rebranding: MIT Libraries Introduces a New Visual Identity
 
 
 
 
Do you digitally archive your participation signs in public events? If you participate in a yearly event how have your signs changed over the years?
By Gary Price: New Online: A Digital Archive of Signs from Last Year’s Boston Women’s March
 
 
 
 
By Katherine Schwab: This Is What A Designer-Led Social Network Looks Like
Are.na
 
 
 
 
Interesting idea. Lots of rabbit trails with this…could one fund help for victims of heinous crimes such as sexual abuse of children?
By John Converse Townsend: Now You Can Help Bail People Out Of Jail Every Time You Buy Something
“One of the things that we want to do with Appolition in 2018 is to help people–black or otherwise–crowdfund the $500 to file their petitions and have cannabis-related charges removed from their record,” Ziegler says. “Folks can have amnesty, and people who are currently in jail can possibly get out, so that’s really cool.”
 
 
 
 
Structures where you live?
By Eillie Anzilotti: See How The Telecom Industry Is Quietly Changing The Shape Of Our Cities
 
 
 
 
By Jason Torchinsky: Watch A School Bus Slide Out Of Control On Ice
 
 
 
 
By Kory Stamper: Where did “asshat” come from?
 
 
 
 
By Elena K. Hometalk Team: Easy Grout Cleaner (and Swiffer Hack) for Under $8
 
 
 
 
By Alicia W.: Four “Killer” Ideas to Get Rid of Weeds Forever
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

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Recipes

By Nina Santos: High Protein Soup Recipes for Nutritious (and Filling) Meals


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FYI January 24, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1739 – Peshva warrior Chimnaji Appa defeats Portuguese forces and captures Tarapur Fort, India.
Shreemant Chimaji Ballal Peshwa (aka Chimaji Appa)(1707–1740) was the son of Balaji Vishwanath Bhat and the younger brother of Bajirao Peshwa of Maratha Empire. He was an able military commander who liberated the western coast of India from Portuguese rule. The high watermark of his career was the capture of Vasai fort from the Portuguese in a hard fought battle.

Maratha campaigns against the portuguesse
Chimaji Appa concentrated his energies towards the Western Ghats. Vasai (formerly known as Bassein) was the ultimate objective of the war, as this was the capital of the provincial government of Portugal’s northern Indian

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Born On This Day

1619 – Yamazaki Ansai, Japanese philosopher (d. 1682)
Yamazaki Ansai (山崎 闇斎, January 24, 1619 – September 16, 1682) was a Japanese philosopher and scholar. He began his career as a Buddhist monk, but eventually came to follow the teachings of Neo-Confucian Zhu Xi. He combined Neo-Confucian ideas with Shinto to create Suika Shinto.

Life
Early Years/Buddhism

Born in Kyoto on January 24, 1619, Yamazaki Ansai was the son of a former rōnin-turned-doctor and the last of four children. In his youth, he was strongly influenced by both his mother and grandmother. While his mother “urged him to develop a noble heart worthy of a samurai’s son,”[1] his grandmother supported him in his study of the Chinese language. In his preteens, he was sent by his father to serve as an acolyte at a Buddhist temple on Mount Hiei.[2] In his early teens, Ansai returned home, and after several years was finally permitted to enter the Myōshin-ji temple of the Rinzai Zen sect in Kyoto for further study. Due to his incredible scholarly aptitude, in his early twenties he was granted entrance to the Gyūkō-ji temple in Tosa. During his time at Tosa, he was strongly advised by his fellow monks to concentrate his studies on the teachings of Neo-Confucian scholars, thereby beginning the process of Ansai’s conversion to Neo-Confucianism and ultimate rejection of Buddhism. Ansai was particularly captivated by the writings of the Song dynasty scholar, Zhu Xi (Chu Hsi), which later became the basis of Ansai’s moral philosophy/teachings. At twenty eight, he returned to Kyoto, and under the patronage of Nonaka Kenzan, was able to continue his Neo Confucian studies, as well as begin to publish his own materials. With the production of his first work Heresies Refuted (Heikii, 1647), an outright rejection of Buddhist faith, Ansai fully embraced “the One True Way” of Neo Confucianism.[3]

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FYI

By GERALD JONAS & Daniel E. Slotnik: Ursula K. Le Guin, Acclaimed for Her Fantasy Fiction, Is Dead at 88

 
 
 
 
By Sean O’Neal: Remembering The Fall’s Mark E. Smith, rock’s most uncompromising voice
 
 
 
 
By Katie Rife: R.I.P. horror novelist Jack Ketchum
 
 
 
 
By Lynn Sweet: Tammy Duckworth is pregnant; will be 1st senator to give birth
 
 
 
 
By Lauren Evans: Cecile Richards Reportedly Stepping Down As President of Planned Parenthood
 
 
 
 
By Maddie Stone: Apparently Storms Can Push 600-Ton Boulders Around
 
 
 
 
By Andrew Liszewski: Riding Along With This Crop Duster As He Barely Misses a Tree Is Better Than Top Gun
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: New Research Resource: Free Online Access to Millions of Documents on Chemical Toxicity Made Possible Through Toxicdocs
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Metadata: YouTube Adopts ISNI ID for Artists & Songwriters
 
 
 
 
By Perry Stein: These kids started a book club for minority boys. It’s the most popular club in school.
 
 
 
 
By Christine Schmidt: Here’s how to build a better newsletter, according to a bunch of self-professed newsletter nerds
 
 
 
 
By Laura Hazard Owen: “Punchier and stronger” and with way more women: How Outside Magazine got to be badass online
 
 
 
 
By J. G. Pasterjak: Action Cam Guide
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Leaked Trump infrastructure plan includes incentives for rural transportation, broadband, utilities
 
 
 
 
Elton John announces final tour on YouTube in VR180 bringing together fans around the world
Elton John is always up for doing things differently, using the latest technology to help him defy space and time, connecting his past and future. Last year, Elton’s YouTube-supported “The Cut” gave undiscovered talent the chance to create the first-ever official music videos for three of his iconic hits, and now his final farewell tour announcement takes experimentation to the next level – livestreaming in VR. Check out VR360 video from the event at youtube.com/eltonjohn and additional event footage including two live performances, a Q&A with Anderson Cooper, and “Behind The Scenes” videos in VR180 tracking Elton’s journey, supported by YouTube, will be available in the coming days.

For more info on the tour, go to EltonJohn.com.
 
 
 
 
By Paul Bradshaw Online Journalism: What changed in 2017 — and what we can expect in 2018 (maybe)
 
 
 
 
By Adele Peters: A 14-Year-Old Made An App To Help Alzheimer’s Patients Recognize Their Loved Ones
In her app under development, called Timeless, Alzheimer’s patients can scroll through photos of friends and family, and the app will tell them who the person is and how they’re related to the patient using facial recognition tech. If a patient doesn’t recognize someone in the same room, they can take a picture and the tech will also try to automatically identify them.
 
 
 
 
By Lindsay Tigar: Advice On Living The Dream From Digital Nomads Who Make Over Six Figures
 
 
 
 
Comments?
By Matthew Marcus: Want To Topple Telecom Oligopolies? Support Locally Owned Broadband

That’s why Lyndon Township’s residents decided to fund a 3 million dollar broadband project, which increased their property taxes by over $20 per month on average. The end result will be a locally owned network offering a basic 100 Mbps fiber-to-the-home service, which is faster and more reliable than most cable services. As Ben Fineman, president of the Michigan Broadband Cooperative explained, “for people in a rural area, that’s far and away better than anything they can get today.”
 
 
 
 
Tequila & surprises???
By Nagina Abdullah: 10 Surprising Benefits of Tequila You Never Knew
 
 
 
 
Five Best Dog Breeds for Single Women Living Alone
 
 
 
 
By Allison Sayer: The Best Homesteading Books
 
 
 
 
By Kate Wood: 15 Best Online Bookstores for Cheap New and Used Books
 
 
 
 
By Lana Winter-Hébert: 20 Online Resources for Free E-Books
 
 
 
 

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