Images January 21, 2017

 

 

 

 

Constructed in 1860 by New York lawyer and legislator Augustus Beardslee, this stone castle, built atop the site of a circa-1700s fortified homestead, is heavily inspired by the design of ancient Irish castles. Now a wedding venue, the former family manse is said to be haunted by the ghosts of French and Indian War soldiers (and their victims), a woman named “Abigail”, who is dressed in white and awaiting a wedding she died the night before, and Pop Christensen, a former owner who, broken and weary from prolonged illness, hung himself in the building.

 

 

Bancroft Tower is a 56-foot-high (17 m) natural stone and granite tower, which looks like a miniature feudal castle. It is located in Salisbury Park, in the city of Worcester, Massachusetts. It was erected in 1900, in memory of George Bancroft. The tower was designed by Earle and Fisher.[2] The cost of construction was roughly $15,000.[3] Bancroft Tower is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[1]

 

Francis Bannerman VI, the castle’s eponym, was born on March 24, 1851, in Dundee, Scotland, emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1854. The family moved to Brooklyn in 1858 and began a military surplus business near the Brooklyn Navy Yard in 1865 purchasing surplus military equipment at the close of the American Civil War. In 1867 the business occupied a ship chandlery on Atlantic Avenue engaged in the purchase of worn rope for papermaking. The store on the 500-block of Broadway opened in 1897 to outfit volunteers for the Spanish–American War.[9] The business bought weapons directly from the Spanish government before it evacuated Cuba; and then purchased over 90 percent of the Spanish guns, ammunition, and equipment captured by the United States military and auctioned off by the United States government.[2][10] Bannerman’s illustrated mail order catalog expanded to 300 pages; and became a reference for collectors of antique military equipment.[2][9]

 

Boldt Castle is a major landmark and tourist attraction in the Thousand Islands region of the U.S. state of New York. Open to guests seasonally between mid May and mid October. It is located on Heart Island in the Saint Lawrence River. Heart Island is part of the Town of Alexandria, in Jefferson County. Originally a private mansion built by an American millionaire, George Boldt, it is today maintained by the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority as a tourist attraction.

 

Boldt Castle is a major landmark and tourist attraction in the Thousand Islands region of the U.S. state of New York. Open to guests seasonally between mid May and mid October. It is located on Heart Island in the Saint Lawrence River. Heart Island is part of the Town of Alexandria, in Jefferson County. Originally a private mansion built by an American millionaire, George Boldt, it is today maintained by the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority as a tourist attraction.

 

Boldt Castle Alster Tower

 

 

Castle Craig, located on East Peak in the Hanging Hills, is constructed of trap rock and is 32 feet (10 m) in height and has a base 58 feet (18 m) in circumference . A metal interior stairway is used to ascend the observation deck on top. It stands 976 feet (297 m) above sea level and provides an expansive view of the greater Meriden, Connecticut area.

 

 

Bettendorf Castle, also known as Vianden Castle, Fox River Grove, Illinois, built in 1931–32.[8]

 

Front view: Bishop Castle is an “elaborate and intricate”[1] “one-man project” named after its constructor, Jim Bishop,[2] that has become a roadside attraction in central Colorado.[3]
The “castle” is located in south central Colorado on State Highway 165[4] in the Wet Mountains of Southern Colorado in the San Isabel National Forest, southwest of Pueblo, Colorado.[5]

Bishop bought the land for the site for $450,[6] and construction on what was originally intended to be a family project to build a cottage[7] started in 1969 when he was fifteen.[8] After Bishop surrounded the cottage with rocks, several neighbors noted that the structure looked something like a castle. Bishop took this into consideration and soon began building his castle.
According to Roadsideamerica, “for most” of the 40 years he has worked on the castle “Bishop was engaged in a running battle with Washington bureaucrats over the rocks that he used,” which came from the National Forest surrounding his property. “Bishop felt that they were his for the taking, the government wanted to charge him per truckload.” That dispute has been settled.[9] In 1996, he was challenged by the local and state government over unsanctioned road signs that pointed to the site. They settled the dispute by issuing official road signs.[10][11]

Nichols Hall is a building on the campus of Kansas State University. This building was originally built in 1911 and appears from the exterior as a castle with battlements. Its interior was destroyed by fire in 1968, and was rebuilt in 1985. The building currently houses the departments of Computing and Information Sciences,[1] Communication Studies,[2] and Theatre and Dance.[3]