Music August 04, 2017

Lilia Garcia:
For those of you who think he is just freestyling or just making unnecessary “noise” hes actualy symbolizing war time. If you actually listen, he imitates bombs being thrown and exploding, guns being shot, chiaos, and innocent people screaming in terror and dieing, (hence taps being played after awhile) Its actually really deep. ❤️



Quotes August 04, 2017

“I suddenly felt like the Grinch feels when he discovers what Chrismas is all about. For the first time in a long time, I felt like I had a purpose being in the Navy. It wasn’t about money and rank or prestige. It was about raising the flag. We do what we do because no one else can or will do it. We fight so others can sleep at night. And I had forgotten that.”
Timothy Ciciora, The Right Words at the Right Time Volume 2: Your Turn!
“We live in a world that has walls and those walls need to be guarded by men with guns.”
Aaron Sorkin, A Few Good Men
“The Japanese fought to win – it was a savage, brutal, inhumane, exhausting and dirty business. Our commanders knew that if we were to win and survive, we must be trained realistically for it whether we liked it or not. In the post-war years, the U.S. Marine Corps came in for a great deal of undeserved criticism in my opinion, from well-meaning persons who did not comprehend the magnitude of stress and horror that combat can be. The technology that developed the rifle barrel, the machine gun and high explosive shells has turned war into prolonged, subhuman slaughter. Men must be trained realistically if they are to survive it without breaking, mentally and physically.”
Eugene B. Sledge, With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa
“I am concerned for the security of our great Nation; not so much because of any treat from without, but because of the insidious forces working from within.”
Douglas MacArthur
“The most dangerous people in the world are not the tiny minority instigating evil acts, but those who do the acts for them. For example, when the British invaded India, many Indians accepted to work for the British to kill off Indians who resisted their occupation. So in other words, many Indians were hired to kill other Indians on behalf of the enemy for a paycheck. Today, we have mercenaries in Africa, corporate armies from the western world, and unemployed men throughout the Middle East killing their own people – and people of other nations – for a paycheck. To act without a conscience, but for a paycheck, makes anyone a dangerous animal. The devil would be powerless if he couldn’t entice people to do his work. So as long as money continues to seduce the hungry, the hopeless, the broken, the greedy, and the needy, there will always be war between brothers.”
Suzy Kassem
“The participation if women in some armies in the world is in reality only symbolic. The talk about the role of Zionist women in fighting with the combat units of the enemy in the war of 5 June 1967 was intended more as propaganda than anything real or substantial. It was calculated to intensify and compound the adverse psychological effects of the war by exploiting the backward outlook of large sections of Arab society and their role in the community. The intention was to achieve adverse psychological effects by saying to Arabs that they were defeated, in 1967, by women.”
Saddam Hussein, The Revolution and Woman in Iraq
“Question the answers, I repeated every class. Reevaluate your conclusions when the evidence changes.”
Craig M. Mullaney, The Unforgiving Minute: A Soldier’s Education
“Maxim 18:
If the officers are leading from in front, watch out for an attack from the rear.
-The Seventy Maxims of Maximally Effective Mercenaries”
Howard Tayler

Images August 04, 2017

Marines Conduct Rappelling Training Marines conduct rappelling training over Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Oct. 20, 2015. U.S. Marine Corps photo’s by Lance Cpl. Austin A. Lewis (Slideshow)


K9 Marine
A multipurpose canine with Marine Raider Regiment prepares to participate in special patrol insertion/extraction training. Normally military dogs wear goggles like these before they jump (with their handler) out of an airplane.
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Austin A. Lewis/Released



USAF Thunderbirds. RAF Fairford, Fairford, United Kingdom.
Photo by UX Gun.


Images August 03, 2017

No information provided.
Photo by Joshua Fuller


No information provided.
Photo by Joshua Fuller


No information provided.
Photo by Joshua Fuller


No information provided.
Photo by Joshua Fuller

Joshua Fuller
London UK
I design artworks through photography and collaborate with other adventurers / I have an admiration for the beauty that surrounds us, photography is a language for that escape that everyone desires
Joshua Fuller


FYI August 03, 2017

1031 – Olaf II of Norway is canonized as Saint Olaf by Grimketel, the English Bishop of Selsey.
Olaf II Haraldsson (995 – 29 July 1030), later known as St. Olaf (and traditionally as St. Olave), was King of Norway from 1015 to 1028. He was posthumously given the title Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae (English: Eternal/Perpetual King of Norway) and canonised in Nidaros (Trondheim) by Bishop Grimkell, one year after his death in the Battle of Stiklestad on 29 July 1030. His remains were enshrined in Nidaros Cathedral, built over his burial site.

Olaf’s local canonisation was in 1164 confirmed by Pope Alexander III, making him a universally recognised saint of the Roman Catholic Church, and a commemorated historical figure among some members of the Anglican Communion.[1] He is also a canonised saint of the Eastern Orthodox Church (feast day celebrated July 29 (translation August 3)) and one of the last famous Western saints before the Great Schism.[2] The exact position of Saint Olaf’s grave in Nidaros has been unknown since 1568, due to the Lutheran iconoclasm in 1536–37. Saint Olaf is symbolised by the axe in Norway’s coat of arms, and the Olsok (29 July) is still his day of celebration. Many Christian institutions with Scandinavian links and Norway’s Order of St. Olav, are named after him.

Modern historians generally agree that Olaf was inclined to violence and brutality, and they accuse earlier scholars of neglecting[3] this side of Olaf’s character. Especially during the period of Romantic Nationalism, Olaf was a symbol of national independence and pride, presented to suit contemporary attitudes.

Olaf II’s Old Norse name is Ólafr Haraldsson. During his lifetime he was known as Olaf ‘the fat’ or ‘the stout’ or simply as Olaf ‘the big’ (Ólafr digri; Modern Norwegian Olaf digre).[4] In Norway today, he is commonly referred to as Olav den hellige (Bokmål; Olaf the Holy) or Heilage-Olav (Nynorsk; the Holy Olaf) in honour of his sainthood.[5]

Olaf Haraldsson had the given name Óláfr in Old Norse. (Etymology: Anu – “forefather”, Leifr – “heir”.) Olav is the modern equivalent in Norwegian, formerly often spelt Olaf. His name in Icelandic is Ólafur, in Faroese Ólavur, in Danish Oluf, in Swedish Olof. Olave was the traditional spelling in England, preserved in the name of medieval churches dedicated to him. Other names, such as Oláfr hinn helgi, Olavus rex, and Olaf are used interchangeably (see the Heimskringla of Snorri Sturluson). He is sometimes referred to as Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae (English: Norway’s Eternal King), a designation which goes back to the thirteenth century. The term Ola Nordmann as epithet of the archetypal Norwegian may originate in this tradition, as Olav was for centuries the most common male name in Norway.

Olaf was born in Ringerike.[6] His mother was Åsta Gudbrandsdatter, and his father was Harald Grenske, great-great-grandchild of Harald Fairhair, the first king of Norway. Harald Grenske died when Åsta Gudbrandsdatter was pregnant with Olaf. She later married Sigurd Syr, with whom she had other children including Harald Hardrada, who would reign as a future king of Norway.

Saga sources for Olaf Haraldsson
There are many texts giving information concerning Olaf Haraldsson. The oldest source that we have is the Glælognskviða or “Sea-Calm Poem”, composed by Þórarinn loftunga, an Icelander. It praises Olaf and mentions some of the famous miracles attributed to him. Olaf is also mentioned in the Norwegian synoptic histories. These include the Ágrip af Nóregskonungasögum (c. 1190), the Historia Norwegiae (c. 1160-1175) and a Latin text, Historia de Antiquitate Regum Norwagiensium by Theodoric the Monk (c. 1177-1188).[7]

Icelanders also wrote extensively about Olaf and we also have several Icelandic sagas about him. These include: Fagrskinna (c. 1220) and Morkinskinna (c. 1225-1235). The famous Heimskringla (c. 1225), written by Snorri Sturluson, largely bases its account of Olaf on the earlier Fagrskinna. We also have the important Oldest Saga of St. Olaf (c. 1200), which is important to scholars for its constant use of skaldic verses, many of which are attributed to Olaf himself.[7]

Finally, there are many hagiographic sources describing St. Olaf, but these focus mostly on miracles attributed to him and cannot be used to accurately recreate his life. A notable one is The Passion and the Miracles of the Blessed Olafr.[8]

More on wiki:


1924 – Leon Uris, American soldier and author (d. 2003)
Leon Marcus Uris (August 3, 1924 – June 21, 2003) was an American author, known for his historical fiction. His two bestselling books were Exodus (published in 1958) and Trinity (published in 1976).[1]

Life and career
Uris was born in Baltimore, Maryland, the son of Jewish American parents Wolf William and Anna (née Blumberg) Uris. His father, a Polish-born immigrant, was a paperhanger, then a storekeeper. His mother was first-generation Russian American.[2] William spent a year in Palestine after World War I before entering the United States. He derived his last name from Yerushalmi, meaning “man of Jerusalem”. (His brother Aron, Leon’s uncle, took the name Yerushalmi.) “He was basically a failure”, Uris later said of his father. “I think his personality was formed by the harsh realities of being a Jew in Czarist Russia. I think failure formed his character, made him bitter.”[3]

At age six, Uris reportedly wrote an operetta inspired by the death of his dog. He attended schools in Norfolk, Virginia and Baltimore, but never graduated from high school, and failed English three times. When he was 17 and in his senior year of high school, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps. He served in the South Pacific with the 2nd Battalion, 6th Marines, where he was stationed in New Zealand, and fought as a radioman in combat on Guadalcanal and Tarawa[4] from 1942 through 1944. He was sent to the US after suffering from dengue fever, malaria and a recurrence of asthma that made him miss his battalion’s decimation at Saipan that featured in Battle Cry.[5] While recuperating from malaria in San Francisco, he met Betty Beck, a Marine sergeant; they married in 1945.

Coming out of the service, he worked for a newspaper, writing in his spare time. Esquire magazine, in 1950, bought an article, and he began to devote himself to writing more seriously. Drawing on his experiences in Guadalcanal and Tarawa, he produced the best-selling Battle Cry, a novel depicting the toughness and courage of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. He then went to Warner Brothers in Hollywood helping to write the movie, which was extremely popular with the public, if not the critics.[4] He went on to write The Angry Hills, a novel set in war-time Greece.

His best-known work may be Exodus, which was published in 1958. Most sources indicate Uris, motivated by an intense interest in Israel, financed his research for the novel by selling the film rights in advance to MGM and by writing newspaper articles about the Sinai campaign.[6][7][8] It is said that the book involved two years of research, and involved thousands of interviews.[9] Exodus illustrated the history of Palestine from the late 19th century through the founding of the state of Israel in 1948.[10][11][12] It was a worldwide best-seller, translated into a dozen languages, and was made into a feature film in 1960, starring Paul Newman, directed by Otto Preminger, as well as into a short-lived Broadway musical (12 previews, 19 performances) in 1971.[13] Uris’ 1967 novel Topaz was adapted for the screen and directed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1969.[14]

Uris’s subsequent works included: Mila 18, about the Warsaw ghetto uprising; Armageddon: A Novel of Berlin, a chronicle which ends with the lifting of the Berlin Blockade in 1949; Trinity, about Irish nationalism and the sequel, Redemption, covering the early 20th century and World War I; QB VII, about the role of a Polish doctor in a German concentration camp; and The Haj, set in the history of the Middle East. He wrote the screenplays for Battle Cry and Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. His work on the subject of Israel has been criticized for being biased against Arabs.[15][16][17]

Personal life
Uris was married three times. His first wife was Betty Beck, whom he married in 1945. They had three children before divorcing in 1968. He then married Marjorie Edwards in 1968, who committed suicide by gunshot the following year.[18]

His third and last wife was Jill Peabody, with whom he had two children. They married in 1970, when she was 22 years old and he was 45; the couple divorced in 1989.[citation needed]

Leon Uris died of renal failure at his Long Island home on Shelter Island in 2003, aged 78.[4] His papers can be found at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas in Austin. The collection includes all of Uris’s novels, with the exception of The Haj and Mitla Pass, as well as manuscripts for the screenplay, Gunfight at the O.K. Corral.[14]

More on wiki:


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I’ve written about the Flying Crowbar, also known as ‘Project Pluto’ before, but now we’ve got a fantastic animation team that can free you from the tedious act of optical character recognition we call ‘reading,’ and let you just watch, like you stare at a fire, only with information and entertainment beamed into your brain via your eyeballs. You’ll love it.

So, please enjoy this first product of our animation department; there’ll be more to come.
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NDN Food Porn, Anyone? 10 Delicious Frybread Photos – Indian Country Media Network

NDN Food Porn, Anyone? 10 Delicious Frybread Photos – Indian Country Media Network

Ode to the Buttered Roll, That New York Lifeline – The New York Times

Ode to the Buttered Roll, That New York Lifeline – The New York Times

907 Updates August 03, 2017

By Leroy Polk & Sidney Sullivan: Staffing difficulties highlighted after entire Sand Point Police Department resigns
Participate? Comments on Vision Zero (Name? Zero Visibility~~)
By Sean Maguire & Dan Carpenter: Midtown streets get an audit from pedestrian & cyclists
By Dave Leval: Feckley looks to senior season, possible NFL career
Comments on this app?
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By Caslon Hatch: GET OUTSIDE: The future of Town Square Park
Moms Everyday – 719Women: Veggie cream cheese dip

Wednesday Aug 2: Perma-Grins Despite Melting Permafrost | eWillys

A few folks (Tom, left, and Jim and Ron, right) from the Alaska Or Rust crew spotted this passed out guy near our Whitehorse hotel. Now he’s kind of famous. This photo is one of my favorites from the trip.

Yesterday we travelled from beautiful Whitehorse to the tiny gas-motel-stop of Beavercreek, just at the edge of the Alaska border.

Wednesday Aug 2: Perma-Grins Despite Melting Permafrost | eWillys

Quotes August 03, 2017

“The important question is not, what will yield to man a few scattered pleasures, but what will render his life happy on the whole amount.”
Joseph Addison
“Pleasures that are in themselves innocent lose their power of pleasing if they become the sole or main object of pursuit.”
William Edward Hartpole Lecky, The Map of Life
“We are products of our past, but we don’t have to be prisoners of it.”
Rick Warren
“We think we are our thinking, and we even take that thinking as utterly ‘true,’ which removes us at least two steps from reality itself.”
Richard Rohr
“In the journal I do not just express myself more openly than I could to any person; I create myself. The journal is a vehicle for my sense of selfhood. It represents me as emotionally and spiritually independent. Therefore (alas) it does not simply record my actual, daily life but rather—in many cases—offers an alternative to it.”
Susan Sontag
You are not here merely to make a living. You are here in order to enable the world to live more amply, with greater vision, with a finer spirit of hope and achievement. You are here to enrich the world, and you impoverish yourself if you forget the errand.
Woodrow Wilson,
28th US president