Tag: FYI

FYI December 02, 2020

On This Day

1763 – Dedication of the Touro Synagogue, in Newport, Rhode Island, the first synagogue in what will become the United States.
The Touro Synagogue or Congregation Jeshuat Israel (Hebrew: קהל קדוש ישועת ישראל‎) is a synagogue built in 1763 in Newport, Rhode Island. It is the oldest synagogue building still standing in the United States,[2] the only surviving synagogue building in the U.S. dating to the colonial era, and the oldest surviving Jewish synagogue building in North America.[3] In 1946, it was declared a National Historic Site.[4]

The first congregation was made up of Sephardic Jews, who are believed to have come via the West Indies, where they participated in the triangular trade along with Dutch and English settlements. They practiced a Spanish and Portuguese Jewish liturgy and ritual. Later some early Ashkenazim joined the congregation. In the late eighteenth century, when warfare threatened, the congregation transferred the deed and Torah scrolls to Congregation Shearith Israel in New York for safekeeping. In the late 19th century, the congregation was primarily Ashkenazim, but they continued to practice the Sephardic liturgy at the synagogue.

In 2012 the two congregations went to court to try to resolve which owned the synagogue and its contents, as the Newport congregation wanted to sell some items to raise money for restoration of the building. In 2017 the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled that the New York congregation owned it; as the US Supreme Court declined to hear the case, this ruling stands.

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Born On This Day

1895 – Harriet Cohen, English pianist (d. 1967)
Harriet Pearl Alice Cohen CBE (2 December 1895 – 13 November 1967) was a British pianist.

Biography
Harriet Cohen was born in London and studied piano at the Royal Academy of Music under Tobias Matthay, having won the Ada Lewis scholarship at the age of 12 followed by the Sterndale Bennett Prize in 1913. She made her debut at a Chappell’s Sunday concert at the Queen’s Hall a year later. Her first major appearance was in 1920 when she appeared at the Wigmore Hall in a joint recital with the tenor John Coates.

She was sister to the singer Myra Verney and a distant cousin of the pianist Irene Scharrer.[1][2]

She became particularly associated with contemporary British music, giving the world premiere of Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Piano Concerto (which was written for her) and recording Edward Elgar’s Piano Quintet with the Stratton Quartet under the composer’s supervision. A number of composers wrote music specifically for her, including John Ireland, Béla Bartók, Ernest Bloch and E. J. Moeran, and particularly Sir Arnold Bax (Cohen’s lover), who wrote most of his piano pieces for her. This includes the music for David Lean’s 1948 film version of Oliver Twist. He also composed Concertino for Left Hand for her after she lost the use of her right hand in 1948.

The last six pieces in the collection Mikrokosmos by Bartók are dedicated to her.

Harriet Cohen dedicated an important effort to the performance of the Tudor composers at a time when this was unusual, and gave recitals of works by William Byrd and Orlando Gibbons and also of Henry Purcell. She was considered one of the finest performers of J. S. Bach’s keyboard music, winning outstanding praise from the musicologist Alfred Einstein. Pablo Casals, also, invited her to play Bach with his orchestra at Barcelona, and Wilhelm Furtwängler extended a similar invitation on hearing her in Switzerland. She gave the first ‘all-Bach’ recital at the Queen’s Hall in 1925.

She also cultivated Spanish music, and gave the second performance of Manuel de Falla’s Nights in the Gardens of Spain, a work which became especially associated with her. She was also an early exponent of music of the Soviet Union in Britain, and visited Russia in 1935 to broadcast from Moscow and Leningrad, including works by Shostakovich, Kabalevsky and Leonid Polovinkin. These composers later sent her further compositions.

Cohen’s influence went well beyond that of a musician. She became strongly associated in the 1930s with publicising the plight of German and Austrian Jews and even played a concert with the scientist Albert Einstein (Alfred’s cousin) in 1934 to raise funds to bring Jewish scientists out of Germany. She became a close friend of Eleanor Roosevelt and Ramsay MacDonald as well as the first president of Israel, Chaim Weizmann.

Cohen was also a close friend of many leading figures of the time. These included not only musicians such as Jean Sibelius, Ralph Vaughan Williams, Sir Edward Elgar and Sir William Walton, but also writers such as Arnold Bennett, George Bernard Shaw, H. G. Wells and D. H. Lawrence as well as politicians or entrepreneurs such as Max Beaverbrook and Leslie Viscount Runciman. Cohen became one of the most talked-about and photographed musicians of her day.

She was Vice-President of the Women’s Freedom League, and was for several years associated with the Jewish National Fund and the Palestine Conservatoire of Music at Jerusalem. Cohen was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1938.[3] The Harriet Cohen International Music Award was introduced in her honour in 1951.

She was the subject of This Is Your Life in 1959 when she was surprised by Eamonn Andrews at the BBC Television Theatre.

She died in London.

In January 2006, Dearest Tania, a words-and-music programme telling the story of Cohen, premiered, written by Duncan Honeybourne and performed with actress Louisa Clein.[4]

Efforts for refugees from Nazism
Harriet Cohen met the American journalist Dorothy Thompson[5] in 1930 on her first tour of America, a tour which took in New York, Washington and the Library of Congress and Chicago, thus finally establishing a name for herself on the International stage. It was a meeting that was to change Cohen’s life and awaken her Jewish consciousness. In 1933 Harriet Cohen travelled to Vienna to play a number of concerts, staying with Dorothy Thompson. She was profoundly moved by the plight of refugees, both Jewish and non-Jewish, who were pouring into the city from Germany. Thompson and Cohen were to correspond about the plight of Jewish refugees in Austria and Germany. Cohen was then able to pass on information from Thompson directly to the British Prime Minister, Ramsay MacDonald, who was at this time her intimate friend.[6] Cohen met Thompson every time she went to America thereafter. From 1933 Cohen committed herself to work in Britain and the United States on behalf of refugees. This would result in a concert in America with Albert Einstein in 1934 to raise funds to bring Jewish scientists out of Germany.

In 1935 Ramsay MacDonald warned Cohen not to travel through Germany because the British Government would not be able to provide immunity for her. Soon after, Adolf Hitler passed the Nuremberg laws totally excluding Jews from public life.

Harriet Cohen had met Albert Einstein in Germany in 1929 when she had afternoon tea at his house. At the time Einstein disclosed that he played the violin and said that one day they should play together. Cohen kept her friendship with Einstein even after he had fled Germany in 1933. Cohen would often visit him in Oxford, England where he settled for a short time. Harriet’s sister Myra studied there at Somerville College, where she gave a piano concert. In 1934, after Einstein moved to the United States, Harriet Cohen did finally play that duet concert with Einstein to raise funds to bring Jewish scientists out of Nazi Germany. Cohen and Einstein remained friends thereafter and he referred to her as “the beloved piano witch”.[7]

It was not until 1939 when she first met Chaim Weizmann, the future first President of Israel, that she began to support the Zionist cause and a Jewish homeland.[8] Cohen’s 1939 visit to Palestine extended her reputation there both as a concert pianist and politically. She argued with British and Jewish officials to try to get Jewish refugees admitted on ships from Nazi Germany (rather than be returned), once almost precipitating an International incident. Harriet Cohen believed passionately in a Jewish homeland but with justice to the Arab Palestinians. She survived two assassination attempts during her trip to Palestine. It was when Cohen was having dinner with Weizmann in London that Weizmann heard the news of the British Government’s 1939 white paper to limit Jewish immigration to Britain to just 15,000 people a year. Blanche Dugdale, Arthur Balfour’s niece, a fellow diner, prophetically said in an agonised voice, “What will happen to the millions fleeing from Hitler?”[9]

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FYI

By Sarah Lacy, LinkedIn: The heartbreaking loss of Tony
Why Tony Hsieh was like the Willy Wonka of shoes
The genius of Zappos founder Tony Hsieh, who died last week, was his ability to create a culture that cared for employees and customers, writes friend Sarah Lacy. She compares Hseih to Willy Wonka for his inventiveness, camaraderie and because he “lived to surprise and delight people at every turn.”

 
 
Tony Hsieh (/ˈʃeɪ/ shay; December 12, 1973 – November 27, 2020)[2][3][4] was an American Internet entrepreneur and venture capitalist. He retired as the CEO of the online shoe and clothing company Zappos in August 2020 after 21 years.[5] Prior to joining Zappos, Hsieh co-founded the Internet advertising network LinkExchange, which he sold to Microsoft in 1998 for $265 million.[6]

On November 27, 2020, fifteen days before his 47th birthday, Hsieh died from complications from burns and smoke inhalation sustained in a house fire that had occurred nine days earlier.[7][8]


Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Rasmuson Foundation: From the Desk of Diane: Fall roundup
 
 
Rasmuson Foundation: Apply now for awards in December
 
 
 
 
Word Wenches Newsletter | December 2020
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
Peter Grant (5 April 1935 – 21 November 1995) was the manager of Led Zeppelin from their creation in 1968 to their break up in 1980.[1] With his intimidating size (6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) and 300 lb (140 kg))[2] (at his peak weight) and confrontational manner, combined with his knowledge and experience, he drove strong deals for his band, and is widely credited with improving pay and conditions for all musicians in dealings with concert promoters.[2] Grant has been described as “one of the shrewdest and most ruthless managers in rock history”.[3]

Born and largely brought up in the south London suburb of South Norwood, England by his mother, he worked variously as a stagehand, bouncer, wrestler, bit-part actor, and UK tour manager for acts such as Chuck Berry, Gene Vincent and the Animals, before getting involved briefly in band management with the Nashville Teens and the Yardbirds.[4][5]

He was also a record executive for Swan Song Records.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 
 
 

The Cake of 2020


 
 
 
 

Ideas

Homehacks: 27 Life Hacks To Make Lockdown Life A Whole Lot Better!
 
 
 
 

Recipes

Coleen’s Recipes: PUMPKIN CAKE CHEESECAKE


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI December 01, 2020

On This Day

1824 – United States presidential election: Since no candidate received a majority of the total electoral college votes in the election, the United States House of Representatives is given the task of deciding the winner in accordance with the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution.
The 1824 United States presidential election was the tenth quadrennial presidential election. It was held from Tuesday, October 26 to Wednesday, December 1, 1824. Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay and William Crawford were the primary contenders for the presidency. The result of the election was inconclusive, as no candidate won a majority of the electoral vote. In the election for vice president, John C. Calhoun was elected with a comfortable majority of the vote. Because none of the candidates for president garnered an electoral vote majority, the U.S. House of Representatives, under the provisions of the Twelfth Amendment, held a contingent election. On February 9, 1825, John Quincy Adams was elected as president.[2][3]

The Democratic-Republican Party had won six consecutive presidential elections and by 1824 was the only national political party. However, as the election approached, the presence of multiple viable candidates resulted in there being multiple nominations by the contending factions, signaling the splintering of the party and an end to the Era of Good Feelings.

Adams won New England, Jackson and Adams split the mid-Atlantic states, Jackson and Clay split the Western states, and Jackson and Crawford split the Southern states. Jackson finished with a plurality of the electoral and popular vote, while the other three candidates each finished with a significant share of the votes. Clay, who had finished fourth, was eliminated. Because he shared many of Adams’s positions on the major issues, he lent him his support, allowing Adams to win the contingent election on the first ballot.

This is one of three presidential elections (along with the 1800 election and 1876 election) that have been decided in the House. It is also one of five in which the winner did not achieve at least a plurality of the national popular vote, and the only U.S. election in which the candidate who had the plurality of votes in the Electoral College did not win the election.

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Born On This Day

1927 – Micheline Bernardini, French dancer and model
Micheline Bernardini (born 1 December 1927) is a French former nude dancer at the Casino de Paris who agreed to model, on 5 July 1946, Louis Réard’s two-piece swimsuit, which he called the bikini, named four days after the first test of an American nuclear weapon at the Bikini Atoll.[1]

Réard’s bikini
Designer Louis Réard could not find a runway model willing to showcase his revealing design for a two-piece swimsuit. Risqué for its time, it exposed the wearer’s navel and much of her buttocks. He hired Bernardini, an 18-year-old nude dancer from the Casino de Paris, as his model.[2][3] He introduced his design, a two-piece swimsuit with a g-string back made out of 30 square inches (194 cm2) of cloth with newspaper type pattern, which he called a bikini, at a press conference at the Piscine Molitor, a popular public pool in Paris in July 1946.[4]

Photographs of Bernardini and articles about the event were widely carried by the press. The International Herald Tribune alone ran nine stories on the event.[5] The bikini was a hit, especially among men, and Bernardini received over 50,000 fan letters.[6]

Later life
Bernardini later moved to Australia. She appeared from 1948 to 1958 in a number of revues at the Tivoli Theatre, Melbourne.[7][8] Footage of her 1946 modeling appearance was featured in an episode of the reality television series Love Lust titled The Bikini, in 2011.[9]

Bernardini posed at age 58 in a bikini for photographer Peter Turnley, in 1986.[10]

 
 

FYI

Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Tuesday, December 1, 2020
 
 
 
 
By David James, Creating Alaska: In Elyse Guttenberg’s books, a fantasy writer finds her voice
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: How California prisoners raised $30,000 for a high school student in need
 
 
 
 

The Awesomer: Insane Line Rider Course; Making an All-Terrain Skateboard; Long-Exposure Drone Photography and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Why cheese curls are junk food’s happiest oops and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By CraftAndu: Kitchen With Many Cool Features
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Christmas Desserts That’ll Pack Up & Go
 
 
I Wash You Dry: Easy Scotcharoos Recipe
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Stained Glass Cookies
 
 
By KitchenMason: How to Make the BEST Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI November 30, 2020

On This Day

2018 – A magnitude 7.0 earthquake with its epicenter only 15 miles from Anchorage, Alaska causes significant property damage but no deaths.
On November 30, 2018, at 8:29 a.m. AKST (17:29 UTC), a magnitude 7.1[1] earthquake hit South Central Alaska.[3] The earthquake’s epicenter was near Point Mackenzie, about 10 miles (16 km) north of Anchorage, and occurred at a depth of 29 miles (47 km). It was followed six minutes later by a magnitude 5.7 aftershock centered 2.5 miles (4.0 km) north-northwest of the municipality.[4][5] The earthquake could be felt as far away as Fairbanks.[6]

The National Tsunami Warning Center—itself located inside the quake zone, in Palmer, Alaska, 42 miles (68 km) northeast of Anchorage—issued tsunami warnings for nearby coastal areas, including Cook Inlet and the Kenai Peninsula, but they were lifted shortly after.[4][7]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1843 – Martha Ripley, American physician (d. 1912)[11]
Martha George Rogers Ripley (November 30, 1843 – April 18, 1912) was an American physician, suffragist, and professor of medicine. Founder of the Maternity Hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Ripley was one of the most outspoken activists for disadvantaged female rights. A prominent leader in the American Woman Suffrage Association, Ripley also served six years as president of the Minnesota Woman Suffrage Association.[1]

Early years
Martha George Rogers was born November 30, 1843, in Lowell, Vermont, the oldest of five children of Esther Ann (George) and Francis Rogers, a stock farmer.[2][3] The family moved to the Iowa frontier, where she attended high school (leaving without a diploma).[3] She was awarded a first-class teacher’s certificate and taught elementary school for a time.[2] In 1867 she married rancher William Warren Ripley, son of a well-known Massachusetts mill-owning family. Shortly thereafter they moved back to his home state of Massachusetts, where he took up a job as manager of his uncle’s paper mill in Lawrence.[2] The couple had three daughters, Abigail, Clara, and Edna May.[3] Within a few years, William had bought his own mill and moved the family to Middleton.[2]

Ripley joined the suffragists in 1875 and worked to establish an active suffrage group in Middleton, becoming close friends of Boston suffragettes Lucy Stone and Henry Browne Blackwell.[1] The success of her efforts gained her a place in the statewide suffrage movement, and she was elected to both the central committee and the executive committee of the Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association, serving in both capacities until 1883.[2] It is known that Ripley was an excellent public speaker and often outspoken, leading her to be well-known and liked by many professional women and several doctors.[4]

Read more->

 
 

FYI

STORIES OF THE FAR NORTH: After the War
 
 
 
 

By Josh Jones, Open Cultre: An Animated Stan Lee Explains Why the F-Word Is “the Most Useful Word in the English Language” (NSFW)
 
 
 
 
By Sandra Azzollini McKinley, Beyond Bylines Blog Profiles: Blog Profiles: Holiday Decorating Blogs, 2020
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DXXXI): A “Wee House” that sits on Loch Shin in the Highlands; One of the most overlooked dance sequences in the history of American film-making; Participants in the Beautiful Leg Contest at Palisades Amusement Park, NJ in 1951; The Underrated Typography of Pencils; This House Listing in New Jersey; Ford Aurora concept interior 1973 and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Awesomer: Bossa Nova Kid; The Biggest Frog That Ever Lived and more ->
 
 
The Awesomer: The Story of Silver Apples and more ->

 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Renovating a Masonic Temple; Memorial to Félicette; The Witch’s Castle and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: DIY Book Covers Have Come a Long Way — How to Create Professional-Quality Covers with Design Apps
 
 
 
 Girl Meets Farm: Full Episodes

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI November 29, 2020

On This Day

1830 – November Uprising: An armed rebellion against Russia’s rule in Poland begins.
The November Uprising (1830–31), also known as the Polish–Russian War 1830–31[3] or the Cadet Revolution, was an armed rebellion in the heartland of partitioned Poland against the Russian Empire. The uprising began on 29 November 1830 in Warsaw when the young Polish officers from the local Army of the Congress Poland’s military academy revolted, led by lieutenant Piotr Wysocki. Large segments of the peoples of Lithuania, Belarus, and the Right-bank Ukraine soon joined the uprising. Although the insurgents achieved local successes, a numerically superior Imperial Russian Army under Ivan Paskevich eventually crushed the uprising.[4][5][6] The Russian Emperor Nicholas I decreed that henceforth Russian-occupied Poland would lose its autonomy and become an integral part of the Russian Empire. With Warsaw remaining little more than a military garrison, its university closed.[7]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1873 – Suzan Rose Benedict, American mathematician and academic (d. 1942)
Suzan Rose Benedict (November 29, 1873 – April 8, 1942) was the first woman awarded a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Michigan and had a long teaching career at Smith College.[1]

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1876 – Nellie Tayloe Ross, American educator and politician, 14th Governor of Wyoming (d. 1977)
Nellie Davis Tayloe Ross (November 29, 1876 – December 19, 1977) was an American politician, the 14th governor of Wyoming from 1925 to 1927 and director of the United States Mint from 1933 to 1953. She was the first woman to be sworn in as governor of a U.S. state, and remains the only woman to have served as governor of Wyoming.[1]

Ross was born in St. Joseph, Missouri[2] to James Wynns Tayloe, a native of Tennessee, and Elizabeth Blair Green, who owned a plantation on the Missouri River. Her family moved to Miltonvale, Kansas in 1884, and she graduated from Miltonvale High School in 1892. She attended a teacher-training college for two years and taught kindergarten for four years.

On September 11, 1902, Ross married William B. Ross, whom she had met when visiting relatives in Tennessee in 1900. William B. Ross was governor of Wyoming from 1923 to his death on October 2, 1924. Ross succeeded her late husband’s successor Frank Lucas as governor when she won the special election, becoming the first female American governor on January 5, 1925. She was a staunch supporter of Prohibition during the 1920s. She lost re-election in 1926 but remained an active member of the Democratic Party.

In 1933, Ross became the first female Director of the United States Mint. Despite initial mistrust, she forged a strong bond with Mary Margaret O’Reilly, the Assistant Director of the Mint and one of the United States’ highest-ranking female civil servants of her time. Ross served five terms as Director, retiring in 1953. During her later years, she wrote for various women’s magazines and traveled. Ross died in Washington, D.C., at the age of 101.

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FYI

Condolences to all who love him during this heartbreaking time.
 
 

 
 
Wayne Templar:
“Always use the green cross code, because I won’t be there when you cross the road”. I wonder how may kids growing up in the 70s wouldn’t have made it to adulthood without this guy? R.I.P.
 
 
David Charles Prowse MBE (1 July 1935 – 28 November 2020) was an English bodybuilder,[1] weightlifter and character actor in British film and television. Worldwide, he was best known for physically portraying Darth Vader in the original Star Wars trilogy (with the character’s voice being performed by James Earl Jones); in 2015, he starred in a documentary concerning that role, entitled I Am Your Father. Prior to his role as Vader, Prowse had established himself as a prominent figure in the UK as the first Green Cross Code man, a character used in road safety public information aimed at children.[2][3][4]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Tim Crews, a rural editor-publisher who fought for open government and went to jail to protect sources, dies at 77
 
 
 
 
By Susanne Matthews, The Author’s Billboard: Commercials: Beautiful Christmas Thoughts and So Much More
 
 
 
 
By Gwen Romack, Kings River Life: From Rescue Dog to Writer – Spreading Laughter When We Need It Most
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Scourge of the Elites
 
 
The Passive Voice: Best books of 2020
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By CutterLight: Salmon Cheddar Bisque with Morels
 
 
By Elizabethinmn: Nut Goodie Thumbprints
 
 
By Momos75: Pistachio and Salted Caramel Brownie Cookies
 
 
By sun.: Sparkly Chocolate Coffee Crinkle Cookies
 
 
By Ddupla27: Iced Sweet Potato Cookies With Roasted Pecans!


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI November 28, 2020

On This Day

1785 – The first Treaty of Hopewell is signed, by which the United States acknowledges Cherokee lands in what is now East Tennessee.
The Treaty of Hopewell was signed by the Choctaw at the foothills of the Smoky Mountains on January 3, 1786. The ceded area amounted to 69,120 acres, and the compensation to the Choctaw took the form of protection by the United States.[1] To elaborate, the plenipoteniaries were Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens and Joseph Martin representing the U.S. while representing the Choctaw were 13 small medal and 12 medal and gorget captains.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1910 – Elsie Quarterman, American ecologist and academic (d. 2014)
Elsie Quarterman (November 28, 1910 – June 9, 2014) was a prominent plant ecologist. She was a Professor Emerita at Vanderbilt University.

Quarterman was born on November 28, 1910 in Valdosta, Georgia. She earned a B.A. from Georgia State Women’s College (now Valdosta State University) in 1932 and earned an M.A. in botany from Duke University in 1943. She completed her PhD at Duke University in 1949 with Henry J. Oosting. During her graduate work and afterward, she also collaborated extensively with Catherine Keever.

Quarterman is best known for her work on the ecology of Tennessee cedar glades. These herb-dominated plant communities on the shallow soils of limestone outcrops are globally rare habitats and contain many endemic plant species. She is also credited with rediscovering the native Tennessee coneflower, Echinacea tennesseensis, which was thought to be extinct, in 1969.[1][2] Conservation efforts for the coneflower were successful, and it was delisted as an endangered species in 2011.[3]

She supervised seven doctoral students, including Stewart Ware, a plant ecologist at the College of William and Mary, and Carol and Jerry Baskin, professors at the University of Kentucky.[4]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Mike Croissant: Shot at and Missed – The Story of Guyon Phillips
 
 
 
 
STORIES OF THE FAR NORTH: Young Black Officers
 
 
 
 
I read a dark mystery with excellent, descriptive writing:

“In every county, township, or parcel, regardless of population or relevance, there is high pressure, low pressure, and the force of greed between.”

“BOOZE HAD him by the balls. Pruett knew it. His conscience told him to ignore the negative; that circumstances allowed him to make significant concessions. But there wasn’t much denying the reality that the bitch was back. Pruett only too gladly let her right through the front door, though the one thing he’d forgotten was that her grip rivaled any vise he ever owned.”

“But being aware and being capable were two different things. One of the many challenges of the addict is the paralyzing terror resiliency faces when eclipsed by the towering shadow of NEED.”


R.S. Guthrie, Blood Land

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
NSFW

Recipes

Betty Crocker Kitchens: All-You-Can-Eat Apps!
 
 
Taste of Home: 60 Christmas Cookies from Grandma’s Recipe Box and more ->


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

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Books A Million

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eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI November 27, 2020

On This Day

1809 – The Berners Street hoax is perpetrated by Theodore Hook in the City of Westminster, London.
The Berners Street hoax was perpetrated by Theodore Hook in Westminster, London, England, in 1809.[1][2] Hook had made a bet with his friend Samuel Beazley that he could transform any house in London into the most talked-about address in a week, which he achieved by sending out thousands of letters in the name of Mrs Tottenham, who lived at 54 Berners Street, requesting deliveries, visitors, and assistance.[3]

History

On 27 November, at five o’clock in the morning, a sweep arrived to sweep the chimneys of Mrs Tottenham’s house. The maid who answered the door informed him that no sweep had been requested, and that his services were not required. A few moments later another sweep presented himself, then another, and another; twelve in all. After the last of the sweeps had been sent away, a fleet of carts carrying large deliveries of coal began to arrive, followed by a series of cakemakers delivering large wedding cakes, then doctors, lawyers, vicars and priests summoned to minister to someone in the house they had been told was dying. Fishmongers, shoemakers and over a dozen pianos were among the next to appear, along with “six stout men bearing an organ”. Dignitaries, including the Governor of the Bank of England, the Duke of York, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Lord Mayor of London, also arrived. The narrow streets soon became severely congested with tradesmen and onlookers. Deliveries and visits continued until the early evening, bringing a large part of London to a standstill.[4]

Every Officer that could be mustered was enlisted to disperse the people, and they were placed at the corners of Berners Street to prevent trades people from advancing towards the house with goods. The street was not cleared at a late hour, as servants of every denomination wanting places began to assemble at five o’clock. It turned out that letters had been written to the different trades people, which stated recommendations from persons of quality. A reward has been offered for the apprehension of the author of the criminal hoax.[5]

Hook stationed himself in the house directly opposite 54 Berners Street, from where he and his friend spent the day watching the chaos unfold.[4]

Despite a “fervent hue and cry” to find the perpetrator, Hook managed to evade detection, although many of those who knew him suspected him of being responsible. It was reported that he felt it prudent to be “laid up for a week or two” before embarking on a tour of the country, supposedly to convalesce.[6]

The site at 54 Berners Street is now occupied by the Sanderson Hotel.
 
 
1945 – CARE (then the Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe) is founded to send CARE Packages of food relief to Europe after World War II.
CARE (Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere, formerly Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe[1]) is a major international humanitarian agency delivering emergency relief and long-term international development projects. Founded in 1945, CARE is nonsectarian, impartial, and non-governmental. It is one of the largest and oldest humanitarian aid organizations focused on fighting global poverty. In 2016, CARE reported working in 94 countries, supporting 962 poverty-fighting projects and humanitarian aid projects, and reaching over 80 million people and 256 million people indirectly.[2]

CARE’s programmes in the developing world address a broad range of topics including emergency response, food security, water and sanitation, economic development, climate change, agriculture, education, and health. CARE also advocates at the local, national, and international levels for policy change and the rights of poor people. Within each of these areas, CARE focuses on empowering and meeting the needs of women and girls and promoting gender equality.[2]

CARE International is a confederation of fourteen CARE National Members, each of which is registered as an autonomous non-profit non-governmental organization in the country and four affiliate members.

Read more ->

Born On This Day

1820 – Rachel Brooks Gleason, fourth woman to earn a medical degree in the United States (d. 1905)
Rachel Brooks Gleason (November 27, 1820 – March 13, 1905) was an American physician, the fourth woman to earn a medical degree in the United States.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Open Culture: A Free 700-Page Chess Manual Explains 1,000 Chess Tactics in Straightforward English
 
 
By Mark Linsenmayer, Open Culture: Famed New Orleans Music Producer Mark Bingham Discusses His Songs and Collaborations: A Nakedly Examined Music Conversation (#136)
 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: How German librarians finally caught an elusive book thief; Abandoned Virginia Renaissance Faire and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: How leather balls hint at an ancient sport; How to Recreate Lost Family Recipes and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Opening a Brewery as a Native American is a Radical Act and more->
 
 
 
 
Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Friday, November 27, 2020

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By shinkdifferent: Plywood Reindeer

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Hangry Hannah’s Kitchen: Sweet Potato Brownie Bread (Gluten + Dairy Free)


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

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FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI November 26, 2020

On This Day

1789 – A national Thanksgiving Day is observed in the United States as proclaimed by President George Washington at the request of Congress.
Thanksgiving is a federal holiday in the United States, celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November.[1] It is sometimes called American Thanksgiving (outside the United States) to distinguish it from the Canadian holiday of the same name. It originated as a harvest festival, and the centerpiece of Thanksgiving celebrations remains Thanksgiving dinner. The dinner traditionally consists of foods and dishes indigenous to the Americas, namely turkey, potatoes (usually mashed), stuffing, squash, corn (maize), green beans, cranberries (typically in sauce form), and pumpkin pie. In American culture Thanksgiving is regarded as the beginning of the fall–winter holiday season, which includes Christmas and the New Year.

The event that Americans commonly call the “First Thanksgiving” was celebrated by the Pilgrims after their first harvest in the New World in October 1621.[2] This feast lasted three days, and—as recounted by attendee Edward Winslow—[3] was attended by 90 Native Americans and 53 Pilgrims.[4] The New England colonists were accustomed to regularly celebrating “thanksgivings,” days of prayer thanking God for blessings such as a military victory or the end of a drought.[5]

Thanksgiving has been celebrated nationally on and off since 1789, with a proclamation by President George Washington after a request by Congress.[6] President Thomas Jefferson chose not to observe the holiday, and its celebration was intermittent until President Abraham Lincoln, in 1863, proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens”, to be celebrated on the last Thursday in November.[7][8] On June 28, 1870, President Ulysses S. Grant signed into law the Holidays Act that made Thanksgiving a yearly appointed federal holiday in Washington D.C.[9][10][11] On January 6, 1885, an act by Congress made Thanksgiving, and other federal holidays, a paid holiday for all federal workers throughout the United States.[12] Under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the date was moved to one week earlier, observed between 1939 and 1941 amid significant controversy. From 1942 onwards, Thanksgiving, by an act of Congress, signed into law by FDR, received a permanent observation date, the fourth Thursday in November, no longer at the discretion of the President.[13][14]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1832 – Mary Edwards Walker, American surgeon and activist, Medal of Honor recipient (d. 1919)

Mary Edwards Walker, M.D. (November 26, 1832 – February 21, 1919), commonly referred to as Dr. Mary Walker, was an American abolitionist, prohibitionist, prisoner of war and surgeon.[1] She is the only woman to ever receive the Medal of Honor.[2]

In 1855, she earned her medical degree at Syracuse Medical College in New York,[3] married and started a medical practice. She volunteered with the Union Army at the outbreak of the American Civil War and served as a surgeon at a temporary hospital in Washington, D.C., even though at the time women and sectarian[clarification needed] physicians were considered unfit for the Union Army Examining Board.[4] She was captured by Confederate forces[3] after crossing enemy lines to treat wounded civilians and arrested as a spy. She was sent as a prisoner of war to Richmond, Virginia until released in a prisoner exchange.

After the war, she was approved for the Medal of Honor, for her efforts to treat the wounded during the Civil War. Notably, the award was not expressly given for gallantry in action at that time, and in fact was the only military decoration during the Civil War. Walker is the only woman to receive the medal and one of only eight civilians to receive it. Her name was deleted from the Army Medal of Honor Roll in 1917 (along with over 900 other, male MOH recipients); however, it was restored in 1977.[3] After the war, she was a writer and lecturer supporting the women’s suffrage movement until her death in 1919.

Read more ->
 
 

FYI

By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: A Flying Car Took to the Skies in Back 1949: See the Taylor Aerocar in Action
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Beatles Create an Abstract Collaborative Painting, Images of a Woman, During Three Days of Lockdown in Japan (1966)
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Stevie Ray Vaughan Gives a Blistering Demonstration of His Guitar Technique
 
 
 
 
Our Third Thirds: Pearl of Wisdom #2
 
 
 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI November 25, 2020

On This Day

1833 – A massive undersea earthquake, estimated magnitude between 8.7 and 9.2, rocks Sumatra, producing a massive tsunami all along the Indonesian coast.
The 1833 Sumatra earthquake occurred on November 25 at about 22:00 local time, with an estimated magnitude in the range of 8.8–9.2 Mw . It caused a large tsunami that flooded the southwestern coast of the island. There are no reliable records of the loss of life, with the casualties being described only as ‘numerous’. The magnitude of this event has been estimated using records of uplift taken from coral microatolls.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1880 – Elsie J. Oxenham, English author (d. 1960)
Elsie Jeanette Dunkerley (25 November 1880 – 9 January 1960), was an English girls’ story writer, who took the name Oxenham as her pseudonym when her first book, Goblin Island, was published in 1907. Her Abbey Series of 38 titles are her best-known and best-loved books.[1] In her lifetime she had 87 titles published and another two have since been published by her niece, who discovered the manuscripts in the early 1990s. She is considered a major figure among girls’ story writers of the first half of the twentieth century, being one of the ‘Big Three’ with Elinor Brent-Dyer and Dorita Fairlie Bruce.[2] Angela Brazil is as well-known – perhaps more so – but did not write her books in series about the same group of characters or set in the same place or school, as did the Big Three.

Oxenham’s books are widely collected and there are several Appreciation Societies: in the UK, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa; with a total membership of over six hundred, some of whom live in the US, Canada, India and The Netherlands although belonging to one or more of the societies mentioned.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Ernie at Tedium, David Buck: Turkey Hotline A celebration of turkey and pop culture just in time for the holidays—including how a telephone hotline somehow combined all three.
 
 
 
 

By Madeleine Muzdakis: Underwater Photographer Captures the Unique Beauty of Swimming With Humpback Whales
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Bake this luxurious 19th-century Thanksgiving pie; Resurrecting Native Americans’ Lost Crops and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Luke Fater, Atlas Obscura: My Hunt for the Original McDonald’s French-Fry Recipe Veteran line-cooks, experts, and die-hard fans tell the story of the fries that birthed an empire, then disappeared—until now.
 
 
 
 
Via Minotaur: Maude Collins: Ohio’s First Female Sheriff

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Leftover Turkey Pot Pie Recipe


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI November 23 & 24, 2020

On This Day

1644 – John Milton publishes Areopagitica, a pamphlet decrying censorship.[2]
Areopagitica; A speech of Mr. John Milton for the Liberty of Unlicenc’d Printing, to the Parlament of England is a 1644 prose polemic by the English poet, scholar, and polemical author John Milton opposing licensing and censorship.[1] Areopagitica is among history’s most influential and impassioned philosophical defences of the principle of a right to freedom of speech and expression. Many of its expressed principles have formed the basis for modern justifications.

Read more->

 
 
1832 – South Carolina passes the Ordinance of Nullification, declaring that the Tariffs of 1828 and 1832 were null and void in the state, beginning the Nullification Crisis.[5]
The Ordinance of Nullification declared the Tariffs of 1828 and 1832 null and void within the state borders of South Carolina, beginning on February 1, 1833.[1] It began the Nullification Crisis. Passed by a state convention on November 24, 1832,[2] it led to President Andrew Jackson’s proclamation against South Carolina, the Nullification Proclamation on December 10, 1832,[3] which threatened to send government ground troops to enforce the tariffs. In the face of the military threat, and following a Congressional revision of the law which lowered the tariff, South Carolina repealed the ordinance.

The protest that led to the Ordinance of Nullification was caused by the belief that the tariffs of 1828 and 1832 favored the North over the South and therefore violated the Constitution. This led to an emphasis on the differences between the two regions and helped set the stage for conflict during the antebellum era.

Born On This Day

1915 – Anne Burns, British aeronautical engineer and glider pilot (d. 2001)
Anne Burns (23 November 1915 – 22 January 2001)[1] was a British aeronautical engineer and glider pilot. She had a career of nearly 40 years in the Royal Aircraft Establishment as an engineer and an expert in wind shear. As a glider pilot, she holds the British record for highest altitude, and was the first woman to cross the English Channel in a glider.

Read more ->

 
 
1886 – Margaret Caroline Anderson, American publisher, founded The Little Review (d. 1973)
Margaret Caroline Anderson (November 24, 1886 – October 19, 1973) was the American founder, editor and publisher of the art and literary magazine The Little Review, which published a collection of modern American, English and Irish writers between 1914 and 1929.[3] The periodical is most noted for introducing many prominent American and British writers of the 20th century, such as Ezra Pound and T. S. Eliot in the United States, and publishing the first thirteen chapters of James Joyce’s then-unpublished novel, Ulysses.[4][5][6]

A large collection of her papers on Gurdjieff’s teaching is now preserved at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.[7]

Read more ->

FYI

By Savannah Tanbusch, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Turkey Blogs
 
 
 
 
MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DXXX): Imagine this Road Trip; A Falling Cone (late 19th Century); Drying incense in Vietnam; Have you ever watched Louis actually singing this iconic song…? More ->
 
 
 
 

South Anchorage Farmers’ Market: Where to find Products NOW Now that the market is over for 2020, see where to find your favorite market products in the coming months
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: The Tennessee Solution to Disappearing Book Reviews
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Hear Legendary BBC Composer Delia Derbyshire’s Electronic Version of Bach’s “Air on a G String”
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: A Curious Herbal: 500 Beautiful Illustrations of Medicinal Plants Drawn by Elizabeth Blackwell in 1737 (to Save Her Family from Financial Ruin)
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Watch How to Be at Home, a Beautiful Short Animation on the Realities of Social Isolation in 2020
 
 
 
 

By Alex Dalenberg, Pocket Collections: The Surprisingly Strange History of Thanksgiving (and Other Turkey Day Trivia) Dig into this collection of fascinating Thanksgiving reads while you’re waiting for dinner to cook.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Taste of Home: West Coast Snappy Joes
 
 
By jessyratfink: How to Cook Thanksgiving Dinner
 
 
By YuesFoodStory: Realistic Orange & Lemon Cookies
 
 
By EricaM57: Stellar Shortbread Cookies
 
 
By Delight Baking: Brookies – Brownies and Cookies in One
 
 
By Handy_Bear: Walnut-Shaped Cookies With Homemade Dulce De Leche
 
 
By Handy_Bear: Homemade Raffaello Coconut and Almond Balls
 
 
By Ivan Beldiagin: Unusual Colored Tea Cookies Without Dyes


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI November 21 & 22, 2020

On This Day

1905 – Albert Einstein’s paper that leads to the mass–energy equivalence formula, E = mc², is published in the journal Annalen der Physik.
In physics, mass–energy equivalence defines the relationship between mass and energy in a system’s rest frame, where the two values differ only by a constant and the units of measurement.[1][2] The principle is described by Albert Einstein’s famous formula:[3]
Mass–energy relation

E = m c 2 {\displaystyle E=m\,c^{2}}
{\displaystyle E=m\,c^{2}}

The formula defines the energy E of a particle in its rest frame as the product of mass m with the speed of light squared (c2). Equivalently, the mass of a particle at rest is equal to its energy E divided by the speed of light squared (c2). Because the speed of light is a large number in everyday units (approximately 3×108 meters per second), the formula implies that a small amount of rest mass corresponds to an enormous amount of energy, which is independent of the composition of the matter. Rest mass, also called invariant mass, is the mass that is measured when the system is at rest. The rest mass is a fundamental physical property that remains independent of momentum, even at extreme speeds approaching the speed of light (i.e., its value is the same in all inertial frames of reference). Massless particles such as photons have zero invariant mass, but massless free particles have both momentum and energy. The equivalence principle implies that when energy is lost in chemical reactions, nuclear reactions, and other energy transformations, the system will also lose a corresponding amount of mass. The energy, and mass, can be released to the environment as radiant energy, such as light, or as thermal energy. The principle is fundamental to many fields of physics, including nuclear and particle physics.

Mass–energy equivalence arose originally from special relativity as a paradox described by Henri Poincaré.[4] Einstein was the first to propose that the equivalence of mass and energy is a general principle and a consequence of the symmetries of space and time. The principle first appeared in the paper “Does the inertia of a body depend upon its energy-content?”, one of his Annus Mirabilis (Miraculous Year) papers, published on 21 November 1905.[5] The formula and its relationship to momentum, as described by the energy–momentum relation were subsequently developed in a series of advances over the next several years.

Read more ->

 
 
1307 – Pope Clement V issues the papal bull Pastoralis Praeeminentiae which instructed all Christian monarchs in Europe to arrest all Templars and seize their assets.[3]

Pastoralis praeeminentiae was a papal bull issued by Pope Clement V on 22 November 1307 to all Christian monarchs. It ordered the arrest of all Knights Templar and to seize their properties on behalf of the church. Clement was forced to support the campaign against the Templars by Philip IV of France, who owed them a great deal of money and had initiated the first arrests against the Templars on 13 October 1307.[1]

Despite the papal request, not all the monarchs complied immediately, most notably, Edward II of England who at first refused to believe the allegations, but later carried out the order.

Following the arrests, a period of trials was sanctioned against the Templars, enforced by torture and pain-induced confessions.

Born On This Day

1894 – Cecil M. Harden, American politician (d. 1984)
Cecil Murray Harden (November 21, 1894 – December 5, 1984) was an American educator who became a Republican politician and an advocate of women’s rights.[1] She served five terms in the U.S. Representative (January 3, 1949 to January 3, 1959) representing Indiana’s 6th congressional district. Harding was the only Republican woman elected to represent Indiana in the U.S. Congress until 2012, when Susan Brooks and Jackie Walorski were elected to serve in the 113th United States Congress beginning in January 2013.[2]

Initially assigned to the Veterans’ Affairs Committee in the 81st Congress, the next term she transferred to the House Committee on Expenditures in Executive Departments (later called Government Operations), where she served as the chair of the Inter-Governmental Relations subcommittee of Government Operations during the 83rd Congress. Harden also served six years (1953–59) on the Committee on the Post Office and Civil Service during the Eisenhower administration. In 1957 Harden and U.S. Representative Florence Dwyer proposed legislation in the U.S. House in support of equal pay for women. Harden also joined with U.S. Senator Margaret Chase Smith and U.S. Representative Frances Bolton to encourage inclusion of issues of interest to women in the Republican Party’s platform. In addition, Harden helped her constituents in Indiana by securing federal funding for flood control projects, especially in the Wabash River valley, and was critical of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission’s plan in 1956 to close its heavy water plant in Dana, Indiana.

Harden, who became in politics in 1932, served as the Republican precinct vice chairman from 1932 to 1940; vice chairman of the Fountain County, Indiana, Republican Party from 1938 until 1950; Indiana’s Republican National committeewoman from 1944 to 1959 and from 1964 to 1972; and delegate-at-large to the Republican National Conventions in 1948, 1952, 1956, 1968, and in 1972. Harden was appointed to serve as special assistant for women’s affairs to U.S. Postmaster General Arthur Summerfield (March 1959 to March 1961) and served on the National Advisory Committee for the White House Conference on Aging in 1972–73.

Read more ->

 
 
1900 – Helenka Pantaleoni, American actress and humanitarian, co-founded U.S. Fund for UNICEF (d. 1987)
Helen Tradusa “Helenka” Adamowska Pantaleoni (November 22, 1900 – January 5, 1987) was a Polish American silent film actress and humanitarian. She was the founding director of the U.S. Committee for UNICEF, a role that she held for 25 years. Her granddaughter is American actress Téa Leoni.

Read more ->

FYI

Any Mountain: Alaska surgeon leads fight against ovarian cancer
bsp;
 
 
 
Dave Grohl, Class Act!

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Zero-Effort Slow-Cooker Recipes
 
 
Food Network: Pumpkin Gooey Butter Cake


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?