Tag: FYI

FYI June 25, 2020

On This Day

1678 – Venetian Elena Cornaro Piscopia is the first woman awarded a doctorate of philosophy when she graduates from the University of Padua.
Elena Lucrezia Cornaro Piscopia (US: /kɔːrˌnɑːroʊ pɪˈskoʊpiə/,[4] Italian: [ˈɛːlena luˈkrɛttsja korˈnaːro piˈskɔːpja]) or Elena Lucrezia Corner (Italian: [korˈnɛr]; 5 June 1646 – 26 July 1684), also known in English as Helen Cornaro, was a Venetian philosopher of noble descent who in 1678 became one of the first women to receive an academic degree from a university, and the first to receive a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Read more->

 
 

Born On This Day

1866 – Eloísa Díaz, Chilean doctor and Chile’s first female physician (d. 1950)[4]
Eloísa Díaz Inzunza (Spanish pronunciation: [elo.ˈisa ˈði.aθ]; June 25, 1866 – November 1, 1950), was the first female medical student to attend the University of Chile, and the first woman to become a doctor of medicine in Chile as well as the entire region of South America.[1][2]

Early life and education
Eloísa Díaz Insunza was born in Santiago, Chile. Her parents were Eulogio Díaz Varas and Carmela Insunza.[3] She completed her requisite studies at Dolores Cabrera Martínez’s school, Isabel Le Brun de Pinochet’s school and at Instituto Nacional.[2]

Díaz enrolled in 1880 in Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad de Chile (English: University of Chile, School of Medicine) shortly after a law was enacted which allowed women to study at the university.[1][2] Díaz became the first woman in South America to graduate and earn her medical license[1][2][3] She graduated on December 27, 1886, and obtained her degree on January 3, 1887.[2] Her thesis was named Breves observaciones sobre la aparición de la pubertad en la mujer chilena y las predisposiciones patológicas del sexo (English: Brief observations on the apparition of puberty in Chilean women and their pathological predispositions about sex).[1]

Career

Díaz began working at San Borja Hospital in January 1891. She worked as a teacher and physician in Escuela Normal from 1889 until 1897. Díaz became the School Medic Supervisor of Santiago in 1898, and was promoted to School Medic Supervisor of Chile. Díaz held this position for more than 30 years.[2] As a philanthropist, Díaz founded several kindergartens, polyclinics for the poor, and school camps.

In 1910, Díaz participated in the Hygiene and Medicine International Scientific Congress in Buenos Aires, where she was named “Illustrious Woman of America”.[2] Díaz was named Director of the School Medical Service of Chile in 1911, where she implemented school breakfasts and mass vaccination of students, as well as campaigns to combat alcoholism, rickets and tuberculosis.

Díaz retired in 1925. In 1950, she was taken ill and admitted to the San Vicente de Paúl Hospital, where she died at the age of 84.[2]

Tribute
La Florida “Dra. Eloísa Díaz Insunza” Hospital is inaugurated in November 2013.[4]

On June 25, 2018 Google celebrated her 152nd birthday with a doodle.[5]
 
 

1874 – Rose O’Neill, American cartoonist, illustrator, artist, and writer (d. 1944)
Rose Cecil O’Neill (June 25, 1874 – April 6, 1944) was an American cartoonist, illustrator, artist, and writer. She built a successful career as a magazine and book illustrator and, at a young age, became the best-known and highest- paid female commercial illustrator in the United States. O’ Neill earned a fortune and international fame by creating the Kewpie, the most widely known cartoon character until Mickey Mouse.[1]

The daughter of a book salesman and a homemaker, O’Neill was raised in rural Nebraska. She exhibited interest in the arts at an early age, and sought a career as an illustrator in New York City at age fifteen. Her Kewpie cartoons, which made their debut in a 1909 issue of Ladies’ Home Journal, were later manufactured as bisque dolls in 1912 by J. D. Kestner, a German toy company, followed by composition material and celluloid versions. The dolls were wildly popular in the early twentieth century, and are considered to be one of the first mass-marketed toys in the United States.

O’Neill also wrote several novels and books of poetry, and was active in the women’s suffrage movement. She was for a time the highest-paid female illustrator in the world upon the success of the Kewpie dolls.[2] O’Neill has been inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.[3]

Read more->

 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 

Author Craig N. Hooper:

1. The latest Garrison Chase thriller, All the Good Men, is now available on Amazon. You can get it here:

In the United States: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08BCTLXQ6

In Canada: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B08BCTLXQ6

2. To support the launch of my new book, I’m giving away the first book in the series, The Greatest Good. Get your FREE copy by June 28th at the latest. It’s back to regular price on the 29th. Get it here:

In the U.S.: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07VYP77N3

In Canada: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07VYP77N3
 
 
 
 

Great upcoming books from Fireside Books. Order now! Raven’s Witness: The Alaska Life of Richard K. Nelson By Hank Lentfer and more ->
 
 
 
 
James Clear, 3 ideas, 2 quotes, 1 question (June 25, 2020)

“Working to deliver the most wisdom per word of any newsletter on the web.”

Read this on JamesClear.com

Happy 3-2-1 Thursday,

Allow me to share three short ideas, two quotes from others, and one question to ponder this week.
3 IDEAS FROM ME

I.
“Where you spend your attention is where you spend your life.”

II.

“You always hold the rights to your effort, but never to your results.

Results are entitled to no one. At best, they are on loan and must be renewed each day.

All you own is the right to try.”

III.
“Some of the major drivers of human behavior…

Safety: Does it provide peace of mind or reduce risk?
Sex: Does it help them find love or make love?
Convenience: Does it save time or energy?
Social norms: Does it help them get along with others?
Status: Does it improve their standing or help them gain approval?

…which all fit into the larger category of self-interest: How does it serve the person?”
2 QUOTES FROM OTHERS

I.

Novelist Jennifer Egan on reading as fuel:

“Reading is the nourishment that lets you do interesting work.”

Source: Life Advice from Jennifer Egan

II.

Inventor and businessman Thomas Edison on focus:

“You do something all day long, don’t you? Every one does. If you get up at seven o’clock and go to bed at eleven, you have put in sixteen good hours, and it is certain with most people, that they have been doing something all the time. They have been either walking, or reading, or writing, or thinking. The only trouble is that they do it about a great many things and I do it about one. If they took the time in question and applied it in one direction, to one object, they would succeed. Success is sure to follow such application. The trouble lies in the fact that people do not have an object, one thing, to which they stick, letting all else go. Success is the product of the severest kind of mental and physical application.”

Source: How They Succeeded
1 QUESTION FOR YOU

What can you work on today that will continue working for you years from now?

Until next week,

James Clear
Author of the million-copy bestseller, Atomic Habits
Creator of the Habit Journal

 
 
 
 
Excellent advice!
The Passive Voice: Don’t Do Business with Crazy People
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Gert Rosenau, Taste of Home: Taco Pasta Salad


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 24, 2020

On This Day

109 – Roman emperor Trajan inaugurates the Aqua Traiana, an aqueduct that channels water from Lake Bracciano, 40 kilometres (25 miles) northwest of Rome.
The Aqua Traiana (later rebuilt and named the Acqua Paola) was a 1st-century Roman aqueduct built by Emperor Trajan and inaugurated on 24 June 109 AD.[1] It channelled water from sources around Lake Bracciano, 40 kilometers (25 mi) north-west of Rome, to Rome in ancient Roman times but had fallen into disuse by the 17th century. It fed a number of water mills on the Janiculum, including a sophisticated mill complex revealed by excavations in the 1990s under the present American Academy in Rome. Some of the Janiculum mills were famously put out of action by the Ostrogoths when they cut the aqueduct in 537 during the first siege of Rome. Belisarius restored the supply of grain by using mills floating in the Tiber. The complex of mills bears parallels with a similar complex at Barbegal in southern Gaul.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1909 – Betty Cavanna, American author (d. 2001)[14]
Betty Cavanna (June 24, 1909 – August 13, 2001) was the author of popular teen romance novels, mysteries, and children’s books for 45 years.[2] She also wrote under the names Elizabeth Headley[3] and Betsy Allen.[4] She was nominated for the Edgar Award for Best Juvenile in 1970 and 1972.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Vector’s World: Mr. Toe
 
 
 
 
Paranormal Romantics: 5 Writing Pep Talks
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Herbicide dicamba is blamed for millions of tree deaths
 
 
 
 
The Hustle: Wanna challenge a parking ticket or get help on bills? This robo-lawyer can help DoNotPay is the hidden hero of the pandemic.
 
 
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Sitka Nature Show #213 – Joseph Cook (encore)
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Eleanor Cummins, produced by Liz Webber, and edited by Susan Howson. Quartz Daily Obsession: Phenology: Stop and note the roses
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Midweek pick-me-up: Pride Month with the greatest LGBT love letters of all time—Virginia Woolf, Oscar Wilde, Eleanor Roosevelt, Margaret Mead and more
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: How Georgia O’Keeffe Became Georgia O’Keeffe: An Animated Video Tells the Story
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Martin Amis Explains His Method for Writing Great Sentences
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Pete Scherer, The Spruce Eats: Grilled Cheese With Mayo


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 23, 2020

On This Day

1305 – A peace treaty between the Flemish and the French is signed at Athis-sur-Orge.
The Treaty of Athis-sur-Orge was a peace treaty signed on 23 June 1305 between King Philip IV of France and Robert III of Flanders. The treaty was signed at Athis-sur-Orge after the Battle of Mons-en-Pévèle and concluded the Franco-Flemish War (1297-1305).

Based on the terms of the treaty, Walloon Flanders, being the cities of Lille, Douai, and Orchies, were allocated to the French crown. In return, Flanders was allowed to preserve its independence as a fief of the kingdom.

 
 

Born On This Day

1889 – Verena Holmes, English engineer (d. 1964)
Verena Winifred Holmes (23 June 1889 – 20 February 1964)[2] was an English mechanical engineer and multi-field inventor, the first woman member elected to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (1924), and a strong supporter of women in engineering. She was one of the early members of the Women’s Engineering Society, and its president in 1931.[3][4] She was the first practising engineer to serve as president of the society.[5]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Joel T. Schumacher (/ˈʃuːmɑːkər/; August 29, 1939 – June 22, 2020) was an American filmmaker. Schumacher rose to fame after directing three hit films: St. Elmo’s Fire (1985), The Lost Boys (1987), and Flatliners (1990). He later went on to direct the John Grisham adaptations The Client (1994) and A Time to Kill (1996). His films Falling Down (1993) and 8mm (1999) competed for the Palme d’Or and Golden Bear, respectively.

In 1993, he signed on to direct the next installments of the Batman film series, Batman Forever (1995) and Batman & Robin (1997).[1] After the Batman films, Schumacher pulled back from blockbusters and returned to making minimalist films such as Tigerland (2000) and Phone Booth (2002), both earning positive reviews.[2][3] He also directed The Phantom of the Opera (2004), The Number 23 (2007), and two episodes of House of Cards.

Known for casting young perfomers, Schumacher helped several actors including Colin Farrell,[4] Kiefer Sutherland,[5] and Matthew McConaughey[6] advance their careers.

Read more ->

 
 
By Dirk Libbey, CinemaBlend: Jim Carrey, Matthew McConaughey And More Pay Tribute To Batman Director Joel Schumacher
 
 
 
 
By Andrew J. Hawkins, The Verge: Segway’s iconic (and oft-ridiculed) self-balancing scooter is ending production
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Weekly’s subscription appeal says it swims against trends that are killing newspapers, some self-infliicted, and gets support with investigative journalism and profiles of success and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Spike Lee Debuts the Short Film “3 Brothers”: A Remake of Do the Right Thing for Our Dark Times
 
 
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: Watch Hundreds of Free Films from Around the World: Explore Film Archives from Japan, France, and the U.S.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: How one agoraphobic traveler wanders the Earth; The Man on the Moon and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The Cherokee chefs bringing back North America’s lost cuisine and more ->
 
 
 
 
NSFW

Recipes

Taste of Home: Cookie Butter Pie
 
 
By Elizabethinmn: One Pan Creamy Spinach and Artichoke Salmon


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 22, 2020

On This Day

1813 – War of 1812: After learning of American plans for a surprise attack on Beaver Dams in Ontario, Laura Secord sets out on a 30 kilometer journey on foot to warn Lieutenant James FitzGibbon.

Laura Secord (née Ingersoll; 13 September 1775 – 17 October 1868) was a Canadian heroine of the War of 1812. She is known for having walked 20 miles (32 km) out of American-occupied territory in 1813 to warn British forces of an impending American attack. Her contribution to the war was little known during her lifetime, but since her death she has been frequently honoured in Canada. Though Laura Secord had no relation to it, most Canadians associate her with the Laura Secord Chocolates company, named after her on the centennial of her walk.

Laura Secord’s father, Thomas Ingersoll, lived in Massachusetts and fought on the side of the Patriots during the Revolutionary War (1775–1783). In 1795 he moved his family to the Niagara region of Upper Canada after he had applied for and received a land grant. Shortly after, Laura married Loyalist James Secord, who was later seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights early in the War of 1812. While he was still recovering in 1813, the Americans invaded the Niagara Peninsula, including Queenston. During the occupation, Secord acquired information about a planned American attack, and stole away on the morning of 22 June to inform Lieutenant James FitzGibbon in the territory still controlled by the British.[1] The information helped the British and their Mohawk allies repel the invading Americans at the Battle of Beaver Dams. Her effort was forgotten until 1860, when Edward, Prince of Wales awarded the impoverished widow £100 for her service on his visit to Canada.

The story of Laura Secord has taken on mythic overtones in Canada. Her tale has been the subject of books, plays, and poetry, often with many embellishments. Since her death, Canada has bestowed honours on her, including schools named after her, monuments, a museum, a memorial stamp and coin, and a statue at the Valiants Memorial in the Canadian capital.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1918 – Cicely Saunders, English Anglican nurse, social worker, physician and writer (d. 2005)
Dame Cicely Mary Strode Saunders OM DBE FRCS FRCP FRCN (22 June 1918 – 14 July 2005) was an English nurse, social worker, physician and writer. She is noted for her work in terminal care research and her role in the birth of the hospice movement, emphasising the importance of palliative care in modern medicine.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Rocky Parker, Beyond Bylines: Cut Through the Clutter: 7 Steps to Receive Targeted News Releases

Harris Cohen Group Product Manager, Search: Bringing fact check information to Google Images
 
 
 
 

By Kate Gibson, CBS News: 9 brands of hand sanitizer may be toxic, FDA warns
 
 
 
 

By Joshua Rhett Miller, The New York Post: Woman caught online shopping during hearing to change Confederate-named school
 
 
 
 

By Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: 200 years of beloved writers on nature as an antidote to depression, Leibniz on how difference dignifies the world, and more
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Exquisite 2300-Year-Old Scythian Woman’s Boot Preserved in the Frozen Ground of the Altai Mountains
 
 
ByJosh Jones, Open Culture: Miles Davis is Attacked, Beaten & Arrested by the NYPD Outside Birdland, Eight Days After the Release of Kind of Blue (1959)
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: In 1968, a Teenager Convinced Thelonious Monk to Play a Gig at His High School to Promote Racial Unity; Now the Concert Recording Is Getting Released
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDXCXVIII): ‘Sciopticon’ magic lantern projector, c. 1890; A Private Collection of 19th Century Photographs of Black Victorians; The ‘Seven Sisters’; A look at the making of Flair, “History’s Most Beautiful Magazine”; An Interesting Historical Insight on Typeface origins: Why this font is everywhere and more ->
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass: These 10 super-useful Gmail add-ons will change how you work
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead: Shea Butter and Oatmeal Melt and Pour Homemade Soap
 
 

Recipes

By Jesse Szewczyk, The Kitchn: Broiled Wedge Salad
 
 

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 9 Simple, So-Good Dinners
 
 
By Susan Slater: Biscochitos


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 21, 2020

On This Day

1900 – Boxer Rebellion. China formally declares war on the United States, Britain, Germany, France and Japan, as an edict issued from the Empress Dowager Cixi.
The Boxer Rebellion (拳亂), Boxer Uprising, or Yihetuan Movement (義和團運動) was an anti-imperialist, anti-foreign, and anti-Christian uprising in China between 1899 and 1901, toward the end of the Qing dynasty.

It was initiated by the Militia United in Righteousness (Yìhéquán), known in English as the Boxers because many of their members had practiced Chinese martial arts, also referred to in the Western world at the time as Chinese Boxing. Villagers in North China had been building resentment against Christian missionaries who ignored tax obligations and abused their extraterritorial rights to protect their congregants against lawsuits. The immediate background of the uprising included severe drought and disruption by the growth of foreign spheres of influence after the Sino-Japanese War of 1895. After several months of growing violence and murder in Shandong and the North China Plain against foreign and Christian presence in June 1900, Boxer fighters, convinced they were invulnerable to foreign weapons, converged on Beijing with the slogan Support the Qing government and exterminate the foreigners. Foreigners and Chinese Christians sought refuge in the Legation Quarter.

In response to reports of an invasion by the Eight Nation Alliance of American, Austro-Hungarian, British, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Russian troops to lift the siege, the initially hesitant Empress Dowager Cixi supported the Boxers and on June 21 issued an Imperial Decree declaring war on the foreign powers. Diplomats, foreign civilians, and soldiers as well as Chinese Christians in the Legation Quarter were besieged for 55 days by the Imperial Army of China and the Boxers. Chinese officialdom was split between those supporting the Boxers and those favoring conciliation, led by Prince Qing. The supreme commander of the Chinese forces, the Manchu General Ronglu (Junglu), later claimed he acted to protect the foreigners. Officials in the Mutual Protection of Southeast China ignored the imperial order to fight against foreigners.

The Eight-Nation Alliance, after being initially turned back, brought 20,000 armed troops to China, defeated the Imperial Army, and arrived at Peking on August 14, relieving the siege of the Legations. Uncontrolled plunder of the capital and the surrounding countryside ensued, along with summary execution of those suspected of being Boxers. The Boxer Protocol of 7 September 1901 provided for the execution of government officials who had supported the Boxers, provisions for foreign troops to be stationed in Beijing, and 450 million taels of silver—approximately $10 billion at 2018 silver prices and more than the government’s annual tax revenue—to be paid as indemnity over the course of the next 39 years to the eight nations involved.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1870 – Clara Immerwahr, Jewish-German chemist and academic (d. 1915)
Clara Helene Immerwahr (21 June 1870 – 2 May 1915) was a German chemist.[1] She was the first woman to be awarded a doctorate in chemistry in Germany, and is credited with being a pacifist as well as a women’s rights activist.[2] From 1901 until her suicide in 1915, she was married to the Nobel Prize-winning chemist Fritz Haber.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

The Awesomer: Making Ancient Instant Ramen; Michel Gondry: Recursion and more ->
 
 
 
 
Carlos Watson, Ozy: Meet 86 Angelic Troublemakers
 
 
 
 

 
 
The Tulsa race massacre (also called the Tulsa race riot, the Greenwood Massacre, or the Black Wall Street Massacre)[9][10][11][12][13][14] took place on May 31 and June 1, 1921, when mobs of white residents attacked black residents and businesses of the Greenwood District in Tulsa, Oklahoma.[1] It has been called “the single worst incident of racial violence in American history.”[15] The attack, carried out on the ground and from private aircraft, destroyed more than 35 square blocks of the district—at that time the wealthiest black community in the United States, known as “Black Wall Street”.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By csiebe: Camping/Backpacking Quilt System
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Lizz Schumer, The Spruce Eats: 16 Best Breakfast Potato Recipes
 
 
CutterLight: The Other Chocolate Chip Skillet Cookie


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 20, 2020

On This Day

451 – Battle of Chalons: Flavius Aetius’ battles Attila the Hun. After the battle, which was inconclusive, Attila retreats, causing the Romans to interpret it as a victory.
The Battle of the Catalaunian Plains (or Fields), also called the Battle of the Campus Mauriacus, Battle of Châlons, Battle of Troyes[11] or the Battle of Maurica, took place on June 20, 451 AD, between a coalition led by the Roman general Flavius Aetius and the Visigothic king Theodoric I against the Huns and their vassals commanded by their king Attila. It was one of the last major military operations of the Western Roman Empire, although Germanic foederati composed the majority of the coalition army. Whether the battle was strategically conclusive is disputed: the Romans possibly stopped the Huns’ attempt to establish vassals in Roman Gaul. However, the Huns successfully looted and pillaged much of Gaul and crippled the military capacity of the Romans and Visigoths. Attila died only two years later and his Hunnic Empire was dismantled by a coalition of their Germanic vassals after the Battle of Nedao in 454.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1847 – Gina Krog, Norwegian suffragist and women’s rights activist (d. 1916)[5]
Jørgine Anna Sverdrup “Gina” Krog (20 June 1847 – 14 April 1916) was a Norwegian suffragist, teacher, liberal politician and editor. She played a central role in the Norwegian women’s movement from the 1880s until her death, notably as a leading campaigner for women’s right to vote. In 1884, Krog co-founded the Norwegian Association for Women’s Rights with liberal MP Hagbart Berner. Over the next two decades, Krog co-founded the Women’s Voting Association, the National Association for Women’s Suffrage, and the Norwegian National Women’s Council, spearheading the presentation of women’s suffrage proposals to the Storting (the Norwegian parliament). Krog wrote articles and gave speeches, travelling throughout Europe and North America to attend international women’s rights conferences. She was editor of the Norwegian feminist periodical Nylænde (New Land) from 1887 until her death in 1916.

Krog was considered radical in her views, seeking full and equal voting rights for all women on the same conditions as men. These views often brought Krog into conflict with more moderate members of the Norwegian women’s movement, many of whom argued for narrower approaches, focusing first on enfranchising privileged women. In 1910, the Storting granted universal voting rights to women for municipal elections, extending this to general elections in 1913.

Krog was the first woman in Norway to receive a state funeral. Since 2009, the Norwegian Association for Women’s Rights has awarded an annual Gina Krog prize for feminist advocates. In March 2013, for International Women’s Day, the Dagny oil field was renamed Gina Krog in her honour.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: As an Antidote to Fear of Death I Eat the Stars: Vintage Science Face Masks
 
 
 
 
Chuck Wendig, Terrible Minds: Gabbling Into The Void 2: Drinking From The Firehose The Ramble 37 comments Gabbling Into The Void 2: Drinking From The Firehose
 
 
 
 

By Dennis McClure, STORIES OF NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Nature Could Beat the Dozers
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Construct Your Own Bayeux Tapestry with This Free Online App
 
 
 
 

By Hanneke Weitering, Space.com: Kathy Lueders, NASA’s 1st female spaceflight chief, will guide a US return to the moon
 
 
 
 

Gastro Obscura: Cook like an ancient Mesopotamian with the world’s oldest recipes; The Cop Cars Doling Out Ice Cream Truck Jingles and more ->
 
 
 
 
Possibly offensive~

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

Our Crafty Mom: 37 Budget-Friendly Kids Craft Ideas and Boredom Busters
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Jessie Sheehan, The Kitchn: Old-Fashioned Buttermilk Bar Donuts


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 19, 2020

On This Day

1913 – Natives Land Act, 1913 in South Africa implemented.
The Natives Land Act, 1913 (subsequently renamed Bantu Land Act, 1913 and Black Land Act, 1913; Act No. 27 of 1913) was an Act of the Parliament of South Africa that was aimed at regulating the acquisition of land.

Overview
The Natives Land Act of 1913[1] was the first major piece of segregation legislation passed by the Union Parliament. It was replaced in 1991. The act decreed that whites were not allowed to buy land from natives and vice versa. That stopped white farmers from buying more native land. Exceptions had to be approved by the Governor-General. The native areas left initially totaled less than 10% of the entire land mass of the Union, which was later expanded to 13%.[2]

The Act further prohibited the practice of serfdom or sharecropping. It also protected existing agreements or arrangement of land hired or leased by both parties.[1]

This land was in “native reserve” areas, which meant it was under “communal” tenure vested in African chiefs: it could not be bought, sold or used as surety. Outside such areas, perhaps of even greater significance for black farming was that the Act forbade black tenant farming on white-owned land. Since so many black farmers were sharecroppers or labor tenants that had a devastating effect, but its full implementation was not immediate. The Act strengthened the chiefs, who were part of the state administration, but it forced many blacks into the “white” areas into wage labor.[3]

Impact
The opposition was modest but vocal. John Dube used his newspaper to create an issue. As president of what would become the African National Congress, he supported whites like William Cullen Wilcox, who had created the Zululand Industrial Improvement Company. That had led to them supplying land to thousands of black people in Natal.[4] Dube was one of five people who were sent to Britain to try and overturn the law once it came into force in South Africa.[5]

Sol Plaatje traveled to Britain with the SANNC (later the African National Congress) to protest the Natives Land Act but to no avail. He collected transcripts of court deliberations on the Natives Land Act and testimonies from those directly subject to the act in the 1916 Book Native Life in South Africa.[6]

Political ironies
Much political irony surrounded the Act:

The minister at the time of its introduction, J.W. Sauer, was a Cape Liberal who opposed disenfranchisement of blacks. He, however, advocated for “separate residential areas for Whites and Natives” in the Parliamentary debate on the bill.
John Tengo Jabavu, a prominent “educated African” welcomed the Act,[7][8][9] but Merriman[citation needed] and Schreiner[citation needed] opposed the Act on principle.[10][11][2]

 
 

Born On This Day

1903 – Mary Callery, American-French sculptor and academic (d. 1977)
Mary Callery (June 19, 1903 – February 12, 1977) was an American artist known for her Modern and Abstract Expressionist sculpture. She was part of the New York School art movement of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.

It is said she “wove linear figures of acrobats and dancers, as slim as spaghetti and as flexible as India rubber, into openwork bronze and steel forms. A friend of Picasso, she was one of those who brought the good word of French modernism to America at the start of World War II”.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Andrew Pulver, The Guardian: Ian Holm, star of Lord of the Rings, Alien and Chariots of Fire, dies aged 88
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Quick hits: PG&E pleads guilty to killing 84 in 2018 Camp Fire
 
 
 
 

By Jonathan Amos, BBC Science Correspondent: Breathtaking new map of the X-ray Universe
 
 
 
 
By Jessica Miller, The Salt Lake Tribune: Paul Petersen pleads guilty to human smuggling in Utah as part of a multistate adoption scheme
 
 
 
 
STORIES OF NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Barge “Bridges”
 
 
 
 

NSFW

 
 
 
 
NSFW

Recipes

Edible Alaska: Eat your way through the longest days
 
 
By Katie Bandurski, Taste of Home: The Best Grilling Recipes From Every State


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 18, 2020

On This Day

1873 – Susan B. Anthony is fined $100 for attempting to vote in the 1872 presidential election.
Susan B. Anthony (February 15, 1820 – March 13, 1906) was an American social reformer and women’s rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women’s suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.

In 1851, she met Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who became her lifelong friend and co-worker in social reform activities, primarily in the field of women’s rights. In 1852, they founded the New York Women’s State Temperance Society after Anthony was prevented from speaking at a temperance conference because she was female. In 1863, they founded the Women’s Loyal National League, which conducted the largest petition drive in United States history up to that time, collecting nearly 400,000 signatures in support of the abolition of slavery. In 1866, they initiated the American Equal Rights Association, which campaigned for equal rights for both women and African Americans. In 1868, they began publishing a women’s rights newspaper called The Revolution. In 1869, they founded the National Woman Suffrage Association as part of a split in the women’s movement. In 1890, the split was formally healed when their organization merged with the rival American Woman Suffrage Association to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association, with Anthony as its key force. In 1876, Anthony and Stanton began working with Matilda Joslyn Gage on what eventually grew into the six-volume History of Woman Suffrage. The interests of Anthony and Stanton diverged somewhat in later years, but the two remained close friends.

In 1872, Anthony was arrested for voting in her hometown of Rochester, New York, and convicted in a widely publicized trial. Although she refused to pay the fine, the authorities declined to take further action. In 1878, Anthony and Stanton arranged for Congress to be presented with an amendment giving women the right to vote. Introduced by Sen. Aaron A. Sargent (R-CA), it later became known colloquially as the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. It was eventually ratified as the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920.

Anthony traveled extensively in support of women’s suffrage, giving as many as 75 to 100 speeches per year and working on many state campaigns. She worked internationally for women’s rights, playing a key role in creating the International Council of Women, which is still active. She also helped to bring about the World’s Congress of Representative Women at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.

When she first began campaigning for women’s rights, Anthony was harshly ridiculed and accused of trying to destroy the institution of marriage. Public perception of her changed radically during her lifetime, however. Her 80th birthday was celebrated in the White House at the invitation of President William McKinley. She became the first female citizen to be depicted on U.S. coinage when her portrait appeared on the 1979 dollar coin.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1862 – Carolyn Wells, American novelist and poet (d. 1942)[5]
Carolyn Wells (June 18, 1862 – March 26, 1942) was an American writer and poet.

Life and career

Born in Rahway, New Jersey,[1] she was the daughter of William E. and Anna Wells.[2] She died at the Flower Fifth Avenue Hospital in New York City in 1942.[3]

Wells had been married to Hadwin Houghton, the heir of the Houghton-Mifflin publishing empire founded by Bernard Houghton. Wells also had an impressive collection of volumes of poetry by others. She bequeathed her collection of Walt Whitman poetry, said to be one of the most important of its kind for its completeness and rarity, to the Library of Congress.[4][5]

After finishing school she worked as a librarian for the Rahway Library Association. Her first book, At the Sign of the Sphinx (1896), was a collection of charades. Her next publications were The Jingle Book and The Story of Betty (1899), followed by a book of verse entitled Idle Idyls (1900). After 1900, Wells wrote numerous novels and collections of poetry.

Carolyn Wells wrote a total 170 books. During the first ten years of her career, she concentrated on poetry, humor, and children’s books. According to her autobiography, The Rest of My Life (1937), she heard That Affair Next Door (1897), one of Anna Katharine Green’s mystery novels, being read aloud and was immediately captivated by the unraveling of the puzzle. From that point onward she devoted herself to the mystery genre. Among the most famous of her mystery novels were the Fleming Stone Detective Stories which—according to Allen J. Hubin’s Crime Fiction IV: A Comprehensive Bibliography, 1749–2000 (2003)—number 61 titles. Wells’s The Clue (1909) is on the Haycraft-Queen Cornerstone list of essential mysteries. She was also the first to conduct a (brief, in this case) annual series devoted to the best short crime fiction of the previous year in the U.S., beginning with The Best American Mystery Stories of the Year (1931) (though others had begun a similar British series in 1929).[6][7][8]

In addition to books, Wells also wrote for newspapers.[9] Her poetry accompanies the work of some of the leading lights in illustration and cartooning, often in the form of Sunday magazine cover features that formed continuing narratives from week to week. Her first known illustrated newspaper work is a two part series titled Animal Alphabet, illustrated by William F. Marriner, which appeared in the Sunday comics section of the New York World.[10] Many additional series ensued over the years, including the bizarre classic Adventures of Lovely Lilly (New York Herald, 1906–07).[11] The last series she penned was Flossy Frills Helps Out (American Weekly, 1942),[12] which appeared after her death.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Ben Beaumont-Thomas, The Guardian: Dame Vera Lynn, singer and ‘forces’ sweetheart’, dies aged 103 Much-loved entertainer, whose voice brought Britain together during the second world war, has died
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By CJ Adams Co-founder, Keen, Google: Want to share your passion with the world? Get Keen
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Senate passes bill that funds public lands conservation, reduces backlog of maintenance needs in national parks and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Excellent information!

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Befferoni and Cheese: How to Make Cheddar Bacon Muffins
 
 
By pauldobrowski: Easy Shakshuka
 
 
By potato_chip: Skillet Ravioli Lasagna
 
 
By Cathy Jacobs, The Spruce Eats: 31 Easy and Delicious Canned Tuna Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 17, 2020

On This Day

1898 – The United States Navy Hospital Corps is established.
A hospital corpsman (HM /ˈkɔːrmən/ [or corpsman]) is an enlisted medical specialist of the United States Navy, who may also serve in a U.S. Marine Corps unit. The corresponding rating within the United States Coast Guard is health services technician (HS).

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1903 – Ruth Graves Wakefield, American chef, created the chocolate chip cookie (d. 1977)
Ruth Graves Wakefield (June 17, 1903 – January 10, 1977) was an American chef, best known as the inventor of the Toll House Cookie, the first chocolate chip cookie. She was also a college graduate, dietitian, educator, business owner, and author.[1]

Wakefield grew up in Easton, Massachusetts, and graduated from Oliver Ames High School in 1920.[2] Wakefield was educated at Framingham State Normal School Department of Household Arts in 1924. There, she worked as a dietitian and lectured about foods. In 1928, she and her husband Kenneth Donald Wakefield (1897–1997) had a son, Kenneth Donald Wakefield Jr.[3] In 1930, she and her husband bought a tourist lodge (the Toll House Inn) in Whitman in Plymouth County. Located about halfway between Boston and New Bedford, it was a place where passengers had historically paid a toll, changed horses, and ate home-cooked meals. When the Wakefields opened their business, they named the establishment the Toll House Inn. Ruth cooked and served all the food and soon gained local fame for her lobster dinners and desserts. People from across the region visited the Toll House, including notables such as US Ambassador Joseph Kennedy, Sr.[4] Her chocolate chip cookies soon became very popular.[5][6] She invented chocolate chip cookies around 1938.[7]

She added chopped up bits from a Nestlé semi-sweet chocolate bar into a cookie.[8] It is often incorrectly reported that the cookie was an accident, and that Wakefield expected the chocolate chunks to melt making chocolate cookies. In reality, Wakefield stated that she deliberately invented the cookie. She said, “We had been serving a thin butterscotch nut cookie with ice cream. Everybody seemed to love it, but I was trying to give them something different. So I came up with Toll House cookie.”[9]

Wakefield wrote a best selling cookbook, Toll House Tried and True Recipes,[10] that went through 39 printings starting in 1930.[11] The 1938 edition of the cookbook was the first to include the recipe for a chocolate chip cookie, the “Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookie”.[9]

During WWII, US soldiers from Massachusetts who were stationed overseas shared the cookies they received in care packages from back home with soldiers from other parts of the US. Soon, hundreds of soldiers were writing home asking their families to send them some Toll House cookies, and Wakefield was soon inundated with letters from around the world requesting her recipe. Thus began the nationwide craze for the chocolate chip cookie.[12][13]

As the popularity of the Toll House Chocolate Crunch Cookie increased, the sales of Nestlé’s semi-sweet chocolate bars also spiked. Andrew Nestlé and Ruth Wakefield made a business arrangement: Wakefield gave Nestlé the right to use her cookie recipe and the Toll House name for one dollar and a lifetime supply of Nestlé chocolate.[14] Nestlé began marketing chocolate chips to be used especially for cookies and printing the recipe for the Toll House Cookie on its package.[15]

Wakefield’s invention met this need and went on to be the most popular cookie of all time.[citation needed] Chocolate chip cookies are still consumed today and currently exist in a market space of over $18 billion in the US.[16]

Wakefield died on January 10, 1977 following a long illness in Jordan Hospital in Plymouth, Massachusetts.[17]

In 2018 the New York Times published a belated obituary for her.[18]

 
 

FYI

Grace & Violence: What’s in a name?
 
 
 
 

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: FROM THE ARCHIVE | The Magic of Moss and What It Teaches Us About the Art of Attentiveness to Life at All Scales
 
 
 
 

Just A Car Guy: ever hear of the WW2 Navy aviator gallon of ice cream tradition?
 
 
 
 

Inside History: How Buffalo Soldiers Protected National Parks and more ->
 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Heather Landy and edited and produced by Liz Webber and Susan Howson. Quaartz Daily Obsession: Videoconferencing
 
 
 
 
STORIES OF NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Bears on the Alaska Highway
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Danette Forbes, Taste of Home: Chicken and Bows
 
 
By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: 40 Easy Dinners That Are Mostly Vegetables
 
 
Taste of Home: Lemony Limoncello Tiramisu


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 16, 2020

On This Day

1836 – The formation of the London Working Men’s Association gives rise to the Chartist Movement.
The London Working Men’s Association was an organisation established in London in 1836.[1] It was one of the foundations of Chartism. The founders were William Lovett, Francis Place and Henry Hetherington. They appealed to skilled workers rather than the mass of unskilled factory labourers. They were associated with Owenite socialism and the movement for general education.

 
 

Born On This Day

1738 – Mary Katherine Goddard, American publisher (d. 1816)[14]
Mary Katherine Goddard (June 16, 1738 – August 12, 1816) was an early American publisher, and the postmaster of the Baltimore Post Office from 1775 to 1789. She was the second printer to print the Declaration of Independence. Her copy, the Goddard Broadside, was commissioned by Congress in 1777, and was the first to include the names of the signatories.[1][2]

In 1998, Goddard was inducted into the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame.[3]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Amelia Gentleman, The Guardian: ‘Everyone Is in That Fine Line Between Death and Life’: Inside Everest’s Deadliest Queue A year on from the loss of 11 people on the world’s highest mountain, survivors talk about what went wrong and why.

 
 
 
 

By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: The Bird Library: A Library Built Especially for Our Fine Feathered Friends
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: 7 ways the world transforms leftover bread; Mobile Vegetables; Pig Ear Sandwich and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Pete Duel Memorial Site: Peter Deuel: “The Fan Letters I Answer First”
“The one type of fan I dislike is the negative kind. A clown who has to put others down to feel like a big deal only demonstrates appalling insecurity in my opinion!”
 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

Open Culture: A Collection of 500 Free Textbooks from Springer
By TikiCrafter: Tiny Hats
 
 

Recipes

By Momos75: Sheet Pan Mustard and Honey Marinated Pork Tenderloin With Veggies
 
 
By SparkyGiraffe: One Pot Bolognese
 
 
By Edwin_LRT: The Lemon Tart You Must Taste.
 
 
By SomethingSoSam: Dessert Crunchwrap