Shorpy March 29, 2017

September 1918. “Shell Shock patients having a happy time fishing and swimming under the walls of the old chateau. These American soldiers are recovering from war neurosis, as the scientists now call the condition that used to be described as ‘shell-shock.’ Capt. A.E. Dennis, American Red Cross hospital representative for the U.S. Army camp at Blois, has obtained wonderful results by taking a number of these patients away from the noise and congestion of the hospital to the quiet out-door life in the forest of the Chateau Chambord near Blois.” 5×7 glass negative by Lewis Hine for the American Red Cross.

 

Library of Congress
A quiet hour at noon in the sleeping tent. (See number 7705) A quiet hour at noon in the sleeping tent. These men are suffering from war neurosis, as the scientists now call the condition that used to be described as “shell-shock.” Capt. A.E. Dennis, AMERICAN RED CROSS hospital representative for the U.S. Army at Blois, has obtained wonderful results by taking a number of these patients away from the noise and congestion of the hospital to a quiet outdoor life in the Chateau Chambord near Blois

 

July 1938. Douglas, Georgia. “Wife of sharecropper in town to sell their crop at the tobacco auction.” Medium format negative by Dorothea Lange.

 

November 1942. Garfield, Utah. “Loading a copper converter at the Garfield smelter of the American Smelting and Refining Company.” Medium format nitrate negative by Andreas Feininger for the Office of War Information.

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