Tag: FYI

FYI November 02, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1410 – The Peace of Bicêtre suspends hostilities in the Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War.
The Armagnac–Burgundian Civil War was a conflict between two cadet branches of the French royal family — the House of Orléans (Armagnac faction) and the House of Burgundy (Burgundian faction) from 1407 to 1435. It began during a lull in the Hundred Years’ War against the English and overlapped with the Western Schism of the papacy.

A new treaty, signed at Bicêtre on 2 November 1410, suspended hostilities, but both sides had taken up arms again as early as spring 1411.

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FYI:
The Bicêtre Hospital is located in Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, which is a commune in the southern suburbs of Paris, France. It lies 4.5 km (2.8 miles) from the center of Paris. The Bicêtre Hospital was originally planned as a military hospital, with construction begun in 1634. With the help of Vincent de Paul, it was finally opened as an orphanage in 1642. It was incorporated into the Hôpital Général in 1656. In 1823, it was called the Hospice de la Vieillesse Hommes. In 1885, it was renamed the Hospice de Bicêtre.[1] In its history it has been used successively and simultaneously as an orphanage, a prison, a lunatic asylum,[2] and a hospital. Its most notorious guest was the Marquis de Sade.[3][4]

The Bicêtre is most famous as the Asylum de Bicêtre where Superintendent Philippe Pinel is credited as being the first to introduce humane methods into the treatment of the mentally ill, in 1793.

The Bicêtre is referenced in the last chapter of Foucault’s Madness and Civilization titled ‘The Birth of the Asylum.’ In it, Pinel’s methods are classified as more devious than humane.
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1696 – Conrad Weiser, American soldier, monk, and judge (d. 1760)
Conrad Weiser (November 2, 1696 – July 13, 1760), born Johann Conrad Weiser, Jr., was a Pennsylvania Dutch pioneer, interpreter and diplomat between the Pennsylvania Colony and Native Americans. He was a farmer, soldier, monk, tanner and judge. He contributed as an emissary in councils between Native Americans and the colonies, especially Pennsylvania, during the 18th century’s tensions of the French and Indian War (Seven Years’ War).

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FYI

 
 

By Adam Clark Estes: The First 8K Video From Space Is Cool, but Good Luck Watching It in 8K on Earth
 

 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: This Chevrolet Astro With a Turf Carpet Is A Bad Pun on Wheels
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Comment of the Day: Gas, Grass, and Astroturf
 
 
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: How a Tiny Flightless Bird Ended Up on an Island in the Middle of the Ocean
 
 
 
 
By Katie Rife: Gather ’round for an exclusive look at the Emmet Otter’s Jug-Band Christmas visual soundtrack
 

 
 
 
 
By Brian Kahn: Whales Can Now Be Tracked From Space
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Discover the hidden wonders of Colombia
 
 
 
 
By Joshua Benton: If you let commenters go after your reporters, it hurts your credibility with other readers The bright side (?): Women don’t seem to face a higher credibility penalty from a mean comment than men do.
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Medicare to pay doctors for telehealth visits
 
 
 
 
By Suzie Mills Air Force Veteran & Founder, Honest Soul Yoga: A veteran-led business strengthening hearts and minds
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice – I very frequently get the question
 
 
 
 
By Jesus Diaz: I ditched the Mac for the iPad, and I’ll never go back The iPad Pro has changed my life, and I don’t care about desktop computing anymore.
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Figuring
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls Friday Video: The Two-Handkerchief Bra, 1921
 
 
 
 
By Ephrat Livni: Novelist Haruki Murakami has good advice on what you can do when life looks dark
 
 
 
 
Reading?
By Ted Mills: Growing Up Surrounded by Books Has a Lasting Positive Effect on the Brain, Says a New Scientific Study
 
 

Aeon: Would you choose to live wild and free as a wolf, or have a job with benefits, like a sled dog? A history of monsters Lava ice and hints of life – an immersive 360° tour of volcanism in our solar system and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Jeffrey Mervis: NSF suspends program allowing graduate fellows to study abroad
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI November 01, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1790 – Edmund Burke publishes Reflections on the Revolution in France, in which he predicts that the French Revolution will end in a disaster.
Reflections on the Revolution in France[1] is a political pamphlet written by the Irish statesman Edmund Burke and published in November 1790. One of the best-known intellectual attacks against the French Revolution,[2] Reflections is a defining tract of modern conservatism as well as an important contribution to international theory. Above all else, it has been one of the defining efforts of Edmund Burke’s transformation of “traditionalism into a self-conscious and fully conceived political philosophy of conservatism”.[3]

The pamphlet has not been easy to classify. Before seeing this work as a pamphlet, we should note that Burke wrote in the mode of a letter, invoking expectations of openness and selectivity that added a layer of meaning.[4] Academics have had trouble identifying whether Burke, or his tract, can best be understood as “a realist or an idealist, Rationalist or a Revolutionist”.[5] Thanks to its thoroughness, rhetorical skill, and literary power, it has become one of the most widely known of Burke’s writings and a classic text in political theory.[6] In the twentieth century, it greatly influenced conservative and classical liberal intellectuals, who recast Burke’s Whiggish arguments as a critique of communist and revolutionary-socialist programmes.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1915 – Margaret Taylor-Burroughs, American painter, poet, and educator, co-founded the DuSable Museum of African American History (d. 2010)
Margaret Taylor-Burroughs (November 1, 1915[1][2] – November 21, 2010), also known as Margaret Taylor Goss, Margaret Taylor Goss Burroughs or Margaret T G Burroughs; was an American visual artist, writer, poet, educator, and arts organizer. She co-founded the Ebony Museum of Chicago, now the DuSable Museum of African American History. An active member of the African-American community, she also helped to establish the South Side Community Art Center, whose opening on May 1, 1941 [3] was dedicated by the First Lady of the United States Eleanor Roosevelt.[4] There at the age of 23 Burroughs served as the youngest member of its board of directors. A long-time educator, she spent most of her career at DuSable High School. Taylor-Burroughs was a prolific writer, with her efforts directed toward the exploration of the Black experience and to children, especially to their appreciation of their cultural identity and to their introduction and growing awareness of art. She is also credited with the founding of Chicago’s Lake Meadows Art Fair in the early 1950s.

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FYI

 
 
By Katie Donough: The Rise and Fall and Rise of the Militant Tenant
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: How a Florida Jeep Club Used Wranglers to Flip a Family’s House Over After Hurricane Michael
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Here’s a Bus With a Built-In 1972 Honda Z600 Escape Pod
 
 
 
 
Huh, who’d thunk?
By Kristen Lee: IIHS Says Teens Shouldn’t Have High-Horsepower Cars But, Like, They’re Not My Dad, Okay? Whatever
 
 
 
 
By Maggie Hendricks: Vertical Formation Skydiving Turns Sheer Terror Into A Beautiful Team Sport
 
 
 
 
By Maddie Stone: Scientists Have Just Named 17 New Sea Slug Species, and They’re All Fabulous
 
 
 
 
By The MNC Editorial Team 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCCXX): Janis Joplin having an Eternal Summer in Copacabana Brazil 1970, This Ghost Temple in Indonesia, Take Prehistoric Survival Classes with a Modern Caveman, Extreme English Gardening at Powis Castle and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Virginia has its own Stonehenge, but it’s made out of foam, Octopus Garden, KAWAZU JAPAN Looping Bridge and more ->
 
 
 
 
KarmaTube: The 2-year Phone Conversation that Changed a Life
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Can diversity in children’s books tackle prejudice? The writing of a novel Publishing Trends: Tropes Readers Adore Across 15 Fiction Genres Amazon Launches Childhood-to-Career Program “Amazon Future Engineer” How Do We Measure Commercial Success in Publishing?
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: A New Resource for E-Books in the Public Domain: GITenberg Prototype Officially Launches
 
 
By Gary Price: National Archives Releases Watergate Road Map
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Colin Marshall: The Model Book of Calligraphy (1561–1596): A Stunningly Detailed Illuminated Manuscript Created over Three Decades
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Josh Jones: Watch/Hear Led Zeppelin’s Earliest Performances from 1968-69 & Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Band’s Birth
 

 

 

 
 
 
 
Chuck Wendig Terrible Minds: Here Is How You NaNoWriMo, You Ruinous Monster, You
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Stacy Conradt, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Luiz Romero Quartz Obsession Rotisserie chicken: What goes around comes around
 
 
 
 
By Amada Bungartz: This Black Hawk Pilot Is Now Taking On Corporate America
Why you should care
Because combat skills can be invaluable for a successful career in corporate America.
 
 
By Blaire Briody: A ‘Housing First’ Strategy Could Help Solve Veteran Homelessness
Why you should care
Because when military members return home, they should have an actual place to call home.
 
 
 
 
By Pilar Marrero: LA Times Publishes Completely Different Political Endorsements in English and Spanish
 
 
 
 
By Ken Doctor – Newsonomics: “Digital defeats print” is the headline as Gannett steps away from printed election results
In cities across America, you won’t be able to find even the most cursory election results in your Wednesday morning newspaper next week. Is this speeding up newspapers’ transition to digital — or just burning a bridge they still need to cross?
 
 
 
 
By Scott Myers: Songwriters on Songwriting: Suzanne Vega
 
 
 
 
Steller Watch – November 1st: >38 Sea Lion of the Month
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Talk Of The Town Party 147
 
 
Mint Notion by Eden Ashley: Stop Having Nothing To Wear + Build A Wardrobe You Love
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Affordable Pottery Barn Hacks Perfect For Your Budget You can now have the beauty of Pottery Barn products minus the expense with these projects!
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Whitney Fabre: Instant Pot Thanksgiving Side Dishes
 
 
By Gav110780: Awesome English Breakfast Muffins
 
 
By Penelopy Bulnick: Caramel Apple Frappuccino
 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI October 31, 2018

On This Day

 
 
802 – Empress Irene is deposed and banished to Lesbos. Conspirators place Nikephoros, the minister of finance, on the Byzantine throne.
Irene of Athens (Greek: Εἰρήνη ἡ Ἀθηναία; c. 752 – 9 August 803 AD), also known as Irene Sarantapechaina (Greek: Εἰρήνη Σαρανταπήχαινα), was Byzantine empress consort by marriage to Leo IV from 775 to 780, Byzantine regent during the minority of her son Constantine VI from 780 until 790, and finally ruling Byzantine (Eastern Roman) empress from 797 to 802. She is best known for temporarily ending Iconoclasm.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1711 – Laura Bassi, Italian physician, physicist, and academic (d. 1778)
Laura Maria Caterina Bassi (October 1711 – 20 February 1778) was an Italian physicist and academic. She received a doctoral degree in Philosophy from the University of Bologna in May 1732.[1] She was the first woman to earn a professorship in physics at a university.[2] She is recognized as the first woman in the world to be appointed a university chair in a scientific field of studies. Bassi contributed immensely to the field of science while also helping to spread the study of Newtonian mechanics through Italy.[1]

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FYI

 
 

 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Top Halloween Candy by State, Because Today is Halloween in the United States, What Can a Linguist Learn From a Gravestone? And more ->
 
 
 
 
By Rina Raphael: The LaCroix of cannabis? The marijuana market bets on beverages Cannabis startups envision a not-too-distant future in which consumers seek alternative refreshments during happy hour.
 
 
 
 
By Sean Captain: San Francisco’s billionaires have transformed a local political fight into a battle for tech’s soul A ballot initiative that would tax the city’s biggest companies to fund housing services has become an ethical litmus test for technology leaders.
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Sangeeta Singh-Kurtz, edited by Jessanne Collins, and produced by Luiz Romero – Mysticore: Witchcraft for the age of Instagram
 
 
 
 
CAR HUNTER: TRUTH IS STRANGER THAN FRICTION, OR WHAT WHERE THEY THINKING? WILDEST CUSTOMS FROM MY TRAVELS!
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: The Vision of Skulls—a Little Rowlandson for Halloween
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: 36 Artists Give Advice to Young Creators, Martin Scorsese Creates a List of the 11 Scariest Horror Films, Patti Smith’s Award-Winning Memoir, Just Kids, Now Available in a New Illustrated Edition and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Laura Hazard Owen: New York Times and chill: With a new video series, the paper pushes for binge-watching “We’re a subscription business, so we’ve been looking a lot at binge-watching and creating a body of work that, when people find one, they will spend time with multiple episodes.”
 
 
 
 
Polly Campbell, Cincinnati Enquirer: Turns out there’s a lot to learn about candy corn, and it comes from Cincinnati
 
 
 
 
Envision Kindness
 

 
 
 
 
By Alicia Kelso: Pizza Hut Unveils ‘Mobile Pizza Factory’ As The Food Delivery War Heats Up
 
 
 
 
By Amy Dodson: San Francisco’s Top-Of-The-Market Is A $45M ‘Biophilia’ Private Listing Overlooking The Bay
 
 
 
 
By Anthony DeMarco: A 5,655-Carat Emerald Discovered In Zambia
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! Link Party 111
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI October 30, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1905 – Czar Nicholas II issues the October Manifesto, granting the Russian peoples basic civil liberties and the right to form a duma. (October 17 in the Julian calendar)
The October Manifesto (Russian: Октябрьский манифест, Манифест 17 октября), officially “The Manifesto on the Improvement of the State Order” (Манифест об усовершенствовании государственного порядка), is a document that served as a precursor to the Russian Empire’s first Russian Constitution of 1906, which would be adopted the next year. The Manifesto was issued by Emperor Nicholas II (1868-1918, ruled 1894-1917), under the influence of Sergei Witte (1849-1915), on 30 October [O.S. 17 October] 1905 as a response to the Russian Revolution of 1905. Nicholas strenuously resisted these ideas, but gave in after his first choice to head a military dictatorship,[1] Grand Duke Nicholas, threatened to shoot himself in the head if the Tsar did not accept Witte’s suggestion.[1] Nicholas reluctantly agreed, and issued what became known as the October Manifesto, promising basic civil rights and an elected parliament called the Duma, without whose approval no laws were to be enacted in Russia in the future. According to his memoirs Witte did not force the Tsar to sign the October Manifesto,[2] which was proclaimed in all the churches.[3]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1728 – Mary Hayley, English businesswoman (d. 1808)
Mary Hayley née Wilkes (30 October 1728 – 9 May 1808) was an English businesswoman. She parlayed an inheritance from her first husband into a sizeable estate with her second husband. Upon the latter’s death, she took over the business and successfully operated a shipping firm from 1781 to 1792 before living out her life in Bath.

Hayley was born in 1728 in London to the prosperous distiller Israel Wilkes Jr. and was a sister to the politician John Wilkes. Kind-hearted but opinionated, she lived an unconventional life and was known for her astute observation and discussion, based upon her wide reading. Refusing to bow to custom, she attended trials at the Old Bailey and traveled throughout Britain to satisfy her wide-ranging curiosity. Marrying a widower, Samuel Storke Jr., in 1752, she became a widow within the year with a young step-son. As her husband’s sole heir, she inherited his business and soon after his death married his chief clerk, George Hayley. He turned out to be a shrewd businessman, increasing her inherited wealth tenfold during his lifetime. Their business established extensive trade relationships with the American colonies, supplying the tea which gained infamy in the Boston Tea Party.

After her second husband’s death and the end of the American Revolution, American merchants owed Hayley a large debt and she became one of the few Britons who successfully recouped their losses after the war. In 1784, she purchased a frigate used by both the Continental Navy and British Navy and had it refurbished as a whaling and sealing vessel. She rechristened the frigate the United States and moved to Boston, where she lived for eight years. Unusually for women at the time, she became a benefactor, donating money and goods to charitable endeavours, and ran a whaling business. Her first venture, a voyage to the Falkland Islands, resulted in a shipment of whale oil, which was seized by the British government in 1785. She successfully recouped her losses from the Crown, as it was unable to prove that she owed duty, as British merchants were exempt if one-third of their crew was also British.

In 1786, Hayley married a Scottish merchant in Boston, Patrick Jeffrey. In 1792, she left him and returned to England with the stipulation that he never again appear in her presence. After a brief stay in London, she lived out her days in Bath.

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FYI

 
 


 
 
I could not find this video so am sharing “Desperado.”

 
 
 
 
By Rhett Jones: NASA’s Killer Pumpkin-Carving Skills Are a Cut Above the Rest
 
 
 
 
By Sam Barsanti: Boy Meets World’s Mr. Feeny, 91, successfully defended his home from a burglar
 
 
 
 
By Raphael Orlove: This Rally Video Will Reset Your Idea of What ‘Fast Driving’ Looks Like
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Caselaw Access Project Announces Official Launch, Free Public Access to 6.4M+ State and Federal Court Decisions
 
 
 
 
Helen Regan and Yoko Wakatsuki, CNN: Japan’s Princess Ayako surrenders her royal status as she marries for love
 
 
 
 
By Christine Cube – Blogger Conferences: Top Events to Attend in November
 
 
 
 
By Soo Young Kim: Glam Doll Donuts: making Minneapolis sweeter
 
 
 
 

By Heather Chapman: How farm life motivates four female candidates in Ky.
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Matthew De Silva and Corinne Purtill, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Luiz Romero – Satoshi Nakamoto: Bitcoin’s greatest mystery
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice – The Real Reason Clowns Creep Us Out
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Delusions of ingenuity Hometalker Eureka, IL: Pot Farm! Or….Pot Rack! — Kitchen Storage
My sister came home for a visit last summer. She lives in Alaska where she eats fresh muskox, sunbathes nude, doesn’t wear deodorant, and doesn’t shave.
Perhaps you really are what you eat.
 
 
 
 
By Susan Myers: Creating Faux Stained Glass With Acrylic Paint and Glue!
 
 
 
 
By r570sv: Paper Mache Skull
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Captain Charlotte: Easy Twisted Potatoes


 
 

 
 

FYI October 29, 2018

On This Day

 
 
539 BC – Cyrus the Great (founder of Persian Empire) entered the capital of Babylon and allowed the Jews to return to their land.
Cyrus II of Persia (Old Persian: 𐎤𐎢𐎽𐎢𐏁 Kūruš;[4] New Persian: کوروش Kuruš; Hebrew: כורש‬, Modern: Kōréš, Tiberian: Kōréš; c. 600–530 BC),[5] commonly known as Cyrus the Great [6] and also called Cyrus the Elder by the Greeks, was the founder of the Achaemenid Empire, the first Persian Empire.[7] Under his rule, the empire embraced all the previous civilized states of the ancient Near East,[7] expanded vastly and eventually conquered most of Southwest Asia and much of Central Asia and the Caucasus. From the Mediterranean Sea and Hellespont in the west to the Indus River in the east, Cyrus the Great created the largest empire the world had yet seen.[8] Under his successors, the empire eventually stretched at its maximum extent from parts of the Balkans (Bulgaria-Paeonia and Thrace-Macedonia) and Eastern Europe proper in the west, to the Indus Valley in the east. His regal titles in full were The Great King, King of Persia, King of Anshan, King of Media, King of Babylon, King of Sumer and Akkad, and King of the Four Corners of the World. The Nabonidus Chronicle notes the change in his title from simply “King of Anshan”, a city, to “King of Persia”. Assyriologist François Vallat wrote that “When Astyages marched against Cyrus, Cyrus is called ‘King of Anshan’, but when Cyrus crosses the Tigris on his way to Lydia, he is ‘King of Persia’. The coup therefore took place between these two events.”[9]

The reign of Cyrus the Great lasted c. 30 years. Cyrus built his empire by first conquering the Median Empire, then the Lydian Empire, and eventually the Neo-Babylonian Empire. He led an expedition into Central Asia, which resulted in major campaigns that were described as having brought “into subjection every nation without exception”.[10] Cyrus did not venture into Egypt, and was alleged to have died in battle, fighting the Massagetae along the Syr Darya in December 530 BC.[11][12] He was succeeded by his son, Cambyses II, who managed to conquer Egypt, Nubia, and Cyrenaica during his short rule.

Cyrus the Great respected the customs and religions of the lands he conquered.[13] This became a very successful model for centralized administration and establishing a government working to the advantage and profit of its subjects.[7] In fact, the administration of the empire through satraps and the vital principle of forming a government at Pasargadae were the works of Cyrus.[14] What is sometimes referred to as the Edict of Restoration (actually two edicts) described in the Bible as being made by Cyrus the Great left a lasting legacy on the Jewish religion, where, because of his policies in Babylonia, he is referred to by the Jewish Bible as messiah (lit. “His anointed one”) (Isaiah 45:1),[15] and is the only non-Jewish figure in the Bible to be called so.[16]

Cyrus the Great is also well recognized for his achievements in human rights, politics, and military strategy, as well as his influence on both Eastern and Western civilizations. Having originated from Persis, roughly corresponding to the modern Iranian province of Fars, Cyrus has played a crucial role in defining the national identity of modern Iran.[17][18][19] The Achaemenid influence in the ancient world eventually would extend as far as Athens, where upper-class Athenians adopted aspects of the culture of the ruling class of Achaemenid Persian as their own.[20]

In the 1970s, the last Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi identified his famous proclamation inscribed onto the Cyrus Cylinder as the oldest known declaration of human rights,[21] and the Cylinder has since been popularized as such.[22][23][24] This view has been criticized by some historians[25] as a misunderstanding[26] of the Cylinder’s generic nature as a traditional statement that new monarchs make at the beginning of their reign.[23][24][27]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1808 – Caterina Scarpellini, Italian astronomer and meteorologist (d. 1873)
Caterina Scarpellini (29 October 1808 – 28 November 1873), was an Italian astronomer and meteorologist.

Life
She was born in Foligno on 29 October 1808, Scarpellini moved to Rome at the age of 18. She was an assistant to her uncle, who was the director of the Roman Campidoglio Observatory. She was a corresponding member of the Accademia dei Georgofili in Florence.[1]

She discovered a comet on 1 April 1854 and established a meteorological station in Rome in 1856. In 1872 she was honored by the Italian government for her work; she died 28 November the following year.[2][3][4]

One of the craters of Venus is named after her.[5]
 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

RBG Costume
No other information available.


 
 

Just A Car Guy
Halloween costume win!


 
 
By Andrew Liszewski: Halloween’s Extra Spooky With Michael Jackson’s Thriller Played On Outdated Zombie Technology
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Justin T. Westbrook: People Are Out There Drifting Horses
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
By Adam Clark Estes: DJI Made a New Sort of Super Drone
 
 
 
 
By Frida Garza: Doctor Won’t Face Jail Time For Dyeing Patient’s Vagina Purple as a ‘Joke’
 
 
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: Australian Cops Perform CPR on Drowning Kangaroo
 
 
 
By Rocky Parker: Blog Profiles: Road Trip Blogs
 
 
 
 

By Associated Press: School to remove name from library over eugenics link
 
 
 
 
Ozy.com The Daily Dose October 29, 2018: How Trump’s Straight Talk Is Changing the World, From Renegade General to VP-Elect, He’s Brazil’s Military Champion Hamilton Mourão, vice presidential pick of Brazil’s newly elected far-right president, is an engine for the military’s growing political influence, He Is Racing Against Time to Save the Philippines’ Ancient Script, 5 Flashback How the 2000 Election Helped Create the Voter Purging Issues We Face Today and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Grave in Space No human has ever flown closer to Pluto than Clyde Tombaugh did in 2015, 18 years after his death. That’s fitting, because he was also the first person to lay eyes on it, Columbo in Budapest The American television character is memorialized in the unlikely locale of Budapest. Here’s why. More ->
 
 
 
 
Glacier Hub Roundup: Citizens Tracking Glaciers, Seismic Noise, and Holocene Glaciers and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 

Painted Therapy Hometalker Nashua, NH: DIY Gutter Garden
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 16 Creative Ways To Upcycle Pallets Here’s our summer roundup of projects featuring everyone’s favorite DIY scrap material – wood pallets!
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 19 Fantastic Techniques for Faux Stained Glass Food coloring, glue, and dye, oh my!
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI October 28, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1420 – Beijing is officially designated the capital of the Ming dynasty on the same year that the Forbidden City, the seat of government, is completed.
The Ming dynasty (/mɪŋ/)[3] was the ruling dynasty of China – then known as the Great Ming Empire – for 276 years (1368–1644) following the collapse of the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Ming dynasty was the last imperial dynasty in China ruled by ethnic Han Chinese. Although the primary capital of Beijing fell in 1644 to a rebellion led by Li Zicheng (who established the Shun dynasty, soon replaced by the Manchu-led Qing dynasty), regimes loyal to the Ming throne – collectively called the Southern Ming – survived until 1683.

The Hongwu Emperor (ruled 1368–98) attempted to create a society of self-sufficient rural communities ordered in a rigid, immobile system that would guarantee and support a permanent class of soldiers for his dynasty:[4] the empire’s standing army exceeded one million troops and the navy’s dockyards in Nanjing were the largest in the world.[5] He also took great care breaking the power of the court eunuchs[6] and unrelated magnates, enfeoffing his many sons throughout China and attempting to guide these princes through the Huang-Ming Zuxun, a set of published dynastic instructions. This failed spectacularly when his teenage successor, the Jianwen Emperor, attempted to curtail his uncles’ power, prompting the Jingnan Campaign, an uprising that placed the Prince of Yan upon the throne as the Yongle Emperor in 1402. The Yongle Emperor established Yan as a secondary capital and renamed it Beijing, constructed the Forbidden City, and restored the Grand Canal and the primacy of the imperial examinations in official appointments. He rewarded his eunuch supporters and employed them as a counterweight against the Confucian scholar-bureaucrats. One, Zheng He, led seven enormous voyages of exploration into the Indian Ocean as far as Arabia and the eastern coasts of Africa.

The rise of new emperors and new factions diminished such extravagances; the capture of the Zhengtong Emperor during the 1449 Tumu Crisis ended them completely. The imperial navy was allowed to fall into disrepair while forced labor constructed the Liaodong palisade and connected and fortified the Great Wall of China into its modern form. Wide-ranging censuses of the entire empire were conducted decennially, but the desire to avoid labor and taxes and the difficulty of storing and reviewing the enormous archives at Nanjing hampered accurate figures.[4] Estimates for the late-Ming population vary from 160 to 200 million,[7] but necessary revenues were squeezed out of smaller and smaller numbers of farmers as more disappeared from the official records or “donated” their lands to tax-exempt eunuchs or temples.[4] Haijin laws intended to protect the coasts from “Japanese” pirates instead turned many into smugglers and pirates themselves.

By the 16th century, however, the expansion of European trade – albeit restricted to islands near Guangzhou like Macau – spread the Columbian Exchange of crops, plants, and animals into China, introducing chili peppers to Sichuan cuisine and highly productive corn and potatoes, which diminished famines and spurred population growth. The growth of Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch trade created new demand for Chinese products and produced a massive influx of Japanese and American silver. This abundance of specie remonetized the Ming economy, whose paper money had suffered repeated hyperinflation and was no longer trusted. While traditional Confucians opposed such a prominent role for commerce and the newly rich it created, the heterodoxy introduced by Wang Yangming permitted a more accommodating attitude. Zhang Juzheng’s initially successful reforms proved devastating when a slowdown in agriculture produced by the Little Ice Age joined changes in Japanese and Spanish policy that quickly cut off the supply of silver now necessary for farmers to be able to pay their taxes. Combined with crop failure, floods, and epidemic, the dynasty collapsed before the rebel leader Li Zicheng, who was defeated by the Manchu-led Eight Banner armies who founded the Qing dynasty.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1599 – Marie of the Incarnation, foundress of the Ursuline Monastery in Quebec (d. 1672)
Marie of the Incarnation, O.S.U. (28 October 1599 – 30 April 1672) was an Ursuline nun of the French order. As part of a group of nuns sent to New France to establish the Ursuline Order, Marie was crucial in the spread of Catholicism in New France. Moreover, she has been credited with founding the first girls’ school in the New World. Due to her work, the Catholic Church declared her a saint[1], and the Anglican Church of Canada celebrates her with a feast day.

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FYI

 
 
By Whitney Kimball: Saturday Night Social: Very Good Girl Gets a Pile of Leaves
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: My Dream Vehicle is the George Barris’ 1966 Tradesman Supervan
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Tom McKay: First Private Chinese Attempt to Launch Satellite Into Orbit Suffers Unspecified Failure
 
 
 
 
Shane Parrish (Farnam Street): Hemingway, a Lost Suitcase, and the Recipe for Stupidity
 
 
 
 
David Sherry Creative Caffeine: Live Blogging
 
 
 
 
AP News: Judge chases prisoners, nabs one during attempted escape
 
 
 
 
“3 Steps to Increasing Your Inner Peace” written by Suzanne Zoglio.
When you awaken each morning, practice Morning Intent. Before you get out of bed, take five minutes to formulate your intent for the day. Decide three things:

1. Which personal trait do you want to grow today (patience, humor, compassion, good listening, loyalty, courage)

2. What top three tasks do you intend to accomplish today?

3. Where will you make a difference in someone’s life today?

Just before you go off to sleep each night, practice Evening Acknowledgement. Reflect on three things:

1. What moments in your day were you the person you aspire to be?

2. What did you learn today, perhaps from mistakes?

3. What blessings large and small are you grateful for today?
 
 
 
 
By Kate Morgan: You Can Force Yourself to Fall Out of Love
Lessons from neuroscience about easing the pain of a breakup
“Understanding how we fall in love on a physiological level doesn’t necessarily mean we can control it, but it does mean we may be able to influence it.”
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Off the Grid, Making Cable and Hippo Love
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: The Ghostly Residents of the Famed Literary Hotel Chelsea, Swedish Court orders ISP to block access to The Pirate Bay and other Torrent sites and more-> Copyright Savvy
 
 
 
 
By Morgan Gstalter: Parkland father 3D prints sculpture of son to protest 3D-printed guns
 
 
 
 
Kassandra Lamb: Always Wanted to Write Fiction ~ Here’s Your Chance to Get Started! November is NaNoWriMo ~ National Novel Writing Month
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls Breakfast Links Week of October 22, 2018: Madhouse genetics: what the archives of mental-health asylums reveal about the history of human heredity and the evolution of genetics, Photo sleuths: How an American Civil War soldier’s photograph with distinctive markings reveals the forgotten invaluable work of the Dead Letter Office. More ->
 
 
 
 
Caffeinated Reviewer: Sunday Post #340 Cutest Little Police Officers
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Anne Lamott on Love, Despair, and Our Capacity for Change, An Illustrated Field Guide to the Art, Science, and Joy of Tea and How a Jellyfish and a Sea Slug Illuminate the Mystery of the Self
 
 
 
 

By Scotty Gilbertson: Jetsons Vs. Flintstones: 1984 Chevrolet S-10 Mirage
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By RayP24: Low-Tech Moving Eyes Portrait (Rembrandt)
 
 
 
 
Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: Shooting Stars
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Loving Repurpose Projects Your Family Can Do For Birds Recycle common household items to make something special for your feathered friends!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 31 Space-Saving Storage Ideas That’ll Keep Your Home Organized Don’t be alarmed if your house feels 10x larger and more tidy after these!
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
The Happy Foodie: Low Carb Apple Pie
 
 
 
 
By paperplateandplane: Cockroach Donuts (Boston Cream)
 
 
 
 
By VespressoCooking: Cheesy Leftover Mashed Potato Cups
 
 
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt : Easy Amazing Pumpkin Bread


 
 

 
 

FYI October 27, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1907 – Černová massacre: Fifteen people are killed in the Hungary when a gunman opens fire on a crowd gathered at a church consecration, which leads to protests over the treatment of minorities in Austria-Hungary.
The Černová massacre (or Černová tragedy, Slovak: Černovská tragédia, Hungarian: Csernovai tragédia or Csernova Affair[1]) was a shooting that happened in Csernova, Kingdom of Hungary (today Černová, part of Ružomberok, Slovakia) on 27 October 1907 in which 15 people were killed and many were wounded after gendarmes fired into a crowd of people gathering for the consecration of the local Catholic church. The shootings sparked protests in European and American press and turned world’s attention to the treatment of minorities in the Hungarian part of Austria-Hungary.[citation needed]

Outline of the events
Pretext

On the initiative of Andrej Hlinka, the Slovak parish priest of nearby Ružomberok and a native of Černová, people of Černová decided to raise money for the construction of a new church.[2] The locals raised 80,000 crowns[2] and the collections received minor[3] donations from the Slovak Americans as well. The construction started in April 1907 and by the autumn, the church was ready for consecration.[4]

The locals wanted the church to be consecrated by Hlinka, however, he was at the time suspended by bishop Sándor Párvy and sentenced to two years of imprisonment due to his pro-Slovak agitation during the election campaign of 1906 and the subsequent conviction of incitement.[5] The people of Černová thus demanded the consecration to be postponed until Hlinka would be able to perform the ceremony. The bishopric denied their request and two Magyar speaking priests[3] were appointed in his stead. First Canon Anton Kurimsky and after his refusal, Dean Martin Pazurik of Likavka.

The shooting

The ceremony was to take place on 27 October 1907. The official procession arrived at the village accompanied by a squad of 15 gendarmes. It was protested against by the locals, who attempted to block its way to the church to prevent Pazurik from consecrating. The demonstration was peaceful in nature [6] [7] although some accounts report stone-throwing at a member of the gendarme escort.[2] In panic[8] the gendarme leader sergeant Ján Ladiczky,[8] an ethnic Slovak,[9] ordered his squad to open fire into the crowd without prior warning[2] killing 15 of the protesting villagers, seriously wounding 12 and lightly injuring 40.[10][3][11]

According to historian Roman Holec, the majority of the members of the Hungarian[12] gendarmes involved in the shooting were of Slovak origin.[8]

Consequences
Many attempted to capitalize politically on the events, Czech and Slovak nationalists in general, and Hlinka in particular. On the one hand, Hlinka’s appeal against his 1906 verdict was rejected, thus, on 30 November 1907 Hlinka started to serve his jail term in the Csillagbörtön (Star Prison), Szeged. On the other hand, Hlinka appealed with success his suspension to the Holy See, so it was cancelled on 8 April 1909. When Hlinka left the prison, Bishop Párvy appointed him again to his Ružomberok parish, and Hlinka consecrated the church in Černová with Párvy’s consent.

The tragedy sparked protests in the European and US press and it turned the world’s attention to the attitude to the minorities in Hungary. Important protesting European personalities included the Norwegian Nobel Prize holder Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, the Oxford historian Robert William Seton-Watson, and the speaker of the Austrian parliament[citation needed].

Today’s Slovak politicians — especially the members of the Slovak National Party — even though all perpetrators were Slovaks, interpret the event as “Hungarian gendarmes shooting at innocent Slovaks” (during the legal actions after the massacre, some gendarmes refused to testify as witnesses, because the victims were their relatives)[citation needed]. With many of their claims regarding the events, the Slovak National Party continues to perpetuate a “false myth of Černová”.[13] Some Slovak sources claim that the gendarmes were ethnic Hungarian.[14] even though there was a very small number of ethnic Hungarians in the region where the gendarmes were recruited. According to Slovak historian Roman Holec, professor at Comenius University in Bratislava, the majority of the gendarmes were Slovaks from Liptó county. (According to the official 1910 census, over 90% of the population were ethnic Slovaks in that county.) They were nevertheless honored for the deed, because they were in the service of Hungarian state. Both the rioters and the gendarmes can be held responsible for the massacre. The rioters were violent from lack of fear of getting shot (i.e. that the sergeant would refrain from giving an order of fire or use blanks). The gendarmes were shooting in all directions instead of aiming for feet or into the air (most victims died due to their head and chest injuries).[8]
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1939 – Suzy Covey, American scholar and academic (d. 2007)
Suzy Covey (Shaw) was a comics scholar. Born October 27, 1939, she died on October 17, 2007 after retiring in 2006 from the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries as a university librarian emerita.[2] Her comics scholarship examined intersections of comics, technology, and sound, including Internet studies and studies of the Comic Book Markup Language (a specialized XML for encoding the images, text, and sound effects depicted in comics). In honor of her work with its comic collections, the Smathers Libraries renamed them the Suzy Covey Comic Book Collection in Special Collections in 2007.[3]

Suzy Covey’s comic studies scholarship was enhanced by her work with computers during the early days of the Internet and her scholarship on music, which followed her undergraduate music studies and her own work as a musician, where she played as a band member on the “Bruce Springstone: Live at Bedrock” parody record, released in 1982. The A-side features “Bedrock Rap/Meet the Flintstones,” (3:01) a parody of Springsteen singing the Flintstones theme; the B-side is a Springsteenesque arrangement of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” (2:41) which is included on the CD collection Baseball’s Greatest Hits. The record sold 35,000 copies and received airplay on rock and college radio. Her musical experience and expertise, along with her technical skills led Suzy Covey to use early bulletin board systems (BBS) and Internet discussion forums to discuss music, comics, and technology. Her role in these discussions and in early Internet studies helped to support and focus her comics research. She studied at Florida State University.

Presentations and Publications
Presentation (listed as Suzy Shaw Covey) “Soldier to Cartoon: Springsteen as Depicted in Comics,” Glory days, a Bruce Springsteen symposium sponsored by Penn State University, Sept. 10, 2005, Long Branch, N.J. (Available from MSU’s Comics Collection and Listed in MSU’s Comics Bibliography.) Conference web page.
2006 Comic Art Conference, “A. Why is Jack Smilin’? Data Mining XML-coded Comic Strips OR B. Heroes and Villains: The Golden Era of Comic Strip Advertising”
Presenter University of Florida Comics Conference 2004: Simultaneity and Sequentiality, Beyond the Balloon: Sound Effects and Background Text in Lynn Johnston’s For Better or For Worse, By Suzanne J. Covey
Article in ImageTexT
“The Internet as an Entertainment System,” Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science, October/November 1994, p. 9-11.
The Administration of Library Owned Computer Files, Association for Research Libraries, 1989 (OMS SPEC Kit and Flyer, #159).
“A Model MRDF Management Facility,” co-author: Covey, III, William C.; Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science, 1989, p. 53-58.
“CAI in Libraries: Using Microcomputers to Train Staff,” Computers in Libraries, vol. 9, no. 12, December 1989, p. 27-33.
“Using CAI to Train Library Staff on Microcomputers,” Library Software Review, January/February 1998, p. 23.
How to Search OCLC [computer-assisted-instruction program in IBM PC BASIC], co-author: McIntyre, Terrence D. Bethea, Sally Brook; University of Florida, 1984, 1985.
COMCAT at UF: Final Report, University of Florida Libraries, 1976.
Presentation “University of Florida Home Page and Academic Home Pages,” Data Day Symposium, University of Florida, March 1995, Gainesville, Florida.
Presentation “The Library/Librarian’s Role in Campus-Wide Information Systems and Networks,” Panelist (with S. Trickey, J. Corey, D. Canelas and D. Beaubien), UFLA, November 1993, Gainesville, Florida.
“A Modern MRDF Management Facility,” Presenter, contributed paper, ASIS National Conference, October 1989, Washington D.C..
Presentation “VACUUM: Lotus 1-2-3 Templates for Student Time Cards and Payroll,” RTSD Technical Services Administrators of Medium-Sized Libraries Discussion Group, ALA Annual Conference, June 1987, San Francisco, California.
Presentation “Using Microcomputers to Train Library Staff,” SCIL Conference and Exhibition, March 1987, Washington DC.
Presentation “Microcomputers as Training Aids in Technical Services,” RTSD Technical Services Administrators of Medium-Sized Libraries Discussion Group, ALA Midwinter meeting, January 1985, Washington DC.

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

By Elizabeth Werth: A Countdown of My Favorite Horror Movie Cars of All Time
 
 
By Katie Rife: Beyond “Monster Mash”: 60 minutes of killer tunes for your graveyard smash
 
 
 
 
By Whitney Kimball: Tekashi 6ix9ine Declared a Free Man; Shooting Ensues Outside His Celebration Dinner
 
 
By Rich Juzwiak: Inside 6ix9ine’s Outrageous Sentencing Hearing
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Mid-1950s San Francisco Rush Hour Traffic, Full View Plexiglass Bubble-Top Introduced in Los Angeles and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Citizen, from Radiotopia: New show releases, many upcoming events featuring your favorite Radiotopians, plus some new seasons right around the corner. Get a peek into what we’ve been up to so far this fall.
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Roper Center to Create World’s Most Comprehensive Health Opinion Database
 
 
 
 
By L. A. Kelley: You Don’t Know Jack (About Jack O’Lanterns, Stingy Jack, and Spring-heeled Jack)
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Gibney: How to build a Moon base Researchers are ramping up plans for living on the Moon.
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: Frankenstein and the Critics
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: Dressing the Women’s Land Army During World War II
 
 

 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: 10 Learnings from 10 Years of Brain Pickings
And as I round the decade:

Don’t just resist cynicism — fight it actively. Fight it in yourself, for this ungainly beast lays dormant in each of us, and counter it in those you love and engage with, by modeling its opposite. Cynicism often masquerades as nobler faculties and dispositions, but is categorically inferior. Unlike that great Rilkean life-expanding doubt, it is a contracting force. Unlike critical thinking, that pillar of reason and necessary counterpart to hope, it is inherently uncreative, unconstructive, and spiritually corrosive. Life, like the universe itself, tolerates no stasis — in the absence of growth, decay usurps the order. Like all forms of destruction, cynicism is infinitely easier and lazier than construction. There is nothing more difficult yet more gratifying in our society than living with sincerity and acting from a place of largehearted, constructive, rational faith in the human spirit, continually bending toward growth and betterment. This remains the most potent antidote to cynicism. Today, especially, it is an act of courage and resistance.
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: My Famous Hot Apple Cider Recipe!


 
 

 
 

FYI October 26, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1689 – General Piccolomini of Austria burns down Skopje to prevent the spread of cholera. He died of cholera himself soon after.
The fire of Skopje started on 26 October 1689 and lasted for two days, burning much of the city; only some stone-built structures, such as the fortress and some churches and mosques, were relatively undamaged. The fire had a disastrous effect on the city: its population declined from around 60,000 to around 10,000, and it lost its regional importance as a trading centre.

In 1689 the Austrian General Enea Silvio Piccolomini led an army to capture Kosovo, Bosnia and Macedonia from the Ottoman Empire.

In the same time, successful development of Skopje was suddenly interrupted in 1689 by the entry of the Austrian army into Macedonia. During the Austrian-Turkish war (1683-1699), Austrian troops under the command of General Piccolomini penetrated in an unstoppable advance far into the interior of European Turkey and, after taking the fortress of Kačanik, descended into the Skopje plain. On October 25, 1689, they took Skopje without much struggle, for the Turkish army and the inhabitants had left the town. By order of General Piccolomini, Skopje was set on fire[1], and the conflagration lasted two days (Oct. 26 and 27); great many houses and shops were destroyed, but the worst damage was in the Jewish quarter of the town, where almost all the dwelling-houses, two synagogues and the Jewish school were destroyed.[2]

During the offensive, the city of Skopje, present-day capital of the Republic of Macedonia, General Piccolomini contracted cholera , after which he died from it.

Some accounts of these events state that Piccolomini razed Skopje due to an inability of his forces to occupy and govern a city so far from his headquarters.[3]
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1899 – Judy Johnson, American baseball player and coach (d. 1989)
William Julius “Judy” Johnson (October 26, 1899 – June 15, 1989) was an American professional third baseman and manager whose career in Negro league baseball spanned 17 seasons, from 1921 to 1937. Slight of build, Johnson never developed as a power threat but achieved his greatest success as a contact hitter and an intuitive defenseman. Johnson is regarded as one of the greatest third basemen of the Negro leagues. In 1975, he was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame after being nominated by the Negro Leagues Committee.

From 1921 to 1929, Johnson was a member of the Hilldale Daisies ball club and became an on-the-field leader respected for his professional disposition. His consistent swing and fielding prowess helped the Daisies win three straight pennants in the Eastern Colored League and the 1925 Colored World Series. After serving as a player manager for the Homestead Grays followed by the Daisies in the early 1930s, Johnson signed with the Pittsburgh Crawfords; as a part of the vaunted Crawford line-up of 1935, Johnson contributed to a team widely considered the greatest in Negro league history. He retired in 1937 after a short second stint with the Grays.

Following his retirement from baseball as a player, Johnson became a scout for Major League Baseball teams. He was hired as an assistant coach by the Philadelphia Athletics in 1954, becoming one of the first African Americans signed to a coaching position on a major league ball club. In his later years, Johnson served on the Negro Leagues Committee and stepped down in 1975 to accept his hall of fame nomination. He suffered a stroke in 1988 and died a year later.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Yessenia Funes: Internet-Famous Gay Penguin Couple Welcomes New Chick Into the World
 
 
 
 
By Catie Keck: That Adorable Baby Octopus Is Actually a Pea-Sized Killer
 
 
 
 
By Yessenia Funes: Alaska Natives Call on Banks to Protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge From Drilling
 
 
 
 
By Isabelle Taft: When Cold War-Era Vietnam Felt the Beat of the ABBA Tambourine
 
 
 
 
By Inside Edition: Texas Grandmother Sonia Johnson Livestreams Breast Cancer Surgery on Facebook
 
 
 
 
By Jeffrey Mervis, Jia You, Nirja Desai: The ‘political’ scientists Dozens of scientists ran for U.S. Congress. On the eve of the general election, 18 are still standing
 
 
 
 
Adam Berson Program Manager, Google.org Crisis Connectivity: How do you thank someone for saving your life?
 
 
A passion for roasting coffee enables a firefighter to help fellow first responders Luke Schneider Paramedic and Founder, Fire Dept. Coffee: A passion for roasting coffee enables a firefighter to help fellow first responders
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: The Digital Library Federation’s Technologies of Surveillance Group Releases “Ethics in Research Use of Library Patron Data”
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Steven Melendez: Suspicious packages spotlight vast postal surveillance system
 
 
By Michael Grothaus: What happened when I tried the U.S. Army’s tactic to fall asleep in two minutes
 
 
 
 
They came in the night – the all-female bomber regiment of the Soviet Air Force
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Imprint consolidation at big houses is a sign of changed times, Just how helpful is reading for depression? This is why Amazon’s revenue decline may actually be a good thing. More ->
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI October 25, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1828 – St Katharine Docks open in London.
St Katharine Docks is a mixed-use development in London, England. It is within Central London and located in the East End and part of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It was one of the commercial docks serving London on the north side of the River Thames and is close to the Tower of London and Tower Bridge. St Katharine was part of the Port of London, in the redevelopment zone now known as the Docklands, and is now a popular housing and leisure complex.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1875 – Carolyn Sherwin Bailey, American author and educator (d. 1961)
Carolyn Sherwin Bailey (October 25, 1875 – December 23, 1961) was an American children’s author. She was born in Hoosick Falls, New York and attended Teachers College, Columbia University, from which she graduated in 1896.[1] She contributed to the Ladies’ Home Journal and other magazines. She published volumes of stories for children like methods of story telling, teaching children and other related subjects, which include Boys and Girls of Colonial Days (1917); Broad Stripes and Bright Stars (1919); Hero Stories (1919); and The Little Rabbit Who Wanted Red Wings (1945). She wrote For the Children’s Hour (1906) in collaboration with Clara M. Lewis.[2] In 1947, her book Miss Hickory won the Newbery Medal.[3]

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
RIP
Tony Joe White (July 23, 1943 – October 24, 2018) was an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, best known for his 1969 hit “Polk Salad Annie” and for “Rainy Night in Georgia”, which he wrote but was first made popular by Brook Benton in 1970. He also wrote “Steamy Windows” and “Undercover Agent for the Blues”, both hits for Tina Turner in 1989; those two songs came by way of Turner’s producer at the time, Mark Knopfler, who was a friend of White. “Polk Salad Annie” was also recorded by Elvis Presley and Tom Jones.

Read more ->

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Emily Long: How to Stream Free Movies From The Library of Congress
 
 
 
 
By Ishaan Jhaveri: How a 19th-Century Teenager Sparked a Battle Over Who Owns Our Faces
 
 
 
 

By Kisha James: No, Elizabeth Warren is not Native American
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Ohio news outlet brings attention to high infant mortality rate by throwing a community-wide baby shower
The event did more than raise awareness: as solutions journalism seeks to do, it brought some promising results. “A local pediatrician said they received 99 new referrals in one day from the event. A local organization of community health workers contacted multiple new clients,” Simpson reports. The shower’s success and the Richland Source’s reputation for organizing it helped them raise $70,000 in donations from local businesses and organizations for other solutions journalism and community events.
 
 
 
 
By Nick Fouriezos: White American Women Stick to Their Guns
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Josh Jones: The Art Institute of Chicago Puts 44,000+ Works of Art Online: View Them in High Resolution
A personal visit to the Art Institute is an awe-inspiring, and somewhat overwhelming experience, if you can get the day to go. You can visit the website, with full unrestricted access, and gather information, study, marvel, and casually browse, at any time of day—every day if you like. No, it’s not the same, but as a learning experience, in some ways, it’s even better. And if, by some awful chance, anything should happen to this art, we won’t have to rely on user-submitted photos to reconstruct the cultural memory.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By ModMischief: Mini Halloween Piñatas
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By PieBaby89: Savory Lavender Honey Biscuits
 
 
 
 
ModernFarmhouseKitchen: Cinnamon Rolls: No Knead, No Machine


 
 

 
 

FYI October 24, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1260 – Chartres Cathedral is dedicated in the presence of King Louis IX of France; the cathedral is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Chartres Cathedral, also known as the Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres), is a Roman Catholic church in Chartres, France, about 80 km (50 miles) southwest of Paris. Mostly constructed between 1194 and 1220, it stands at the site of at least five cathedrals that have occupied the site since Chartres became a bishopric in the 4th century. It is in the Gothic and Romanesque styles.

It is designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, which calls it “the high point of French Gothic art” and a “masterpiece”.[2]

The cathedral has been well preserved. The majority of the original stained glass windows survive intact, while the architecture has seen only minor changes since the early 13th century. The building’s exterior is dominated by heavy flying buttresses which allowed the architects to increase the window size significantly, while the west end is dominated by two contrasting spires – a 105-metre (349 ft) plain pyramid completed around 1160 and a 113-metre (377 ft) early 16th-century Flamboyant spire on top of an older tower. Equally notable are the three great façades, each adorned with hundreds of sculpted figures illustrating key theological themes and narratives.

Since at least the 12th century the cathedral has been an important destination for travelers. It remains so to the present, attracting large numbers of Christian pilgrims, many of whom come to venerate its famous relic, the Sancta Camisa, said to be the tunic worn by the Virgin Mary at Christ’s birth, as well as large numbers of secular tourists who come to admire the cathedral’s architecture and historical merit.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1885 – Alice Perry, Irish engineer and poet (d. 1969)
Alice Jacqueline Perry (24 October 1885 – 21 April 1969) was the first woman in Ireland to graduate with a degree in engineering.[1]

Early life and education
Born in Wellpark, Galway in 1885, Alice was one of five daughters of James and Martha Perry (née Park).[2] Her father was the County Surveyor in Galway West and co-founded the Galway Electric Light Company.[3] Her uncle, John Perry, was a Fellow of the Royal Society and invented the navigational gyroscope.[4]

After graduating from the High School in Galway, she won a scholarship to study in Royal University, Galway in 1902. Having excelled in mathematics, she changed from studying for a degree in arts to an engineering degree. She graduated with first class honours in 1906.[1][5] The family appear to have been academically gifted. Her sisters Molly and Nettie also went on to third level education; a third sister Agnes earned BA (1903) and MA (1905) in mathematics from Queen’s College Galway (later UCG then NUIG), taught there in 1903–1904, was a Royal University of Ireland examiner in mathematics in 1906, and later became assistant headmistress at a secondary school in London.[6]

Career
Following her graduation she was offered a senior postgraduate scholarship but owing to her father’s death the following month, she did not take up this position.[2] In December 1906 she succeeded her father temporarily as county surveyor for Galway County Council.[2] She remained in this position for five[2] or six[1] months until a permanent appointment was made. She was an unsuccessful candidate for the permanent position and for a similar opportunity to be a surveyor in Galway East.[2] She remains the only woman to have been a County Surveyor (County Engineer) in Ireland.[1]

In 1908 she moved to London with her sisters, where she worked as a Lady Factory Inspector for the Home Office.[1] From there she moved to Glasgow, at which point she converted from Presbyterianism to Christian Science in 1915.[4] She met and married John (Bob) Shaw on 30 September 1916.[2] Shaw was a soldier who died in 1917 on the Western Front.[1][2]

Later life and death
Perry retired from her inspector’s position in 1921[4] and became interested in poetry, first publishing in 1922.[1] In 1923 she moved to Boston, the headquarters of Christian Science.[4] Until her death in 1969, Perry worked within the Christian Science movement as a poetry editor and practitioner,[2] publishing seven books of poetry.[1]

Legacy
An All-Ireland medal has been named in her honour, The Alice Perry Medal, with the first prizes awarded in 2014.[7]

On Monday 6 March 2017, NUI Galway held an official ceremony to mark the naming of the Alice Perry Engineering Building.[8][9]

Publications

The children of Nazareth : and other poems (c1930)
The morning meal and other poems (1939)
Mary in the garden and other poems (1944)
One thing I know and other poems (c1953)
Women of Canaan and other poems (1961)
 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Kelly Faircloth: The Inventor of Famous Green Bean Casserole Has Died
 
 
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: These Crows Are More Clever Than Non-Human Apes When It Comes to Building Compound Tools
 
 
 
 
By Erik Shilling: Ice-T was Arrested for Blowing Through a Toll Booth in a McLaren 720S
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Oct. 29 webinar to discuss Adverse Childhood Events in rural America
 
 
By Heather Chapman: How one Washington town battles rural ‘brain drain’
 
 
 
 
Morgan Weisman Google for Education: Tools that aim to reach all types of learners, wherever they are
Editor’s note: Before joining Google’s Education team, Morgan Weisman was a kindergarten teacher. Today she is sharing how one of her students inspired her to help build products that aim to meet the needs of all types of learners.
 
 
 
 
Forbes Daily Dozen: George Soros made his fortune as one of the world’s greatest investors. He’s since become one of its finest philanthropists—and the bogeyman of the right, Why is Wal-Mart investing in a startup run by former Israeli spies? More ->
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Segran: The Warby Parker of strollers is here
 
 
 
 
The Public Domain Review Vol.8 #18: Mother Shipton the witch of York; Early experiments with X-Rays; and lots of Halloween treats…
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Gwynn Guilford, edited by Jessanne Collins, and produced by Luiz Romero. Spooky music: Forbidden chord + apocalyptic ditty
 
 
 
 

Open Culture Josh Jones: Laurie Anderson’s Virtual Reality Installation Takes Viewers on an Unconventional Tour of the Moon
 

 
 
 
 
By Joshua Benton: WikiTribune is handing the keys more completely to its users (after laying off its journalists)
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: The best of both worlds , Duck walk and more ->

 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice – Dreams, Why Translation Deserves Scrutiny, Does YouTube Underpay Artists 13 Billion a Year? Understanding YouTube’s Article 13 Freakout and How Instagram Saved Poetry
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #110)
 
 
 
 
My Sweet Cottage Hometalker Seattle, WA: An Ugly Shelving Unit Becomes Cute Mudroom Shoe Storage
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes