FYI January 17, 2017

On January 17, 1920, the Eighteenth Amendment and Volstead Act went into effect, beginning the Prohibition era in the United States. With the quality and quantity of available spirits being squeezed dry, the daring residents of Templeton, Iowa, started producing a carefully crafted bootleg rye whiskey affectionately known as The Good Stuff.

This date also happened to be the birth date of the notorious bootlegger and Chicago gangster, Al Capone.

 

 

On this day:

1917 – The United States pays Denmark $25 million for the Virgin Islands.
The United States Virgin Islands (U.S.V.I.; also called the American Virgin Islands), officially the Virgin Islands of the United States, are a group of islands in the Caribbean that are an insular area of the United States. The islands are geographically part of the Virgin Islands archipelago and are located in the Leeward Islands of the Lesser Antilles.

The U.S. Virgin Islands consist of the main islands of Saint Croix, Saint John, and Saint Thomas, and many other surrounding minor islands. The total land area of the territory is 133.73 square miles (346.36 km2).[1] The territory’s capital is Charlotte Amalie on the island of Saint Thomas.

In 2010 the population was 106,405,[2] and mostly Afro-Caribbean. Tourism is the primary economic activity, although there is a significant rum manufacturing sector.[1] Farming is done on a relatively small scale on the islands of St. Croix and St. Thomas, although it has seen a slow revival in recent years.

Previously the Danish West Indies of the Kingdom of Denmark–Norway, they were sold to the United States by Denmark in the Treaty of the Danish West Indies of 1916. They are classified by the U.N. as a Non-Self-Governing Territory, and are currently an organized, unincorporated United States territory. The U.S. Virgin Islands are organized under the 1954 Revised Organic Act of the Virgin Islands and have since held five constitutional conventions. The last and only proposed Constitution, adopted by the Fifth Constitutional Convention in 2009, was rejected by the U.S. Congress in 2010, which urged the convention to reconvene to address the concerns Congress and the Obama Administration had with the proposed document. The convention reconvened in October 2012 to address these concerns, but was not able to produce a revised Constitution before its October 31 deadline.

 

1929 – Popeye the Sailor Man, a cartoon character created by E. C. Segar, first appears in the Thimble Theatre comic strip.
Popeye the Sailor Man is a cartoon fictional character created by Elzie Crisler Segar.[3] The character first appeared in the daily King Features comic strip, Thimble Theatre, on January 17, 1929, and Popeye became the strip’s title in later years; Popeye has also appeared in theatrical and television animated cartoons.

Segar’s Thimble Theatre strip was in its 10th year when Popeye made his debut, but the one-eyed (left) sailor quickly became the main focus of the strip, and Thimble Theatre became one of King Features’ most popular properties during the 1930s. After Segar’s death in 1938, Thimble Theatre was continued by several writers and artists, most notably Segar’s assistant Bud Sagendorf. The strip continues to appear in first-run installments in its Sunday edition, written and drawn by Hy Eisman. The daily strips are reprints of old Sagendorf stories.[citation needed]

In 1933, Max Fleischer adapted the Thimble Theatre characters into a series of Popeye the Sailor theatrical cartoon shorts for Paramount Pictures. These cartoons proved to be among the most popular of the 1930s, and Fleischer—and later Paramount’s own Famous Studios—continued production through 1957. These cartoon shorts are now owned by Turner Entertainment, a subsidiary of Time Warner, and distributed by its sister company Warner Bros. Entertainment.[citation needed]

Over the years, Popeye has also appeared in comic books, television cartoons, arcade and video games, hundreds of advertisements,[citation needed] and peripheral products (ranging from spinach to candy cigarettes), and the 1980 live-action film directed by Robert Altman, starring comedian Robin Williams as Popeye.

In 2002, TV Guide ranked Popeye #20 on its “50 Greatest Cartoon Characters of All Time” list.[4]

 

1961 – U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivers a televised farewell address to the nation three days before leaving office, in which he warns against the accumulation of power by the “military–industrial complex” as well as the dangers of massive spending, especially deficit spending.
As early as 1959, Eisenhower began working with his brother Milton and his speechwriters, including his chief speechwriter Malcolm Moos, to develop his final statement as he left public life. It went through at least 21 drafts.[6] The speech was “a solemn moment in a decidedly unsolemn time”, warning a nation “giddy with prosperity, infatuated with youth and glamour, and aiming increasingly for the easy life.”[3]

As we peer into society’s future, we – you and I, and our government – must avoid the impulse to live only for today, plundering for our own ease and convenience the precious resources of tomorrow. We cannot mortgage the material assets of our grandchildren without asking the loss also of their political and spiritual heritage. We want democracy to survive for all generations to come, not to become the insolvent phantom of tomorrow.[1]

A draft of the farewell address, showing handwritten edits.

The only general to be elected president in the 20th century, he famously warned the nation about the potentially corrupting influence of the “military-industrial complex”. This is frequently mischaracterized as a criticism of the arms industry, which it was not.[7] He in fact declared such an industry to be necessary. His concern was of its potential for corruption:

Until the latest of our world conflicts, the United States had no armaments industry. American makers of plowshares could, with time and as required, make swords as well. But we can no longer risk emergency improvisation of national defense. We have been compelled to create a permanent armaments industry of vast proportions. Added to this, three and a half million men and women are directly engaged in the defense establishment. We annually spend on military security alone more than the net income of all United States corporations.

Now this conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence—economic, political, even spiritual—is felt in every city, every Statehouse, every office of the Federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet, we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources, and livelihood are all involved. So is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together.[1]

He also expressed his concomitant concern for corruption of the scientific process as part of this centralization of funding in the Federal government:

Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades.

In this revolution, research has become central, it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

The prospect of domination of the nation’s scholars by Federal employment, project allocation, and the power of money is ever present and is gravely to be regarded.

Yet in holding scientific discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite.[1]

 

Born on this day:

1560 – Gaspard Bauhin, Swiss botanist, physician, and academic (d. 1624)
Jean and Gaspard were the sons of Jean Bauhin (1511–1582), a French physician who had to leave his native country on becoming a convert to Protestantism. Gaspard was born at Basel and studied medicine at Padua, Montpellier, and in Germany. Returning to Basel in 1580, he was admitted to the degree of doctor, and gave private lectures in botany and anatomy. In 1582 he was appointed to the Greek professorship in the University of Basel, and in 1588 to the chair of anatomy and botany. He was later made city physician, professor of the practice of medicine, rector of the university, and dean of his faculty.

The Pinax theatri botanici (English, Illustrated exposition of plants) is a landmark of botanical history, describing some 6,000 species and classifying them. The classification system was not particularly innovative, using traditional groups such as “trees”, “shrubs”, and “herbs”, and using other characteristics such as utilization, for instance grouping spices into the Aromata. He did correctly group grasses, legumes, and several others. His most important contribution is in the description of genera and species. He introduced many names of genera that were later adopted by Linnaeus, and remain in use. For species he carefully pruned the descriptions down to as few words as possible; in many cases a single word sufficed as description, thus giving the appearance of a two-part name. However, the single-word description was still a description intended to be diagnostic, not an arbitrarily-chosen name (in the Linnaean system, many species names honor individuals, for instance).

In addition to Pinax Theatri Botanici, Gaspard planned another work, a Theatrum Botanicum, meant to be comprised in twelve parts folio, of which he finished three; only one, however, was published (1658), long after his death. He also gave a copious catalogue of the plants growing in the environs of Basel, its flora, and edited the works of Pietro Andrea Mattioli (1500–1577) with considerable additions. His principal work on anatomy was Theatrum Anatomicum infinitis locis auctum (1592).

 

 

1886 – Glenn L. Martin, American pilot and businessman, founded the Glenn L. Martin Company (d. 1955)
On May 10, 1912, Martin flew a self-built seaplane from Newport Bay, California to Avalon on Catalina Island, then back across the channel. This broke the earlier English Channel record for over-water flight. Martin’s total distance was 68 miles (109 km), with the Newport-Avalon leg taking 37 minutes.[5] He picked up a bag of mail on the island on the way, and was presented with $100 ($2300 in 2011) prize for his achievement. In 1913, Martin was not as fortunate while competing in the Great Lakes Reliability Cruise, a 900 miles (1,400 km) race of seaplanes around the Great Lakes. Martin’s pontoon hit a wave at high speed and low altitude, causing the plane to somersault, and sink to the bottom with Martin, who escaped and attempted to salvage the plane to finish the race.[6]

In 1912, Glenn L. Martin built an airplane factory in an old Methodist church in Los Angeles, California. To make money to finance this business, he began stunt-flying at fairs and local airfields. He saw an advertisement for a pilot/airplane owner to play a role in a movie. Sensing an opportunity to market his airplanes, he replied to the ad and got the part. He was to play the role of a dashing hero in the movie A Girl of Yesterday (1915) starring Mary Pickford. He soon found that it would be harder than he thought. In addition to flying Pickford around in his airplane, he had a scene where he had to kiss Frances Marion, who later became a legendary Hollywood screenwriter. Martin in describing his hesitance having to kiss Marion declared “my mother would not like it” which astounded Pickford. He worked up the courage however after persuasion by Paramount boss Adolph Zukor and completed the scene.[7][8]
Achievements
Martin held a record for longest American over-water flight, 66 miles. His company designed aircraft for the military, including bombers for both world wars. An early success came during World War I with production of the MB-1 bomber. The MB-2 and others were also successful. In 1932, Martin won the Collier Trophy for his involvement with the Martin B-10 bomber.

 

 

1922 – Betty White, American actress, game show panelist, television personality, and animal rights activist
Betty Marion White Ludden (born January 17, 1922)[2] is an American actress, animal rights activist, author, comedian, radio host, singer, and television personality. Regarded as a pioneer of television, White was one of the first women to have control both in front of and behind the camera;[3] and is recognized as the first woman to produce a sitcom,[4] which contributed to her receiving the honorary title as the Mayor of Hollywood in 1955.[5]

She is known for her Emmy Award-winning roles as Sue Ann Nivens on The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1973–77) and Rose Nylund on The Golden Girls (1985–92). The Writers Guild of America has included both sitcoms in its list of the 101 Best Written TV Series Of All Time.[6] A staple guest of many American game shows such as Password, Match Game and The $25,000 Pyramid, White has been dubbed the ‘First Lady of Game Shows’ and became the first woman to receive an Emmy Award for Outstanding Game Show Host in 1983 for the show Just Men!.[7] From 2010 to 2015, she starred as Elka Ostrovsky in the TV Land sitcom Hot in Cleveland, for which she has won two consecutive Screen Actors Guild Awards and she was nominated for an Emmy Award.

In a career that has spanned more than 75 years, she has received seven Emmy awards, three American Comedy Awards, three Screen Actors Guild awards, and a Grammy.[8] She also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, is a Television Hall of Fame inductee (class of 1995), and a Disney Legend (class of 2009).

In 2013, the Guinness World Records recognized White as having the longest television career for a female entertainer.[9]

Music January 17, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

907 Updates January 17, 2017

Chris Klint: 2 survive crash of small plane in Southwest Alaska

 

Congratulations Christopher Benshoof!
The Hometown Hero: How an Alaska-grown educator makes math fun for the next generation of Fairbanks students
SPONSORED Presented by BP: Making a tough subject memorable and meaningful is all about asking the right questions.

 

Congratulations Hans Vogel!
Charles Wohlforth: How a shop in Palmer out-innovated defense contractors to manufacture high-tech equipment in Alaska

 

Congratulations Ryne Olson!
Mike Campbell: Unrelenting Ryne Olson, 28, tops her mushing mentor to win Copper Basin 300

Shorpy January 17, 2017

Circa 1909. “Madison Avenue, Toledo.” An outpost of Penna. Painless Dentists, showing those native Ohio Tooth Torturers how it’s done.

 

November 1942. “Pittsburgh (vicinity). Montour No. 4 mine of the Pittsburgh Coal Company. Coal miner waiting to go underground.” Medium-format nitrate negative by John Collier for the Office of War Information.

Images January 17, 2017

On a recent visit with her grandparents in Minnesota, a kindergartner from Fairbanks, Alaska was told of how her grandpa would walk to and from school when he was young, through snow and blizzards, uphill both ways. Her response, “That’s what we do in gym class.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quotes January 17, 2017

If you give people the room to change their mind, they usually do.
In a time of carbon footprints, isn’t it about time to consider your human footprint? Every time you speak what impression are you leaving?
Gary John Bishop

 

Let no man pull you low enough to hate him.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

People really inspire you, or they drain you. Pick them wisely.
Hans F. Hanson

 

 

We believe that if a volunteer has a transformative experience, it will naturally ripple out into the world.
Nipun Mehta

 

 
“Man’s life is a progress, and not a station.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Compensation”

 

 

It’s not about “having” time. It’s about making time.
Unknown

 

There’s no need to be perfect to inspire others. Let people get inspired by how you deal with your imperfections.
Unknown

 

You are not required to set yourself on fire to keep other people warm.
Unknown

 

“How strange painting is, it delights us with representations of objects that are not pleasing in themselves!”
Eugene Delacroix, The Journal of Eugene Delacroix

 

FYI January 16, 2017

On this day:

 

1883 – The Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, establishing the United States Civil Service, is passed.
The Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act (ch. 27, 22 Stat. 403) is a United States federal law, enacted in 1883, which established that positions within the federal government should be awarded on the basis of merit instead of political affiliation.[1] The act provided selection of government employees by competitive exams,[1] rather than ties to politicians or political affiliation. It also made it illegal to fire or demote government officials for political reasons and prohibited soliciting campaign donations on Federal government property.[1] To enforce the merit system and the judicial system, the law also created the United States Civil Service Commission.[1] This board would be in charge of determining the rules and regulations of the act.[2] The Act also allowed for the president, by executive order to decide which positions could be subject to the act and which would not.[2] A crucial result was the shift of the parties to reliance on funding from business,[3] since they could no longer depend on patronage hopefuls.

 

It was 50 years ago on Jan. 16, 1964 that Charles Dotter, the father of interventional radiology, performed the first angioplasty. Today, millions of individuals get this medical intervention annually.

Angioplasty and stenting revolutionized medicine and led the way for the more widely known applications of coronary artery angioplasty and stenting that revolutionized the practice of cardiology. Today many conditions that once required surgery can be treated nonsurgically by interventional radiologists. Through a small knick in the skin, they use tiny catheters and miniature instruments so small they can be run through a person’s network of arteries to treat at the site of illness internally, saving the patient from open invasive surgery. While no treatment is risk free, the risks of interventional procedures are far lower than the risks of open surgery, and are a major advance in medicine for patients.

Some of the more recent advances in interventional radiology include:

Nonsurgical ablation of tumors to kill cancer without harming the surrounding tissue
Embolization therapy to stop hemorrhaging or to block the blood supply to a tumor
Catheter-directed thrombolysis to clear blood clots, preventing disability from deep vein thrombosis and stroke
Carotid artery angioplasty and stenting to prevent stroke

 

Charles Theodore Dotter (14 June 1920 – 15 February 1985) was a pioneering US vascular radiologist who is credited with developing interventional radiology.

Dotter, together with his trainee Dr Melvin P. Judkins, described angioplasty in 1964.

Dotter invented angioplasty and the catheter-delivered stent, which were first used to treat peripheral arterial disease. On January 16, 1964, at Oregon Health and Science University Dotter percutaneously dilated a tight, localized stenosis of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) in an 82-year-old woman with painful leg ischemia and gangrene who refused leg amputation. After successful dilation of the stenosis with a guide wire and coaxial Teflon catheters, the circulation returned to her leg. The dilated artery stayed open until her death from pneumonia two and a half years later.[4] He also developed liver biopsy through the jugular vein, initially in animal models[5] and in 1973 in humans.[6]

Charles Dotter is commonly known as the “Father of Interventional Radiology.” He served as the chairman of the School of Medicine Department of Diagnostic Radiology at Oregon Health Sciences University for 33 years, from 1952 until his death in 1985. The University now boasts the Dotter Interventional Institute in his honor.

 

 

Born on this day:

1634 – Dorothe Engelbretsdatter, Norwegian author and poet (d. 1716)
In 1678 her first volume appeared, Siælens Sang-Offer published at Copenhagen. This volume of hymns and devotional pieces, very modestly brought out, had an unparalleled success. The first verses of Dorothe Engelbretsdatter are commonly believed to have been her best.[3]

The fortunate poet was invited to Denmark, and on her arrival at Copenhagen was presented at court. She was also introduced to Thomas Hansen Kingo, the father of Danish poetry. The two greeted one another with improvised couplets, which have been preserved and of which the poet’s reply is incomparably the neater.[4] King Christian V of Denmark granted her full tax freedom for life. Her Taare-Offer (1685) was dedicated to Queen Charlotte Amalia, the wife of King Christian V.[5]

In 1683, her husband died. She had nine children, but seven of them died young and her two adult sons lived far away from Bergen. She lost her house in the great fire in 1702 in which 90 percent of the city of Bergen was destroyed. Her re-placement house was not available until 1712. Her sorrow is evident in examples such as the poem Afften Psalme. She died on the 19th of February 1716. [4]

 

1919 – Jerome Horwitz, American chemist and academic (d. 2012)
In 1964, while conducting research for the Karmanos Institute, Horwitz synthesized a compound that was to become known as zidovudine (AZT) – an antiviral drug used to treat HIV patients; Zidovudine was initially developed as a treatment for cancer.[5] Horwitz was also first to synthesize stavudine (d4T) and zalcitabine (ddC) – two other reverse transcriptase inhibitors used in the treatment of HIV patients.[6]

Also during 1964, he published the first production and demonstration of X-gal as a chromogenic substrate.[7]

After synthesizing AZT, Horwitz went on to create many successful treatments for cancer and other diseases. At the time of his most recent findings, Horwitz was working for the Michigan Cancer Foundation with a federal grant from the National Institutes of Health; he retired in 2005.

 

1947 – Laura Schlessinger, American physiologist, talk show host, and author
Laura Catherine Schlessinger (born January 16, 1947) is an American talk radio host, socially conservative commentator and author.[5] Her radio program consists mainly of her responses to callers’ requests for personal advice and has occasionally featured her short monologues on social and political topics. Her website says that her show “preaches, teaches, and nags about morals, values and ethics”.[6]

Schlessinger used to combine her local radio career with a private practice as a marriage and family counselor, but after going into national syndication, she concentrated her efforts on the daily The Dr. Laura Program, and on writing self-help books. The books Ten Stupid Things Women Do to Mess Up Their Lives, and The Proper Care and Feeding of Husbands are among her bestselling works. A short-lived television talk show hosted by Schlessinger was launched in 2000. In August 2010, she announced that she would end her syndicated radio show in December 2010.[7][8]

Her show moved to Sirius XM Radio’s Sirius XM Stars on January 3, 2011. Schlessinger announced a “multi-year” deal to be on satellite radio.[9][10]

 

1948 – John Carpenter, American director, producer, screenwriter, and composer
John Howard Carpenter (born January 16, 1948) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, musician, editor and composer. Although Carpenter has worked in numerous film genres, he is most commonly associated with horror and science fiction films from the 1970s and 1980s.[1]

Most films in Carpenter’s career were initially commercial and critical failures, with the notable exceptions of Halloween (1978), The Fog (1980), Escape from New York (1981), and Starman (1984). However, many of Carpenter’s films from the 1970s and the 1980s have come to be viewed as cult classics, and he has been acknowledged as an influential filmmaker. Cult classics that Carpenter directed include: Dark Star (1974), Assault on Precinct 13 (1976), The Thing (1982), Christine (1983), Big Trouble in Little China (1986), Prince of Darkness (1987), They Live (1988) and In the Mouth of Madness (1995).

Carpenter is also notable for having composed or co-composed most of the music of his films; some of them are now considered cult as well, with the main theme of Halloween being considered a part of popular culture. He released his first studio album Lost Themes in 2015, and also won a Saturn Award for Best Music for Vampires (1998).

 

FYI:

Maddie Stone: A Mind-Boggling Carbon Deposit Was Just Discovered in the Congo

 

 

907 Updates January 16, 2017

Help for police, firemen, medical personnel etc. who experience trauma?  
Julia O’Malley for The Washington Post: In Alaska, veterans have a safety net. Why didn’t it catch Esteban Santiago?

 

Comments on starting a museum, maybe just accumulating “neat old stuff?”
Lisa Demer: In Utqiagvik, Joe the Waterman made an Alaska museum like no other
Quirky and packed with Alaska Native art, artifacts and animals, Joe’s Museum is an unexpected treasure in the Far North.

 

Stepping in, helping out: On the job with Alaska’s community health aides
Presented by Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium SPONSORED: Community health aides help solve health care hurdles in the Last Frontier.

 

Rick Sinnott: A challenging bird count on a remote Alaska island

 

Laurel Andrews: In Juneau, a ‘year of kindness’ started by police department gains momentum

Images January 16, 2017

Paul took this photo from our driveway 01142017.

 

Sunrise in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Photo by BGD.

 

 

It still looks almost full, but the moon was slightly past full when Peter Lowenstein caught it on the morning of January 13, 2017 in Mutare, Zimbabwe.

 

 

Waning gibbous moonrise behind the Empire State Building in New York City – January 13, 2017 – via a composite of 10 images spaced 4 minutes apart. Notice the low lying clouds partially hiding the moon when it was low in the sky. Image by Gowrishankar Lakshminarayanan.

Quotes January 16, 2017

Happy Monday!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How good was your day?