Tag: FYI

FYI September 22, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1948 – Gail Halvorsen officially started parachuting candy to children as part of the Berlin Air lift.
The Berlin Blockade (24 June 1948 – 12 May 1949) was one of the first major international crises of the Cold War. During the multinational occupation of post–World War II Germany, the Soviet Union blocked the Western Allies’ railway, road, and canal access to the sectors of Berlin under Western control. The Soviets offered to drop the blockade if the Western Allies withdrew the newly introduced Deutsche mark from West Berlin.

The Western Allies organized the Berlin airlift (26 June 1948–30 September 1949) to carry supplies to the people of West Berlin, a difficult feat given the size of the city’s population.[1][2] Aircrews from the United States Air Force, the Royal Air Force, the French Air Force,[3] the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Royal Australian Air Force, the Royal New Zealand Air Force, and the South African Air Force[4]:338 flew over 200,000 sorties in one year, providing to the West Berliners up to 8,893 tons of necessities each day, such as fuel and food.[5] The Soviets did not disrupt the airlift for fear this might lead to open conflict.[6]

By the spring of 1949, the airlift was clearly succeeding, and by April it was delivering more cargo than had previously been transported into the city by rail. On 12 May 1949, the USSR lifted the blockade of West Berlin. The Berlin Blockade served to highlight the competing ideological and economic visions for postwar Europe.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1891 – Alma Thomas, American painter and educator (d. 1978)
Alma Woodsey Thomas (September 22, 1891 – February 24, 1978) was an African-American Expressionist painter and art educator.[1] She lived and worked primarily in Washington, D.C. and The Washington Post described her as a force in the Washington Color School.[2] The Wall Street Journal describes her as a previously “underappreciated artist” who is more recently recognized for her “exuberant” works, noteworthy for their pattern, rhythm and color.[3]

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FYI

 
 
Lawrence Martin-Bittman (14 February 1931 – 18 September 2018),[1][2] formerly known as Ladislav Bittman, was an American artist, author, and retired professor of disinformation at Boston University.[3] Prior to his defection to the United States in 1968, he served as an intelligence officer specializing in disinformation for the Czechoslovak Intelligence Service.[4]

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Beat Richner (13 March 1947 – 9 September 2018) was a Swiss pediatrician, cellist and founder of children’s hospitals in Cambodia. He created the Kantha Bopha Foundation in Zurich in 1992 and became its head. He and another expatriate oversee and run the predominantly Cambodian-manned hospitals. As both a cellist and a medical doctor, Richner was known by patients, audiences, and donors as “Beatocello”.[1]

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Marceline Loridan-Ivens (19 March 1928[1] – 18 September 2018)[2] was a French writer and film director who was married to Joris Ivens.[3] Her memoir But You Did Not Come Back details her time in Auschwitz-Birkenau.[4]

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By Elizabeth Werth: The First Woman to Ever Compete in Le Mans Still Holds The Title of the Highest-Finishing Female Competitor
 
 
 
 
By Whitney Kimball: Holy Shit, Six Siblings Took Out Campaign Ads Against Their Republican Brother
 
 

 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Lightning 3way, Fender flairs, Starling murmuration and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Agrothe2: A Tale of Two Interests: Resource Review of Suburban Homestead, A Youtube Channel By Siloe Oliveira
 
 
By clfinney: A Great Place to Get Free Information
The ACES offer many free publications, videos, and advice. It is mainly staffed by educators. Much of the information is provided for free. Some of the more extensively researched reports have fees though. Some of the grants received by ACES require matching funding; my guess is these fees help meet that requirement. The main purpose of ACES is to make life better for citizens of Alabama. Extensions exist in each state and have a similar purpose. This link goes to a list of each state’s Extension service. Check them out!
 
 
By jcooperc: Gorgeous Inspiration for Home Gardeners and Farmer Florists
 
 
By Al Cross: Recovering addict who writes a column for Kentucky and Tennessee newspapers publishes a book about his experiences
 
 
 
 
By Tim Alberta: Kent Sorenson Was a Tea Party Hero. Then He Lost Everything.
 
 
 
 
By Gwen Inhat: Australian stores pull sewing needles from shelves as fruit crisis worsens
The Australian government has also increased the penalties for such produce tampering, up to 10 to 15 years in prison.
 
 
 
 
Mickie’s Mutterings: Createspace Paperbacks to KDP Move with Pictures
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Amy X. Wang, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Luiz Romero: Catfishing
 
 
 
 
By Aytekin Tank: Why you shouldn’t share your goals
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: University of Kansas: Digital Scholarship Rescues Ethnographic Cookbook From Oblivion
 
 
By Gary Price: Research Poster: “The Role of Academic Librarians in Education and Training: A Timeline of Attitude Transformation”
 
 
 
 
By Mica Soellner, Appleton Post-Crescent: Appleton Public Library to launch new digital music library promoting local musicians
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura by Abbey Perreault: The Food Truck That Invites You to Be the Cook These traveling historians are hungry for your life story.
 
 
Atlas Obscura by Anika Burgess: Women Built London’s Waterloo Bridge, But It Took These Photos to Prove It Uncovering evidence of a long-forgotten history.
 
 

Ideas

 
 

By Hometalk Highlights: Make Your Home Smell Amazing With These DIY Winter Scent Ideas Your home is about to smell AH-mazing!
 
 
 
 
Kingston Crafts: Use Pool Noodles to Organize and Store Your Boots!
 
 
 
 
Beth Hometalker Athens, GA: A DIY Suspended Loft Bed
 
 
 
 
Ferdi Hometalker South Africa: Gabion Cladding


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 21, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1170 – The Kingdom of Dublin falls to Norman invaders.
Vikings invaded the territory around Dublin in the 9th century, establishing the Norse Kingdom of Dublin, the earliest and longest-lasting Norse kingdom in Ireland. Its territory corresponded to most of present-day County Dublin. The Norse referred to the kingdom as Dyflin, which is derived from Irish Dubh Linn, meaning ‘black pool’. The first reference to the Vikings comes from the Annals of Ulster and the first entry for 841 CE reads: “Pagans still on Lough Neagh”. It is from this date onward that historians get references to ship fortresses or longphorts being established in Ireland. It may be safe to assume that the Vikings first over-wintered in 840–841 CE. The actual location of the longphort of Dublin is still a hotly debated issue. Norse rulers of Dublin were often co-kings, and occasionally also Kings of Jórvík in what is now Yorkshire. Under their rule, Dublin became the biggest slave port in Western Europe.[2][3]

Over time, the settlers in Dublin became increasingly Gaelicized. They began to exhibit a great deal of Gaelic and Norse cultural syncretism, and are often referred to as Norse-Gaels.

The extent of the kingdom varied, but in peaceful times it extended roughly as far as Wicklow (Wykinglo) in the south, Glen Ding near Blessington, Leixlip (Lax Hlaup) west of Dublin, and Skerries, Dublin (Skere) to the north. The Fingal area north of Dublin was named after the Norse who lived there.

In 988, Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill led the initial Gaelic conquest of Dublin. As a result, the founding of Dublin is counted by some from the year 988, although a village had existed on the site of Dublin since before the Roman occupation of Great Britain nearly a thousand years earlier.

In the mid-11th century, the Kingdom of Leinster began exerting influence over Dublin. Though the last king of Dublin was killed by the Norman conquerors of Dublin in 1171, the population of the city retained their distinctiveness for some generations.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1756 – John Loudon McAdam, Scottish engineer (d. 1836)
John Loudon McAdam (23th September 1756[1] – 26 November 1836) was a Scottish engineer and road-builder. He was the inventor of “macadamisation”, an effective and economical method of constructing roads.

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FYI

 
 
By Michelle Woo: Here’s What You Can Do With Apple’s New iOS 12 Parental Controls
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Dear Lord, Praying Mantises Can Actually Catch Fish
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: Watch a Moth Keep Its Balance While Being Pelted With Tiny Cannonballs
 
 
By Brian Kahn: This Deep Sea Eel Is the Raddest Thing You’ll See All Week
 
 
 
 
By James Doubek: There’s No Stopping Toronto’s ‘Uber-Raccoon’
 
 
 
 
By Atlas Obscura: Creating Disneyland, Broken Down Dam Park, Earhart’s Last Message and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Surviving the Stupid, How to write the perfect sentence, 10 Successful Writers Who Dropped Out (Or Were Kicked Out) of School and more ->
 
 
 
 
By closmanson: Relying on the book… Facebook that is!
 
 
 
 
By Sean Braswell: The Women Who Helped Take Down a Nixon Supreme Court Nominee
 
 
 
 
By Michael Burke: Alaska gov, lieutenant gov come out against Kavanaugh
 
 
 
 
By Elie Mystal: Details On The Allegations Against, And Yale Law School Investigation Into Professor Jed Rubenfeld What is going on with Yale’s clerkship process, and when are they going to tell the rest of us?
 
 
 
 
By Jeff Laverly: Stuck in Alaska: 1953 Ford F350
 
 
 
 
By Lee Humphreys, edited by Nigel Warburton: The urge to share news of our lives is neither new nor narcissistic
 
 
By Michael W. Hickson, edited by Sam Dresser: How a Huguenot philosopher realised that atheists could be virtuous
 
 
 
 
Chuck Wendig Terrible Minds: Coming This Thorsday, It’s Chuck & Anthony: Ragnatalk
 
 
 
 

By Ayun Halliday: The Hieronymus Bosch Demon Bird Was Spotted Riding the New York City Subway the Other Day…
 
 
 
 
By Jesus Diaz: See the ghostly remains of a failed techno-utopia These secret cities of the former Soviet Union point to a “perfect technocratic future that never happened.”
 
Danila Tkachenko RESTRICTED AREAS
 
 
By Adele Peters: This real estate company figured out a simple way to offer the homeless a house and a job
 
 
By Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan: A 200-year-old guide to color, redesigned for the internet age
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy: Meet the Godfather of Voguing
 
 
By MessyNessy, Francky Knapp: A Night on the Town in Bygone LA
 
 

Ideas

 
 

By Liz – Simple Decorating Tips: THE POT RACK IN OUR 100 YEAR OLD HOUSE
 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 20, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1697 – The Treaty of Ryswick is signed by France, England, Spain, the Holy Roman Empire and the Dutch Republic, ending the Nine Years’ War.
The Treaty or Peace of Ryswick, also known as The Peace of Rijswijk was a series of agreements signed in the Dutch city of Rijswijk between 20 September and 30 October 1697, ending the 1689-97 Nine Years War between France and the Grand Alliance of England, Spain, the Holy Roman Empire and the Dutch Republic.[b]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1906 – Vera Faddeeva, Russian mathematician (d. 1983)
Vera Faddeeva (Russian: Вера Николаевна Фаддеева; Vera Nikolaevna Faddeeva; 1906–1983) was a Soviet mathematician from a family of mathematicians. Faddeeva published some of the first work in the field of linear algebra. Her 1950 work, Computational methods of linear algebra was widely acclaimed and she won a USSR State Prize for it. Between 1962 and 1975, she prepared many research papers with her husband, Dmitry Konstantinovich Faddeev.

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FYI

 
 

By Elizabeth Bruenig in Arlington, Tex. Videos by Gillian Brockell: Twelve years ago, Amber Wyatt reported her rape. Few believed her. Her hometown turned against her. The authorities failed her. Danielle Kunitz and Gillian Brockell/The Washington Post What do we owe her now?
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Here’s how some rural schools are arming teachers
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Bill would keep secret how much revenue individual retailers get from SNAP; newspapers ask Senate to reject idea
 
 
 
 
By Justin Wise: Willie Nelson: ‘I don’t care’ if my supporters get angry that I support O’Rourke
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Michele Debczak: The iNaturalist App Is Like Shazam for Plants, Animals, and Insects
 
 
iNaturalist.org
 
 
 
 
By Michael Hobbs: Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrong
 
 
 
 
By Justin Higginbottom: If a Tree Falls in the Forest, a Drone May Be There to See It — and Seed-Bomb
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: What Makes Edgar Allan Poe So Great? An Animated Video Explains
 
 

 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Move to Inbox More 4 of 4 The great British hedgehog census is prickly business, Living in a Library New York’s early library buildings included apartments for on-site custodians and their families, The Puffing Gun Many popular cereals, including Kix and Cheerios, exploded out of its chamber and into existence and more ->
 
 

Atlas Obscura: Tracing ska music’s great migration, Tesla’s Tower In the early 20th century, the inventor Nikola Tesla set out to build a tower that would send wireless electricity around the world. But things didn’t go as he had planned. More ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Exploring the Ruins of Bannerman Castle
 
 
 
 
Quartz Obsession Today’s email was written by Whet Moser with Chase Purdy, edited by Jessanne Collins, and produced by Luiz Romero -> Coke: The secret recipe for global domination
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Wanda @ From House To Home Hometalker Inman, SC: Black and Gold Glam Cabinet Makeover
 
 
 
 
By DrewPaulDesigns: GARAWÄL: Convert Your Garage!
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Little on the complicated side~
By twiesner: Disney Inspired Poison Apple Cookies
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 19, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1796 – George Washington’s Farewell Address is printed across America as an open letter to the public.
George Washington’s Farewell Address is a letter written by first President of the United States George Washington to “friends and fellow-citizens”.[1] He wrote the letter near the end of his second term of presidency, before retiring to his home at Mount Vernon in Virginia.

It was originally published in David C. Claypoole’s American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796 under the title “The Address of General Washington To The People of The United States on his declining of the Presidency of the United States”, and it was almost immediately reprinted in newspapers across the country and later in pamphlet form.[2] The work was later named the “Farewell Address” as it was Washington’s valedictory after 20 years of service to the new nation. It was published about ten weeks before the presidential electors cast their votes in the 1796 presidential election. It is a classic statement of republicanism, warning Americans of the political dangers which they must avoid if they are to remain true to their values.

The first draft was originally prepared by James Madison in June 1792, as Washington contemplated retiring at the end of his first term in office.[3] However, he set aside the letter and ran for a second term after the disputes between Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, which convinced him that growing tensions would rip apart the country without his leadership, including divisions between the newly formed Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties, and the current state of foreign affairs.[4]

As his second term came to a close four years later, Washington prepared a revision of the original letter with the help of Alexander Hamilton to announce his intention to decline a third term in office. He also reflects on the emerging issues of the American political landscape in 1796, expresses his support for the government eight years after the adoption of the Constitution, defends his administration’s record, and gives valedictory advice to the American people.[5]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1889 – Sarah Louise Delany, American physician and author (d. 1999)
Sarah Louise “Sadie” Delany (September 19, 1889 – January 25, 1999) was an American educator and civil rights pioneer who was the subject, along with her younger sister, Elizabeth “Bessie” Delany, of the New York Times bestselling oral history, Having Our Say, by journalist Amy Hearth. Sadie was the first African-American permitted to teach domestic science at the high-school level in the New York public schools, and became famous, with the publication of the book, at the age of 103.

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FYI

 
 

By Bill Friskics-Warren: Big Jay McNeely, 91, Dies; R&B’s ‘King of the Honkers’
 
 
By Lauren Onkey: Hear The Revolutionary R&B Of Big Jay McNeely, Honking Proto-Rocker
 
 
Cecil James McNeely (April 29, 1927 – September 16, 2018),[2][3] better known as Big Jay McNeely, was an American rhythm and blues saxophonist.
Read more ->
 
 
 
 
By Margalit Fox: Alan Abel, Hoaxer Extraordinaire, Is (on Good Authority) Dead at 94
“A few hundred years ago, I would have been a court jester,” he told The Plain Dealer of Cleveland in 2007. His primary intent, Mr. Abel often said, was “to give people a kick in the intellect.”
 
 

Alan Irwin Abel (August 2, 1924 – September 14, 2018)was an American prankster, hoaxer, writer, and mockumentary filmmaker famous for several hoaxes that became media circuses.

Read more ->
 
 
Alan Abel website
 
 
 
 
By Justin T. Westbrook: Burning Man’s Boeing 747 Is Stuck in the Nevada Desert
 
 
 
 
By Dan McQuade: Golf Digest Helped Free An Innocent Man From Prison
 
 
 
 
Longreads – Laurie Penny: No, I Will Not Debate You Civility will never defeat fascism, no matter what The Economist thinks.
 
 
 
 

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: How We Spend Our Days Is How We Spend Our Lives: Annie Dillard on Choosing Presence Over Productivity
 
 
 
 
By Rob Delaney: Henry
The hole in his throat is about the same circumference as a bullet hole. I’ve gotten to know his tracheotomy nurse rather well. She was a captain in the British Territorial Army and served in Iraq and Afghanistan. She also helped turn Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children into a triage unit for adults on the day of the bombings in London on July 7th, 2005, which killed 52 people. So even though I fucking hate what she’s taught me to do to my beautiful baby boy’s neck, I’m grateful to have her around to talk me back to sanity afterward.
 
 
 
 
By Dan Peleschuk: The Chess Grandmaster Battling Latvian Money Laundering – Can Finance Minister Dana Reizniece-Ozola outsmart Latvia’s money launderers?
 
 
 
 
By Rozena Crosman: When Thousands Struck Back Against the USSR … by Singing
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Tom Schad: Group of Pro Football Hall of Famers threaten boycott as they seek insurance, pay from NFL
 
 
 
 
By JD Handy: More Rain Than Shine: book review of, How To Grow Vegetables In Sitka, Alaska. By Lori Adams
 
 
 
 
By Julian Dossett: Journalism in an Instant: How Livestreaming is Changing Our News
 
 
 
 
By Christine Schmidt: How the Broke in Philly collaboration is focusing local media’s attention on poverty and economic mobility
“As journalists, we’re taught to be competitive and territorial. On the other hand, things are changing dramatically, so don’t assume other people in your local market don’t want to collaborate.”
 
 
 
 

By Brian Jacobs: How We Made “Billions of Birds Migrate” National Geographic’s web-based takeoff on the classic bird migration print poster
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Some rural areas are slow to embrace legal marijuana
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Mental health worker makes house calls in rural Idaho
 
 
 
 

Kanoe Namahoe: Mike Rowe on what his guidance counselor got wrong
 
 
mikeroweWORKS Foundation
 
 
 
 
By Michael Petrou: Re-examining Lippmann’s Legacy Journalists are still grappling with many of the issues that defined Walter Lippmann’s extraordinary career
 
 
 
 

By JR Raphael: As Inbox fades away, here’s how to get its best features in Gmail
 
 
 
 
By Julia Malacoff – Glassdoor: Phone interview coming up? Don’t make these mistakes
 
 
 
 
DriveTribe News: THIS SELF-DRIVING CAR WAS MADE 50 YEARS BEFORE TESLA, The Worlds First Hydrogen Train Has Been Launched and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Pete Duel Memorial Site
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
The Bajan Texan: DIY Hexagon Cork Board for your Vision Board or Wall Organization
 
 
 
 
Elena K, Hometalk Team Hometalker Ozone Park, NY: Easy Grout Cleaner (and Swiffer Hack) for Under $8
 
 
 
 
Scrappy Geek: 15 EASY DIY Halloween Decorations!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 27 Techniques To Instantly Take Your Decor To Another Level Sometimes it’s the small changes that are the wow factors
 
 
 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #105)
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Stacey Ballis: How to make Bloody Mary scones, a brunch game-changer


 
 

 
 

FYI September 18, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1895 – The Atlanta Exposition Speech on race relations is delivered by Booker T. Washington.
The Cotton States and International Exposition Speech was an address on the topic of race relations given by Booker T. Washington on September 18, 1895. The speech laid the foundation for the Atlanta compromise, an agreement between African-American leaders and Southern white leaders in which Southern blacks would work meekly and submit to white political rule, while Southern whites guaranteed that blacks would receive basic education and due process of law.

The speech,[1] presented before a predominantly white audience at the Cotton States and International Exposition (the site of today’s Piedmont Park) in Atlanta, Georgia, has been recognized as one of the most important and influential speeches in American history.[2] The speech was preceded by the reading of a dedicatory ode written by Frank Lebby Stanton.[3]

Washington began with a call to the blacks, who composed one third of the Southern population, to join the world of work. He declared that the South was where blacks were given their chance, as opposed to the North, especially in the worlds of commerce and industry. He told the white audience that rather than relying on the immigrant population arriving at the rate of a million people a year, they should hire some of the nation’s eight million blacks. He praised blacks’ loyalty, fidelity and love in service to the white population, but warned that they could be a great burden on society if oppression continued, stating that the progress of the South was inherently tied to the treatment of blacks and protection of their liberties.

He addressed the inequality between commercial legality and social acceptance, proclaiming that “The opportunity to earn a dollar in a factory just now is worth infinitely more than the opportunity to spend a dollar in an opera house.” Washington also suggested toleration of segregation by claiming that blacks and whites could exist as separate fingers of a hand.

The title “Atlanta Compromise” was given to the speech by W. E. B. Du Bois, who believed it was insufficiently committed to the pursuit of social and political equality for blacks.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1752 – Adrien-Marie Legendre, French mathematician and theorist (d. 1833)
Adrien-Marie Legendre (/ləˈʒɑːndər, -ˈʒɑːnd/;[3] French: [adʁiɛ̃ maʁi ləʒɑ̃dʁ]; 18 September 1752 – 10 January 1833) was a French mathematician. Legendre made numerous contributions to mathematics. Well-known and important concepts such as the Legendre polynomials and Legendre transformation are named after him.

Life
Adrien-Marie Legendre was born in Paris on 18 September 1752 to a wealthy family. He received his education at the Collège Mazarin in Paris, and defended his thesis in physics and mathematics in 1770. He taught at the École Militaire in Paris from 1775 to 1780 and at the École Normale from 1795. At the same time, he was associated with the Bureau des Longitudes. In 1782, the Berlin Academy awarded Legendre a prize for his treatise on projectiles in resistant media. This treatise also brought him to the attention of Lagrange.

The Académie des Sciences made Legendre an adjoint member in 1783 and an associé in 1785. In 1789, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.[4]

He assisted with the Anglo-French Survey (1784–1790) to calculate the precise distance between the Paris Observatory and the Royal Greenwich Observatory by means of trigonometry. To this end in 1787 he visited Dover and London together with Dominique, comte de Cassini and Pierre Méchain. The three also visited William Herschel, the discoverer of the planet Uranus.

Legendre lost his private fortune in 1793 during the French Revolution. That year, he also married Marguerite-Claudine Couhin, who helped him put his affairs in order. In 1795, Legendre became one of six members of the mathematics section of the reconstituted Académie des Sciences, renamed the Institut National des Sciences et des Arts. Later, in 1803, Napoleon reorganized the Institut National, and Legendre became a member of the Geometry section. From 1799 to 1812, Legendre served as mathematics examiner for graduating artillery students at the École Militaire and from 1799 to 1815 he served as permanent mathematics examiner for the École Polytechnique.[5] In 1824, Legendre was denied his pension from the École Militaire because he refused to vote for the government candidate at the Institut National—the comte de Corbière, Ministre de L’Intérieur of the ultraroyalist government. His pension was partially reinstated with the change in government in 1828. In 1831, he was made an officer of the Légion d’Honneur.

Legendre died in Paris on 10 January 1833, after a long and painful illness, and Legendre’s widow carefully preserved his belongings to memorialize him. Upon her death in 1856, she was buried next to her husband in the village of Auteuil, where the couple had lived, and left their last country house to the village. Legendre’s name is one of the 72 names inscribed on the Eiffel Tower.

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FYI

 
 

By Patrick Redford: Martial Arts Legend Kid Yamamoto Dead At 41

 
 
Norifumi Yamamoto (山本 徳郁 Yamamoto Norifumi, March 15, 1977 – September 18, 2018) was a Japanese mixed martial artist and kickboxer who competed in the bantamweight division of the UFC. He quickly gained popularity in the Shooto organization due to his aggressive, well-rounded style and controversial persona. He moved on to K-1 Hero’s, where he became the K-1 Hero’s 2005 Middleweight Grand Prix Tournament Champion in December, 2005 after defeating Genki Sudo via a controversial TKO due to punches.

Yamamoto came from a wrestling family. His father Ikuei Yamamoto represented Japan at the 1972 Olympic games in Munich and his sisters Miyu and Seiko both won world championships in freestyle wrestling. Kid received his education in the United States and wrestled at Marcos de Niza High School in Tempe, Arizona, capturing three state championships (with a third-place finish as a freshman). During that time he lived and received training from Townsend and Tricia Saunders. He also trained briefly under Choi Mu Bae.[1].

Though by most measures he was a natural bantamweight, many of Yamamoto’s most significant bouts have been in the lightweight division as it was the lightest division in Hero’s. More recently, he competed in the Ultimate Fighting Championship in the bantamweight division, although he did not perform well there, going winless in his first four fights.

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A look at the ginormous Antonov An-225 Mriya jumbo jet as it came in for a landing at Oakland International Airport. Apparently, the massive airplane was hired by the US Government to pick up typhoon relief supplies bound for Guam, and had to stop to refuel on its way from Kiev.
 
 
 
 
Colossal: Watch How Steel Ribbons Are Shaped into Cookie Cutters, Manami Ito Performs a Violin Solo With a Customized Prosthetic Bow Arm and more ->
 
 
 
 

Father’s Devotion: 1972 Ford Mustang


By Adam Clarke: Father’s Devotion: 1972 Ford Mustang
 
 
 
 
The Diesel-Electric Elephant Company: Dullard boaters, rats on string, Thunderbird machines and Sunday, Bloody Sunday #narrowboat #england
 
 
 
 
By Eden Ashley: 9 Ways You Can Live More With Intention
 
 
 
 
By Frankie Schembri: Fifty-thousand-year-old wolf pup still has paws, skin, and hair
 
 
 
 
By Christina Dodd: How I Got 25K More BookBub Followers (and Why I Did)
 
 
 
 
Kate Atkinson tells Sarah Shaffi how the curious case of ‘perfect spy’ Jack King inspired her book, Transcription
Kate Atkinson was still working on A God in Ruins – her last novel and a not-quite-sequel to her bestselling Life After Life – when she came across something of interest.

While on the National Archives’ website, she got drawn into the latest releases section, and learnt about Jack King, who was an MI5 spy during the Second World War. Posing as a Gestapo agent, he infiltrated fascist groups and prevented secret information from getting into the hands of the Nazis. But his real identity had been the cause of speculation for some time; now, it was being revealed that he was really a bank clerk at the Westminster Bank called Eric Roberts.
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: Ladies’ Facilities in the 1700s to 1900s
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall: Download Classic Japanese Wave and Ripple Designs: A Go-to Guide for Japanese Artists from 1903
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Wet & Forget Hometalker Elgin, IL: How To Make a Home Emergency Kit
 
 
 
 
Melanie Hometalk Helper Canada: Solar Light Fall Makeover
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 23 DIY Pumpkins You’ve Never Seen Before! These 23 DIY decor pumpkins are so unique, we guarantee your neighbors won’t have the same ones!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Perfect Coffee Tables You And Your Husband Can Build Together Get the perfect coffee table, and build with your hubbie!
 
 
 
 
By gravitino: A Tiny Telescope Observatory
 
 
 
 
By many_methods: Minion Wood Burner
 
 
 
 
By Magpie’s Miscellany: Basic Net Wire Wrap
 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By ModernFarmhouseKitchen: Irish Soda Bread
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 17, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1683 – Antonie van Leeuwenhoek writes a letter to the Royal Society describing “animalcules”.
Antonie Philips van Leeuwenhoek[note 2] FRS (/ˈleɪvənhʊk/; Dutch: [ɑnˈtoːni vɑn ˈleːuə(n)ˌɦuk] (About this sound listen)[p] ; 24 October 1632 – 26 August 1723) was a Dutch businessman and scientist in the Golden Age of Dutch science and technology. A largely self-taught man in science, he is commonly known as “the Father of Microbiology”, and one of the first microscopists and microbiologists.[5][6] Van Leeuwenhoek is best known for his pioneering work in microscopy and for his contributions toward the establishment of microbiology as a scientific discipline.

Raised in Delft, in the Dutch Republic, van Leeuwenhoek worked as a draper in his youth and founded his own shop in 1654. He became well recognized in municipal politics and developed an interest in lensmaking. In the 1670s, he started to explore microbial life with his microscope.[note 3] This was one of the notable achievements of the Golden Age of Dutch exploration and discovery (c. 1590s–1720s).

Using single-lensed microscopes of his own design, van Leeuwenhoek was the first to experiment with microbes, which he originally referred to as animalcules (from Latin animalculum = “tiny animal”). Through his experiments, he was the first to relatively determine their size. Most of the “animalcules” are now referred to as unicellular organisms, although he observed multicellular organisms in pond water. He was also the first to document microscopic observations of muscle fibers, bacteria, spermatozoa, red blood cells, crystals in gouty tophi, and blood flow in capillaries. Van Leeuwenhoek did not write any books; his discoveries came to light through correspondence with the Royal Society, which published his letters.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1743 – Marquis de Condorcet, French mathematician and political scientist (d. 1794)
Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas de Caritat, Marquis of Condorcet (French: [maʁi ʒɑ̃n‿ɑ̃twan nikola də kaʁita kɔ̃dɔʁsɛ]; 17 September 1743 – 29 March 1794), known as Nicolas de Condorcet, was a French philosopher and mathematician. His ideas, including support for a liberal economy, free and equal public instruction, constitutional government, and equal rights for women and people of all races, have been said to embody the ideals of the Age of Enlightenment and Enlightenment rationalism. He died in prison after a period of flight from French Revolutionary authorities.

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FYI

 
 

By Kelly Faircloth: Freddie Oversteegen, Who Fought Nazis As a Teen Resistance Member, Dies at 92
 
 
Freddie Nanda Dekker-Oversteegen (6 September 1925 – 5 September 2018) was part of the Dutch resistance during the occupation of the Netherlands during World War II.
 
 
By Harrison Smith: Freddie Oversteegen, Dutch resistance fighter who killed Nazis through seduction, dies at 92
 
 
 
 
Great comments!
By Alanis King: Unattended Car Shuts Down Parts of Phoenix Airport for Hours, Delays Hundreds of Flights
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: This Epic Ford Super Duty vs. Tow Truck Battle Ended in an Arrest
 
 
 
 
By Caroline Siede: Extremely devoted Lord Of The Rings fan constructs actual, geothermal hobbit hole
 
 
Jim Costigan: My Hobbitt Shed
 
 
 
 
By Giri Nathan: Auld Lad At Ireland Bookie Shop Thwarts Three Armed Robbers
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: A pair of WWII bunkers in New Orleans contains 7 million fish, Best Backyard Treehouses and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Frankie Schembri: Ig Nobel prizes honor do-it-yourself colonoscopies, a curious use for postage stamps, and other peculiar research
Japanese gastroenterologist Akira Horiuchi won the medical education prize for an experiment in which he reviewed the comfort and efficiency of self-colonoscopy in the sitting position by performing a colonoscopy on himself while seated. He reported only “mild discomfort.”

Other winners included a team that demonstrated that most people who use complicated products do not read the instruction manual (Literature Prize); researchers who surveyed Spanish drivers to determine the frequency, motivation, and effects of shouting and cursing while in a car (Peace Prize); a group that investigated whether using Voodoo dolls to retaliate against abusive bosses makes employees feel better (Economics Prize); and a team that tested the effectiveness of a “spit shine” by cleaning 18th century sculptures with saliva and several alcohol-based cleaners (Chemistry Prize). Spit won.
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Defamation lawsuit over alleged fake Western painting tossed, Bookstores are finding creative ways to survive and thrive in the age of Amazon and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Michael Grothaus: Here are iOS 12’s best new features Apple’s free operating-system update has a lot to offer—even if your iPhone or iPad is a few years old.
 
 
 
 
By Eillie Anzilotti: This basic income program will give $1,000 a month to black mothers Magnolia Mother’s Trust will begin as a pilot program in Jackson, Mississippi, with 15 women, and aims to lift black mothers out of poverty.
 
 
 
 
By ggphillips: The Most Nostalgic Time of The Year
 
 
By Barb: A Plant IS What It Eats
 
 
 
 

By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCCXIV): Frida Kahlo meeting Josephine Baker, Paris 1939, Probably the most-decorated female combatant in the entire history of warfare, That time KLM flights used to have a fully automatic rifle to defend passengers against Polar bears and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Stephanie Donovan: Blog Profiles: Empty Nest Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Tony Bradley: Translating Cybersecurity Jargon to English 0
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Mayor in town GateHouse abandoned says she won’t put legal ads in new paper to be called Uranus Examiner
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Starting a pre-election series via FactCheck: Trump and Obama have both played fast and loose with facts lately
 
 
 
 

By Ken Doctor: Newsonomics: Could a McClatchy-Tronc merger help local newspapers transition to digital? One’s a family-controlled, century-plus-old newspaper chain, known for believing in its civic mission but not for its digital strategy. The other is, well, Tronc. With an assist from L.A.’s richest man, could this be a path forward?
 
 
Dan Stillman: “The New York Times removed bylines from its homepage. I made a browser extension that adds them back.”
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Journal Article: “Stepping Beyond Libraries: The Changing Orientation in Global GLAM-Wiki”
 
 
 
 
By Sean Braswell: The FBI Plot to Bring Down the Gay Man Behind the March on Washington
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: How the Grateful Dead’s “Wall of Sound”–a Monster, 600-Speaker Sound System–Changed Rock Concerts & Live Music Forever
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Jonathan Fong Hometalker Santa Monica, CA: Blue Whale Air Plant Holder
 
 
 
 
Jennifer | CrazyDiyMom Hometalker Sheboygan, WI: DIY PVC Pipe People and more->
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Clever Ways to Use Cookie Cutters Outside of Your Kitchen Cookie cutters & crafts is a match made in heaven
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 16, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1880 – The Cornell Daily Sun prints its first issue in Ithaca, New York. The Sun is the nation’s oldest, continuously-independent college daily.
The Cornell Daily Sun is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York by students at Cornell University and hired employees.

The Sun features coverage of the university and its environs as well as stories from the Associated Press and UWIRE. It prints on weekdays when the university is open for academic instruction as a tabloid-sized daily. In addition to these regular issues, The Sun publishes a graduation issue and a freshman issue, which is mailed to incoming Cornell freshmen before their first semester. The paper is free on campus and online.

Aside from a few full-time production and business positions, The Sun is staffed by Cornell students and is fully independent of the university. It operates out of its own building in downtown Ithaca. The Sun is currently the number one college newspaper in the United States, according to The Princeton Review.[1]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1880 – Clara Ayres, American nurse (d. 1917)
Clara Ayres (1880–1917) was an American nurse, who joined the United States Army during the First World War. Ayres and Helen Burnett Wood were the first two women to be killed while serving in the United States military, following an explosion on USS Mongolia on May 17, 1917.

Career
Clara Edith Work (later Ayres) was born on September 16, 1880, in Venice Township, Seneca County, Ohio. She was the eldest of three children of James and Mary Work. She was brought up in Attica within the Township. On September 30, 1903, she married grocery store owner Wayland D. Ayres, who died three years later from tetanus from a workplace injury. She attempted to run the store herself, but was eventually employed as a clerk at a dry foods store nearby.[1]

In 1910, she travelled to Chicago to study nursing at the school there. She graduated in 1913, and worked until 1917 as an instructor at the Cook County Hospital. That year she responded to the American Red Cross appeal for trained nurses for the First World War. She was accepted, and was transferred on board the USS Mongolia to travel to France. The day after sailing on May 17, the crew underwent a firing practice. The medical staff being transferred watched from near one of the guns, when it exploded, killing Ayres and fellow nurse Helen Burnett Wood.[1]

The ship transferred their bodies back to New York City. The two women were the first of their gender to be killed while serving in the United States military. Following a service by the Red Cross on May 23, Ayres’ body was taken back to Ohio where she was buried with military honors on May 26. A Bronze plaque honoring her was placed at the Chicago Training School for Nurses.[1] The deaths made national news, and the United States Navy was accused in the United States Congress of covering up how the women were killed.[2] A historical marker was placed near her grave in 2017.[3]

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

I had a Dodge Dart Sport 360 (no sunroof) that I called “Precious” as in precious and few are the moments it ran smoothly~
By Elizabeth Werth: It’s Time We Bring Back Car Advertisements from the 1970s
 
 
 
 
The Caffeinated Reviewer: Sunday Post #334 Pumpkin Spice Everything…
 
 
 
 
Perfectly DeStressed: I Was Lost in the Laundry. Did Anyone Even Notice I was Gone?
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life Magazine: To Catch a Witch By Heather Blake, Upside Down or Right Side Up, Arvada is a Lover Valley Animal Center: Jewels Murder on Lake Okeechobee: Mystery Short Story A Reel Catch By Lorraine Bartlett Sherlock Holmes & the Case of the Disappearing Diva By Gemma Halliday & Kelly Rey: Review/Giveaway/Interview Reedley High School’s Academic Decathlon 3 Doors Down and Collective Soul Ride Their Rock & Roll Express Tour Travellin’ Shoes By V.M. Burns: Review/Giveaway/Guest Post California Drinkin’ Part II Check out What’s Up this week on KRL News & Reviews!
 
 
 
 
Joan Reeves Sling Words: What Is a Clean Link & How Do You Make One?
 
 
 
 
Limecello: SHHM = Smithsonian Hispanic Heritage Month
 
 
 
 
Maria Popovas Brain Pickings: Walt Whitman on creativity, Toni Morrison on the deepest meaning of love, Martin Buber on what a tree can teach us about seeing each other fully
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls Breakfast Links: Week of September 10, 2018
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Fall Pumpkins, Pillows and a Wreath – Get Your Fall DIY On
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: These Are the Coolest PVC Pipe Ideas We’ve Ever Seen (Honestly) PVC is literally our favorite material. We SWEAR by it!
 
 
 
 
By briggs1108: Teardrop Trailer Tiny Home
 
 
 
 
By strooom: Steel and Glass Partition Wall
 
 
 
 
By TueBjørn: Fixing and Improving Old Greenhouse
 
 
 
 
By Penelopy Bulnick: Flexible 3D Print Masks
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Core3D: Dragon Hands
 
 
 
 
By seamster: How to Make Giant Halloween Spiders
 
 
 
 
Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: Festive Pumpkin Planters
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Everything Pretty: 53 Healthy Pumpkin Recipes and more ->


 
 

 
 

FYI September 15, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1616 – Joseph Calasanz opens the first modern public elementary school.
Joseph Calasanz, Sch.P. (Spanish: José de Calasanz; Italian: Giuseppe Calasanzio), (September 11, 1557 – August 25, 1648), also known as Joseph Calasanctius and Josephus a Matre Dei, was a Spanish Catholic priest, educator and the founder of the Pious Schools, providing free education to the sons of the poor, and the Religious Order that ran them, commonly known as the Piarists. He is honored as a saint by the Catholic Church.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1857 – Anna Winlock, American astronomer and academic (d. 1904)
Anna Winlock (born September 15, 1857 in Cambridge, Massachusetts; died January 4, 1904 in Boston[1]) was an American astronomer and daughter of Joseph Winlock and Isabella Lane. Like her father, she was a computer and astronomer. It is plausible that this connection allowed her to be among the first of the women to be known as “the Harvard Computers.” She was also a distinguished woman computer as she made the most complete catalogue of stars near the north and south poles of her era. She is also remembered for her calculations and studies of asteroids. In particular, she did calculations on 433 Eros and 475 Ocllo.

Early years

Winlock attended the Cambridge Schools as a child and began to develop an interest in both mathematics and the Greek language. Upon her graduation she received a letter from her principal expressing his appreciation for her Greek and of her character. Her father influenced her interest in astronomy. When she was twelve, she attended a solar eclipse expedition with her father in his homestate of Kentucky. In June 1875, Joseph died shortly after Winlock had graduated from primary school. Winlock quickly followed in her father’s footsteps becoming one of the first female paid staff members of the Harvard College Observatory.[2]


Harvard College Observatory

After the death of her father, it fell upon her to find financial support for her mother and four siblings, and soon she approached the Harvard College Observatory seeking a job in calculations. Specifically, she was capable of reducing volumes of unreduced observations, a decades worth of numbers in a useless state, that previously her father had left unfinished. The interim director of the observatory complained that he could not process the data, as “the condition of the funds is an objection to hiring anyone.” [3] Winlock presented herself to the observatory and offered to reduce the observations. Having been previously introduced to the principles of mathematical astronomy by her father she seemed like a capable asset to the observatory and could be paid less than half the prevailing rate for calculating at the time. Harvard was able to offer her twenty-five cents an hour to do the computations. Winlock found the conditions acceptable and took the position.[3]

In less than a year, she was joined at the observatory by three other women who also served as computers; they became known as Pickering’s Harem, gaining notoriety for leaving an uncomfortable example on the government computing agencies because of the women’s low wages and arduous work, even though it was of high quality.[4] Winlock found it important the work to be done in astronomy, especially for women. By her own development as a scientist and her lasting contributions to the stellar program of the observatory, she served as an example that women were equally capable as men of doing astronomical work.[5]

Major contributions

Through her thirty-year career at the Harvard College Observatory, Winlock contributed to the many projects the observatory faced. Her most significant work involved the continuous and arduous work of reducing and computing meridian circle observations. Five years earlier under the direction of her father, the observatory collaborated with multiple foreign observatories in a project for preparing a comprehensive star catalogue. The project was divided into sections or zones by circles parallel to the celestial equator. Winlock began to work on the section called the “Cambridge Zone” shortly after being hired on by the observatory. Working over twenty years on the project, the work done by her team on the Cambridge Zone contributed significantly to the Astronomische Gesellschaft Katalog, which contains information on more than one-hundred thousand stars and is used worldwide by many observatories and their researchers.[1][2] Besides her work on the Cambridge Zone, she also contributed to many independent projects. She supervised in the creation of the Observatory Annals (a collection of tables that provide the positions of variable stars in clusters) into 38 volumes.[2]

Death
Winlock’s death was unexpected. On December 17, 1904 she visited the Harvard College Observatory for what would be the last time, and she continued working through the holiday season. The last entry in her notebook of reductions was on New Years Day 1904. Three days later she died suddenly at the age of 47 in Boston, Massachusetts. A funeral service was held at St. John’s Chapel in Cambridge.[1][6]
 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

By Brigit Katz: Record-Breaking Distance Runner Diane Leather Never Let Lack of Opportunity Slow Her Down The first woman to run a mile in less than five minutes has died at age 85
 
 
Diane Leather obituary First woman to run a sub-five-minute mile, who had to wait years for the recognition she merited
 
 
Diane Leather Charles (7 January 1933 – 6 September 2018) was an English athlete who was the first woman to run a sub-5-minute mile.[1]
 
 
 
 
By Julie Muncy: The Sound Engineer Behind Star Trek: The Motion Picture and Tron Has Passed Away
 
 

Frank Serafine was a motion picture sound designer and sound editor, and composer. He was best known for his work as a Hollywood Supervising Sound Editor / Designer on such blockbusters as the Star Trek and Tron movies, Addams Family, The Fog, Poltergeist: The Other Side, RobotJox, Ice Pirates, Hoodwinked 2, Orgazmo, The Lawnmower Man, Virtuosity, Field of Dreams, Emmy-Winning Sound Design on The Day After and Oscar-Winning Sound Design for The Hunt for Red October. Frank died after being struck by an automobile while crossing Palmdale Boulevard in Palmdale, CA on September 12, 2018.

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By Elizabeth Werth: Desiré Wilson Proved She Was the Most Successful Woman in Racing by Winning in a Formula One Car
Desiré Randall Wilson (born 26 November 1953)[1] is a former racing driver from South Africa and one of only five women to have competed in Formula One.[2] Born in Brakpan,[1] she entered one Formula One World Championship Grand Prix in 1980 with a non-works RAM Racing-prepared Williams FW07, but failed to qualify.[3] She also raced in the 1981 non-world championship South African Grand Prix in a one off deal with Tyrrell Racing. This race was not part of the 1981 world championship due, in part, to the FISA–FOCA war.[4] She qualified 16th and, after a disastrous start where the car stalled, she moved up though the field in wet conditions, as conditions dried she fell back and damaged the car when it touched a wall while she was letting the race leader through.[5]

She became the only woman to win a Formula One race of any kind when she won at Brands Hatch in the short-lived British Aurora F1 Championship in 1980.[3] As a result of this achievement, she has a grandstand at Brands Hatch named after her.[5] Following her attempts in Formula One, Wilson participated in other disciplines including CART[6] and sports car racing.[5] In 1982, Wilson entered the Indianapolis 500, but failed to qualify. She did not qualify for 1983 and 1984 Indy 500s as well.[5]

She is married to fellow South Africa-native and road course architect, Alan Wilson.[2]

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By Elizabeth Werth: Yes, The U.S. Army Actually Developed a Flying Jeep with Guns
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Tom McKay: Watch the Last Delta II Rocket Carry ICESat-2 Into Space
 
 
 
 
National Science Foundation September 2018
 
 
NSF’s 10 Big Ideas
In 2016, NSF unveiled a set of “Big Ideas” — 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering. With its broad portfolio of investments, NSF is uniquely suited to advance this set of cutting-edge research agendas and processes that will require collaborations with industry, private foundations, other agencies, science academies and societies, and universities and the education sector. The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge — indeed to define that cutting edge — of global science and engineering leadership and to invest in basic research and processes that advance the United States’ prosperity, security, health and well-being.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura Anne Ewbank: Before Food Trucks, Americans Ate ‘Night Lunch’ From Beautiful Wagons They were the ancestors of the modern diner.
 
 
 
 
Alaska Master Gardner Blog: Fuchsias , Good for more than one season in Fairbanks?
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy: The Secret Rooftop Farms you can Visit above Parisian Department Stores
 
 
By Francky Knapp: Sneaking into the Forbidden City with our Travel Heroine du Jour
 
 
 
 
By James Clear: Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds
Leo Tolstoy was even bolder: “The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
 
 
 
 


Think about it~

Ozy: The Internet Could Become an Environmental Problem
 
 
Ozy: Volunteering Overseas May Do More Harm Than Good
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: 1955 Heavy Traffic on the Lodge Expressway Detroit, Michigan
 
 
 
 
By Joanne Guidoccio: Inspired by Jann Arden
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 


 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: Don’t Kick Your Old Crib to the Curb Before Seeing These 14 Ideas Just because your kids are older does not mean you have to get rid of their crib.
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Oriental Chicken Salad, Pina Colada Pie, Pumpkin Cream Cheese Muffins and more->
 
 
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Dutch Apple Pie
 
 
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Beer Bread
 
 

 
 
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Homemade BBQ Sauce
 
 

 
 
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Lemon Cucumber Smoothie
 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 14, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1682 – Bishop Gore School, one of the oldest schools in Wales, is founded.
The Bishop Gore School (Welsh: Ysgol Esgob Gore) is a secondary school in Swansea in Wales, founded on 14 September 1682 by Hugh Gore (1613–1691), Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. It is situated in Sketty, close to Singleton Park and Swansea University. In December 2013 the school was ranked in the second highest of five bands by the Welsh Government, based on performance in exams, value added performance, disadvantaged pupils’ performance, and attendance.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1857 – Julia Platt, American embryologist and politician (d. 1935)
Julia Barlow Platt (14 September 1857 in San Francisco – 1935) was an American embryologist and politician.

Julia Platt received her undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont before moving to Cambridge to perform research at the Harvard Annex in 1887. During her time at Harvard, she challenged the anti-coeducational policies in place. In 1889, she left Harvard to take courses and do research at Woods Hole, Clark University, the University of Chicago, Bryn Mawr, the University of Freiberg, the Naples Zoological Station, and the University of Munich. She obtained her doctorate at Freiburg in 1898. She investigated embryogenesis, in particular the head development, from studying sharks and salamanders. Her most notable contribution to the field was her demonstration that neural crest cells formed the jaw cartilage and tooth dentine in Necturus maculosus (mudpuppy embryos), but her work was not believed by her contemporaries. Her claim went counter to the belief that only mesoderm could form bones and cartilage. Her hypothesis of the neural crest origin of the cranial skeleton gained acceptance only some 50 years later when confirmed by Sven Hörstadius and Sven Sellman.[1]

Unable to obtain a doctoral degree from Radcliffe or secure a university position, she said “if I cannot obtain the work I wish, then I must take up with the next best” and then became active in politics, including tearing down a fence to give the public access to the beach at Lover’s Point in Pacific Grove, California. In 1931, at the age of 74, she became mayor of Pacific Grove, California.[2] According to Steve Palumbi and Carolyn Sotka, her prescient pioneering setting up of a marine protected area was crucial to the recovery of the sea otter.[3]

Publications
Platt, J. B. (1890): “The Anterior Head-Cavities of Acanthias (Preliminary Notice)”, Zool. Anz. 13: 239
Platt, J. B. (1892): “Fibres connecting the Central Nervous System and Chorda in Amphioxus”, Anat. Anz. 7: 282-284
Platt, J. B. (1893): “Ectodermic Origin of the Cartilages of the Head”, Anat. Anz. 8: 506-509
Platt, J. B. (1894): “Ontogenetische Differenzirung des Ektoderms in Necturus”, Archiv mikr. Anat. 43: 911-966
Platt, J. B. (1894): “Ontogenetic Differentiations of the Ectoderm in Necturus” Anat. Anz. 9: 51-56
Platt, J. B. (1898): “The development of the cartilaginous skull and of the branchial and hypoglossal musculature in Necturus”, Morphol. Jahrb. 25: 377-464

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
Meg Jones, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Leader of Center for Veterans Issues in Milwaukee dies
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Now Available: UC Santa Cruz Library Digitizes Over 6,000 Photos From Pirkle Jones/Ruth-Marion Baruch Collection
 
 
By Gary Price: Ireland: A Day in the Dublin Central Library
“Some of those people who would be waiting [outside] would be people who would spend the whole day here,” says library assistant James Barry. “This is a traditional library and then it’s a social space and a safe space for people to be.”
 
 

 
 
 
 
Atlas Obsuvra: Behold, a massive knit map of the cosmos and more->
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Canine In Training
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: New TV series explores history of rural Georgia churches
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Daily webinars on farm safety scheduled next week, which is National Farm Safety and Health Week
 
 
 
 
By DC: 94-Year-Old Stroke Survivor Plays Jazz Piano for the First Time in Years
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday: Why We Say “OK”: The History of the Most Widely Spoken Word in the World
 
 

 
 
 
 
Knowledge of Wharton: Will New Regulations Avert Another Meltdown?
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Whitten: Domino’s free pizza gimmick goes awry in Russia after too many people get logo tattoos
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 30 Ideas Every Pet Owner Should Know Whether it is removing a stain or building a bed for Fido, every pet owner needs to see these ideas!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Useful Ways To Reuse Your Leftover Plastic Bottles Save all of those pesky plastic bottles to craft these useful projects for your life!
 
 
 
 
Melissa Woods Hometalker Saint Joseph, MN: Entertainment Center Turned Kids Closet Armoire Furniture Makeover
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Scrappy Geek: Cedar Plank Shrimp Over Alfredo Zoodles


 
 

 
 

FYI September 13, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1847 – Mexican–American War: Six teenage military cadets known as Niños Héroes die defending Chapultepec Castle in the Battle of Chapultepec. American troops under General Winfield Scott capture Mexico City in the Mexican–American War.
The Niños Héroes (Spanish: [ˈniɲos ˈeɾoes], Boy Heroes), also known as the Heroic Cadets or Boy Soldiers, were six Mexican teenage military cadets. These cadets died defending Mexico City’s Chapultepec Castle from invading U.S. forces in the 13 September 1847 Battle of Chapultepec, during the Mexican–American War. According to legend, in an act of bravery, Juan Escutia wrapped the Mexican flag around his body and jumped from the top of the castle in order to keep it from falling into the enemy’s hands.[2]

The Niños Héroes are a key part of Mexico’s patriotic folklore, commemorated by a national holiday on September 13. However, several modern Mexican historians claim that parts of the story are not factual.[2][3]


Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1755 – Oliver Evans, American inventor, engineer and businessman (d. 1819)
Oliver Evans (September 13, 1755 – April 15, 1819) was an American inventor, engineer and businessman born in rural Delaware and later rooted commercially in Philadelphia. He was one of the first Americans building steam engines and an advocate of high pressure steam (vs. low pressure steam). A pioneer in the fields of automation, materials handling and steam power, Evans was one of the most prolific and influential inventors in the early years of the United States. He left behind a long series of accomplishments, most notably designing and building the first fully automated industrial process, the first high-pressure steam engine, and the first (albeit crude) amphibious vehicle and American automobile.

Born in Newport, Delaware, Evans received little formal education and in his mid-teens was apprenticed to a wheelwright. Going into business with his brothers, he worked for over a decade designing, building and perfecting an automated mill with devices such as bucket chains and conveyor belts. In doing so Evans designed a continuous process of manufacturing that required no human labor. This novel concept would prove critical to the Industrial Revolution and the development of mass production. Later in life Evans turned his attention to steam power, and built the first high-pressure steam engine in the United States in 1801, developing his design independently of Richard Trevithick, who built the first in the world a year earlier. Evans was a driving force in the development and adoption of high-pressure steam engines in the United States. Evans dreamed of building a steam-powered wagon and would eventually construct and run one in 1805. Known as the Oruktor Amphibolos, it was the first automobile in the country and the world’s first amphibious vehicle, although it was too primitive to be a success as either.

Evans was a visionary who produced designs and ideas far ahead of their time. He was the first to describe vapor-compression refrigeration and propose a design for the first refrigerator in 1805, but it would be three decades until his colleague Jacob Perkins would be able to construct a working example. Similarly, he drew up designs for a solar boiler, machine gun, steam-carriage gearshift, dough-kneading machine, perpetual baking oven, marine salvage process, quadruple-effect evaporator, and a scheme for urban gas lighting, ideas and designs which would not be made reality until some time after his death. Evans had influential backers and political allies, but lacked social graces and was disliked by many of his peers. Disappointed and then angry at the perceived lack of recognition for his contributions, Evans became combative and bitter in later years, which damaged his reputation and left him isolated. Despite the importance of his work, his contributions were frequently overlooked (or attributed to others after his death) so he never became a household name alongside the other steam pioneers of his era.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Nick Douglas: How to Watch Live Footage of Hurricane Florence
 
 
By Gwen Ihnat: Big Beer sends a half-million cans of water for Hurricane Florence relief
 
 
 
 
By Clayton Purdom, Danette Chavez, Katie Rife, William Hughes, Alex McLevy, Erik Adams, and Gwen Ihnat: Walker, Slipnutz, and baseball: 11 essential Late Night With Conan O’Brien clips
 
 
 
 
By Gwen Ihnat: What’s the best-tasting supermarket brand coffee?
 
 
 
 
Steve Hill: I’ve got a new book out — it’s all about Mobile-First Journalism (the clue’s in the title)
 
 
 
 
New tools for parents and content for older kids in the YouTube Kids app
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Schools in Washington state get creative to help homeless students find a ride to school
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Study: Rural childhood makes future success more likely, but rural and urban areas need different strategies for kids
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Descend into Great Britain’s network of secret nuclear bunkers, Shrinking Peak The southern summit of Kebnekaise was the highest point in Sweden. Then it melted. detroit, michigan Monumental Kitty This feline raises a friendly paw at drivers barreling toward the freeway and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: A Well-Traveled Bookstore Since 2015, Rita Collins has piloted her mobile bookshop, filled with donated literature of all sorts, across the U.S. several times, From Plants to Tinctures We’ve put together a beginner’s guide to extracting flavors from herbs and flowers, Meet the ‘Radio Guy’ Steve Erenberg collects outdated medical devices, masks, and technology. He refers to his collection as a mix of tech and art and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Michelle Bruton: ‘The Dawn Wall’ Will Make Your Palms Sweat and Your Stomach Flip
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Robert Bowen: Information Overload: Every C5 Corvette Fact in One Place
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By ElkeMa: How to Swear Like Shakespeare
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Reasons to Drop Everything and Buy Inexpensive Tile The next time you spot some sample tiles, you won’t be able to help yourself from grabbing a stack!
 
 
 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: DIY Bug Repellents & Traps
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Adina Mayo: Bob’s Red Mill Paleo Pancake Mix Review
 
 
 
 
By jprussack: Backyard Pizza
 
 
 
 
By ModernFarmhouseKitchen: Pecan Bars