Category: FYI

FYI

FYI February 07, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1497 – The Bonfire of the Vanities occurs, during which supporters of Girolamo Savonarola burn cosmetics, art, and books in Florence, Italy.
A bonfire of the vanities (Italian: falò delle vanità) is a burning of objects condemned by authorities as occasions of sin. The phrase usually refers to the bonfire of 7 February 1497, when supporters of the Dominican friar Girolamo Savonarola collected and publicly burned thousands of objects such as cosmetics, art, and books in Florence, Italy, on the Mardi Gras festival.[1] Such bonfires were not invented by Savonarola, but had been a common accompaniment to the outdoor sermons of San Bernardino di Siena in the first half of the century.

The focus of this destruction was nominally on objects that might tempt one to sin, including vanity items such as mirrors, cosmetics, fine dresses, playing cards, and even musical instruments. Other targets included books that were deemed to be immoral, such as works by Boccaccio, and manuscripts of secular songs, as well as artworks, including paintings and sculpture.

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Born On This Day

1906 – Oleg Konstantinovich Antonov, Russian engineer, founded the Antonov Aircraft Company (d. 1984)
Oleg Konstantinovich Antonov (Russian: Оле́г Константи́нович Анто́нов, ; 7 February 1906 – 4 April 1984) was a prominent Soviet aircraft designer, and the first chief of Antonov – a world-famous aircraft company in Ukraine, later named in his honour.

Antonov was personally responsible for designing a number of very successful Soviet airplanes (such as the Antonov An-12) and gliders for both civilian and military use.

Early life
Antonov was born on 7 February 1906 in Troitsy (now Podolsky District of the Moscow Oblast), Russian Empire of Russian Ethnicity.[1][unreliable source?] In 1912, the Antonovs moved to Saratov, where he attended the non-classical secondary school (now gymnasium №1) and secondary school (now school №23). From an early age, Antonov was fascinated with aviation and spent much of his spare time at the local airfield.

Early engineering career
At the age of 17, Antonov founded the “Amateur Aviation Club” and later joined the “Organization of Friends of the Air Force”. Later he designed the OKA-1 “Pigeon”, a glider that was entered in a competition in Moscow where he won the first prize, a flight on a Junkers 12 aircraft.[2]

In 1930, Antonov graduated from the Kalinin Polytechnical Institute in Leningrad. He continued to design gliders and in 1931 Antonov became the chief designer at the Moscow Glider Factory. During the next eight years, he designed 30 different gliders including the Standard-1, Standard-2, OKA-6 and the large “City of Lenin” glider. Due to a requirement that all pilots in the Soviet Union had to begin their flight training in gliders, Antonov was able to produce up to 8,000 gliders per year.[2]

In 1938, after an incident when an instructor defected to the West using a glider, the Soviet government reversed its decision regarding glider training, banned the sport of gliding and shut down the Moscow Glider Factory.

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FYI

By Ellie Shechet: Man Arrested Twice on Domestic Violence Charges Shot and Killed Ex-Girlfriend on the Street
A man who had previously been arrested on domestic violence charges twice and released pending trial, shot and killed his ex-girlfriend on the street on Tuesday, NBC New York reports. Law enforcement sources told NBC New York that Kareem Dawson, 31, chased after and shot Tiffany Wilson, 28, who was the mother of his two children.
 
 
 
 
By Michael Ballaban: The Falcon Heavy’s Boosters’ Landings Made Twin Triple Sonic Booms And They’re Loud As Hell
 
 
 
 
By Andrew P. Collins: Here’s How Jay Leno’s Car Detailer Recommends You Clean Your Ride
 
 
 
 
By Kashmir Hill and Surya Mattu: The House That Spied on Me
 
 
 
 
By Heather Graham: Minnesota holding workshops for law enforcement on farmers’ mental-health issues; high suicide rate noted
 
 
 
 
By Stephanie Donovan – Blog Profiles: Zero Waste Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: 1,600 Occult Books Now Digitized & Put Online, Thanks to the Ritman Library and Da Vinci Code Author Dan Brown
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall: NASA Puts 400+ Historic Experimental Flight Videos on YouTube

 
 
 
 
By Dan Colman: Bill Gates Names His New Favorite Book of All Time: A Quick Introduction to Steven Pinker’s Enlightenment Now
 
 
 
 
By Tom Suddard: Car Shipping 101: Because You Can’t Drive Every Project Home
 
 
 
 
By Yutaka Ishii: Search your perfect image Introducing a new Unsplash search at STUDIO.
 
 
 
 
By Pablo Esparza Altuna: The House That Saved Refugee Mothers From the Spanish Civil War

It was December 1940, and most of the women in the maternity ward were Spanish Republicans who had fled across the border in February 1939 at the end of their country’s civil war. Soon they were joined by French, Eastern European, Jewish and Gypsy women fleeing the advancing Nazi war machine.
 
 
 
 
Webneel: 50 Valentine’s Day Free Design Resources – Download Free Vectors, PSD and Icons
 
 
 
 

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Atlas Obscura – The First Girl Scout Cookie Was Surprisingly Boring



Cookie Ancestor

From Thin Mints to decadent Peanut Butter Patties, Girl Scout cookies come in exciting flavors. Yet, the original recipe was surprisingly kind of boring.
 
 
 
 

The Borrowing Records of Famous Readers
The New York Society Library is a subscription library that has been around since 1754. With a few small gaps, the institution has preserved the circulation records of its members, including Alexander Hamilton, Willa Cather, and Nora Ephron.
 
 
 
 


HILLSBORO, OREGON Secret Jewels
An unassuming ranch house hides a treasure trove of unique gems and minerals.
 
 
 
 
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Henrik Edberg – How to Live a Happy Life: 10 Things to Say Yes to Starting Today

“Very little is needed to make a happy life; it is all within yourself, in your way of thinking.”
Marcus Aurelius

Saying no is often the easier way out.

When you say no you can safely stay within your comfort zone. You don’t have to fear failing or being rejected. The scary unknown and sometimes difficult change can be avoided.

But if you say yes your life can expand and deepen. The yes allows you to open up your life to more happiness.

Today I would like to share 10 things that I have said yes to and that have helped me to become happier in my life.

Pick one of these that resonate the most with you and focus on making it a part of your life.

Read complete article ->

Henrik Edberg: 5 Effective Ways to Keep the Energy and Optimism Up During the Dark and Cold Winter

Up here in Sweden the winter is dark, cold and often comes with a mix of rain and snow. And spring is still far away.

It is not easy to keep the energy and optimism up like in the bright and warm summer days.

So today I’d like to share 5 habits I use that make it a lot easier to stay positive even throughout this dark and often grey season.

Read more -> Discover 5 simple habits that actually work to keep the energy and optimism up even though the winter might be cold, dark and dreary.

By Henrik Edberg: How to Overcome Frustration: 3 Simple but Effective Steps

Frustration. It winds you up and can take so much out of you.

Because it not only sucks energy but also distracts you and can steal quite a bit of time.

So what can you do?

Well, sometimes that frustration can actually be a positive and can give you a new idea or angle on things. Or it can give you the power to keep going just a little bit more until you reach your goal.

But when you start going in circles, when the frustration just makes you mad or your mind foggy and the day is starting to slip through your fingers then there are steps you can take.

There are ways to turn such a state of mind or day around.

Into something better. Into something more helpful. And into something that will make you feel better again.

Read more -> Overcome and stop your frustration right now by using these 3 simple and powerful steps.

SBHM: Black Suffragettes Time Has Forgotten


Fannie Lou Hamer

Hi friends! I’ve been putting out the call for months now to have people write guest posts for any of the Smithsonian Heritage Months. I’m very grateful that Cassandra Carr responded, a… Read more ->

SBHM: Black Suffragettes Time Has Forgotten

FYI February 06, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

AD 60 – The earliest date for which the day of the week is known.
A graffito in Pompeii identifies this day as a dies Solis (Sunday). In modern reckoning, this date would have been a Wednesday. However, according to the system of astrological hours that was originally used to designate the days of the week, a day that was dies Solis according to its sunset hour would have been dies Mercurii (Wednesday) according to its sunrise hour, the convention that finally won out. Accordingly, we know that the currently used cycle of weeks has extended unbroken since at least this date.
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1929 – Colin Murdoch, New Zealand pharmacist and veterinarian, invented the tranquilliser gun (d. 2008)
Colin Albert Murdoch ONZM (6 February 1929 – 4 May 2008) was a New Zealand pharmacist and veterinarian who made a number of significant inventions, in particular the tranquilliser gun, the disposable hypodermic syringe and the child-proof medicine container. He had a total of 46 patents registered in his name.[1]

Biographical background
Born in Christchurch, New Zealand, in 1929, to parents Mary Kathleen and Frank William James, Murdoch displayed a talent for chemistry at a very early age. Although he struggled through his schooling years with dyslexia, Murdoch already displayed an interest in both mechanical and technical skills. At the age of ten he successfully made gunpowder and came to the realization that an ignition could be caused by the mixing of certain nitrates and sulphuric acid. This discovery led the young Murdoch to build a successful firearm using a wick and a small asbestos-filled hammer.[2]

At the age of 13 he was awarded the Royal Humane Society Medal for saving a drowning man in the New Brighton estuary.[2]

Murdoch later came to outgrow his dyslexia and went on to study at The College of Pharmacy in Wellington. Following this, he completed a five-year apprenticeship and, like his father, became a pharmacist. He later studied to become a veterinarian. as he had an interest in not only human welfare, but also the welfare of animals.

Disposable hypodermic syringe
Both a pharmacist and a veterinarian, Murdoch was aware of the risks in reusing syringes. There was a high risk of passing infection from one patient to the next in both humans and animals, unless the glass syringe was sterilized accurately. Wanting to eliminate these risks, and needing more effective vaccination for his animal patients, Murdoch designed and invented the disposable hypodermic syringe, a plastic version of its glass predecessor. Murdoch presented the design to officials of the New Zealand Department of Health, who were skeptical, and believed it “too futuristic”, and that it would not be received well by both doctors and patients. Development of the syringe was held off for a few years due to lack of funding. Eventually, when he was granted both patents, Murdoch’s syringe became hugely successful, with millions used throughout the world every day. It is not widely known as a New Zealand design, although Murdoch’s achievements have been covered in the New Zealand media.

Tranquilliser gun
Main article: Tranquilliser gun
In the 1950s, while working with colleagues who were studying introduced wild goat, deer and tahr populations in New Zealand, Murdoch had the idea that the animals would be much easier to catch, examine and release if a dose of tranquilliser could be administered by projection from afar. Murdoch became experienced with repairing and modifying guns during World War II, as rifles and shot guns were not being imported into New Zealand at that time. With both motive and experience, Murdoch went on to develop a range of rifles, darts and pistols, which have had an enormous impact on the treatment and study of animals around the world.

At the time Murdoch started testing his gun, the only tranquilliser drugs available were curare and alkaloids of nicotine, both of which tended to have fatal reactions in a high percentage of animals. In partnership with pharmaceutical companies, he helped develop more sophisticated drugs with precise and safe reactions.

Paxarms Limited (which stands for peace and arms), Murdoch’s own company, has developed various systems for administering veterinary products to a range of animals.[3]

Recognition
Colin Murdoch has been acknowledged for his life’s work. In 1976 he won three gold medals and a bronze at the World Inventions Fair in Brussels. The New Zealand Design Council has also honoured him and in 2000 he was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to inventing. Time magazine included him in a list of the 100 most influential people of the South Pacific.[1]

Despite the relative ubiquity of his inventions, Murdoch did not become rich because of them. He deliberately chose not to sue companies that violated his patents, satisfied instead that they were being put to good use.

In his final years he lived quietly in Timaru until his death from cancer.

 
 
 
 

FYI

Community honors slain deputy hours after deadly shooting
 
 
 
 
By Ryan Felton: Amtrak Train Decouples While Traveling At 125 MPH: Report
 
 
 
 
One bullet for Polanski and the girl’s mother.
By Madeline Davis: Here’s Audio of Quentin Tarantino Defending Roman Polanski: 13-Year-Old Girl ‘Wanted to Have It’
 
 
 
 

By Yessenia Funes: We Finally Know Exactly How the Flint Water Crisis Killed 12 People
 
 
 
 
By Molly Osberg: How People Die in America
 
 
 
 
By Tom McKay: Report: Yale Dental Students, Staff Took Selfie With Severed Heads
 
 
 
 
By Alex McLevy: John Cena completes transformation into “John Cen-aww” by publishing children’s book
 
 
 
 
By Michael Ballaban: The Philippines Just Flattened A Whole Bunch Of Smuggled Cars With A Bulldozer
 
 
 
 
By Dan Colman: Download Free Coloring Books from Great Libraries, Museums & Cultural Institutions: The British Library, Smithsonian, Carnegie Hall & More
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Hear Freddie Mercury’s Vocals Soar in the Isolated Vocal Track for “Somebody to Love”

 

 
 
 
 
By Pavni Diwanji: Resources for families to make choices about online safety
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: As Trump appointees reconsider new mine-dust rules, researchers find largest cluster of advanced black lung ever
Norton, Va., lawyer Joe Wolfe said the federal government needs to declare a public-health emergency for the 50,000 miners still working. “New federal regulations that are supposed to limit exposure to dangerous levels of coal and silica dust were fully implemented in 2016, a few months before NPR first reported the PMF epidemic,” Berkes and Lancianese report. “The Trump administration recently announced a ‘retrospective study’ of the new regulations, which has mine safety advocates concerned, especially given the epidemic of the disease caused by mine dust.”
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Chapter of new book explores the news media’s failure to recognize rural America’s power in the 2016 election
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Nominations for SPJ’s Black Hole Award, which spotlights government secrecy, are due by Friday, Feb. 16
Submit nominations by emailing FOI Committee member Mike Farrell at farrell@email.uky.edu or mail to him at the School of Journalism and Media, 144 Grehan Building, University of Kentucky,
Lexington, KY 40506-0042.
 
 
 
 
By Bara Vaida: How a debate over patient consent rules led to a book on vaccine history
 
 
 
 
By Jennifer A. Dixon: Guns in the Library | Safety & Security
 
 
 
 
Great idea! Students learn real skills and a benefical project is accomplished.
By Gary Price: Digital Curation: Pratt School of Information Students and New York Times Join Together For Digital Archive Project
 
 
 
 
By LisaRogak: Where to Get a Good Job Without a College Degree
 
 
 
 
By KatieKay: Easy Tissue Paper Flowers
 
 
 
 
By Crystal Allen Hometalker Canada: DIY Upcycled Pallet Rainbow Flower Garden
 
 
 
 
By Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: Dollar Store Backsplash
 
 
 
 

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Colassal: You’d Better Sit Down For This 


A Photographer Captures a Decade in the Life of a Single Ukrainian Park Bench
 
 
 
 

Amanda Parer’s Giant Inflatable Rabbits Invade Public Spaces Around the World
 
 
 
 

Radically Unusual Caterpillars Captured by Photographer Igor Siwanowicz
 
 
 
 
Read more -> You’d Better Sit Down For This 

FYI February 05, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1597 – A group of early Japanese Christians are killed by the new government of Japan for being seen as a threat to Japanese society.History
Kakure Kirishitans are called the “hidden” Christians because they continued to practice Christianity in secret. They worshipped in secret rooms in private homes. As time went on, the figures of the saints and the Virgin Mary were transformed into figurines that looked like the traditional statues of the Buddha and bodhisattvas;[citation needed] depictions of Mary modeled on the Buddhist deity Kannon, goddess of mercy, became common, and were known as “Maria Kannon”.[4] The prayers were adapted to sound like Buddhist chant, yet retained many untranslated words from Latin, Portuguese, and Spanish. The Bible and other parts of the liturgy were passed down orally, because printed works could be confiscated by authorities.[1] Because of the official expulsion of the Catholic clergy in the 17th century, the Kakure Christian community relied on lay leaders to lead the services.

In some cases, the communities drifted away from Christian teachings. They lost the meaning of the prayers and their religion became a version of the cult of ancestors, in which the ancestors happened to be their Christian martyrs.

Kakure Kirishitan was recognized by Bernard Petitjean, a Catholic priest, when Ōura Church was built in Nagasaki in 1865. Approximately 30,000 secret Christians, some of whom had adopted these new ways of practicing Christianity, came out of hiding when religious freedom was re-established in 1873 after the Meiji Restoration. The Kakure Kirishitan became known as Mukashi Kirishitan (昔キリシタン), or “ancient” Christians, and emerged not only from traditional Christian areas in Kyushu, but also from other rural areas of Japan.[1]

The majority of Kakure Kirishitan rejoined the Catholic Church after renouncing unorthodox, syncretic practices. Some Kakure Kirishitan did not rejoin the Catholic Church, and became known as the Hanare Kirishitan (離れキリシタン, separated Christians).[1] Hanare Kirishitan are now primarily found in Urakami and on the Gotō Islands.[2]

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Born On This Day

1903 – Joan Whitney Payson, American businesswoman and philanthropist (d. 1975)
Joan Whitney Payson (February 5, 1903 – October 4, 1975) was an American heiress, businesswoman, philanthropist, patron of the arts and art collector, and a member of the prominent Whitney family. She was also co-founder and majority owner of Major League Baseball’s New York Mets baseball franchise, and was the first woman to own a major-league team in North America without inheriting it.

Early life
Joan Whitney was born in New York City, the daughter of Payne Whitney and Helen Julia Hay. Her brother was John Hay Whitney. She inherited a trust fund from her grandfather, William C. Whitney and on her father’s death in 1927, she received a large part of the family fortune. She attended Miss Chapin’s School, then studied at Barnard College for a year, as well as taking some courses at Brown.[2]

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FYI

By Patrick Redford: Colts Linebacker Edwin Jackson Killed By Suspected Drunk Driver
 
 
 
 

By Stuart Neatby / Prince George Citizen: Families of MMIW give testimony to inquiry in Prince George
 
 
 
 
By Patrick Allan: See If You’re Allowed to Access Police Body-Cam Video in Your State
 
 
 
 
By KIM HOEY, DELMARVA NOW. CORRESPONDENT: Doctor’s office prescribes reading for children, handing out free books
Dr. Stacey Fox started the reading chapter at Beacon in February 2016. She’d seen the program at A.I. duPont hospital during her residency and thought it would be a great addition to the Lewes pediatric offices.

Studies show that reading to a child can be correlated to later success in school and life, she said.
 
 
 
 
By Yessenia Funes: This Is What ‘Snowfall of the Century’ Looks Like in Moscow
 
 
 
 
By Maddie Stone: Permafrost Soils Contain ‘Extraordinary’ Levels of Mercury
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Jeff Glucker: Here’s Why Subaru Thinks It Can Charge You $50,000 For The WRX STI Type RA
 
 
 
 
By Sam Barsanti: Paul Simon is also retiring from touring
 
 
 
 
By Andres Arbelaez: What if Spotify had Stories?
On Spotify’s Desktop app, users can navigate a sidebar that shows their Friends’ listening activity. The sidebar looks like this:
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday: Read the Poignant Letter Sent to Anne Frank by George Whitman, Owner of Paris’ Famed Shakespeare & Co Bookshop (1960): “If I Sent This Letter to the Post Office It Would No Longer Reach You”
 
 
 
 
By Debi Beard Hometalker Solana Beach CA: How to Create a Textured Finish With Frozen Paint
 
 
 
 

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Atlas Obscura:  February 05, 2018


Inside the Winchester Mystery House
Under new management, the labyrinthine mansion is giving up more of its closely guarded secrets. As visitors get to know the house, they also get to know Sarah Winchester, the famously private and eccentric woman who built it—and no ghost stories are necessary to marvel at its creativity and ambition.
 
 
 
 

A Floating Landmark
One stormy January day, a historic brining shed, normally based in Lubec, Maine, got swept away and made landfall in Canada.
 
 
 
 

Naskart Racing
The world’s largest indoor go-kart racetrack is hiding in Connecticut.
 
 
 
 

Homewood Cemetery
PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA: These tranquil resting grounds are home to recognizable souls like the Heinz family.
 
 
 
 
Read more -> Atlas Obscura