Tag: FYI

FYI January 19, 2020

On This Day

1764 – Bolle Willum Luxdorph records in his diary that a mail bomb, possibly the world’s first, has severely injured the Danish Colonel Poulsen, residing at Børglum Abbey.[7]
A letter bomb, also called parcel bomb, mail bomb, package bomb, note bomb, message bomb, gift bomb, present bomb, delivery bomb, surprise bomb, postal bomb, or post bomb, is an explosive device sent via the postal service, and designed with the intention to injure or kill the recipient when opened. They have been used in Israeli assassinations and in terrorist attacks such as those of the Unabomber. Some countries have agencies whose duties include the interdiction of letter bombs and the investigation of letter bombings.[1] The letter bomb may have been in use for nearly as long as the common postal service has been in existence, as far back as 1764 (see Examples).

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Born On This Day

1813 – Henry Bessemer, English engineer and businessman (d. 1898)
Sir Henry Bessemer FRS (19 January 1813 – 15 March 1898) was an English inventor, whose steel-making process would become the most important technique for making steel in the nineteenth century for almost one hundred years from 1856 to 1950.[2][3] He also played a significant role in establishing the town of Sheffield as a major industrial centre.[4]

Bessemer had been trying to reduce the cost of steel-making for military ordnance, and developed his system for blowing air through molten pig iron to remove the impurities. This made steel easier, quicker and cheaper to manufacture, and revolutionized structural engineering. One of the most significant innovators of the Second Industrial Revolution, Bessemer also made over 100 other inventions in the fields of iron, steel and glass. Unlike most inventors, he managed to bring his own projects to fruition and profited financially from their success.

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FYI

Gizmodo Science: The Most and Least Physically Active U.S. States; 436-Million-Year-Old Scorpion Was Among the Planet’s First Air Breathers and more ->
 
 
 
 
Carol Tice, Make A Living Writing: Writing Headlines: 16 Wicked-Smart Ways to Attract More Readers
 
 
 
 
By Brian Gallagher, Nautilus: The Case for Professors of Stupidity Why aren’t there more people studying the science behind stupidity?
On this past International Holocaust Remembrance Day, I reread a bit of Bertrand Russell. In 1933, dismayed at the Nazification of Germany, the philosopher wrote “The Triumph of Stupidity,” attributing the rise of Adolf Hitler to the organized fervor of stupid and brutal people—two qualities, he noted, that “usually go together.” He went on to make one of his most famous observations, that the “fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.”
 
 
 
 
By Doug Horner, The Guardian: Bring up the bodies: the retired couple who find drowning victims Gene and Sandy Ralston are a married couple in their 70s, who also happen to be among North America’s leading experts at searching for the dead.
 
 
 
 

By Cassandra Jones, Scary Mommy: All Hail This Mom Of Twins Who Turns Off WiFi When Her Husband Is Pooping
 
 
 
 

By Zachary Crockett, The Hustle: Why it only costs $10k to ‘own’ a Chick-fil-A franchise The chicken chain is known for having the lowest entry cost of any major fast-food franchise — but there’s a catch.
 
 
 
 

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: What to do when the world gets you down; Mary Shelley’s father on parenting and how an early love of reading paves the path to happiness; and more
 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: Missing Grave; Witch Hunt Memorial and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The chef restoring Appalachia’s world-class cuisine and more ->
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Beech B200 Super King Air, N547LM: Accident occurred January 16, 2020 near Unalaska Airport (PADU), Alaska
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Elderhood; Why Book Reviewing Isn’t Going Anywhere and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Ideas

By Penolopy Bulnick: Rainbow Ends Crochet Scarf
 
 
Perfectly DeStressed: Bread Box Charging Station
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Easy Grissini Breadstick Recipe
 
 
By agarkovahelena: Best Ever Coffee Beans Cookies
 
 
By Italianwikiblog: Make an Italian Coffee and Chocolate Extravaganza!
 
 
By YukonJulie: The Best Chocolate Shortbread Cookies Ever


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 18, 2020

On This Day

1886 – Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England.
Field hockey is a widely played team sport of the hockey family. The game can be played on grass, watered turf, artificial turf or synthetic field, as well as an indoor boarded surface. Each team plays with ten field players and a goalkeeper. Players commonly use sticks made out of wood, carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in different quantities (with the higher carbon fibre stick being more expensive and less likely to break) to hit a round, hard, plastic hockey ball. The length of the hockey stick is based on the player’s individual height, the top of the stick usually comes to the players hip, taller players typically have taller sticks.[1] The sticks have a round side and a flat side only the flat face of the stick is allowed to be used, if the other side is used it results in a foul. Goalies often have a different kind of stick, however they can also use an ordinary field hockey stick. The specific goal-keeping sticks have another curve at the end of the stick, this is to give them more surface area to save the ball. The uniform consists of shin guards, shoes, shorts or a skirt, a mouthguard and a jersey.

Today, the game is played globally, mainly in parts of Western Europe, South Asia, Southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, and parts of the United States (primarily New England and the Mid-Atlantic states).[2][3]

Known simply as “hockey” in many territories, the term “field hockey” is used primarily in Canada and the United States where ice hockey is more popular. In Sweden, the term landhockey is used and to some degree also in Norway where it is governed by Norway’s Bandy Association.[4]

During play, goal keepers are the only players who are allowed to touch the ball with any part of their body (the player’s hand is considered part of the stick if on the stick), while field players play the ball with the flat side of their stick. If the ball is touched with the rounded part of the stick, it will result in a penalty. Goal keepers also cannot play the ball with the back of their stick.

Whoever scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is tied at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout, depending on the competition’s format. There are many variations to overtime play that depend on the league and tournament play. In college play, a seven-aside overtime period consists of a 10-minute golden goal period with seven players for each team. If a tie still remains, the game enters a one-on-one competition where each team chooses 5 players to dribble from the 25-yard line down to the circle against the opposing goalie. The player has 8 seconds to score on the goalie keeping it in bounds. The play ends after a goal is scored, the ball goes out of bounds, a foul is committed (ending in either a penalty stroke or flick or the end of the one on one) or time expires. If the tie still persists more rounds are played until one team has scored.

The governing body of field hockey is the International Hockey Federation (FIH), which is called the Fédération Internationale de Hockey in French, with men and women being represented internationally in competitions including the Olympic Games, World Cup, World League, Champions Trophy and Junior World Cup, with many countries running extensive junior, senior, and masters club competitions. The FIH is also responsible for organizing the Hockey Rules Board and developing the rules for the game.

A popular variant of field hockey is indoor field hockey, which differs in a number of respects while embodying the primary principles of hockey. Indoor hockey is a 5-a-side variant, with a field which is reduced to approximately 40 m × 20 m (131 ft × 66 ft). With many of the rules remaining the same, including obstruction and feet, there are several key variations: Players may not raise the ball unless shooting on goal, players may not hit the ball (instead using pushes to transfer the ball), and the sidelines are replaced with solid barriers which the ball will rebound off.[5] In addition, the regulation guidelines for the indoor field hockey stick require a slightly thinner, lighter stick than an outdoor stick.[6]

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Born On This Day

1853 – Marthinus Nikolaas Ras, South African farmer, soldier, and gun-maker (d. 1900)
Marthinus Nikolaas Ras (18 January 1853 – 21 February 1900)[1] was a South African farmer, soldier, and gun-maker who is considered the father of South African Artillery.[2]

Military service

He served in the First Boer War in the Potchefstroom commando under General Piet Cronjé. After witnessing the siege on the British fort at Potchefstroom by the Boers, he realized the need for artillery by the Boer forces to be able to successfully mount an assault the British blockhouses and forts. In the early stages of the conflict, the Boers seriously lacked cannons to enable them to assault the six British army forts in the Transvaal. In December 1880, he requested and obtained permission to return home to his farm Bokfontein, near Brits, to build a cannon for the Boer forces.[3]

Cannon building
He built two cannons (named the Ras cannons), the first being a 3 inch caliber, 4½ feet barrel cannon, named “Martienie” and the second a 2 inch caliber, 5½ barrel cannon, named “Ras”. The “Martienie” cannon was used to great effect on a British fort near Rustenburg, firing 93 shots and resulting in the subsequent surrender of the fort.[4]

Death
On 21 February 1900 during the Second Boer War, whilst on the way back to his farm at Bokfontein, he was ambushed and killed at Kaya’s Put by an impi (African war party) of the Kgatla tribal chief Linchwe, an African tribe fighting on the side of the British.[5][6]

 
 

FYI

By Deena Prichip, NPR: Meals On Wheels Serves Up Breakfast, Lunch And Community At Local Diner
 
 
 
 

American Songwriter: Letter From the Editor: An Opportunity To Be Great
 
 
 
 

Steven Paul Judd, The NTVS: FIRST DROP OF 2020! 👀 It’s Pretty Awesome.
 
 
 
 
By David S. Wallens, Classic Motorsports: Video: Mud-Throwing, Tail-Wagging, V8-Growling Ford Rally Racers
 
 
 
 

By Carly Stern, Ozy: Why You Might Want to Get Back to Working on the Railroad
Why you should care
Sometimes the benefits are what make the job a dream.

 
 

By Jeffery Mcgee, Ozy: Goat Farming: A Love Story How does an Aussie soldier go from serving in the military to goat farming in the U.S.?
Why you should care
Because love, and livestock, could save your life.

 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: Uncover 10 hidden secrets of the New York City Subway and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Okay, so you’re a rocket scientist and a whole hog pitmaster? Haven Brothers Diner; Pocari Sweat; America’s Forgotten Fruit and more ->
 
 
 
 

James Breakwell: The Bear’s New Home
The bear made it home. I should have given you this breaking news last week, but between the car crash, the never ending dinner-turned-twisted-sociology-experiment, and the pig fecal symphony that nearly made my house uninhabitable, it sort of slipped my mind.
 
 
 
 

bluebird of bitterness: Senior moments
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Sci-Fi Set in the 2020’s Predicted a Dim Decade for Humanity and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Hank Berrien, The Daily Wire: Kathy Bates: In My Day, Actresses Knew Why They Went To Men’s Hotel Rooms
 
 
 
 
Bluebird of Bitterness: Happy [cheery, merry, joyful, jocular, gleeful] birthday, Peter
 
 
 
 

By Oliver Smith, Outside: My Journey to Scotland’s Most Remote Pub
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

The Food Network: Eggs Benedict Casserole 
 
 
By Meghan Splawn: 10 Super-Nourishing Soups to Help You Feel Better Fast


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 17, 2020

On This Day

1648 – England’s Long Parliament passes the “Vote of No Addresses”, breaking off negotiations with King Charles I and thereby setting the scene for the second phase of the English Civil War.[5]
The Vote of No Addresses was a measure passed on 17 January 1648 by the English Long Parliament when it broke off negotiations with King Charles I. The vote was in response to the news that Charles I was entering into an engagement with the Scots. Cromwell in particular urged that no new negotiations be opened with Charles and the vote was carried by 141 to 91.[1] This led to the support of the general council on 8 January and a hitherto reluctant House of Lords convening a committee to approve it on 13 January.

By September 1648 the Second Civil War had been fought and the Royalists, the English Presbyterians, and their Scottish allies had been defeated by the New Model Army at Preston. The Army, now in the ascendancy, wished to resume negotiations with the king so Parliament repealed the measure in September 1648.[2][3]

The Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, after many addresses to His Majesty for the preventing and ending of this unnatural war raised by him against his Parliament and kingdom, having lately sent Four Bills to His Majesty which did contain only matter of safety and security to the Parliament and kingdom, referring the composure of all other differences to a personal treaty with His Majesty; and having received an absolute negative, do hold themselves obliged to use their utmost endeavours speedily to settle the present government in such a way as may bring the greatest security to this kingdom in the enjoyment of the laws and liberties thereof; and in order thereunto, and that the House may receive no delays nor interruptions in so great and necessary a work, they have taken these resolutions, and passed these votes, viz.:

That the Lords and Commons do declare that they will make no further addresses or applications to the King.
That no application or addresses be made to the King by any person whatsoever, without the leave of both Houses.
That the person or persons that shall make breach of this order shall incur the penalties of high treason.
That the two Houses declare they will receive no more any message from the King; and do enjoin that no person whatsoever do presume to receive or bring any message from the King to both or either of the Houses of Parliament, or to any other person.
— January 17, 1647/8. Old Parliamentary History, xvi. 489. See Great Civil War, iv. 50-53.[4]

 
 

Born On This Day

1877 – Marie Zdeňka Baborová-Čiháková, Czech botanist and zoologist (d. 1937)[9]
Dr. Marie Zdeňka Baborová-Čiháková (17 January 1877, Prague – 29 September 1937, Čelákovice) was the first female Czech botanist and zoologist.[1][2][3][4]

Works
Klapálek, František; Šulc, Karel; Babor, Josef Florián; Baborová-Čiháková, Marie Zdeňka; Janda, Jiří (1914). Velký illustrovaný přírodopis všech tří říší. II II (in Czech). Rašín : Ústř. naklad. a knihkup. učit. čsl. Retrieved 31 August 2018.

 
 

FYI

Vector’s World: Horsepower; Scrunched and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Mary Otto, Association of Health Care Journalists: Reporter uncovers ‘painful mistakes’ in one state’s handling of dentist errors
In this new Q&A for AHCJ, Kane describes how he tackled the reporting for the series and worked with newsroom colleagues to bring the story to life. He also offers advice to journalists who may want to take a closer look at a professional board in their state.
 
 
 
 
By Amanda Watts and Jason Hanna, CNN: Families of Canadians killed in Iran crash to receive $25,000 to help with first expenses, Trudeau says

 
 
 
 

Grassroots Motor Sports: Project Endurance Miata: Trading a Turbo for a V6, but Do We Install a Honda J35 or a GM LFX?
 
 
 
 

By Whitney Johnson, Director of Visual and Immersive Experiences, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: WHEN IS A PHOTOGRAPH ACCURATE?
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Site tracks how often each Congress member votes with Trump; could be helpful in covering this year’s elections; Retired rural reporter criticizes Facebook for allowing fake news; his op-ed is easily adaptable by all news media; Quick hits: Washington community tries a creative solution for its shortage of mental-health-care providers and more ->
 
 
 
 

News from Science: Scientists find way to make diphtheria treatment without injecting horses with toxin; Deciphering a cancer treatment’s dark side and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Sean Braswell, Ozy: The Unspeakable Childhood Trauma That Made a Golf Legend
Why you should care
For Ben Hogan, succeeding at golf was not just about competition but about survival.

 
 
 
 

Maura, Happy Deal Happy Day: 47 NEW Hard To Find 40-70% off Amazon Promo Code
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: The Anti-Conformist, Libertarian Philosophy That Shaped Rush’s Classic Albums; Hear Christopher Tolkien (RIP) Read the Work of His Father J.R.R. Tolkien, Which He Tirelessly Worked to Preserve and more ->
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Downtown Seattle Barnes & Noble store to close Saturday and more ->
 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Liz Webber, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Prohibition: A frosty glass of unintended consequences
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 

Ideas

Cari, Everything Pretty: 26 Home Remedies for Cold and Cough

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 16, 2020

On This Day

1120 – The Council of Nablus is held, establishing the earliest surviving written laws of the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem.
The Council of Nablus was a council of ecclesiastic and secular lords in the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, held on January 16, 1120.

History
The council was convened at Nablus by Warmund, Patriarch of Jerusalem, and King Baldwin II of Jerusalem. It established twenty-five canons dealing with both religious and secular affairs. It was not quite a church council, but not quite a meeting of the royal court; according to Hans Mayer, due to the religious nature of many of the canons, it can be considered both a parlement and an ecclesiastical synod. The resulting agreement between the patriarch and the king was a concordat, similar to the Concordat of Worms two years later.[1]

The council established the first written laws for the kingdom. It was probably also where Hugues de Payens obtained permission from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem and Warmund, Patriarch of Jerusalem to found the Knights Templar.[2] [3]

The council was not mentioned in the chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres, who served in the retinue of Baldwin II and must have been present. This is probably because the nature of the canons, dealing as they do with the crimes and sins of the Latin population, contradicted Fulcher’s portrayal of the Kingdom as a Christian utopia. William of Tyre, writing about sixty years later, included a detailed account of the proceedings, but neglected to record any of the canons themselves, which he felt were well-known and could be found in any local church; however, he also probably wanted to avoid the implication that the early Kingdom was not as heroic as his generation remembered it.[4]

Although the canons may have been well known in William’s time, only one copy, located in a church in Sidon, seemed to survive the Muslim reconquest of the Kingdom. This copy made its way to Europe where it was in the papal library at Avignon by 1330. It is now located in the Vatican Library, MS Vat. Lat. 1345.

A copy was edited in the Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio of Giovanni Domenico Mansi in the 18th century, and more recently a new edition has been published by Benjamin Z. Kedar in Speculum (Vol. 74, 1999). Kedar argues that the canons are largely derived from the Byzantine Ecloga, promulgated by Leo III and Constantine V in 741. Kedar believes that the canons were put into practise in the 12th century,[5] although Marwan Nader disagrees, since they were not included in the Livre des Assises de la Cour des Bourgeois and other Assizes of Jerusalem, which were written in the 13th century.[6]

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Born On This Day

1634 – Dorothe Engelbretsdatter, Norwegian author and poet (d. 1716)
Dorothe Engelbretsdatter (16 January 1634 – 19 February 1716) was a Norwegian author. She principally wrote hymns and poems which were strongly religious. She has been characterized as Norway’s first recognized female author as well as Norway’s first feminist before feminism became a recognized concept.[1][2]

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FYI

The Rural Blog: Study: 1 in 3 rural adults have trouble paying medical bills; Kentucky lawmakers still dubious about rural fiber-optic broadband project that hasn’t delivered on its promises; Researchers conclude that pain from working in coal mines, not layoffs (as some think), leads to opioid addiction and more ->
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: FROM THE ARCHIVE | How Do You Know That You Love Somebody? Philosopher Martha Nussbaum’s Incompleteness Theorem of the Heart’s Truth, from Plato to Proust
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass: The making of Mojo, AR contact lenses that give your eyes superpowers; At a growing number of coffee shops, getting a coffee to go means checking out a cup and more ->
 
 
Fast Company Compass: The perfect ergonomic keyboard is here
 
 
By Mark Wilson, Fast Company: The Untold Story of the Vegetable Peeler That Changed the World The origin story of one of the great icons of 20th-century industrial design.
 
 
 
 
James Clear: 3 ideas, 2 quotes, 1 question (January 16, 2020)
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: The Daily Routines of Famous Creative People, Presented in an Interactive Infographic; When People Gave Anti-Valentine’s Day Cards: Revisit the “Vinegar Valentines” That Spread Ridicule and Contempt and more ->
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Annaliese Griffin, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Pester power: Turning whines into dollar signs
 
 
 
 
By Lucas Reilly, Mental Floss: The Most Dangerous Job: The Murder of America’s First Bird Warden When the hunting of a profitable bird is outlawed, enforcing the law means dealing with armed and angry lawbreakers.
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Meglymoo87: Oreo Phone Case (made From COFFEE GROUNDS!)
 
 
By ctstarkdesigns: Let’s Make a Snow Fort! – Building a Quinzhee
 
 
By MagicManu: Making a Reading Bench for Children
 
 
Our Crafty Mom: 50 Of The Best Budget-Friendly DIY IKEA Hacks

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Quick and Easy Kimchi Pancakes

 
 
By target022: Classic French Palmiers
 
 
By In the Kitchen With Matt: Classic Rice Krispies Treats
 
 
Food Network Kitchen: Keto Meatloaf
 
 
The Kitchn: 101 Easy Dinners That Start with Broth; The Traveling Couple That Lives in an RV Full-Time and Spends $150 per Week on Food; 15 Marinades That Make Boneless Chicken Breasts So Much Better and more ->


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 15, 2020

On This Day

1969 – The Soviet Union launches Soyuz 5.
Soyuz 5 (Russian: Союз 5, Union 5) was a Soyuz mission using the Soyuz 7K-OK spacecraft launched by the Soviet Union on 15 January 1969, which docked with Soyuz 4 in orbit. It was the first docking of two crewed spacecraft of any nation, and the first transfer of crew from one space vehicle to another of any nation, the only time a transfer was accomplished with a space walk – two months before the US Apollo 9 mission performed the first internal crew transfer.

The flight was also memorable for its dramatic re-entry. The craft’s service module did not separate, so it entered the atmosphere nose-first, leaving cosmonaut Boris Volynov hanging by his restraining straps. As the craft aerobraked, the atmosphere burned through the module. But the craft righted itself before the escape hatch was burned through. Then, the parachute lines tangled and the landing rockets failed, resulting in a hard landing which broke Volynov’s teeth.

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Born On This Day

1869 – Ruby Laffoon, American lawyer and politician, 43rd Governor of Kentucky (d. 1941)
Ruby Laffoon (January 15, 1869 – March 1, 1941) was an American politician who served as the 43rd Governor of Kentucky from 1931 to 1935. A Kentucky native, at age 17 Laffoon moved to Washington, D.C., to live with his uncle, U.S. Representative Polk Laffoon. He developed an interest in politics and returned to Kentucky, where he compiled a mixed record of victories and defeats in elections at the county and state levels. In 1931, he was chosen as the Democratic gubernatorial nominee by a nominating convention, not a primary, making him the only Kentucky gubernatorial candidate to be chosen by a convention after 1903. In the general election, he defeated Republican William B. Harrison by what was then the largest margin of victory in Kentucky gubernatorial history.

Dubbed “the terrible Turk from Madisonville,”[1] Laffoon was confronted with the economic difficulties of the Great Depression. To raise additional revenue for the state treasury, he advocated the enactment of the state’s first sales tax. This issue dominated most of his term in office and split the state Democratic Party and Laffoon’s own administration. The lieutenant governor, A. B. “Happy” Chandler, led the fight against the tax in the legislature. After the tax was defeated in two regular legislative sessions and one specially called legislative session, Laffoon forged a bipartisan alliance to get the tax passed in a special session in 1934.

Laffoon’s feud with Lieutenant Governor Chandler continued throughout his term and affected the 1935 gubernatorial race. (At the time, the lieutenant governor was elected independently from the governor.) Term-limited by the state constitution, Laffoon supported political boss Tom Rhea to succeed him as governor, and convinced the Democrats to again hold a nominating convention to choose their gubernatorial nominee. This would have greatly improved Laffoon’s chances of hand-picking his successor. While Laffoon was on a visit to Washington, D.C., Chandler was left as acting governor under the provisions of the Kentucky Constitution. Chandler issued a call for a special legislative session to consider a mandatory primary election bill. Laffoon rushed back to the state to invalidate the call, but the Kentucky Court of Appeals upheld it as constitutional, and the primary law was passed. Chandler defeated Rhea in the primary, and went on to succeed Laffoon as governor. Following his term in office, Laffoon returned to his native Madisonville, where he died of a stroke in 1941. Among his gubernatorial legacies was appointing a record number of Kentucky colonels, including Harland Sanders, who used the title “Colonel” when he opened his chain of Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants.

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FYI

By Minnyvonne Burke, NBC News: Man in prison 30 years for killing stepmother got out and killed again, police say Timothy Chavira, 56, was previously convicted for the 1986 murder of his stepmother, Laurie Ann Chavira.
If convicted of murdering Cruz de Leon, Timothy Chavira faces the death penalty or life in prison without the possibility of parole. According to online jail records, his next court date is in March.
 
 
 
 
By David K. Li, NBC News: Florida 14-year-old girl set up camera to prove physical abuse Footage that the teen turned over to the sheriff showed a man, who was subsequently arrested and charged, grabbing her by the hair and slamming her head against a bed post.
Becnel was charged with felony child abuse and misdemeanor tormenting an animal, according to county jail records. He was released Jan. 3 after posting $4,000 bail, records showed.

 
 
 
 
By Jessica Havenga, Beyond Bylines: 7 Parenting News Sites New and Expecting Parents Should Know About
 
 
 
 
By Christopher Smith: 2021 GMC Yukon Design, Technology Highlighted In Several Videos
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Social studies textbooks are edited to reflect states’ political leanings; how does your local version compare?; Oregon weekly seeks donations to fund investigation after local officials won’t waive fees for copies of public records; New restaurants in SW Va. celebrate Appalachian cuisine and more ->
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Ground Collision: GippsAero GA8, N524AV; accident occurred May 01, 2019 at Bethel Airport (PABE), Alaska and more ->
 
 
 
 
Webneel: Daily Inspiration – 1395: amazing photography kid water surfing; Best Animation Movie Characters (32) and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Victoria Jaggard, SCIENCE Executive Editor, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: WHAT IS IT LIKE LIVING ALONGSIDE A VOLCANO?
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Whet Moser, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Snowflakes: Frozen fractals all around
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: The Amazing Artistry & Ingenuity of the Furniture Enjoyed by 18th Century Aristocrats; How Sam Mendes’ WWI Film 1917 Was Made to Look Like One Long, Harrowing Shot and more ->
 
 
 
 
49 Writers Blog: Lisa Alexia | Crossing Borders: Review of Floating Coast by Bathsheba Demuth
 
 
 
 
Author Sahara Foley: January 2020 Free & Discounted eBooks Multi-Genre–16th to 31st
 
 
 
 
MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDLXXXV): Arco Magno, Italy; Moon Trees; Deep in the Sahara desert, is the World’s Longest Conveyor; The Queen and her Land Rover Defenders and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Ed Erhart, Wikimedia: Imagination becomes reality in the winners of the 2019 Wiki Loves Earth photo contest
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: ‘SAM’ Review: Building a Better Bricklayer; The Hunger Diaries and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

New Life On A Homestead: DIY Natural Make-Up – Liquid Foundation and Face Powder

Recipes

A Taste of Alaska: Rocky Road Ice Cream
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Bake a Victoria Sponge Cake
 
 
By Allison Underhill, The Food Network: The Best (and Craziest!) New Groceries Hitting Store Shelves in January 2020


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 14, 2020

On This Day

1939 – Norway claims Queen Maud Land in Antarctica.
Queen Maud Land (Norwegian: Dronning Maud Land)[note 1] is a c. 2.7 million square kilometre (1.04 million sq mi)[4] region of Antarctica claimed as a dependent territory[5] by Norway. The territory lies between 20° west and 45° east, between the claimed British Antarctic Territory to the west and the similarly claimed Australian Antarctic Territory to the east. On most maps there had been an unclaimed area between Queen Maud Land’s borders of 1939 and the South Pole until 12 June 2015 when Norway formally annexed that area.[6] Positioned in East Antarctica, the territory comprises about one-fifth of the total area of Antarctica. The claim is named after the Norwegian queen Maud of Wales (1869–1938).

Norwegian Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen was the first person known to have set foot in the territory, in 1930. On 14 January 1939, the territory was claimed by Norway. On 23 June 1961, Queen Maud Land became part of the Antarctic Treaty System, making it a demilitarised zone. It is one of two Antarctic claims made by Norway, the other being Peter I Island. They are administrated by the Polar Affairs Department of the Norwegian Ministry of Justice and Public Security in Oslo.

Most of the territory is covered by the Antarctic ice sheet, and a tall ice wall stretches throughout its coast. In some areas further within the ice sheet, mountain ranges breach through the ice, allowing for birds to breed and the growth of a limited flora. The region is divided into the Princess Martha Coast, Princess Astrid Coast, Princess Ragnhild Coast, Prince Harald Coast and Prince Olav Coast. The waters off the coast are called the King Haakon VII Sea.

There is no permanent population, although there are 12 active research stations housing a maximum average[clarification needed] of 40 scientists, the numbers fluctuating depending on the season. Six are occupied year-round, while the remainder are seasonal summer stations. The main aerodromes for intercontinental flights, corresponding[clarification needed] with Cape Town, South Africa, are Troll Airfield, near the Norwegian Troll research station, and a runway at the Russian Novolazarevskaya Station.[7]

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Born On This Day

1862 – Carrie Derick, Canadian botanist and geneticist (d. 1941)[13]
Carrie Matilda Derick (January 14, 1862 – November 10, 1941)[2] was a Canadian botanist and geneticist, the first female professor in a Canadian university, and the founder of McGill University’s Genetics Department.[3][4]

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FYI

The Rural Blog: Cops mock drug defendants on social media; some papers do, too; experts say that adds to stigma, inhibits treatment; HGTV seeking a small town to spruce up for new show; Miners block another coal train in an effort to get back pay and more ->
 
 
 
 
Lindsay Taub Hash Code Program Manager, Google: Google’s Hash Code competition is back
 
 
 
 
Brent Schrotenboer, USA TODAY: LSU’s Ed Orgeron almost got kicked off his college team; now he’s a state hero
 
 
 
 
Jim Butcher: Dresden Drop: Series Read-Along Begins and Fool Moon On Sale!
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Stevie Borrello, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Lisa Frank: The dark side of the rainbow
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Looking deeper into the Goodreads troll problem and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Kory Grow, Rolling Stone: Florence Welch on Sobriety, Embracing Loneliness and Loving Patti Smith
As she tours in support of her new album, ‘High as Hope,’ the singer reflects on her emotional journey so far

 
 
 
 
BBC News: Val d’Isere: The doctor who hid a Jewish girl – and the resort that wants to forget
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: The New York Public Library Announces the Top 10 Checked-Out Books of All Time; Art Record Covers: A Book of Over 500 Album Covers Created by Famous Visual Artists; What the Earth Would Look Like If We Drained the Water from the Oceans and more ->
 
 
 
 
49 Writers Blog: Dan Henry | Buckwheat Walking: A 2006 Trip Journal
Editor’s Note: Thank you to Dan Henry for offering this remembrance of Carlin “Buckwheat” Donahue. Dan writes, “Buckwheat was the founder of many fine events (such as the Skagway Belly Bounce), but is remembered by writers for being a co-founder of the North Words Writers Symposium, now in its 11th year, in Skagway on May 27-30, 2020. Buckwheat took his last walk on October 14, 2019. He is deeply missed.” Here is an excerpt from Dan’s journal describing the days he accompanied Buckwheat on part of his transcontinental walk.

Recipes

FOOD by Lyds: Tiramisu Mousse | Quick and Easy Recipe
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Pineapple Upside-Down Cake


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 13, 2020

On This Day

1435 – Sicut Dudum, forbidding the enslavement of the Guanche natives in Canary Islands by the Spanish, is promulgated by Pope Eugene IV.
Sicut dudum (English: Just as Long Ago) is a papal bull promulgated by Pope Eugene IV in Florence on January 13, 1435, which forbade the enslavement of local natives in the Canary Islands who had converted or were converting to Christianity. Sicut dudum was meant to reinforce Creator Omnium, issued the previous year, condemning Portuguese slave raids in the Canary Islands. Over forty years after Creator omnium and Sicut dudum, Pope Sixtus IV found it necessary to repeat the prohibition in his papal bull Regimini gregis, which threatened the excommunication of all captains or pirates who enslaved Christians.

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Born On This Day

1810 – Ernestine Rose, American suffragist, abolitionist, and freethinker (d. 1892)[6]
Ernestine Louise Rose (January 13, 1810 – August 4, 1892)[1] was a Jewish suffragist, abolitionist, and freethinker. Her career spanned from the 1830s to the 1870s, making her a contemporary to the much more widely celebrated suffragists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Largely forgotten in contemporary discussions of the American women’s rights movement, she was one of its major intellectual forces in nineteenth-century America.[2] Her relationship with Judaism is a debated motivation for her advocacy.[3] In 1996, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.[4]

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FYI

By Mark Jacob | LocalNewsIni: The Arkansas Gamble: Can a Tablet and a Print Replica Rescue Local News?
 
 
 
 
Stan C. Smith – Awesome Animal: Reindeer
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Witness Rush Drummer Neil Peart’s (RIP) Finest Moments On Stage and Screen; Artist Ed Ruscha Reads From Jack Kerouac’s On the Road in a Short Film Celebrating His 1966 Photos of the Sunset Strip; The First & Last Time Mister Rogers Sang “Won’t You Be My Neighbor” (1968-2001)

 
 
 
 

By Marisa Abeyta, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Fitness Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Peter Valdes-Dapena, CNN Business: Corvette wins North American Car of the Year Award

 
 
 
 
By JAKE BLEIBERG and STEFANIE DAZIO Associated Press: Design of AR-15 could derail charges tied to popular rifle A subtle design feature of the AR-15 rifle has raised a technical legal question that is derailing criminal cases tied to one of America’s most popular weapons

 
 
 
 

By David Montanaro | Fox News: Fort Hood survivor: Pensacola attack, Saudi trainees’ extremist ties show ‘nothing has changed’
 
 
 
 

The Rural Blog: How high-deductible insurance can hurt rural hospitals and patients; Jan. 24 journalism talk to cover farmers’ role in fighting climate change; you can watch via livestream; Most rural counties gained jobs over the past year, but job growth rate lags metros; map has county-level data and more ->
 
 
 
 
Alaska Health Fair 2020 Schedule of Health Fairs + Affordable Blood Tests
 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Michael Tabb and Annaliese Griffin, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Multitasking: The myth of doing it all
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By scoochmaroo: How to Make Leather Sneakers
 
 
By Inchman: Coffee in A… Pen?
 
 

Recipes

Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Chinese Braised Mushrooms
 
 
By Creative Mom CZ: Coffee Flan
 
 
By SomethingSoSam: How to Bake, Decorate, and Ship Vegan Watercolor Sugar Cookies


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 12, 2020

On This Day

1967 – Dr. James Bedford becomes the first person to be cryonically preserved with intent of future resuscitation.
James Hiram Bedford (April 20, 1893 – January 12, 1967) was an American psychology professor at the University of California who wrote several books on occupational counseling.[1] He is the first person whose body was cryopreserved after legal death, and who remains preserved at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation.[2][3][4]

[[{{}}]]== Cryonic preservation ==
See also: Cryonics § History

In June 1965, Ev Cooper’s Life Extension Society (LES) offered the opportunity to preserve one person free of charge, stating that “the Life Extension Society now has primitive facilities for emergency short term freezing and storing our friend the large homeotherm (man). LES offers to freeze free of charge the first person desirous and in need of cryogenic suspension.” Bedford did not take this opportunity, however, but later used his own funds. Bedford suffered from kidney cancer that had later metastasized into his lungs, a condition that was untreatable at the time.[5] Bedford left $100,000 to cryonics research in his will, but more than this amount was utilized by Bedford’s wife and son in court, having to defend his will and his cryopreservation due to arguments created by other relatives.[5]

Bedford’s body was frozen a few hours after his death due to natural causes related to his cancer.[5] His body was preserved by Robert Prehoda (author of the 1969 book Suspended Animation), Dr. Dante Brunol (physician and biophysicist) and Robert Nelson (President of the Cryonics Society of California). Nelson then wrote a book about the subject titled We Froze the First Man. Compared to those employed by modern cryonics organizations, the use of cryoprotectants in Bedford’s case was primitive. He was injected with a solution 15% dimethyl sulfoxide and 85% ringers solution, a compound once thought to be useful for long-term cryogenics, so it is unlikely that his brain was protected. Vitrification was not yet possible, further limiting the possibility of Bedford’s eventual recovery. In his first suspended animation stages, his body was stored at Edward Hope’s Cryo-Care facility in Phoenix, Arizona, for two years, then in 1969 moved to the Galiso facility in California. Bedford’s body was moved from Galiso in 1973 to Trans Time near Berkeley, California, until 1977, before being stored by his son for many years.[5]

Bedford’s body was maintained in liquid nitrogen by his family in southern California until 1982, when it was then moved to Alcor Life Extension Foundation, and has remained in Alcor’s care to the present day.[6] In May 1991, his body’s condition was evaluated when he was moved to a new storage dewar. The examiners concluded that “it seems likely that his external temperature has remained at relatively low subzero temperatures throughout the storage interval.”[7] The date of Bedford’s cryopreservation, January 12, is now known as “James Bedford Day”, and is celebrated every year.[8]

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Born On This Day

1799 – Priscilla Susan Bury, British botanist (d. 1872)
Priscilla Susan Bury, born Falkner (12 January 1799 Liverpool – 8 March 1872 Croydon), was an English botanist and illustrator.

Life
Priscilla Susan Bury was born in Fairfield, 2 miles east of Liverpool, England. She began to draw plants from her family’s greenhouse and, by 1829, had enough studies of lilies and allied plants for publication. From 1831-1834, her drawings were published in A Selection of Hexandrian Plants[1]. The engraving was entrusted to the Londoner Robert Havell, engraver of the John James Audubon (1785-1851) plates. The book was carried out in aquatint and the 350 plant drawings painted in part by hand. The subscribers to this large folio numbered only 79, mostly from the Lancashire region, Audubon being one of them. The book was described as “one of the most effective colour-plate folios of its period” by Wilfrid Jasper Walter Blunt in his The Art of Botanical Illustration.[2]

She married Edward Bury (1794-1858), a noted railway engineer, on 4 March 1830. The couple had at least three sons, born between 1831 and 1835. Although she was not trained as a botanist or patronized as a professional artist[3], she was the author of several other scientific plant illustrations[4] including The Botanist of Benjamin Maund (1790-1863).[5]
The standard author abbreviation Bury is used to indicate this person as the author when citing a botanical name.[6]

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FYI

Jazebel.com: The Greatest Athlete of All Time Wins Another Title; Murderer in Indiana Sentenced to 65 Years In Prison After Stabbing Classmate Pregnant With His Child; ‘The Rapist Is You’ Protestors Chant Outside Weinstein Trial and more ->
 
 
 
 
Jalopnik.com: Portuguese Dakar Motorcyclist Paulo Gonçalves Has Died; These Are The Fascinating Cars and Trucks Racing Dakar For The First Time This Year; Two GM Engineers Arrested For Street Racing C8 Corvettes and more ->
 
 
 
 
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Vector’s World: Making good on that “I’m going to get in shape in 2020” resolution; Nap time ad more ->
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: The Spirit of the Woods: Poet and Painter Rebecca Hey’s Gorgeous 19th-Century Illustrations for the World’s First Encyclopedia of Trees
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Romance: 10 Books That Break the Cliché Mold
 
 
 
 
Stan C. Smith – Awesome Animal: Chinese Giant Salamander
 
 
 
 
Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo: Laying a trail…
 
 
 
 
By Minnyvonne Burke, NBC News: Seattle man kills himself after officer falsely says he critically injured woman in crash The officer said he used the ruse to get information. A police watchdog said the ruse contributed to the man’s death.
 
 
 
 
Click2Houston: Meet the 13 astronauts who could be the first humans on Mars
 
 
 
 
By Leah Asmelash, CNN: Australia’s indigenous people have a solution for the country’s bushfires. And it’s been around for 50,000 years
 
 
 
 
By Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead: Pygmy Goats – A Great Livestock Choice for Homesteads of Any Size
 
 
 
 
Kathyrn’s Report: Rotor Suction: Robinson R44, N447PA; accident occurred September 06, 2019 in Nuiqsut, Alaska
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Sheela Prakash, the Kitchn: How To Make Giardiniera, the Italian Condiment You’ll Want to Put on Everything

By T. K. Brady, The Food Network: 5 of the Easiest Healthy Recipes to Make the First Week of 2020


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 11, 2020

On This Day

1912 – Immigrant textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, go on strike when wages are reduced in response to a mandated shortening of the work week.
The Lawrence textile strike, also known as the Bread and Roses strike, was a strike of immigrant workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1912 led by the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Prompted by a two-hour pay cut corresponding to a new law shortening the workweek for women, the strike spread rapidly through the town, growing to more than twenty thousand workers and involving nearly every mill in Lawrence.[2] Starting January 1, 1912, the Massachusetts government started to enforce a law that allowed women to work a maximum of 54 hours, rather than 56 hours. Ten days later, they found out that pay had been reduced along with the cut in hours.[3]

The strike united workers from more than 40 different nationalities.[4] Carried on throughout a brutally cold winter, the strike lasted more than two months, from January to March, defying the assumptions of conservative trade unions within the American Federation of Labor (AFL) that immigrant, largely female and ethnically divided workers could not be organized. In late January, when a striker, Anna LoPizzo, was killed by police during a protest, IWW organizers Joseph Ettor and Arturo Giovannitti were framed and arrested on charges of being accessories to the murder.[4]

IWW leaders Bill Haywood and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn came to Lawrence to run the strike. Together they masterminded its signature move, sending hundreds of the strikers’ hungry children to sympathetic families in New York, New Jersey, and Vermont. The move drew widespread sympathy, especially after police stopped a further exodus, leading to violence at the Lawrence train station.[4] Congressional hearings followed, resulting in exposure of shocking conditions in the Lawrence mills and calls for investigation of the “wool trust.” Mill owners soon decided to settle the strike, giving workers in Lawrence and throughout New England raises of up to 20 percent. Within a year, however, the IWW had largely collapsed in Lawrence.[4]

The Lawrence strike is often referred to as the “Bread and Roses” strike. It has also been called the “strike for three loaves”.[5] The phrase “bread and roses” actually preceded the strike, appearing in a poem by James Oppenheim published in The American Magazine in December 1911.[6] A 1915 labor anthology, The Cry for Justice: An Anthology of the Literature of Social Protest by Upton Sinclair, attributed the phrase to the Lawrence strike, and the association stuck.[7][8]

A popular rallying cry from the poem that has interwoven with the memory of the strike:[3]

As we come marching, marching, we battle too for men,
For they are women’s children, and we mother them again.
Our lives shall not be sweated from birth until life closes;
Hearts starve as well as bodies; give us bread, but give us roses!

—James Oppenheim

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Born On This Day

1807 – Ezra Cornell, American businessman and philanthropist, founded Western Union and Cornell University (d. 1874)
Ezra Cornell (/kɔːrˈnɛl/; January 11, 1807 – December 9, 1874) was an American businessman, politician, and philanthropist. He was the founder of Western Union, founder of Ithaca’s first library, and a co-founder of Cornell University. He also served as President of the New York Agriculture Society and as a New York state Senator.

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FYI

Neil Ellwood Peart, OC (/pɪərt/; September 12, 1952 – January 7, 2020) was a Canadian musician and writer best known as the drummer and primary lyricist of the rock band Rush. Peart received numerous awards for his musical performances, including an induction into the Modern Drummer Hall of Fame in 1983,[3] making him the youngest person ever so honoured.[4][failed verification] His drumming was renowned for its technical proficiency, and his live performances for their exacting nature and stamina.

Peart was born in Hamilton, Ontario[5] and grew up in Port Dalhousie, Ontario (now part of St. Catharines). During adolescence, he floated between regional bands in pursuit of a career as a full-time drummer. After a discouraging stint in England to concentrate on his music, Peart returned home, where he joined Rush, a Toronto band, in mid-1974.

Early in his career, Peart’s performance style was deeply rooted in hard rock. He drew most of his inspiration from drummers such as Keith Moon, Ginger Baker and John Bonham, players who were at the forefront of the British hard rock scene.[6][7] As time passed, he began to emulate jazz and big band musicians Gene Krupa and Buddy Rich. In 1994, Peart became a friend and pupil of jazz instructor Freddie Gruber.[8][9] It was during this time that Peart decided to revamp his playing style by incorporating jazz and swing components.[7]

In addition to serving as Rush’s primary lyricist, Peart also published several memoirs about his travels. His lyrics for Rush addressed universal themes and diverse subjects including science fiction, fantasy, and philosophy, as well as secular, humanitarian, and libertarian themes. Peart wrote a total of seven nonfiction books focused on his travels and personal stories.

On December 7, 2015, Peart announced his retirement from music in an interview with Drumhead Magazine,[10] though bandmate Geddy Lee insisted Peart was quoted out of context, and suggested Peart was “simply taking a break”.[11] However, in January 2018, bandmate Alex Lifeson confirmed that Rush was retiring due to Peart’s health issues.[12] During his last years, Peart lived in Santa Monica, California, with his wife, photographer Carrie Nuttall, and daughter Olivia. After a three-year illness, Peart died of glioblastoma on January 7, 2020, at age 67.[13]

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By George Pennacchio, ABC 7: Edd Byrnes, known for “77 Sunset Strip,” “Grease,” dies at 87 at Santa Monica home, son says

 
 
Edd Byrnes (born Edward Byrne Breitenberger; July 30, 1932 – January 8, 2020) was an American actor, best known for his starring role in the television series 77 Sunset Strip. He also was featured in the 1978 film Grease as television teen-dance show host Vince Fontaine, and was a charting recording artist with “Kookie, Kookie (Lend Me Your Comb)” (with Connie Stevens).

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By Aliyah Chavez: Indian Country Today adds two national correspondents
 
 
 
 

By Alisha Ebrahimji, CNN: People are finding one final image of a deceased loved one, thanks to Google Maps’ Street View
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev (Russian: Серге́й Константинович Крикалёв, also transliterated as Sergei Krikalyov; born August 27, 1958) is a Russian cosmonaut and mechanical engineer. As a prominent rocket scientist, he is a veteran of six space flights and ranks third to Gennady Padalka and Yuri Malenchenko for the amount of time in space: a total of 803 days, 9 hours, and 39 minutes.[1] He retired from spaceflight in 2007 and is currently working as vice president of Space Corporation Energia.

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Ideas

Little House Big Alaska: DIY Valentine Treat Boxes
 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 10, 2020

On This Day

49 BC – Julius Caesar crosses the Rubicon, signalling the start of civil war.[1]
The Great Roman Civil War (49–45 BC), also known as Caesar’s Civil War, was one of the last politico-military conflicts in the Roman Republic before the establishment of the Roman Empire. It began as a series of political and military confrontations, between Julius Caesar (100–44 BC), his political supporters (broadly known as Populares), and his legions, against the Optimates (or Boni), the politically conservative and socially traditionalist faction of the Roman Senate, who were supported by Pompey (106–48 BC) and his legions.[1]

Prior to the war, Caesar had served for eight years in the Gallic Wars. He and Pompey had, along with Marcus Licinius Crassus, established the First Triumvirate, through which they shared power over Rome. Caesar soon emerged as a champion of the common people, and advocated a variety of reforms. The Senate, fearful of Caesar, demanded that he relinquish command of his army. Caesar refused, and instead marched his army on Rome, which no Roman general was permitted to do. Pompey fled Rome and organized an army in the south of Italy to meet Caesar.

The war was a four-year-long politico-military struggle, fought in Italy, Illyria, Greece, Egypt, Africa, and Hispania. Pompey defeated Caesar in 48 BC at the Battle of Dyrrhachium, but was himself defeated much more decisively at the Battle of Pharsalus. The Optimates under Marcus Junius Brutus and Cicero surrendered after the battle, while others, including those under Cato the Younger and Metellus Scipio fought on. Pompey fled to Egypt and was killed upon arrival. Scipio was defeated in 46 BC at the Battle of Thapsus in North Africa. He and Cato committed suicide shortly after the battle. The following year, Caesar defeated the last of the Optimates in the Battle of Munda and became Dictator perpetuo (Dictator in perpetuity or Dictator for life) of Rome.[2] The changes to Roman government concomitant to the war mostly eliminated the political traditions of the Roman Republic (509–27 BC) and led to the Roman Empire (27 BC–AD 476).

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Born On This Day

1898 – Katharine Burr Blodgett, American physicist and engineer (d. 1979)
Katharine Burr Blodgett (January 10, 1898 – October 12, 1979)[2] was an American physicist and chemist known for her work on surface chemistry, in particular her invention of “invisible” or nonreflective glass while working at General Electric. She was the first woman to be awarded a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Cambridge, in 1926.[3]

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FYI

Vector’s World: Tired, Recycle reuse and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The Queer History of London’s Public Loos; Colorado: Dinos and Dunes in the Desert; An A-Maizing Tower and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Virginia Morell, Science: These parrots are the first birds observed showing kindness to others
 
 
 
 
By Jessica Wildfire, Medium: How to Scorch a Casual Gaslighter A few simple strategies
 
 
 
 
By Whitney Johnson, Director of Visual and Immersive Experiences, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: WHAT’S BEHIND THE ICONIC IMAGES OF AUSTRALIA’S MASSIVE FIRES?
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass: Dear Victoria’s Secret: Here’s how to recover from your death spiral; ‘Just Mercy,’ the new Michael B. Jordan drama, wants to spark a criminal justice revolution; These bamboo houses are designed to stay standing during earthquakes and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Lorhainne Eckhart: It’s Free-Book-for-a-Review Friday!
 
 
 
 
By Stacey Freedenthal, PhD, LCSW, Speaking of Suicide: Do You Wish You Could Go to Sleep and Never Wake Up?
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: “Mr. Tambourine Man” & Other Bob Dylan Classics, Sung Beautifully by Kids; 14 Paris Museums Put 300,000 Works of Art Online: Download Classics by Monet, Cézanne & More; Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Stacy Conradt, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Clowns: No, you’re creepy
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Kentucky stringed instrument-making school helps give recovering opioid addicts a sense of purpose; Quick hits: old rural hospitals need widespread repairs; rural Italian restaurant gives felons a second chance and more ->
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Dynamic Rollover: Safari 400, N104CV; accident occurred April 10, 2019 in Gallatin, Sumner County, Tennessee and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Jason Turbow, Grub Street, New York Times: How New York’s Bagel Union Fought — and Beat — a Mafia Takeover The mob saw an opportunity. Local 338 had other ideas.
 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Maura, Happy Deal: Homemade Moist Chocolate Cake Recipe with Pudding
 
 
Molly Yeh’s Top Recipes: Asian Scotch Eggs Everything Grilled Cheese Peanut Butter Krispy Squares Monster Cookie Dough Turkish Coffee Brownies Fortune Cookies
 
 
The Kitchn: Baked Buffalo Wings With Blue Cheese-Yogurt Dip
 
 
The Frayed Apron: Curried Chicken Egg Salad in Collard Green Wraps; Creamy Carob Mousse (a no-cook, dairy free pudding) and more ->
 
 
By Linda Wilson, New Life On A Homestead: Basic Sourdough Starter