Tag: FYI

FYI November 19, 2019

On This Day

1967 – The establishment of TVB, the first wireless commercial television station in Hong Kong.
Television Broadcasts Limited (TVB) is a television broadcasting company based in Hong Kong. The company operates five free-to-air terrestrial television channels in Hong Kong, with TVB Jade as its main Cantonese language service, and TVB Pearl as its main English service. TVB is headquartered at TVB City at the Tseung Kwan O Industrial Estate.

It began operations on 19 November 1967. The company was registered on 26 July 1965[1] and was co-founded by Sir Run Run Shaw, who was chairman from 1980 to 2011, together with Sir Douglas Clague and Harold Lee Hsiao-wo of the Lee Hysan family.[2] When TVB first began broadcasting it was commonly known and promoted as “Wireless Television” (無綫電視 Cantonese: mou4 sin3 din6 si6) in Chinese to distinguish it from the then cable television broadcaster, Rediffusion Television (麗的呼聲), which later became ATV. It is still usually referred to with that name, although ATV later switched to “wireless” (free-to-air) broadcasting as well.

TVB is known primarily for its dramas, and produces the Miss Hong Kong and Miss Chinese International pageants. It has historically been the most dominant broadcaster in Hong Kong.[3][4][5]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1845 – Agnes Giberne, Indian-English astronomer and author (d. 1939)
Agnes Giberne (19 November 1845 in Belgaum, India – 20 August 1939 in Eastbourne, England) was a prolific British author who wrote fiction with moral or religious themes for children and also books on astronomy for young people.[1]

Educated by governesses in Europe and England after her father Major Charles Giberne retired from service in India, Agnes Giberne started publishing didactic novels and short stories with improving themes under her initials A.G., some of it for the Religious Tract Society. Later she used her full name for her fiction, for her well-received works on astronomy and the natural world, and for her biography of the children’s writer Charlotte Maria Tucker. Most of her writing was done before 1910.

Giberne was an amateur astronomer who worked on the committee setting up the British Astronomical Association and became a founder-member in 1890. Her popular illustrated book Sun, Moon and Stars: Astronomy for Beginners (1879), with a foreword by Oxford Professor of Astronomy, Charles Pritchard, was printed in several editions on both sides of the Atlantic, and sold 24,000 copies in its first 20 years. Later she wrote a book called “Among the Stars” which, as Giberne explains in the Introduction, is a version of “Sun, Moon and Stars” for younger children. It is about a boy called Ikon who is very interested in the stars. He meets a Professor who explains more about the stars and solar system to Ikon.

 
 

FYI

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: FROM THE ARCHIVE | Ongoingness: Sarah Manguso on Time, Memory, Beginnings and Endings, and the True Measure of Aliveness
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Nikola Tesla Accurately Predicted the Rise of the Internet & Smart Phone in 1926; Quentin Tarantino’s World War II Reading List and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Steven Cole Smith, Classic Motorsports: A Friend For Life: Linda Sharp
 
 
 
 
Ernie at Tedium: Text By Procedure
 
 
 
 
Valentina, Bird Cages 4 Less Thanksgiving Parrot: Recipe for Disaster
An oldie but goodie: How to prepare Thanksgiving Dinner with your parrot.

You’ll need:

1 Parrot (Oh, wait, remove parrot from this list)
1 Turkey
Mashed potatoes/gravy
Corn Pudding
Cranberry Sauce
Green Beans
Hot Rolls
Stuffing
Relish tray
Sweet Potatoes
Pumpkin pie/whipped cream
Hot Coffee

Grab a cup of coffee and follow the directions below the jump.
It is going to be a long day so place your parrot on a perch nearby to keep you company while you prepare the meal.

Remove parrot from kitchen counter back to perch. Prepare stuffing; remove parrot from edge of stuffing bowl. Stuff turkey & place it in the roasting pan, remove parrot from edge of pan. Have another cup of coffee to steady your nerves.

Remove parrot’s head from turkey cavity and re-stuff voided area. Prepare relish tray; remember to make twice as much so that you will have a regular size serving after the parrot has eaten his fill. Remove parrot from kitchen counter. Prepare cranberry sauce; discard berries accidentally flung to the floor. Peel potatoes, remove parrot from edge of potato bowl. Arrange sweet potatoes in a pan & cover with brown sugar & mini-marshmallows remove parrot from edge of pan & replace missing marshmallows.

Brew another pot of coffee. While it is brewing, clean up the torn filter and old coffee grounds from around the pot. Pry coffee bean from parrot’s beak. Have another cup of coffee & remove parrot from kitchen counter.

When time to serve the meal: Place roasted turkey on a large platter, cover beak marks with strategically placed sprigs of parsley. Put mashed potatoes into serving bowl; re whip at last minute to conceal bite marks and footprints.

Place pan of sweet potatoes on sideboard; forget presentation cause there is no way to hide the areas of missing marshmallow.Put rolls in decorative basket, remove parrot from side of basket along with beaked rolls, and serve what is left. Set a stick of butter out on the counter to soften – think better of it and return it to the refrigerator.

Wipe down counter to remove mashed potato foot tracks. Remove parrot from kitchen counter & carve the pie into serving slices. Wipe whipped cream off parrot’s beak & place large dollops of remaining cream on pie slices. Whole slices are then served to guests, beaked-out portions should be reserved for host & hostess. Place parrot inside cage & lock the door.

Sit down to a nice relaxing dinner with your family – accompanied by plaintive cries of “WANT DINNER!” from the other room.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

 
 
 
 
Chuck Wendig, Terrible Minds: Swimming Sideways: Navigating Grief As A Writer And An Artist
All I know is, keep on going. Keep swimming. Those we have lost would want us to, wouldn’t they? One suspects it might be their greatest wish, and so we honoring them by doing exactly that, in whatever we we can muster, in whatever direction we find best, with our strongest stroke.

Stay afloat, fellow writer. Respond to the current. You are not its master, but nor is it yours.
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: South Dakota anti-meth ad campaign widely mocked, but governor says it’s doing its job by getting people’s attention; Navajo and Hopi tribes scramble to find new revenue after closure of coal-fired power plant, largest in Western U.S. and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 18, 2019

On This Day

1903 – The Hay–Bunau-Varilla Treaty is signed by the United States and Panama, giving the United States exclusive rights over the Panama Canal Zone.
The Hay–Bunau-Varilla Treaty (Spanish: Tratado Hay-Bunau Varilla) was a treaty signed on November 18, 1903, by the United States and Panama, which established the Panama Canal Zone and the subsequent construction of the Panama Canal. It was named after its two primary negotiators, Philippe-Jean Bunau-Varilla, the French diplomatic representative of Panama, and United States Secretary of State John Hay.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1917 – Beebe Steven Lynk, African-American chemist and author (d. 1948)
Beebe Steven Lynk (1872–1948)[1] was one of the first African-American women chemists and chemistry teachers. She was an active member of the early black women’s club movement, authoring a book, Advice to Colored Women in 1896.

Early life and education
Lynk was born in Mason, Tennessee, on October 24, 1872. She was the daughter of Henderson Stevens and Jule Ann (Boyce) Steven.[2][3][1] She earned a degree from Lane College in Jackson, Tennessee, in 1892 at the age of 20.[4]

Lynk gained a Ph. C. (a degree in Pharmaceutical Chemistry) from the University of West Tennessee in 1903.[4] This was a two-year, pre-bachelor degree, for training teachers.[5]

Career
Lynk became one of two female faculty members (out of ten) at the University’s new medical school.[3] She was the professor of medical Latin botany and materia medica.[5] The University of West Tennessee had been founded by Lynk’s husband in 1900 in Jackson, Tennessee, moving to Memphis in 1907.[6] The university struggled with performance and acceptance, as well as financially, and closed in 1923.[6][5]

In addition to teaching, Lynk wrote a book called Advice to Colored Women (1896)[2] and was active in the African-American women’s club movement,.[3] An advocate for women’s rights, she was a member of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs, serving as Treasurer of the Tennessee State Federation of that organization. Her book reflected the organization’s mission of advancing the status of African-American women through education and respectability.[5]

Personal life
On April 12, 1893, Lynk married Dr. Miles Vandahurst Lynk,[2] known both as the founder, editor and publisher of Medical and Surgical Observer (the first medical journal issued by an African-American),[3] as well as founding the University of West Tennessee.

Beebe Steven Lynk died on November 11, 1948 of carcinoma of stomach in Memphis, Tennessee.[1][7] Very little information is known about her life, in part because the University of West Tennessee no longer exists.[4] Further sources on her may be available through the Tennessee State archives.[8]

 
 

FYI

Vector’s World: Mod scooter; One piece sliding door and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: High-Demand Mummies; Taiwan’s Pygmy Seahorses Are Very Online and more ->
 
 
 
 

By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDLXXVIII): A copy of Alice in Wonderland sprouting mushrooms due to water damage; Rod Stewart’s Model Railway; 100 Cross-stitchers Rally To Finish Quilting Project Late 99-Year-Old Left Behind; Danish Arctic explorer Peter Freuchen and his wife, Vogue fashion illustrator, Dagmar Cohn, 1947; Bar Installs 70+ Big Mouth Billy Bass And Programs Them To Sing Along To Pop Songs and more ->
 
 
 
 
By David S. Wallens, Grassroots Motor Sports: Video: Half Motorcycle, Half Honda S600, Half Miata
 
 
 
 

By Debra Adams Simmons, HISTORY Executive Editor, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: How do you re-create a 7,000-year-old woman?
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Why Disabled Romance Is Important; The Secret Society of Women Writers in Oxford in the 1920s and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Attention must be paid: Rural journalists attend workshop on covering substance abuse and recovery, confronting stigma; Ohio farmers support new state program to reduce fertilizer runoff into Lake Erie that causes toxic algae blooms; Emergency telemedicine services illustrate the growing rural-urban health gap and more ->

 
 
 
 

By Judy Christie: Free tips for saving family stories
 
 
 
 

Little House Big Alaska: The BIG List of Edible Gifts
 
 
 
 

By Marisa Abeyta, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Female Photographer Blogs
 
 
 
 
Dinosaurs and tomatoesBy Marion Ownen, Lagniappe (LAN-yap) = A little bit extra: How climate change growls at Alaska gardeners
 
 
 
 

Hank Shaw, Hunt Gather Talk Podcast: All About Squirrels
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hockeyidiot: Water Wheel Sea Glass

Recipes

By Circonflexe, Instructables: Hyperbolic Cookies
 
 
By TOBY, Instructables: Top Notch Twice Cooked Mashed Potatoes
 
 
By Toolsthatbuild, Instructables: Easy Breakfast Meal Prep With Overnight Oats


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 17, 2019

On This Day

1810 – Sweden declares war on its ally the United Kingdom to begin the Anglo-Swedish War, although no fighting ever takes place.
During the Napoleonic Wars until 1810, Sweden and the United Kingdom were allies in the war against Napoleon. As a result of Sweden’s defeat in the Finnish War and the Pomeranian War, and the following Treaty of Fredrikshamn and Treaty of Paris, Sweden declared war on the United Kingdom. The bloodless war, however, existed only on paper, and Britain was still not hindered in stationing ships at the Swedish island of Hanö and trade with the Baltic states.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1942 – Lesley Rees, English endocrinologist and academic
Dame Lesley Howard Rees DBE (born 17 November 1942)[1] is a British professor, medical doctor, and endocrinologist. She was Dean of St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical College (Bart’s) from 1989–95, the first and only woman to hold this post. Rees led the College to a successful merger with the London Hospital Medical College as part of Queen Mary University of London in 1995.[2] She is currently Emeritus Professor of Chemical Endocrinology at Bart’s.

Rees was educated at Pate’s Grammar School for Girls, Cheltenham.[1] Rees studied at Bart’s and qualified in 1965. She went on to specialise in clinical endocrinology and was appointed Professor of Chemical Endocrinology in 1980. She also became the University of London’s Public Orator, the first science graduate to hold this post. She has published more than 300 articles in peer reviewed journals, and in 1980 delivered the Goulstonian lecture of the Royal College of Physicians.[3]

In 1984 Rees became the first woman to serve as Chairman of the UK Society for Endocrinology and was awarded its Jubilee Medal in 1989.[4] She was Chair of the Editorial Board of the Society’s academic journal Clinical Endocrinology for 10 years until 2010.[5] Rees also served as Secretary General of the International Society of Endocrinology,[6] the first time the post was held outside the USA.

In 1983, as Subdean at Bart’s, Rees “was given” the task of reforming medical education. An innovative development was the building of a Clinical Skills Laboratory for medical students, nursing and midwifery training.[7] This was modelled on a laboratory at the University of Limburg in Maastricht which had been shown to raise the performance of clinical skills in medical students.[8]

Rees became the first Director of Education at the Royal College of Physicians in 1997. In 2001 Rees was awarded a DBE for services to medical education.[9]

She is a niece of the conductor, Sir Colin Davis.[10]

 
 

FYI

By David Ehrlich, Indie Wire: The Wild Story of How Mary Steenburgen Wrote the Best Original Movie Song of the Year
 
 
 
 

Kings River Life: “Jackie Dale, The Cat Mother: TNR, Refuge, and More Kittens” from Kings River Life Magazine
 
 
 
 
Maria Poipova’s Brain Pickings: Relationship Lessons from Trees; Bertrand Russell on How to Heal an Ailing and Divided World; Beginnings at the End of Love: Rebecca West’s Extraordinary Love Letter to H.G. Wells in the Wake of Heartbreak
 
 
 
 

By Kelsey Walsh, 49 Writers Blog: Tidal Echoes: What to Do with an English Major?
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Bethany H. % New Life On A Homestead: 38 Uses for Borax in and Around Your Home

Recipes

By Kelli Foster, The Kitchn: Low-Carb? Here Are 10 Thanksgiving Side Dishes to Make.
 
 
By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: Crispy Sheet Pan Gnocchi and Veggies
 
 
The Food Network: Chicken Potpie With Cheddar Crust
 
 
The Food Network: Caramelized Onion and Bacon Pull-Apart Bread


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 16, 2019

On This Day

1857 – Second relief of Lucknow: Twenty-four Victoria Crosses are awarded, the most in a single day.
The Siege of Lucknow (Hindi: लखनऊ की घेराबंदी) was the prolonged defence of the Residency within the city of Lucknow during the Indian Rebellion of 1857. After two successive relief attempts had reached the city, the defenders and civilians were evacuated from the Residency, which was then abandoned.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1899 – Mary Margaret McBride, American radio host (d. 1976)
Mary Margaret McBride (November 16, 1899 – April 7, 1976) was an American radio interview host and writer. Her popular radio shows spanned more than 40 years. In the 1940s the daily audience for her housewife-oriented program numbered from six to eight million listeners. She was called “The First Lady of Radio.”

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Maria Sherman, Jezebel: Your Best Yearbook Quote
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: Astronauts’ Exercise Programs Could Help Cancer Patients Endure Chemotherapy; A Woman’s ‘Velvety’ Palms Revealed Her Lung Cancer; Stunning Fossil Discovery Uncovers the Second-Most Primitive Flying Bird and more ->
 
 
Gizmodo Earther: Slide Into the Weekend With the Most Hilarious Wildlife Photos of 2019 and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: This five-legged, three-tailed cat mummy isn’t as strange as it seems; Starrett House; World’s Largest Radio Telescope and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The Legend of Monterey Jack; Canada’s Inuit Cuisine Cooking Show and more ->
 
 
 
 
Sahara Foley: November 2019 Free and Discounted eBooks–Multi Genres– 16th to 30th
 
 
 
 
Matt Goff: Sitka Nature Show #195 – John Harley
 
 
Matt Goff: Sitka Nature Show #191 – Kitty LaBounty
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Bárbara Abbês, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Bananas: Slip sliding away
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: “Overestimating Humanity”: 21 More Reasons Why We Need #PlatformAccountability
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Sacha Black: How to Build a DIY Audio Booth

Recipes

A Taste of Alaska: Raspberry Cream Martini
 
 
A Taste of Alaska: Moose in the Morning & Black Widow Cocktail adapted from Keto Diet


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 15, 2019

On This Day

1806 – Pike expedition: Lieutenant Zebulon Pike sees a distant mountain peak while near the Colorado foothills of the Rocky Mountains. (It is later named Pikes Peak.)
The Pike Expedition (July 15, 1806 – July 1, 1807) was a military party sent out by President Thomas Jefferson and authorized by the United States government to explore the south and west of the recent Louisiana Purchase.[1] Roughly contemporaneous with the Lewis and Clark Expedition, it was led by United States Army Lieutenant Zebulon Pike, Jr. who was promoted to captain during the trip. It was the first official American effort to explore the western Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains in present-day Colorado. Pike contacted several Native American tribes during his travels and informed them of the new US rule over the territory. The expedition documented the United States’ discovery of Pikes Peak. After splitting up his men, Pike led the larger contingent to find the headwaters of the Red River. A smaller group returned safely to the US Army fort in St. Louis, Missouri before winter set in.

Pike’s company made several errors and ended up in Spanish territory in present-day Southern Colorado, where the Americans built a fort to survive the winter. Captured by the Spanish and taken into Mexico in February, their travels through present-day New Mexico, Mexico, and Texas provided Pike with important data about Spanish military strength and civilian populations. Although he and most of his men were released because the nations were not at war, some of his soldiers were held in Mexican prisons for years, despite US objections. In 1810, Pike published an account of his expeditions, which was so popular that it was translated into French, German, and Dutch for publication in Europe.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1849 – Mary E. Byrd, American astronomer and educator (d. 1934)
Mary Emma Byrd (November 15, 1849 – July 13, 1934) was an American educator and is considered a pioneer astronomy teacher[1] at college level.[2] She was also an astronomer in her own right, determining cometary positions by photography.[3]

Personal life

Mary E. Byrd was born November 15, 1849 in Le Roy, Michigan to the reverend John Huntington Byrd and Elizabeth Adelaide Lowe as the second of six children.[4] The family moved to Kansas in 1855. Her father was strongly opposed to slavery and the slave trade. Her mother was a descendant of John Endecott. Her parents instilled in her a strong Puritan belief, making her a person of high moral principles. Her uncle, David Lowe, a Kansas judge, who served for one term in Congress, refused to seek re-election because he found “politics and ideal honesty incompatible”. She died of cerebral hemorrhage on July 13, 1934 in Lawrence, Kansas and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery.[5]

Education
In the late 19th century it was very difficult for a young woman to get a decent education.[6] This was no different for Mary Byrd and this is reflected in her education. She was a teacher, on and off, while trying to get an education. Byrd graduated from Leavenworth High School. She attended Oberlin College from 1871-1874, when John Millott Ellis was the college president. She left Oberlin before graduating. She graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in 1878. She studied under Edward Pickering at Harvard College Observatory. She received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Carleton College in 1904.

Byrd was one of a group of young women who were the pioneers of coeducation. Most notable in this group was probably Alice Freeman Palmer. She worked briefly at The Coast Star in Manasquan, NJ prior to her death.

Career

Mary Emma Byrd held many teaching posts. The most important:

1883-1887 Teacher of mathematics and astronomy at Carleton College
1887-1906 Director of the observatory at Smith College[7] in Northampton, Massachusetts.

In 1906, Byrd, at the height of her career, resigned from her positions at Smith[8] because the college accepted money from Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller, which she found reprehensible. Upon her resignation, she returned to Lawrence, Kansas. She continued writing, and contributed many articles to Popular Astronomy magazine.

During her life Byrd was a member of:

the Astronomical and Astrophysical Society of America (now the American Astronomical Society or simply AAS),
the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
the British Astronomical Association
the Anti-Imperialist League of Northampton
The American Mathematical Society (Ref. New York Mathematical Society list of members June 1892, page 6.

Publications
Mary Emma Bird has written two books:

Laboratory Manual in Astronomy which was published in 1899 and is currently available as a reprint by BiblioLife, ISBN 978-1-110-12258-5
First Observations In Astronomy: A Handbook For Schools And Colleges which was published in 1913 and is currently available as a reprint by Kessinger Publishing, ISBN 0-548-62274-4

Further reading

Bailey, Martha J. ; “Byrd, Mary Emma (1849–1934), astronomer”. In American women in science, a biographical dictionary. Santa Barbara, Calif., ABC-CLIO, 1994. p. 46.; 1994
Leonard, John William, editor-in-chief; “Byrd, Mary Emma”. In Woman’s who’s who of America. A biographical dictionary of contemporary women of the United States and Canada. 1914-1915; New York, American Commonwealth Co.; p. 152.; 1914

 
 

FYI

Vector’s World: Stacked housing and more ->
 
 
 
 
49 Writer’s Blog: Andromeda Romano-Lax | Page One Rewrite, Part Two
 
 
 
 
Chuck Wendig Terrible Minds: On Writing What You Want, Without Permission
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: The USPTO wants to know if artificial intelligence can own the content it creates and more->
 
 
 
 
Webneel: Daily Inspiration – 1335
 
 
 
 
By Kathleen McCoy, KSKA: 4 Alaska Startups: How they built it
Call 550-8433 (Anchorage) or 1-888-353-5752 (statewide) during the live broadcast (2:00 – 3:00pm)
Send e-mail to hometown@alaskapublic.org before, during or after the live broadcast (e-mails may be read on air)
Post your comment or question below (comments may be read on air
LIVE: Monday, November 18, 2019 at 2:00 p.m
RE-AIR: Monday, November 18, 2019 at 8:00 p.m.
 
 
 
 

Alaskan Book Cafe, Wulfwyn Reads Excessively: Review: Narcissist: A Complete Guide for Dealing with Narcissism and Creating the Life You Want
 
 
 
 

By Victoria Pitt, Ozy: When a Misogynist Meets a Whip
Why you should care
Sometimes the good really do get a chance to make right this evil wrong.

 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Over a year after the shooting, Capital Gazette journalists keep publishing to ‘do the work we love’ and honor the fallen; Celebrate National Rural Health Day with a week of events starting Monday and more ->
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: Salvador Dalí’s Iconic Deck of Tarot Cards Get Re-Issued: It’s Out Today; The Seven Road-Tested Habits of Effective Artists and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Ambros Custom: Turning Stainless Steel Hex Nut and Bolt Into 5 Carat Emerald Ring

Recipes

By paperplaceandplane: Venus Fly Trap MisFortune Cookies
 
 
By MelissaC222: No Boil Mac and Cheese in Slow Cooker


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 14, 2019

On This Day

1886 – Friedrich Soennecken first developed the hole puncher, a type of office tool capable of punching small holes in paper.
Friedrich Soennecken (September 20, 1848 – July 2, 1919), was an entrepreneur and inventor. He was the founder of Soennecken, a German office supplier.

Soennecken was born in Iserlohn-Dröschede, Sauerland in 1848, the son of a blacksmith. On May 27, 1875 he founded the F. Soennecken Verlag, a commercial enterprise in Remscheid, Westphalia. His main invention is the “round writing” style of calligraphy and the pen nib associated with it.[1] Round writing was designed to be a visually appealing, standardized style of penmanship which was easy to learn and execute, and Soennecken published books on the topic in several languages.[2][3]

In 1888, Friedrich Nietzsche wrote to a friend that he had finally discovered both a quality paper to write on and a quality pen from Germany: Soenneckens Rundschrift Federhalter.[citation needed]

Soennecken also introduced the two-hole punch and the ring binder. In 1876 he and his company relocated to Poppelsdorf, near Bonn, to be closer to the University which later awarded him the honorary title Dr. med. h. c..

Soennecken died in Bonn in 1919.

Inventions
Ink container with stable stand (invented as an apprentice)
A style of writing with the round tip of the feather of a pen nib (1860)
Round writing, model of our current script
An early type of binder which later became the Soennecken file (1886)
The hole punch
The ring binder, later symbolically part of the logo of Soennecken

 
 

Born On This Day

1856 – Madeleine Lemoyne Ellicott, American activist (d. 1945)
Madeleine Lemoyne, Mrs. Charles E. Ellicott (November 14, 1856 – 1945) was an American suffragist. She was the founder of the League of Women Voters of Maryland, serving as its president for 20 years, longer than anyone else.

Life
Born in Chicago, Ellicott studied chemistry at Rush Medical College, and then continued her studies at the Polytechnic in Zurich, Switzerland. In conjunction with the annual National League of Women Voters meeting planned for Baltimore in 1922, she was one of the organizers of the Pan-American Conference of Women.[1]

She married Charles Ellis Ellicott in 1890. They had three sons, Charles Ellis Ellicott, Jr. (born 1892), Valcoulon Lemoyne Ellicott (born 1893), and John Roman Ellicott (born 1896).[2]

 
 

FYI

YouTube Blog: Can anyone match Freddie Mercury’s legendary voice? Queen and YouTube Music are challenging fans to find out!
To take on the #FreddieChallenge now or find out more about FreddieMeter, visit freddiemeter.withyoutube.com.
 
 
 
 

By Tal Snir Senior Product Manager, Search: How do you pronounce quokka? Practice with Search
 
 
 
 

By Nicole Chavez, CNN: As El Paso Walmart reopens, residents find healing after the horror
 
 
 
 

By Associated Press, NBC News: Old dogs, new tricks: 10,000 pets needed for science Scientists are looking for thousands of volunteer pups for the largest-ever study of aging in canines.
To nominate a pet, owners can visit the Dog Aging Project’s website.
 
 
 
 
By Christine Schmidt, Nieman Lab: Wondering how The Salt Lake Tribune got 501(c)(3) status? Here’s their entire application to the IRS — and the IRS’s response Attention, local newspaper owners: This is now a proven, IRS-approved path to convert your money-losing daily into a community nonprofit. Give it some thought.
 
 
 
 

By Robotics in Alaska Benjamin Fate Velaise Staffing services associate and Doyon tribal member, Google: Sharing knowledge this Native American Heritage Month
 
 
 
 

By Vivi Vitalone, NBC News: How tuk-tuk drivers became the unlikely heroes of Iraq’s popular revolt “We are not ashamed of being poor anymore because the protest is not going to succeed without us being beside the demonstrators.”
 
 
 
 

By Peter Sblendorio, New York Daily News: Family ordered to take down Christmas decorations, including snowman, until closer to holiday
One family member, Claudia Simonis, said it worked better for them to put the decorations up early since she is eight months pregnant.
 
 
 
 

By Michael Ballaban, Jalopnik: My Problem With The Ford ‘Mustang’ Mach-E
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: How Humans Migrated Across The Globe Over 200,000 Years: An Animated Look; Watch L’Inferno (1911), Italy’s First Feature Film and Perhaps the Best Adaptation of Dante’s Classic; The Velvet Underground as Peanuts Characters: Snoopy Morphs Into Lou Reed, Charlie Brown Into Andy Warhol and more ->

 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Second round of trade aid may be on its way soon; Philanthropies organize food-systems initiative to generate support for small farmers and sustainable practices; Summit highlighted rural women’s often bold, unconventional approaches to problem-solving in their communities and more ->

 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Natasha Frost, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith.Quartz Obsession: Crystals: The new blood diamonds?
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Publishing Your Ebook Is Changing on Smashwords and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

New Life On A Homestead: How to Make Clipboard and Clothespin Learning Games for Kids
 
 
By Sarah Rodriguez, New Life On A Homestead: Growing Garlic in Containers – So Easy!

Recipes

A Taste of Alaska: Raspberry Clafoutis


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 13, 2019

On This Day

1841 – James Braid first sees a demonstration of animal magnetism, which leads to his study of the subject he eventually calls hypnotism.
James Braid (19 June 1795 – 25 March 1860) was a Scottish surgeon and “gentleman scientist”. He was a significant innovator in the treatment of club-foot and an important and influential pioneer of hypnotism and hypnotherapy. He is regarded by many as the first genuine “hypnotherapist” and the “Father of Modern Hypnotism”.[1]

Although Braid believed that hypnotic suggestion was a valuable remedy in functional nervous disorders, he did not regard it as a rival to other forms of treatment, nor wish in any way to separate its practice from that of medicine in general. He held that whoever talked of a “universal remedy” was either a fool or a knave: similar diseases often arose from opposite pathological conditions, and the treatment ought to be varied accordingly. — John Milne Bramwell (1910)[2]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1869 – Helene Stöcker, German author and activist (d. 1943)
Helene Stöcker (13 November 1869 in Wuppertal – 24 February 1943 in New York City) was a German feminist, pacifist and gender activist.

Life
Stöcker was raised in a Calvinist household and attended a school for girls which emphasised rationality and morality.[1][2] She moved to Berlin to continue her education and then she studied at the University of Bern, where she became one of the first German women to receive her doctorate. In 1905 she helped found the League for the Protection of Mothers (Bund für Mutterschutz, BfM),[3] and she became the editor of the organisation’s magazine Mutterschutz (1905-1908) and then Die Neue Generation (1906–1932).[1] In 1909, she joined Magnus Hirschfeld in successfully lobbying German parliament from including lesbian women in the law criminalising homosexuality.[4] Stöcker’s influential new philosophy, called the New Ethic, advocated the equality of illegitimate children, legalisation of abortion, and sexual education, all in the service of creating deeper relationships between men and women which would eventually achieve women’s political and social equality.
Stöcker’s plaque in Berlin

During World War I and the Weimar period, Stöcker’s interest shifted to activities in the peace movement. In 1921 in Bilthoven, together with Kees Boeke and Wilfred Wellock, she founded an organisation with the name Paco (the Esperanto word for “peace”) and later known as War Resisters’ International (Internationale der Kriegsdienstgegner, WRI). She was also very active in the Weimar sexual reform movement. The Bund für Mutterschutz sponsored a number of sexual health clinics, which employed both lay and medical personnel, where women and men could go for contraception, marriage advice, and sometimes abortions and sterilisation. From 1929 to 1932, she took one last stand for abortion rights. After a papal encyclical, the Casti connubii, issued on December 31, 1930[5] denounced sex without the intent to procreate, the radical sexual reform movement collaborated with the Socialist and Communist parties to launch one final campaign against paragraph 218, which prohibited abortion. Stöcker added her iconic voice to a campaign that ultimately failed.

When the Nazis came to power in Germany, Stöcker fled first to Switzerland and then to England when the Nazis invaded Austria. Stöcker was attending a PEN writers conference in Sweden when war broke out and remained there until the Nazis invaded Norway, at which point she took the Trans-Siberian Railway to Japan and finally ended up in the United States in 1942. She moved into an apartment on Riverside Drive in NYC and died there of cancer in 1943.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Open Culture: A Brief History of Chess: An Animated Introduction to the 1,500-Year-Old Game; Watch the Serpentine Dance, Created by the Pioneering Dancer Loie Fuller, Performed in an 1897 Film by the Lumière Brothers; The Virtual Choir: Watch a Choir Conductor Digitally Unite 3500 Singers from Around the World and more ->

 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Amazon Announces the Best Books of 2019 and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Awesomer: We’re All Going to Die; Smoothed-out Criminal; Sonic the Hedgehog (New Trailer); Veteran-Made Gear and more ->
 
 
 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 12, 2019

On This Day

1905 – Norway holds a referendum resulting in popular approval of the Storting’s decision to authorise the government to make the offer of the throne of the newly-independent country.
A referendum on retaining the monarchy or becoming a republic was held in Norway on 12 and 13 November 1905.[1] Voters were asked whether they approved of the Storting’s decision to authorise the government to make the offer of the throne of the newly self-ruling country.[2]

The proposal was approved by 78.9% of voters.[3] Following the referendum, the Storting offered Prince Carl of Denmark a mandate to the Norwegian throne on 18 November; Carl accepted, assuming the throne as King Haakon VII. The new royal family arrived in Norway on 25 November. King Haakon and Queen Maud were crowned in a ceremony in Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim on 22 June 1906.[4]

Read more->

 
 

Born On This Day

1606 – Jeanne Mance, French-Canadian nurse, founded the Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal (d. 1673)
Jeanne Mance (November 12, 1606 – June 18, 1673) was a French nurse and settler of New France. She arrived in New France two years after the Ursuline nuns came to Quebec. Among the founders of Montreal in 1642, she established its first hospital, the Hôtel-Dieu de Montréal, in 1645. She returned twice to France to seek financial support for the hospital. After providing most of the care directly for years, in 1657 she recruited three sisters of the Religieuses hospitalières de Saint-Joseph, and continued to direct operations of the hospital.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

The Rural Blog: Rural arts and culture scenes enhance small-town life, could improve communities’ local economies; Weekly reports on increasing tick-borne allergy to red meat; U.S. corn farmers and ethanol producers stagger under combined weight of refinery waivers and wet weather and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Employee’s unauthorized conduct was not a DMCA prohibited circumvention; BookLife by Publishers Weekly Launches Paid Review Service for Self-Published Authors and more->
 
 
 
 
Mom’s Favorite Reads eMagazine Fall 2019
 
 
 
 
49 Writers Blog: Mary Odden | Old Guns, New Guns in AQR
Volume 36, Summer & Fall 2019 issue of the Alaska Quarterly Review is a beautiful book. It contains a stunning photo-essay, “The Lonely Islands” by Nancy Lord and Irene Owsley that juxtaposes Lord’s essay of Attu and Kiska islands during the Japanese invasion of World War II with Owsley’s photos of the overgrown detritus from those years. Surreal and haunting—forty-some glossy photos devoid of humans suggest, like an empty chair, the most precipitous of human aggressions. Remains of ships and bunkers—a material history of war eroded nearly unintelligible—made grimmer by a rotting shoe, guns stripped of gunners, spent and unspent ammunition—are all mute and subsumed by desolate beauty. A tiny lake framed by lichens and cotton grass, fog-draped rising ground beyond it, reminds only with its perfect roundness that it is a bomb crater.
 
 
 
 
Paul Militaru Photography
 
 
 
 
By Stephanie Donovan, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Climate Change Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Aletha Kehas: An Interview with Children’s Author & Illustrator Andrea Torrey Balsara on “A Better World of Books”
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: All that glitters is lead at this historic Native American site; Galápagos Land Iguanas and more ->
 
 
 
 
High Country News: George Takei recounts internment’s long shadow The actor and activist remembers his childhood detainment by the U.S. government during World War II in a new graphic novel.
 
 
 
 
Weekly digest for Hannah Howe, on November 11, 2019
 
 
 
 
Prolific Works: Your Tuesday Email of Free Books
 
 
 
 
By Eden Ashley: 20 Easy Zero Waste Swaps That Will Save You Money
 
 
 
 
The Crime Report: My Weekend as an Amateur Cold Case Detective; Conspiracy to Distribute Illegal Drugs on Dark Web Earns 12-Year Sentence and more ->
 
 
 
 
ILSR’s Community Broadband Networks Initiative: Recently in Community Networks… Week of 11/11/2019
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By SmogDog: The Dog Has Landed…
 
 
By Davisgraveyard: Building a Haunted Chapel
 
 
By MikeTheDesignerBell: DIY Sheet Metal Skateboard

Recipes

By Flour On My Apron: Chocolate Covered Fondants
 
 
By Rebekah White: Scottish Oxtail Soup
 
 
By Lauren Kodiak, The Kitchn: This Quinoa Salad Is My Holy Grail
 
 
By Meghan Splawn, the Kitchn: The Universally Perfect, All-Seasons Bean Dish I Bring to Every Potluck


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 11, 2019

On This Day

1865 – Dr Mary Edwards Walker receives the US Medal of Honor, becoming the first woman to receive the award.
Mary Edwards Walker, M.D. (November 26, 1832 – February 21, 1919), commonly referred to as Dr. Mary Walker, was an American abolitionist, prohibitionist, prisoner of war and surgeon.[1] She is the only woman to ever receive the Medal of Honor.[2]

In 1855, she earned her medical degree at Syracuse Medical College in New York,[3] married and started a medical practice. She volunteered with the Union Army at the outbreak of the American Civil War and served as a surgeon at a temporary hospital in Washington, D.C., even though at the time women and sectarian[clarification needed] physicians were considered unfit for the Union Army Examining Board.[4] She was captured by Confederate forces[3] after crossing enemy lines to treat wounded civilians and arrested as a spy. She was sent as a prisoner of war to Richmond, Virginia until released in a prisoner exchange.

After the war, she was approved for the Medal of Honor, for her efforts to treat the wounded during the Civil War. Notably, the award was not expressly given for gallantry in action at that time, and in fact was the only military decoration during the Civil War. Walker is the only woman to receive the medal and one of only eight civilians to receive it. Her name was deleted from the Army Medal of Honor Roll in 1917 (along with over 900 other, male MOH recipients); however, it was restored in 1977.[3] After the war, she was a writer and lecturer supporting the women’s suffrage movement until her death in 1919.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1915 – Anna Schwartz, American economist and author (d. 2012)
Anna Jacobson Schwartz (/ʃwɔːrts/; November 11, 1915 – June 21, 2012) was an American economist who worked at the National Bureau of Economic Research in New York City and a writer for the New York Times. Paul Krugman once said that Schwartz is, “one of the world’s greatest monetary scholars.”[1] Schwartz is most notably recognized for her collaborative work with Milton Friedman on A Monetary History of the United States, 1867–1960, which was published in 1963.[2] This book placed the blame for the Great Depression at the door of the Federal Reserve System.[1] She was also president of the Western Economic Association International in 1988.[3] Schwartz was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 2013.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

The Rural Blog: Groups work to prevent veteran suicides, especially in rural areas, where VA says 51 percent of veterans live; USDA program aims to help suicidal farmers and ranchers and more ->
 
 
 
 
Jezebel: Congratulations to This Antisocial Screaming Penguin for Winning New Zealand’s Bird of the Year Poll and more ->
 
 
 
 
Jalopnik: I’m Willing to Pay an Obscene Amount of Money For This Guy’s Brilliant Pedestrian Car Horn Invention; Here’s The Difference Between Cheap And Expensive Brake Pads; Inside Pirelli’s Massive Formula One Tire Operation and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo: The Smartphone Wasn’t Inducted Into the National Toy Hall of Fame This Year; The Best Phones You Can Buy Right Now and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: The Nile Could Be a Window Into the Underworld; Radar Scans Reveal Ancient Human Footprint Embedded in Mammoth Track; ‘Lost’ Species of Mouse-Deer Spotted in Vietnam After 30 Years and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Alaska Landmine: New documents reveal coordinated effort to eliminate Campbell Lake public access and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: The Internet Archive Is Digitizing & Preserving Over 100,000 Vinyl Records: Hear 750 Full Albums Now; Why David Sedaris Hates America’s Favorite Word, “Awesome”; An Animated Leonard Cohen Offers Reflections on Death: Thought-Provoking Excerpts from His Final Interview and more->
 
 
 
 
By Kirstie Taylor, Medium: The Most Important Quality To Look For In A Life Partner
Life is a rollercoaster; be conscious of who you choose to ride it with.
 
 
 
 
By Debra Adams Simmons, HISTORY Executive Editor, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: How to remember such a long-ago sacrifice? More ->
 
 
 
 
Ozy Daily Dose: Fighting the Agent Orange Battle of the 9/11 Generation; A Breast Cancer Survivor’s Survival Guide? Start With Air Guitar and more ->
 
 
 
 
James Clear: Haters and Critics: How to Deal with People Judging You and Your Work
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass: There could be a simple solution to Facebook’s political ad woes; How to deal with a manager who doesn’t manage; A better use for sprawling, big-box store parking lots? Urban farms; Brad Meltzer gets kids to care about history in PBS’s ‘Xavier Riddle and the Secret Museum’ Brad Meltzer gets kids to care about history in PBS’s ‘Xavier Riddle and the Secret Museum’ and more ->
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Man with drone accused of taunting police dogs acquitted: Always wanted to get his pilot’s license – but it was too expensive, so he bought a drone and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Shabby FuFu: Farmhouse Christmas Signs And More To DIY

Recipes

By Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: 40 Clove Garlic Pheasant
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Great British Bake-Off Gift Guide


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI November 10, 2019

On This Day

1910 – The date of Thomas A. Davis’ opening of the San Diego Army and Navy Academy, although the official founding date is November 23, 1910.
Army and Navy Academy is a college-preparatory boarding school for boys, grades 7–12, in Carlsbad, California. It was founded in 1910.[1]
History

The Academy was founded by Thomas A. Davis on November 23, 1910. It was originally located in the Pacific Beach neighborhood of San Diego, California. In 1936, the Academy moved to Carlsbad, California, where it opened as the Davis Military Academy. Davis Military Academy was renamed San Diego Army and Navy Academy, and in 1944 “San Diego” was dropped from the name giving it its present name, Army and Navy Academy. The Academy was most notably led by Colonel (Hon.) William Currier Atkinson, who served as the Academy’s president for fifty years.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1735 – Granville Sharp, English activist and scholar, co-founded the Sierra Leone Company (d. 1813)
Granville Sharp (10 November 1735 – 6 July 1813) was one of the first English campaigners for the abolition of the slave trade. He also involved himself in trying to correct other social injustices. Sharp formulated the plan to settle black people in Sierra Leone, and founded the St. George’s Bay Company, a forerunner of the Sierra Leone Company. His efforts led to both the founding of the Province of Freedom, and later on Freetown, Sierra Leone, and so he is considered to be one of the founding fathers of Sierra Leone. He was also a biblical scholar, a classicist, and a talented musician.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Patti Smith’s remedy for insomnia, Neil Gaiman’s poetic ode to the queer Quaker astronomer who confirmed relativity and catapulted Einstein into fame
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass Newsletter:
How Sesame Street changed television and my life As the seminal children’s show celebrates its 50th birthday, a mega-fan looks back on its immeasurable impact on her life.; Lol or lmao? These infographics chart how laughter has evolved online and more ->

 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Visual Flight Rules Encounter with Instrument Meteorological Conditions: Zenith Zodiac 601XL, N929GB; fatal accident occurred December 21, 2017 in Thompson’s Station, Williamson County, Tennessee; Controlled Flight into Terrain: Piper PA-28-140, N9549W; fatal accident occurred September 29, 2017 in Brinnon, Jefferson County, Washington and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Seamster: Author Spotlight: Gravitino

Recipes

FOOD By Lyds: Holiday Cornbread Recipe
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Air Fryer French Fries
 
 
By gdy67: Pumpkin Bread Rolls