907 Updates January 08, 2017

Are there fault or responsibility issues?
Annie Zak, Suzanna Caldwell:  Anchorage police returned gun to Florida shooting suspect after ‘mental health crisis’

 

Eminent Domain
Devin Kelly: City of Anchorage poised to head to court with property owners on Spenard Road

 

Alice Rogoff: A New Year’s update from the publisher of Alaska Dispatch News

 

Annie Zak: Alaska’s next big crop will be … rhodiola? These farmers and researchers hope so.

Rhodiola

 

 

Videos January 08, 2017

 

 

Beautiful Scenery

Music January 08, 2017

 

 

Quotes January 08, 2017

Quotes & humor

 

 

How did anyone write essay’s, term papers, dissertations, etc. before google, wiki and redbull?~~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you wait long enough to make dinner, everyone will just eat cereal.
It’s science.
dumpaday

 

 

‘I learned that you actually have more power when you shut up.’
Andy Warhol

 

We must remember that we are not just form and matter. We are luminous beings. And our destiny is to radiate light.
Sandra Ingerman.
She has been through hell. So believe me when I say, fear her when she looks into a fire and smiles.
E. Corona

 

I am currently under construction.
Thank you for your patience.
picturequotes.com
Don’t trust what you see, even salt looks like sugar.
inspirationalquotesmagazine.com

 

I want to be a woman who overcomes obstacles by tackling them in faith, instead of tiptoeing around them in fear.
Renee Swope

 

 

Keep calm and let Karma finish it.
Kushandwizdom

 

Rudeness is the weak person’s imitation of strength.
Eric Hoffer
Flawsome   (adj.) an individual who embraces their “flaws” and know they’re awesome regardless.
TheMindsJournal.com

 

Reminders:

Be careful who you vent to.  A listening ear is also a running mouth.
Unknown

Set some goals.
Stay quiet about them.
Smash the hell out of them.
Clap for your damn self.
spiritualword

 

F.E.A.R.
has two meanings-
Forget Everything and Run
or
Face Everything and Rise.
The choice is yours.
thechive.com

 

If their name isn’t God, their opinion doesn’t matter and their approval is not needed.
Curiano.com

 

FYI January 07, 2017

NATIONAL BOBBLEHEAD DAY

 

NATIONAL TEMPURA DAY (Is beer battered halibut an acceptable substitute?)

 

On this day:

1610 – Galileo Galilei makes his first observation of the four Galilean moons: Ganymede, Callisto, Io and Europa, although he is not able to distinguish the last two until the following day.
Galileo Galilei (Italian pronunciation: [ɡaliˈlɛːo ɡaliˈlɛi]; 15 February 1564[3] – 8 January 1642) was an Italian polymath: astronomer, physicist, engineer, philosopher, and mathematician, he played a major role in the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century.

He has been called the “father of observational astronomy”,[4] the “father of modern physics”,[5][6] the “father of scientific method”,[7] and the “father of science”.[8][9]

His contributions to observational astronomy include the telescopic confirmation of the phases of Venus, the discovery of the four largest satellites of Jupiter (named the Galilean moons in his honour), and the observation and analysis of sunspots. Galileo also worked in applied science and technology, inventing an improved military compass and other instruments.
1894 – William Kennedy Dickson receives a patent for motion picture film.
William Kennedy-Laurie Dickson (3 August 1860 – 28 September 1935) was a Scottish inventor who devised an early motion picture camera under the employment of Thomas Edison (post-dating the work of Louis Le Prince).[1][2]
In 1879 At age 19 William Dickson wrote a letter to Thomas Edison trying to seek employment with the inventor. He was turned down. That same year Dickson, his mother, and two sisters moved from Britain to Virginia.[3] In 1883 he was finally hired to work at Edison’s Menlo Park laboratory. In 1888, American inventor and entrepreneur Thomas Alva Edison conceived of a device that would do “for the Eye what the phonograph does for the Ear”. In October, Edison filed a preliminary claim, known as a caveat, with the US Patent Office (which shut down 1932 in the great depression) outlining his plans for the device. In March 1889, a second caveat was filed, in which the proposed motion picture device was given a name, the Kinetoscope. Dickson, then the Edison company’s official photographer, was assigned to turn the concept into a reality.

 

Louis Le Prince
Louis Aimé Augustin Le Prince (French: [lwi lə pʁɛ̃s]; 28 August 1841 – vanished 16 September 1890) was a French inventor who shot the first moving pictures on paper film using a single lens camera.[1][2] He has been heralded as the “Father of Cinematography” since 1930.[3]

A Frenchman who also worked in the United Kingdom and the United States, Le Prince conducted his ground-breaking work in 1888 in the city of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England.[4] In October 1888, Le Prince filmed moving picture sequences Roundhay Garden Scene and a Leeds Bridge street scene using his single-lens camera and Eastman’s paper film.[5] These were several years before the work of competing inventors such as William Friese-Greene, Auguste and Louis Lumière and Thomas Edison.

He was never able to perform a planned public demonstration in the US because he mysteriously vanished from a train on 16 September 1890.[1] His body and luggage were never found, but, over a century later, a police archive was found to contain a photograph of a drowned man who could have been him.[5] Not long after Le Prince’s disappearance, Thomas Edison tried to take credit for the invention. But Le Prince’s widow and son, Adolphe, were keen to advance his cause as the inventor of cinematography. In 1898 Adolphe appeared as a witness for the defence in a court case brought by Edison against the American Mutoscope Company. (The suit claimed that Edison was the first and sole inventor of cinematography, and thus entitled to royalties for the use of the process). Adolphe Le Prince was not allowed to present his father’s two cameras as evidence (and so establish Le Prince’s prior claim as inventor) and eventually the court ruled in favour of Edison. However, a year later that ruling was overturned.[6]

 

1904 – The distress signal “CQD” is established only to be replaced two years later by “SOS”.
CQD (transmitted in Morse code as  – · – ·    – – · –    – · · ) is one of the first distress signals adopted for radio use. It was announced on 7 January 1904, by “Circular 57” of the Marconi International Marine Communication Company, and became effective, beginning 1 February 1904 for Marconi installations.

Land telegraphs had traditionally used “CQ” (“sécu”, from the French word sécurité)[1] to identify alert or precautionary messages of interest to all stations along a telegraph line, and CQ had also been adopted as a “general call” for maritime radio use. However, in landline usage there was no general emergency signal, so the Marconi company added a “D” (“distress”) to CQ in order to create its distress call. Thus, “CQD” is understood by wireless operators to mean, “All stations: distress.” Contrary to popular belief, CQD does not stand for “Come Quick, Danger”, “Come Quickly: Distress”, “Come Quick—Drowning!”, or “C Q Danger” (Seek You, Danger); these are backronyms.[citation needed]

 

Born on this day:

Jonas Alströmer (7 January 1685 – 2 June 1761) was a pioneer of agriculture and industry in Sweden.
Born Jonas Toresson (later changed to Alström) in the town of Alingsås in Västergötland, in 1707 he became a clerk for Stockholm merchant Alberg in London. Alberg’s business failed after about three years, but Alström became a shipbroker on his own, and did very well.

Eventually he desired to establish industry back home, and in 1724 established a woolen factory in his native village, which became profitable after some initial difficulties. He then established a sugar refinery in Gothenburg, encouraged improvements in potato cultivation, tanning, cutlery, and shipbuilding. His greatest success came with the introduction of sheep.

He was one of the six persons who founded the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1739.

The court honored him with a knighthood of the Order of the North Star in 1748, and soon after with letters of nobility, changing his name to Alströmer.

He was honored with a status in the Stockholm Exchange, and in 1961 a postage stamp marked the 200th anniversary of his passing.

Jonas Alströmer had four sons in two marriages, Patrik Alströmer, August Alströmer (father of Anna Margaretha Alströmer), Clas Alströmer and Johan Alströmer. His son Clas Alströmer was a noted naturalist.

 

1718 – Israel Putnam, American general (d. 1790)
Israel Putnam (January 7, 1718 – May 29, 1790) was an American army general officer, popularly known as Old Put, who fought with distinction at the Battle of Bunker Hill (1775) during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783). His reckless courage and fighting spirit became known far beyond Connecticut’s borders through the circulation of folk legends in the American colonies and states celebrating his exploits.

He had previously served notably as an officer with Rogers’ Rangers during the French and Indian War, when he was captured by Mohawk warriors. He was saved from the ritual burning given to enemies by intervention of a French officer, with whom the Mohawk were allied.

 

1834 – Johann Philipp Reis, German physicist and academic, invented the Reis telephone (d. 1874)
Reis imagined electricity could be propagated through space, as light can, without the aid of a material conductor, and he performed some experiments on the subject. The results were described in a paper, “On the Radiation of Electricity”, which, in 1859, he mailed to Professor Poggendorff for insertion in the then well-known periodical, Annalen der Physik. The manuscript was rejected, to the great disappointment of the sensitive young teacher.[4]

Reis, like Bell would later do, had studied the organs of ear and the idea of an apparatus for transmitting sound by means of electricity had floated on his mind for years. Inspired by his physics lessons he attacked the problem, and was rewarded with success. In 1860, he constructed the first prototype of a telephone, which could cover a distance of 100 meters. In 1862, he again tried to interest Poggendorff with an account of his “telephon”, as he called it.[5] His second offering was also rejected, like the first. The learned professor, it seems, regarded the transmission of speech by electricity as a chimera; Reis bitterly attributed the failure to his being “only a poor schoolmaster.”[4]

Reis had difficulty interesting people in Germany in his invention despite demonstrating it to (among others) Wilhelm von Legat, Inspector of the Royal Prussian Telegraph Corps in 1862.[6] It aroused more interest in the United States In 1872, when Professor Vanderwyde demonstrated it in New York.

Prior to 1947, the Reis device was tested by the British company Standard Telephones and Cables (STC). The results also confirmed it could faintly transmit and receive speech. At the time STC was bidding for a contract with Alexander Graham Bell’s American Telephone and Telegraph Company, and the results were covered up by STC’s chairman Sir Frank Gill to maintain Bell’s reputation.[5]

 

1891 – Zora Neale Hurston, American anthropologist and author (d. 1960)
Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891[1][2] – January 28, 1960) was an American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, and anthropologist. Of Hurston’s four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays, she is best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

In addition to new editions of her work being published after a revival of interest in her in 1975, her manuscript Every Tongue Got to Confess (2001), a collection of folktales gathered in the 1920s, was published posthumously after being discovered in the Smithsonian archives.

 

1912 – Charles Addams, American cartoonist, created The Addams Family (d. 1988)
Charles Samuel “Chas” Addams[2] (January 7, 1912 – September 29, 1988) was an American cartoonist known for his darkly humorous and macabre characters. Some of the recurring characters, who became known as The Addams Family, have been the basis for spin-offs in several other forms of media.

 

1946 – Jann Wenner, American publisher, co-founded Rolling Stone
Jann Simon Wenner (born January 7, 1946) is the co-founder and publisher of the popular culture biweekly magazine Rolling Stone, as well as the current owner of Men’s Journal and Us Weekly magazines. Born in New York City, Wenner graduated from Chadwick School and later attended the University of California, Berkeley. He dropped out, but while at Berkeley he participated in the Free Speech Movement. Wenner, with his mentor Ralph J. Gleason, co-founded Rolling Stone in 1967 with the help of a loan from family members and his soon to be wife.[1] Later in his career, several musicians would allege that Wenner was unfairly biased against their work, thus hindering their induction into the Hall of Fame.[2][3][4] Wenner received the Norman Mailer Prize in 2010 for his work in the publishing industry.

 

 

FYI:

The Kitty Genovese Story Was the Prototype for Fake News

 

 

Marketwired Dec 9, 2016: Producers Sheila Johnson, Bo Derek and Mark Sennet Announce Pre-Production of the Historical Feature Film “W.A.S.P.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


COFFEE DRINKERS….THANK ME LATER….

Homemade Coffee Creamer

For each flavor of creamer, you start off with the same basic ‘base’ recipe.

14 oz sweetened condensed milk
1 3/4 cup milk or cream

Mix the ingredients together well. Add them to a mason jar and shake to thoroughly mix the contents.

POSSIBLE FLAVOR COMBINATIONS
French Vanilla Creamer
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Vanilla Bean Coffee Creamer
2 teaspoons vanilla bean paste

Chocolate
2-3 tablespoons chocolate syrup

Chocolate Almond
1 tablespoon cocoa powder
1 teaspoon almond extract

Strudel
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract

Vanilla Caramel
2 tablespoons caramel ice cream topping
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Chocolate Raspberry
2 teaspoons cocoa powder
2 tablespoons raspberry syrup

Irish Cream
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
1 teaspoon instant coffee
1-2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract

Coconut
2 teaspoons coconut extract

Chocolate / Caramel / Coconut
2 teaspoons coconut extract
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
2 tablespoons caramel ice cream topping

Peppermint Patty
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
1 teaspoon peppermint extract

Cinnamon Vanilla
2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Pumpkin Spice
3 tablespoons pureed pumpkin
1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
4 tablespoons maple syrup
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Honey Vanilla
1/4 cup honey
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Almond Joy
1-2 teaspoons coconut extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup

Sweet Cream
Use 1 3/4 cups of heavy cream instead of the milk in the base recipe
2 teaspoons vanilla extract OR the inside of a vanilla bean, scraped
1 teaspoon almond extract

Chocolate Orange
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
1-2 teaspoons orange extract

Hazelnut
2 teaspoons hazelnut extract

Chocolate Hazelnut
2 tablespoons chocolate syrup
2 teaspoons hazelnut extract

Cinnamon Cake
2 teaspoons cinnamon
2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Salted Caramel
2-3 tablespoons caramel ice cream topping
1/2 teaspoon salt

Eggnog
replace milk in base recipe with equal amount of heavy cream
1 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 teaspoons rum extract
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Toasted Almond
2 teaspoons almond extract

Directions & Tips:
In all these recipes, anything that has a dry or thick ingredient (like cinnamon, honey, etc..) should be heated up with a small amount of your milk/cream from the base recipe so it can dissolve properly. Then, add the rest of the milk/cream along with the sweetened condensed milk.

If you want really creamy creamer, use heavy cream instead of milk in your base recipe.

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Music January 07, 2017

 

907 Updates January 07, 2016

One bullet. Be interesting to know the folks that “survived” what quality of life will they have?  Quadriplegic, coma? Those are harsh, but real examples of what is medically termed as “survived.”
Nathaniel Herz, Chris Klint, Suzanna Caldwell, Jerzy Shedlock: Esteban Santiago, the suspect in Florida airport shooting, was an Anchorage resident

 

Tegan Hanlon: State review concludes Juneau police officer was justified in using deadly force

 

Chris Klint: Anchorage police form group to strengthen community bonds

 

Possible options? Private property fences, community service patrols, park camera’s, park fee’s?
Devin Kelly: Some Anchorage homeowners don’t pay taxes for park upkeep. An assemblyman wants to change that.

 

Rasmuson Foundation announces new board member, new staff 

 

Rasmuson Foundation: Artists Invited to Apply for Grants

 

 

This is a reminder of the upcoming deadline for providing input on possible changes to Alaska’s regulations at 18 AAC 75 Oil and Other Hazardous Substances and 18 AAC 78 Underground Storage Tanks related to petroleum cleanup levels and how they are calculated for spills, leaking underground storage tanks and contaminated sites.
Please see the notice at Alaska Online Public Notices or visit our website created for this regulations scoping project. The deadline for providing comments and input to the department is Jan. 15, 2017.
The department greatly appreciates your time and effort in reviewing the notice and providing comments on this important area of our regulations.  For any questions please feel free to contact me by phone or email.
Sincerely,
Sally Schlichting
Unit Manager for Technical Services, Policy & Regulations
Contaminated Sites Program
Alaska Department of Environmental Conservatio
410 Willoughby Avenue, Juneau, Alaska 99811
Phone: 907-465-5076

Videos January 07, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Images January 07, 2017

 

 

 

Blue Live _Matter
Get your shirt here ➡ http://teehey.com/stand-for-the-flag

 

 

 

 

Shorpy January 07, 2017

“Durant, Mrs. T. (child) — between March 1905 and August 1906.” 5×7 glass negative from the C.M. Bell portrait studio in Washington, D.C.