Tag: FYI

FYI July 19, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1848 – Women’s rights: A two-day Women’s Rights Convention opens in Seneca Falls, New York.
Women’s rights are the rights and entitlements claimed for women and girls worldwide, and formed the basis for the women’s rights movement in the nineteenth century and feminist movement during the 20th century. In some countries, these rights are institutionalized or supported by law, local custom, and behavior, whereas in others they are ignored and suppressed. They differ from broader notions of human rights through claims of an inherent historical and traditional bias against the exercise of rights by women and girls, in favor of men and boys.[1]

Issues commonly associated with notions of women’s rights include the right: to bodily integrity and autonomy; to be free from sexual violence; to vote; to hold public office; to enter into legal contracts; to have equal rights in family law; to work; to fair wages or equal pay; to have reproductive rights; to own property; to education.[2]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1929 – Gaston Glock, Austrian engineer and businessman, co-founded Glock Ges.m.b.H.
Gaston Glock (born 19 July 1929) is an Austrian engineer, and founder of the firearms company Glock.

A book about Gaston Glock’s life and his company, titled Glock: The Rise of America’s Gun, was published in 2012.

Manufacturing
Glock began as a manufacturer of curtain rods and knives for the Austrian military. He had not designed or manufactured a firearm until he was 52 years old. He was already an expert in polymers as a result of his previous business ventures.

In 1980 he bought an injection-moulding machine to manufacture handles and sheaths for the field knives he was making for the Austrian army in his garage workshop. His earliest employees were from the camera industry and were experts in producing polymer components. His first pistol took one year to produce from the design and concept stage to production, and he applied for an Austrian patent in April 1981 for the pistol known as the Glock 17.[1]

Personal life

Glock married Helga Glock in 1958, and they co-founded the family business in 1963.[2] They divorced in 2011 and have been in litigation since.[3]

Glock supports different charities in Austria, having donated over one million euros.[4][5][6]

Murder attempt
In July 1999, Glock’s tax advisor Charles Ewert hired a French mercenary to murder Glock with a hammer in a car park in an apparent attempt to cover up embezzlement of millions from the Glock company.[7] Although Glock’s injuries included seven head wounds and the loss of about a litre of blood, Glock was able to fend off the attack by striking the hitman twice. The hired killer, 67-year-old Jacques Pêcheur, was sentenced to 17 years in prison for the attack. Charles Ewert was sentenced to 20 years as a result of Pêcheur’s testimony.[8]

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
Adrian Cronauer (September 8, 1938 – July 18, 2018) was a United States Air Force sergeant and radio personality whose experiences as an innovative disc jockey in Vietnam inspired the 1987 film Good Morning, Vietnam.[3][4]

Background in radio
Cronauer was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He began his broadcasting career at the age of 12 as a guest for a Pittsburgh-area children’s amateur hour.[5] He attended the University of Pittsburgh, where he helped found the forerunner of the university’s college radio station WPTS.[6][7]

Military service
In the late 1970s, Cronauer had an idea for a television sitcom that would be a blend of M*A*S*H and WKRP in Cincinnati, two popular TV series of that era. It was not until some years later that he was able to elicit interest in the proposal which became the film Good Morning, Vietnam.[8] The movie was based on his experiences as a Saigon-based DJ during the Vietnam War, where he served from 1965 to 1966.[9] His program was known as the “Dawn Buster.” According to Cronauer, other than the film’s portrayal of him being a radio host, very little of the film reflects his experiences,[10] except the bombing of a restaurant which Cronauer witnessed from nearby.[11] A subsequent special program on National Public Radio about the role of the American Forces Vietnam Network (AFVN-military radio and television) earned Cronauer a 1992 Ohio State Award and two 1991 Gold Medals from the New York Radio Festival. Prior to getting stationed in Vietnam he was stationed at Iraklion Air Station Crete, Greece.[12]

Personal life
Cronauer attended the University of Pittsburgh where he led a group that founded the school’s first student radio station, now WPTS-FM.[13] His subsequent media work included being the classical morning host at WVWR in Roanoke, Virginia (now Virginia Tech’s WVTF),[14] during which time he created the proposal that would culminate in Good Morning, Vietnam.

He earned a master’s degree in Media Studies from the New School for Social Research in New York City and a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Pennsylvania. Cronauer’s law practice concentrated in information and communications law. Cronauer consented to disbarment in the District of Columbia in October 2014 for reportedly misleading consumers through misrepresentations and deceptive and fraudulent loan modification and foreclosure prevention practices.[15] Later he worked as a special assistant to the Director of the Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office.[16][17][18]

Cronauer was a member of Mensa[19] and a “lifelong card-carrying Republican”, having taken an “active role” in both Bob Dole’s 1996 unsuccessful presidential campaign and George W. Bush’s 2004 successful presidential re-election campaign.[3]

Cronauer died on July 18, 2018, at his home in Western Virginia after a long illness.[1]
 
 
 
 
By Kate Bernot: Burger King gifts dog with terminal cancer free burgers for life and now I’m verklempt
 
 
 
 
By Kristen Lee: Huge Pipe Explosion Just Left a Crater in New York City Street (Updated)
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Sunken Russian Warship Rumored to Contain 200 Tons of Gold Discovered Near South Korea
 
 
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: Whale Sharks Can Live 130 Years, New Study Estimates
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: U.S. Copyright Office Releases Upgrades to Virtual Card Catalog Proof of Concept
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Why some gravestones are shaped like tree stumps, A Medicine Wheel on Nose Hill, Poker Creek, Population: Two and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Chas Hometalk Helper Fort Collins, CO: Keep Pests Out Of Your Garden
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Lovely Repurposed Items Perfect For Your Garden Craft special repurposed pieces perfect for your garden.
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Birddogpumpkins: Smoked Salmon on a Stick
 
 
 
 
By Urbangriller: BBQ Porchetta
 
 
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Pizza Quesadillas!


 
 

 
 

FYI July 18, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1942 – World War II: During the Beisfjord massacre in Norway, 15 Norwegian paramilitary guards help members of the SS to kill 288 political prisoners from Yugoslavia.
The Beisfjord massacre (Norwegian: Beisfjord-massakren) was a massacre on 18 July 1942 at Lager I Beisfjord (German for “Beisfjord Camp No.1”, Norwegian: Beisfjord fangeleir) in Beisfjord, Norway of 288 political prisoners. The massacre had been ordered a few days earlier by the Reichskommissar for Norway Josef Terboven.[1]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1915 – Roxana Cannon Arsht, American judge (d. 2003)
Roxana Cannon Arsht (July 18, 1915 – October 3, 2003) was an American judge. She was the fifth woman to be admitted to the bar in the U.S. state of Delaware, and the first to hold a judicial position in the state’s history. After retiring, she took part in a philanthropic career until the end of her life. Arsht received several awards for her work, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame of Delaware Women in 1986.

Biography
Roxana Cannon was born in Wilmington, Delaware, at Second and Adams streets, to Samuel and Tillie Statnekoo Cannon.[1][2] Her father was an immigrant from Russia, and emphasized the importance of education.[3] After attending public schools across Wilmington, she received a bachelor of arts degree from Goucher College, and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Law School with a degree in law in 1939;[2][4] she was one of two women to graduate in her class.[5] Cannon passed the Bar in 1941, but was unable to find a job,[6] which became even more difficult when she married fellow lawyer Samuel Arsht.[2] She became a mother of two daughters, and focused her attention on working for the reproductive rights of women, including through her involvement in the development of Planned Parenthood’s Delaware office.[6]

She began working for Delaware Family Court in 1962 in a volunteer master position. Nine years later, the Governor of Delaware Russell W. Peterson appointed Arsht as a judge in Delaware Family Court, making her the first woman to hold a judicial position in the state’s history.[6] She retired from the position in 1983, and started a new job in philanthropy.[4] Arsht and her husband contributed $2 million to the campaign towards the construction of Arsht Hall on the primary campus of the University of Delaware’s Academy of Lifelong Learning (now called Osher Lifelong Learning Institute). She was the first women to serve on the Medical Center of Delaware’s board between 1993 and 1997, and was a trustee of the Christiana Care Health System for nearly 30 years. Before the death of her husband, she donated $2.5 million in support of the construction of the Roxana Cannon Arsht Surgicenter.[6] She died at Christiana Hospital in Newark, Delaware on October 3, 2003.[1]

Legacy
Arsht was a role model for woman practicing law, and created a precedent which allowed others to follow. She described herself as “gutsy, independent and not afraid to challenge the status quo” and was considered one of Delaware’s most influential women in the past half-century.[6] She received numerous awards which included the First State Distinguished Service Award, the Josiah Marvel Cup, the Trailblazer Award, and was granted recognition from the National Conference for Community and Justice. In 1986, Arsht was inducted into the Hall of Fame of Delaware Women.[4]

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

By Gary Price: University of Wyoming Libraries Receives Grant to Digitize Stereograph Images of Wyoming Including Yellowstone National Park
 
 
 
 
By Victoria Kim: Judge lifts controversial order requiring the L.A. Times to alter article about an ex-Glendale cop
 
 
 
 
By Rina Raphael: The struggle to be New Mexico’s 1st Native American congresswoman
 
 
 
 

By Jessica Leigh Hester: The Dazzlingly Colorful Atlases That Brought the Night Sky Within Reach Detailed maps of the heavens weren’t just for scholars.
 
 
 
 
Messy Nessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCXCVI): What they found when they dredged canals in Amsterdam, Is this the funnest Masonic society or what?, The Gate House at Brockenhurst Manor, available for holiday lodging, Overlooked Obituaries and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Niger Innis: Let’s remove the legal shield from hackers who rob us of our civil rights
 
 
 
 

By Leah Sottile: How We Made the “Bundyville” Podcast & Series How my solo project became a cross-institutional quest
 
 
 
 
By Arnie Fertig: How to Volunteer Yourself Into a New Job Skills-based volunteering builds and demonstrates your abilities to collaborate and communicate, show initiative, solve problems and provide leadership.
 
 
 
 
By Carly Stern: The German Entrepreneur Who Took the Clump out of Coffee
 
Amalie Auguste Melitta Bentz (31 January 1873 – 29 June 1950), born Amalie Auguste Melitta Liebscher, was a German entrepreneur who invented the coffee filter in 1908.

Biography
Bentz was born in Dresden. Her father was a publisher.

As a housewife, Bentz found that percolators were prone to over-brewing the coffee, espresso-type machines at the time tended to leave grounds in the drink, and linen bag filters were tiresome to clean. She experimented with many means, but ended up using blotting paper from her son Willi’s school exercise book and a brass pot perforated using a nail. When the grounds-free, less bitter coffee met with general enthusiasm, she decided to set up a business.[1] The Kaiserliche Patentamt (Imperial Patent Office) granted her a patent on 20 June 1908, and on 15 December the company was entered into the commercial register with 73 Pfennig as “M. Bentz.” After contracting a tinsmith to manufacture the devices, they sold 1,200 coffee filters at the 1909 Leipzig fair.[2]

Her husband Hugo and their sons Horst and Willi were the first employees of the emerging company. In 1910, the company won a gold medal at the International Health Exhibition and a silver medal at the Saxon Innkeepers’ Association. When the First World War erupted, metals were requisitioned for use in zeppelin construction, her husband was conscripted to Romania, paper was rationed, and coffee beans import was impossible due to the British blockade, disrupting the normal business. During this time she supported herself by selling cartons.[3]

Continuing expansion caused them to move their business several times within Dresden. By 1928 the demand for their products was so high that the 80 workers had to work in a double-shift system. As no satisfactory production facilities could be found in Dresden, the fast-growing company moved in 1929 to Minden in eastern Westphalia. By that time 100,000 filters had been produced.[3]

Horst took over the company, now “Bentz & Sohn,” in 1930. She transferred the majority stake in Melitta-Werke Aktiengesellschaft to Horst and Willi in 1932, but kept a hand in the business, ensuring that the employees were cared for, offering Christmas bonuses, increasing vacation days from 6 to 15 days per year, and reducing the working week to 5 days. Bentz fostered the company’s “Melitta Aid” system, a social fund for company employees.[3]

After the outbreak of World War II, production stopped and the company was ordered to produce goods to aid the war effort. At the conclusion of war, the workers relocated for a time to old factories, barracks, even pubs, because the surviving portions of the main factory had been requisitioned as a provisional administration for the Allied troops, a condition that held for twelve years. By 1948, production of filters and paper had resumed, and at the time of her death at Holzhausen at Porta Westfalica in 1950, the company had reached 4.7 million Deutsche marks.[3]

Legacy
The grandchildren of Melitta Bentz, Thomas and Stephen Bentz, still control the Melitta Group KG headquartered in Minden in the east of North Rhine-Westphalia, with some 3,300 employees in 50 companies.[3]
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: From the Archives: A Pretty, Witty Pineapple Reticule, c1800

or a zoomable view of the bag on the Kyoto web site, click here.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Talk Of The Town Party 132
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #96)
 
 
 
 

Judy Tutorial Team Marlboro, NY: Renters Patio- Plastic Pallet Patio
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 30 Great Jar Ideas You Have To Try The ingenious mason jar projects you never even thought of!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 DIY Boho Looks For Less Mix it up! Get the Boho chic look in your home with these easy DIY Boho inspired ideas.

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI July 17, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1918 – The RMS Carpathia, the ship that rescued the 705 survivors from the RMS Titanic, is sunk off Ireland by the German SM U-55; five lives are lost.
RMS Carpathia was a Cunard Line transatlantic passenger steamship built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson of Wallsend, Northumberland, England. She was constructed in their shipyard in Newcastle upon Tyne.

Carpathia made her maiden voyage in 1903 from Liverpool to Boston (Massachusetts), and continued on this route before being transferred to Mediterranean service in 1904. In April 1912, she became famous for rescuing the survivors of rival White Star Line’s RMS Titanic after she struck an iceberg and sank with a loss of 1,517 lives in the North Atlantic Ocean. Carpathia braved dangerous ice fields and diverted all steam power to her engines in her rescue mission. She arrived only two hours after Titanic had sunk and rescued 705 survivors from the ship’s lifeboats.

Carpathia herself was sunk on 17 July 1918 after being torpedoed by the German submarine SM U-55 off the southern Irish coast with a loss of five crew members.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1898 – Berenice Abbott, American photographer (d. 1991)
Berenice Abbott (July 17, 1898 – December 9, 1991),[2] née Bernice Alice Abbott, was an American photographer best known for her portraits of between-the-wars 20th century cultural figures, New York City photographs of architecture and urban design of the 1930s, and science interpretation in the 1940s to 1960s.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Sam Barsanti: R.I.P. Anthony Filosa, Nathan For You’s retired judge
 
 
 
 
By Dell Cameron: First Republican Joins U.S. House Effort to Restore Net Neutrality
 
 
 
 
By Chris Forrester: National Ernie Pyle Day celebration to take place in Franklin Hall
 
 
 
 
By Elisabeth Leoni Managing Editor, The Keyword: Emo-gee, that’s a cool job. Meet the woman who designs Google’s emoji.
 
 
 
 
By Jayne Stowell Strategic Negotiator: Delivering increased connectivity with our first private trans-Atlantic subsea cable
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Food banks bring mobile pantries to rural food deserts
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Tests come back positive for Asian carp in SE Tenn.
 
 
 
 
By Joseph Burns: Mississippi journalist’s reporting leads medical center to change billing practices
 
 
 
 
By Nicholas Quah: Dog-eared MP3s: The podcast and book publishing industries are finding new ways to cross-pollinate
 
 
 
 
By Nicholas Quah: Wilson FM, which aims to “elevate podcast aesthetics,” is the first exciting podcast app in a long while
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Introducing Culture Pass: New York City Library System Cardholders Can Now Get Free Admission to More Than 30 NYC Museums, Cultural Institutions
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: For a brief, glorious moment, camera-wielding pigeons spied from above, The Best Independent Ice Cream Shops and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Josh McGinley: Donating Money? There May Be Even Better Ways to Give Back
 
 
 
 
By Kristina Gaddy: Meet the Black Actor Who Changed Hollywood
 
 
 
 
Debra Lynn Dadd: Stinky postage stamps, linen sheets, misleading advertising, and more…
 
 
 
 
Radiotopia: Everything is Alive
 
 
 
 
Great comments!

By Adam Clarke: Machine Gun Equipped: 1921 Ford Model T
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 

By Artuino: Create Floor Plan Using MS Excel
 
 
 

By Pegasaurus: Concrete Pendant
 
 
 
 
By Deceiver: The Surly Mermaid: Catamaran to Recreational Cruiser Conversion
 
 
 
 


Joy Hometalker Houston, TX: Easy Update For Concrete Pavers!
 
 
 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: Easy and Inexpensive Water Fountain/Feature
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 17 DIY Parents Share Brilliant Kids’ Project Ideas
 
 
 
 

 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By jprussack: How to Fry Squash Blossoms


 
 

 
 

FYI July 16, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1054 – Three Roman legates break relations between Western and Eastern Christian Churches through the act of placing an invalidly-issued Papal bull of Excommunication on the altar of Hagia Sophia during Saturday afternoon divine liturgy. Historians frequently describe the event as the start of the East–West Schism.

The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism and the Schism of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox churches, which has lasted since the 11th century.[1] The Schism was the culmination of theological and political differences between the Christian East and West which had developed over the preceding centuries, and marked the first time since the Edict of Milan that there was more than one body considered by secular authorities to constitute the Christian Church.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1934 – Katherine D. Ortega, 38th Treasurer of the United States
Katherine Dávalos Ortega (born July 16, 1934) was the 38th Treasurer of the United States. She served from September 26, 1983 to July 1, 1989 under Presidents Ronald Reagan and then George H. W. Bush. Ortega also has the distinction of being the first female bank president in the state of California.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

Vector’s World: Piatti scooter, Persu Streamliner and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Andrew P. Collins: I Will Never Get Tired of Watching the Sherp Muscle Through Mud Pits
 
 
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: Scientist Loses Distinguished Award After Acceptance Presentation Full of Racy Photos
 
 
 
 
By Alex Guyot: A Decade on the App Store: From Day One Through Today
 
 
 
 
By Paula McClain: The Extraordinary Life of Martha Gellhorn, the Woman Ernest Hemingway Tried to Erase -> A maverick war correspondent, Hemingway’s third wife was the only woman at D-Day and saw the liberation of Dachau. Her husband wanted her home in his bed.
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tansbusch: Blog Profiles: Football Blogs
 
 
 
 
Medium Future Human: The Cognition Crisis, The Misguided Idiot’s Quest for Immortality, The Unlikely Revival of Electrocution Therapy, What Happens When a Computer Runs Your Life and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Seanan McGuire: The Allure of Gothic Horror
 
 
 
 

By Tory Bilski: The Busy, Briny Lives of Iceland’s Herring Girls From 1903 until 1969, women flocked to Siglufjörður to spend long hours gutting and packing fish.
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday: What It Would Look Like If Wes Anderson, Quentin Tarantino & Other Directors Filmed Cooking Videos
 
 
 
 
Glacier Hub Newsletter July 16, 2018
 
 
 
 
Cari Everything Pretty: Amazon Prime Day Deals 2018
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Simple Storage Solutions From the Dollar Store
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI July 15, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1910 – In his book Clinical Psychiatry, Emil Kraepelin gives a name to Alzheimer’s disease, naming it after his colleague Alois Alzheimer.
Aloysius Alzheimer (also known as Alois Alzheimer; /ˈɑːltshaɪmər, ˈælts-, ˈɔːlts-/;[1] German: [ˈaːlɔɪs ˈaltshaɪmɐ]; 14 June 1864 – 19 December 1915) was a German psychiatrist and neuropathologist and a colleague of Emil Kraepelin. Alzheimer is credited with identifying the first published case of “presenile dementia”, which Kraepelin would later identify as Alzheimer’s disease.[2]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1919 – Iris Murdoch, Irish-born British novelist and philosopher (d. 1999)
Dame Jean Iris Murdoch DBE (15 July 1919 – 8 February 1999) was a British novelist and philosopher born in Ireland to Irish parentage. Murdoch is best known for her novels about good and evil, sexual relationships, morality, and the power of the unconscious. Her first published novel, Under the Net, was selected in 1998 as one of Modern Library’s 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century. In 1987, she was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. Her books include The Bell (1958), A Severed Head (1961), The Red and the Green (1965), The Nice and the Good (1968), The Black Prince (1973), Henry and Cato (1976), The Sea, the Sea (1978, Booker Prize), The Philosopher’s Pupil (1983), The Good Apprentice (1985), The Book and the Brotherhood (1987), The Message to the Planet (1989), and The Green Knight (1993). In 2008, The Times ranked Murdoch twelfth on a list of “The 50 greatest British writers since 1945”.[1]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

By Bradley Brownell: From Now On All Soccer Should Be Played On Motorcycles
 
 
 
 
By Tom McKay: Antarctic Exploration Vessel Which Should Be Named Boaty McBoatface But Tragically Isn’t Launches


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Anthony Moore: How to Be an Irresistible Conversationalist and Make People Laugh More My speech impediment made conversations terrifying
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Vermont editor wins ISWNE’s Eugene Cervi Award for being a watchdog, a public servant and an exemplary journalist
 
 
 
 
Comments?
By Mark Ridolfi: Editorial decrying closure of Iowa gun-permit records, while reaching out to readers, wins top prize from ISWNE

In his 1,200-word piece, North Scott Press Assistant Editor Mark Ridolfi wrote, “Exercising the regulated right to bear and carry firearms, in my view, seems neither an embarrassment to be covered up, nor a benefit to be automatically pushed into print or online. It simply creates a publicly managed record. And publicly managed records, in my view, should be public. Those wanting secrecy say public gun records can be a road map for thieves. But the state’s new stand-your-ground law pretty much assures a grim end to crooks who use that map.”

Ridolfi recounted stories that he had done about the records, including one revealing that one in five residents of the Scott County town of McCausland had a permit to carry a concealed firearm. “Now the public records are inaccessible,” he wrote. “No one but law-enforcement professionals can look to determine if permits are being issued in accordance with the statewide standard. No one can discern why individuals have been turned down. No one will know if a thrice-denied applicant gets his or her fourth request granted.”

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

By Gary Price: New Research Resource: SCOTUS Watch Tracks Public Statements by Senators on How They Plan to Vote For U.S. Supreme Court Nominee
 
SCOTUS Watch Website
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: In the News: FreeLaw Project’s Collection of the Special Counsel’s Various Cases and Dockets (Full Text Court Filings)
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Kahlil Gibran on the Courage to Weather the Uncertainties of Love, How to Change Your Mind: Michael Pollan on How the Science of Psychedelics Illuminates Consciousness, Mortality, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Cry, Heart, But Never Break: A Remarkable Illustrated Meditation on Loss and Life
 
 
 
 

Barn Finds By Steve Boelhouwer: Happy Camper: 1970 Dodge Travco 270
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Everything Pretty: 20 Essential Oil Hacks, Unicorn Bubbling Bath Salts and more->
 
 
 
 
By jessyratfink: How to Make a Friendship Bracelet
 
 
 
 
By xryman: PVC Faux Bamboo Privacy Wall With LEDs
 
 
 
 
Creatively Living Hometalker Richland, WA: How I Made My Dream Coffee Bar
Katy:
L.O.V.E. IT!! What an awesome job you all did. SWEEEET! 🙂 PS I am coming to your house. .25 cents for a cup of coffee, it’s a deal.

Creatively Living:
Katy Yes, come have coffee with me…I spend most my day with 2 children 3 and under…so you can definitely have coffee with me for 25 cents if you let me talk to you for awhile 🙂
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By jprussack: How to Make Italian Cheesecake
 
 
 
 
By Penolopy Bulnick: Easy Oreo Ice Cream
 
 
 
 
By ruudcreates: BBQ Ratatouille


 
 

 
 

FYI July 14, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1798 – The Sedition Act becomes law in the United States making it a federal crime to write, publish, or utter false or malicious statements about the United States government.
The Alien and Sedition Acts were four bills passed by the Federalist-dominated 5th United States Congress and signed into law by President John Adams in 1798.[1] They made it harder for an immigrant to become a citizen (Naturalization Act), allowed the president to imprison and deport non-citizens who were deemed dangerous (Alien Friends Act of 1798)[2] or who were from a hostile nation (Alien Enemy Act of 1798),[3] and criminalized making false statements that were critical of the federal government (Sedition Act of 1798).[4][dead link]

The Federalists argued that the bills strengthened national security during an undeclared naval war with France (1798–1800). Critics argued that they were primarily an attempt to suppress voters who disagreed with the Federalist party and its teachings, and violated the right of freedom of speech in the First Amendment.[5] Three of the acts were repealed after the Democratic-Republican party of Thomas Jefferson came to power. But the Alien Enemies Act remained in effect, was revised and codified in 1918 for use in World War I. It was used by the government to identify and imprison dangerous enemy aliens from Germany, Japan, and Italy in World War II. (This was separate from the Japanese internment camps used to remove people of Japanese descent from the West Coast.) After the war they were deported to their home countries. In 1948 the Supreme Court determined that presidential powers under the acts continued after cessation of hostilities until there was a peace treaty with the hostile nation. The revised Alien Enemies Act remains in effect today.

The Naturalization Act increased the residency requirement for American citizenship from five to fourteen years. At the time, the majority of immigrants supported Thomas Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans, the political opponents of the Federalists.[1] The Alien Friends Act allowed the president to imprison or deport aliens considered “dangerous to the peace and safety of the United States” at any time, while the Alien Enemies Act authorized the president to do the same to any male citizen of a hostile nation above the age of fourteen during times of war. Lastly, the controversial Sedition Act restricted speech that was critical of the federal government. Under the Sedition Act, the Federalists allowed people who were accused of violating the sedition laws to use truth as a defense.[6] The Sedition Act resulted in the prosecution and conviction of many Jeffersonian newspaper owners who disagreed with the government.[6]

The acts were denounced by Democratic-Republicans and ultimately helped them to victory in the 1800 election, when Thomas Jefferson defeated the incumbent, President Adams. The Sedition Act and the Alien Friends Act were allowed to expire in 1800 and 1801, respectively. The Alien Enemies Act, however, remains in effect as Chapter 3; Sections 21–24 of Title 50 of the United States Code.[7]

Read more->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1866 – Juliette Wytsman, Belgian painter (d. 1925)
Juliette Wytsman (née Trullemans; 14 July 1866 – 8 March 1925) was a Belgian impressionist painter. She was married to painter Rodolphe Wytsman. Her paintings are in the collections of several museums in Belgium.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

By Julia Muncy: George Jenson, Production Illustrator for Return of the Jedi and Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Has Died
 
 
 
 


 

Just A Car Guy: The Z/28 on Mosteller’s Garage in Chattanooga was a warning for 34 years to the local teens to not street race.

(The car was buried in 2012, 34 years after the accident.)

 
 
 
 
Just A Car Guy:
all the power in the world won’t matter if you can’t drive for shit. Here’s one 1100 hp example why you should avoid racing idiots, on narrow roads

 
 
 
 
By Olivia Riggio: Mental Illness Serves as Easy Scapegoat in Mass Murder Accounts
 
 
 
 
By Ted Mills: Watch “The Hangman,” a Classic Animated Film That Explores What Happens When No One Dares to Stand Up to Evil
 

 
 
 
 
By Nancy Baym: Book Excerpt: How Music Fans Built the Internet
There weren’t a lot of people online in the early 1990s. Mark Kelly, keyboard player for the English band Marillion, early internet adopter and self-titled “co-inventor of crowdfunding,” was an exception.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 

Diy29970102 Hometalker: Multifunctional Coat Rack From an Old Window.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Elizabeth Passarella Recipe: Squash and Onions with Brown Sugar


 
 

 
 

FYI July 13, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1814 – The Carabinieri, the national gendarmerie of Italy, is established.
The Carabinieri (formally Arma dei Carabinieri, “Carabinieri Force” or previously Corpo dei Carabinieri Reali, “Royal Carabinieri Corps”;[1][2][3][4] Italian pronunciation: [karabiˈnjɛːri]) is the fourth Italian military force charged with police duties under the authority of the Ministry of Defense. Carabinieri are the national gendarmerie of Italy, policing both military and civilian populations. Carabinieri (similar to Polizia di Stato and Guardia di Finanza) are always “on duty” throughout the national territory including out of service hours, during leave and whilst on vacation, and they are always permitted to carry their assigned weapon as personal equipment (Beretta 92FS pistol). It was originally founded as the police force of the Kingdom of Sardinia, the forerunner of the Kingdom of Italy. During the process of Italian unification, it was appointed the “First Force” of the new national military organisation. Although the Carabinieri assisted in the suppression of opposition during the rule of Benito Mussolini, they were also responsible for his downfall and many units were disbanded during World War II by Nazi Germany, which resulted in large numbers of Carabinieri joining the Italian resistance movement. Since 2001, it has been one of the four Italian Armed Forces.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1889 – Emma Asson, Estonian educator and politician (d. 1965)

Emma Asson (13 July 1889 – 1 January 1965),[1] was an Estonian politician (Social Democrat). She was the first women to be elected to the Estonian parliament. Asson participated in the creation of the first constitution of the independent Estonia, particularly within the fields of education and gender equality. She also wrote the first textbook in the Estonian language in 1912.[citation needed]

Biography
Emma Asson was born in Vaabina Parish, Võru County, Governorate of Livonia, part of the Russian Empire, as the daughter of a teacher. She studied at the A. S. Pushkin Girls’ School in Tartu and graduated in history at the Bestuzhev Courses in Saint Petersburg in Russia in 1910. She was then employed as a history teacher at a girls’ college in Tartu.

Emma Asson was active in different women’s organisations for social and education issues. In 1919, she was elected to the Tallinn city council as well as to the first national parliament of the independent Estonia for the social democrats. She was the first woman. In 1920 the women of Estonia were given full political rights under a new constitution. Two women were consulted over this constitution and they were Minni Kurs-Olesk and Asson.[2] She was a member of the Education Ministry in 1919-21, secretary for the Estonian Women’s Association and Head of the Education Department in 1925-1940.

She was married to the politician Ferdinand Petersen from 1921-41.

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Jason Torchinsky: Arizona Lawmaker Gets Out Of Speeding Ticket Then Brags To Cop About Driving 140 MPH Like A Moron
 
 
 
 
By Alex McLevy: Joe Bob Briggs is back to host one last horror movie marathon
 
 
 
 
By Liz Seegert: Driving and older adults: Is there a right time to stop?
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: What losing Dairy Queens means to rural Texas
 
By Emily Foxhall: What’s a Texas town without a Dairy Queen?
 
 
 
 
By Christine Schmidt: AM/FM radio holds strong for American listeners
 
 
 
 
By Judd Slivka: A new proposed law would turn drone journalism into a swarm of lawsuits and make it easy to sue over news photography
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The History of Pie-Throwing in Comedy, Canada’s Ultimate Plant Mom, A Temple That Celebrates Femininity and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Spaces: A gin distillery is reborn as a light-filled home, Amsterdam’s bridge houses are now tiny hotels and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Steven Van Zandt Creates a Free School of Rock: 100+ Free Lesson Plans That Educate Kids Through Music
 
 
 
 

By Jonathan Crow: “Tsundoku,” the Japanese Word for the New Books That Pile Up on Our Shelves, Should Enter the English Language
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Margaret Atwood to Teach an Online Class on Creative Writing
 

 
 
 
 
July Director’s Notes: A Message from the Director of the National Science Foundation
 
 
 
 
By Francky Knapp: A Rock Band’s Vintage Closet on the Run
 
 
 
 

I believe this is a Grand Touring LE model with some upgrades (?). Base price for this model is $29,999. I don’t get it, but somebody must be buying them.
Vector’s World


 
 
Polaris Slingshot Grand Touring LE
 
 

 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Useful Tips For Covering Up Every Eyesore In Your Home Time to hide those terrible home blemish with these amazing hacks!

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI July 12, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1562 – Fray Diego de Landa, acting Bishop of Yucatán, burns the sacred books of the Maya.
Diego de Landa Calderón, O.F.M. (12 November, 1524 – 29 April, 1579) was a Spanish bishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Yucatán.[1] Historians describe him as a cruel and fanatical priest who led a violent campaign against idolatry. In particular, he burned almost all the Mayan manuscripts (codex) that would have been very useful in deciphering Mayan script, knowledge of Maya religion and civilization, and the history of the American continent.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1849 – William Osler, Canadian physician and author (d. 1919)
Sir William Osler, 1st Baronet, FRS FRCP (/ˈɒzlər/; July 12, 1849 – December 29, 1919) was a Canadian physician and one of the four founding professors of Johns Hopkins Hospital. Osler created the first residency program for specialty training of physicians, and he was the first to bring medical students out of the lecture hall for bedside clinical training.[1] He has frequently been described as the Father of Modern Medicine and one of the “greatest diagnosticians ever to wield a stethoscope”.[2][3] Osler was a person of many interests, who in addition to being a physician, was a bibliophile, historian, author, and renowned practical joker. One of his achievements was the founding of the History of Medicine Society (previously section) of the Royal Society of Medicine, London.[4]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Erik Adams: Happy 50th birthday, Hot Wheels: Here’s a primetime special
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Texas Geniuses Create Dorkiest Vehicle Ever By Turning Postal Jeep Into Star Wars ‘Star Destroyer’
 

 
 
 
By Andrew Liszweski: The World’s First Full-Color, 3D X-rays Are Freaking Me Out
 
 
 
 
By Rocky Parker: These 9 News Sites Top the Charts for Entertainment and Music Content
 
 
 
 

By Marlee Baldridge: In Alabama, a small-town paper is figuring out digital advertising — and they’re doing it live A bet on live video, a busy news year, and maximizing staff talents let the Alexander City Outlook increase its digital ad revenue 80 percent in a year’s time.
 
 
 
 
By Emma Taggart: NASA Is Training This 17-Year-Old Girl to Become One of the First Humans on Mars
 
 
 
 
By Jess Bidgood: What Did Baby Jessica Think of the Thai Cave Rescue? She Had No Idea It Happened
 
 
 
 
By Harry McCracken: How Slack’s search finally got good For years, organizations have been pouring essential knowledge into Slack. Getting it back out again wasn’t all that easy—until now.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Peggy Hill Hometalker Pocatello, ID: Painting a Front Walk
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 27 Gorgeous Update Ideas For Your Bedroom If your bedroom needs a facelift, check out these stunning ideas!
 
 
 
 
By ThomasVDD: Duct Tape Dispenser
 
 
 
 
By mikeasaurus: Magnetic Silly Putty
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Paige Russell: INVENTION CLASS
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Penolopy Bulnick: 2-Ingredient Watermelon Shake
 
 
 
 
By MaxPower1977: Best Smoked BBQ Pork Ribs


 
 

 
 

FYI July 11, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
911 – Signing of the Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte between Charles the Simple and Rollo of Normandy.

The Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte, between Charles the Simple (King Charles III of France) and Rollo, the leader of the Vikings, was signed[citation needed] in autumn 911. The treaty permitted the Normans to settle in Neustria in return for their protection of Charles’ kingdom from any new invasion by the “northmen”. No written records survive concerning the creation of the Duchy of Normandy.

In 911, a group of Vikings led by Rollo attacked Paris before laying siege to Chartres. Appeals for help from the Bishop of Chartres, Joseaume, were answered by Robert, Marquis of Neustria, Richard, Duke of Burgundy and Manasses, Count of Dijon. On 20 July 911, at the Battle of Chartres, they defeated Rollo despite the absence of many French barons and of Charles the Simple.[1] After the Frankish victory near Chartres on 26 August, Charles decided to negotiate with Rollo.[clarification needed] The talks, led by Hervé, the Archbishop of Reims, resulted in the Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte. The treaty granted Rollo and his soldiers all the land between the river Epte and the sea “in freehold and good money”. In addition, it granted him Brittany “for his livelihood”[clarification needed]. At the time, Brittany was an independent country which France had unsuccessfully tried to conquer. In exchange, Rollo guaranteed the king his loyalty, which involved military assistance for the protection of the kingdom. As a token of his goodwill, Rollo also agreed to be baptised and to marry Gisela, a presumed legitimate daughter of Charles.[2]

The territory covered by the treaty corresponds to the northern part of today’s Upper Normandy down to the Seine, but the territory of the Vikings would eventually extend west beyond the Seine to form the Duchy of Normandy, so named because of the Norsemen who ruled it.

The treaty was entered into[clarification needed] after the death of Alan I, King of Brittany and while another group of Vikings occupied Brittany. Around 937, Alan I’s son Alan II returned from England to expel those Vikings from Brittany in a war that was concluded in 939. During this period the Cotentin Peninsula was lost by Brittany and gained by Normandy.

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1916 – Mortimer Caplin, American tax attorney, educator, and IRS Commissioner

Mortimer Maxwell Caplin (born July 11, 1916) is an American lawyer and educator, and the founding member of Caplin & Drysdale, Chartered.[1] Born in New York City, Caplin holds a B.S. degree, Phi Beta Kappa, from the University of Virginia, where he is also a member of the school’s prestigious Raven Society. He is an Order of the Coif graduate of the University of Virginia Law School, where he earned his LL.B. degree. Caplin also achieved a Doctor of Juridical Science from New York University, and several honorary doctorate in law degrees (LL.D.) from Washington College, the University of South Carolina, and Saint Michael’s College.[2]

First in his class at the University of Virginia School of Law, and Editor-in-Chief of Virginia Law Review, Caplin served as a law clerk to U.S. Circuit Judge Armistead M. Dobie. He then practiced law in New York City from 1941 to 1950, with time out for military service in the United States Navy. During the invasion of Normandy, he served as U.S. Navy beachmaster,[3] cited as member of initial landing force on Omaha Beach and the recipient of the French Legion of Honor.

In 1950, Caplin returned to UVA as professor of law, specializing in tax and corporate law and publishing extensively in these fields. He also served as adjunct professor of law at The George Washington University Law School from 1965 to 1966 and at the University of Miami School of Law from 1967 to 1970. Additionally, Caplin engaged in practice as counsel to a Virginia law firm. He turned 100 in July 2016.[4]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
Just A Car Guy: Heroes of the day! Pasco County Fire and Rescue Station 10 and EMTs! Gene and Melissa were sodding their yard when he had a heart attack, due to stress over the HOA deadline, and Florida heat and humidity… the Fire Dept and EMTs came back to finish the sod and prevent an HOA fine!
 

 

 
 
 
 

Just A Car Guy: World’s shortest international bridge, connecting a homeowner in Canada to his backyard in New York
 
 
 
 
Just A CarGuy: despite its name, the Volkswagen T6 California (Beach and Ocean editions) is not sold in the U.S. (Why? Smog? Crash tests?)

 
 
 
 
Just A Car Guy: Excessive speed caused that roller coaster to screw up last month
 
 
 
 
By Hazel Cills: Ireland Is Changing Cervical Cancer Screenings After a String of Deaths Due to Testing Errors
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: This Mercedes S-Class On A Russian ‘GAZ’ Frame Is The Off-Road Frankenstein The World Needs
 
 
 
 
By Erik Shilling: This Lucky Couple Bought A Running Miata For Just $300
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Discovery of Stone Tools in China Shows Early Humans Left Africa Over 2 Million Years Ago
 
 
 
 

By Brian Kahn: Scorching Heat Wave Reveals Signs of Ancient Civilization in the UK
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Harvard Library Launching New Website
 
 
 
 
Arab News: Arab-Chinese digital library to be launched in Beijing
 
 
 
 
Patricia Correa Director, Developer Marketing Google Play: #IMakeApps: A French farmer helps kids develop healthy digital habits
 

 
 
 
 
Making Morse code available to more people on Gboard Tania Finlayson Morse code & assistive tech developer: Making Morse code available to more people on Gboard
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Farmers making more money from oil and gas rights
 
 
 
 
By Laura Hazard Owen: Several people are typing: The good, the bad, and the mansplaining of WikiTribune “‘Leadership structure’ isn’t a very Wiki phrase.”
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Why Med Schools Are Requiring Students to Take Art Classes, and How It Makes Med Students Better Doctors
 

 
 
 
 
By Brandon Barton: Rock ‘n’ roll is noise pollution – with ecological implications that can spread through a food web
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Jimmy Page Visits Oxford University & Tells Students How He Went from Guitar Apprentice to Creating Led Zeppelin
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 

By Anam: DIY Marbled Resin Coffee Table
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Amy My Recipe Treasures: Mountain Man Crock Pot Breakfast


 
 

 
 

FYI July 10, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1962 – Telstar, the world’s first communications satellite, is launched into orbit.

Telstar is the name of various communications satellites. The first two Telstar satellites were experimental and nearly identical. Telstar 1 launched on top of a Thor-Delta rocket on July 10, 1962. It successfully relayed through space the first television pictures, telephone calls, and telegraph images, and provided the first live transatlantic television feed. Telstar 2 launched May 7, 1963. Telstar 1 and 2—though no longer functional—still orbit the Earth.[1]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1724 – Eva Ekeblad, Swedish noble and agronomist (d. 1786)

Eva Ekeblad (née Eva De la Gardie; 10 July 1724 – 15 May 1786) was a Swedish countess who was a salon hostess, agronomist, and scientist. She was widely known for discovering a method in 1746 to make alcohol and flour from potatoes, allowing greater use of scarce grains for food production, significantly reducing Sweden’s incidence of famine.

Ekeblad was the first female member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (1748).[1][2][3]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

Tab Hunter (born Arthur Andrew Kelm; July 11, 1931 – July 8, 2018) was an American actor, television host, pop singer, film producer, and author. He starred in more than 40 films and was a well-known Hollywood star and heart throb of the 1950s and 1960s, known for his Golden Blond Californian surfer-boy looks. At his height he had his own television show The Tab Hunter Show and a hit single with “Young Love”.

Early life
Hunter was born in New York City, the son of Gertrude (née Gelien) and Charles Kelm. His father was Jewish and his mother was a German (Christian) emigrant, from Hamburg.[3] He had an older brother, Walter, and two paternal half-sisters, Sarah and Rebecca.[4]

Hunter’s father was reportedly abusive, and within a few years of his birth, his parents divorced. He was raised in California living with his mother, brother, and maternal grandparents, John Henry and Ida (née Sonnenfleth) Gelien, living in San Francisco, Long Beach and Los Angeles.[5] His mother reassumed her maiden surname, Gelien, and changed her sons’ surnames, as well. As a teenager, Arthur Gelien, as he was then known, was a figure skater,[6] competing in both singles and pairs. Hunter was sent to Catholic school by his religious mother.[7]

He joined the U.S. Coast Guard aged 15, lying about his age to enlist. While in the Coast Guard, he gained the nickname “Hollywood” for his penchant for watching movies rather than going to bars while on liberty.[8] When his age was discovered, he was discharged by the Coast Guard. He met actor Dick Clayton socially; Clayton suggested that Hunter become an actor.[9]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Eds. note: We received the following email from a reader, who requested that we publish it because he thinks it can help other people. We strongly agree. After verifying facts of the story, we are republishing it in full—with names changed and lightly edited for clarity, and with the express permission of him, his wife, and the approval of their advocate at the child advocacy center. Please be aware that there are potentially disturbing discussions of child sexual abuse and suicide.

A Letter From A Parent
Anonymous
We learned later it is not ideal to ask many detail questions, or to bring the subject back up ourselves. Also avoiding leading the child is of utmost importance. If anyone reading this is ever in a similar situation, we have learned the best response is along the lines of “Thank you for telling me, that was very important information. Is there anything else important you want to tell us? I love you,” while remaining as neutral as possible.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
By Tom McParland: Whoever Created The Dealer Ads For These Kia Stingers Must Have A Sense Of Humor
 
 
 
 
By Shan Wang: YouTube has a plan to boost “authoritative” news sources and give grants to news video operations
 
 
 
 
By Laura Staugaitis: Brave Snorkelers and Ravenous Jellyfish Steal the Spotlight in This Year’s Underwater Photographer of the Year
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Article: “Fifty Years Ago, A Navajo Group Recorded Oral Histories From 450 Elders on 1,700 Reel-To-Reel Tapes. Now, the Collection Is Being Preserved For Future Generations”
 
 
 
 
GlacierHub Weekly Newsletter 07-09-18. Film ‘Arctic’ Shot on an Icelandic Glacier, Disney Princesses Grow Up to be Earth Scientists and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Learn the History of Indian Philosophy in a 62 Episode Series from The History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps: The Buddha, Bhagavad-Gita, Non Violence & More
 
 
 
 
via Dangerous Minds: Steely Dan Creates the Deadhead/Danfan Conversion Chart: A Witty Guide Explaining How You Can Go From Loving the Dead to Idolizing Steely Dan
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Nearly 1,000 Paintings & Drawings by Vincent van Gogh Now Digitized and Put Online: View/Download the Collection
 
 
 
 

By DC: The Shortest-Known Paper Published in a Serious Math Journal: 2 Succinct Sentences
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy: 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCXCV) This Provençale Chateau for rent, Yoga with Audrey Hepburn, The Arctic Slash, A site dedicated to the most historic stone homes in the US, Nationwide Performance Piece to mark the centenary of the Battle of the Somme and more ->
 
 
 
 
Mexican-American David Carrillo, has started this adorable video series about moving to Paris + learning French.

 
 
 
 
By Thomas Nicholson: Celebrating Caribbean-American heritage: These 10 sites showcase the Caribbean’s best, from rum to its vast culture
 
 
 
 
Christina Dodd on Friends, Enemies and Writing
I was once asked to write a chapter for HOW TO WRITE A ROMANCE, the book Romance Writers of America published in conjunction with Writer’s Digest. As a subject for me, they suggested Selling A Book Can Change Your Life.

I burst into laughter. I called my published friends. I read them the subject. Each one of them burst into laughter. We laughed, I think, because while selling a book may change your life, it won’t change you.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Debra Lynn Dadd: Fragrance-free info, dry skin solutions, EMF resources, lots of Q&A comments, and more…
 
 
 
 
By Riane Konc: Books Where the Dog Dies, Rewritten So the Dog Doesn’t Die Finally, it’s safe to read “Where the Red Fern Grows”
 
 
 
 
Re: ‘A look at Fort St. John’s proposed new coat of arms,’ July 5, 2018
 
 
 
 

Glass Gem Corn: Carl Barnes, a part-Cherokee farmer from Oklahoma, liked to experiment with ancestral corn varieties.
 
 
 
 
By Christine Cube: Blog Profiles: Yard & Gardening Blogs
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 14 DIY Hacks to Stay Clean While Camping
 
 
 
 
By JPRussack: How to Dry a Cell Phone
 
 
 
 
Great comments!
By bekethwia: Laptop Compubody Sock
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 

By mikeasaurus: Watermelon Shark