Tag: FYI

FYI June 15, 2020

On This Day

1300 – The city of Bilbao is founded.
Bilbao (/bɪlˈbaʊ, -ˈbɑːoʊ/, also US: /-ˈbeɪoʊ/,[3][4][5] Spanish: [bilˈβao]; Basque: Bilbo [bilβo]) is a city in northern Spain, the largest city in the province of Biscay and in the Basque Country as a whole. It is also the largest city proper in northern Spain. Bilbao is the tenth largest city in Spain, with a population of 345,141 as of 2015.[6] The Bilbao metropolitan area has 1,037,847 inhabitants,[7][8][9] making it one of the most populous metropolitan areas in northern Spain; with a population of 875,552[10] the comarca of Greater Bilbao is the fifth-largest urban area in Spain. Bilbao is also the main urban area in what is defined as the Greater Basque region.

Bilbao is situated in the north-central part of Spain, some 16 kilometres (10 mi) south of the Bay of Biscay, where the economic social development is located, where the estuary of Bilbao is formed. Its main urban core is surrounded by two small mountain ranges with an average elevation of 400 metres (1,300 ft).[11] Its climate is shaped by the Bay of Biscay low-pressure systems and mild air, moderating summer temperatures by Iberian standards, with low sunshine and high rainfall. The annual temperature range is low for its latitude.

After its foundation in the early 14th century by Diego López V de Haro, head of the powerful Haro family, Bilbao was a commercial hub of the Basque Country that enjoyed significant importance in Green Spain. This was due to its port activity based on the export of iron extracted from the Biscayan quarries. Throughout the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth, Bilbao experienced heavy industrialisation, making it the centre of the second-most industrialised region of Spain, behind Barcelona.[12][13] At the same time an extraordinary population explosion prompted the annexation of several adjacent municipalities. Nowadays, Bilbao is a vigorous service city that is experiencing an ongoing social, economic, and aesthetic revitalisation process, started by the iconic Bilbao Guggenheim Museum,[12][14][15][16] and continued by infrastructure investments, such as the airport terminal, the rapid transit system, the tram line, the Azkuna Zentroa, and the currently under development Abandoibarra and Zorrozaurre renewal projects.[17]

Bilbao is also home to football club Athletic Club de Bilbao, a significant symbol for Basque nationalism[18] due to its promotion of only Basque players and one of the most successful clubs in Spanish football history.

On 19 May 2010, the city of Bilbao was recognised with the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize, awarded by the city state of Singapore, in collaboration with the Swedish Nobel Academy.[19] Considered the Nobel Prize for urbanism, it was handed out on 29 June 2010. On 7 January 2013, its mayor, Iñaki Azkuna, received the 2012 World Mayor Prize awarded every two years by the British foundation The City Mayors Foundation, in recognition of the urban transformation experienced by the Biscayan capital since the 1990s.[20][21] On 8 November 2017, Bilbao was chosen the Best European City 2018 at The Urbanism Awards 2018, awarded by the international organisation The Academy of Urbanism.[22]

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Born On This Day

1878 – Margaret Abbott, Indian-American golfer (d. 1955)[6]
Margaret Ives Abbott (June 15, 1878 – June 10, 1955)[2] was an American golfer. She was the first American woman to win an Olympic event: the women’s golf tournament at the 1900 Paris Games.

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FYI

The Rural Blog: Study cites benefits of telehealth; commentary says mental telehealth is ‘clinically equivalent to in-person care’ and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Stephanie Donovan, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Political Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Ryan McCarthy and Maryam Jameel, Pro Publica: The Postal Service Is Steadily Getting Worse — Can It Handle a National Mail-In Election? Postal delays and mistakes have marred primary voting, and after years of budget cuts and plant closures, mail delivery has slowed so much that ballot deadlines in many states are no longer realistic.
 
 
 
 
By Agnes Chang, Pro Publica: “They Were the Authority and I Didn’t Argue With Authority” In an era before rape kits, Sue Royston decided to fight for justice even though the police doubted her, the prosecution discouraged her, and those around her dismissed her story.
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDXCXVII): The Real Jamaican bobsleigh team that inspired Cool Runnings; The Digital Art of Jp Cummins; Abandoned Checkpoints Across Europe; Loosen up with Racquel Welch circa 1967 in Vietnam and more ->
 
 
 
 

The War Horse: Finding Peace in Lederhosen and more ->
 
 
 
 

The Ben Shapiro Show: Sunday Special: Ep. 53 – The 75th Anniversary Of D-Day
 
 
 
 

By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Take a Virtual Drive through London, Tokyo, Los Angeles & 45 Other World Cities
 
 
 
 

Perfectly Destressed: Monarch Butterfly Waystation
 
 
 
 
By STORIES OF NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Caterpillar Dozers
 
bSTORIES OF NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Correction about D8 Caterpillar
 
 
 
 
Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Sitka Nature Show #212 – Elizabeth Graham (encore)
 
 
 
 
Weekly digest for Hannah Howe, on June 15, 2020. #53
It’s an amazing fact that the vast majority of the female Resistance fighters I have researched lived well into their nineties.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Emily Racette Parulski, Taste of Home: The Best Salad in Every State
 
 
Chocolate Covered Katie: Vegan Recipes For Carnivores


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 14, 2020

On This Day

1158 – Munich is founded by Henry the Lion on the banks of the river Isar.
Munich (/ˈmjuːnɪk/ MEW-nik; German: München [ˈmʏnçn̩] (About this soundlisten); Bavarian: Minga [ˈmɪŋ(ː)ɐ]; Latin: Monachium) is the capital and most populous city of Bavaria, the second most populous German state. With a population of around 1.5 million,[3] it is the third-largest city in Germany, after Berlin and Hamburg, and thus the largest which does not constitute its own state, as well as the 11th-largest city in the European Union. The city’s metropolitan region is home to 6 million people.[4]

Straddling the banks of the River Isar (a tributary of the Danube) north of the Bavarian Alps, it is the seat of the Bavarian administrative region of Upper Bavaria, while being the most densely populated municipality in Germany (4,500 people per km²). Munich is the second-largest city in the Bavarian dialect area, after the Austrian capital of Vienna.

The city was first mentioned in 1158. Catholic Munich strongly resisted the Reformation and was a political point of divergence during the resulting Thirty Years’ War, but remained physically untouched despite an occupation by the Protestant Swedes.[5] Once Bavaria was established as a sovereign kingdom in 1806, Munich became a major European centre of arts, architecture, culture and science. In 1918, during the German Revolution, the ruling house of Wittelsbach, which had governed Bavaria since 1180, was forced to abdicate in Munich and a short-lived socialist republic was declared. In the 1920s, Munich became home to several political factions, among them the NSDAP. After the Nazis’ rise to power, Munich was declared their “Capital of the Movement”. The city was heavily bombed during World War II, but restored most of its traditional cityscape. After the end of postwar American occupation in 1949, there was a great increase in population and economic power during the years of Wirtschaftswunder, or “economic miracle”. The city hosted the 1972 Summer Olympics and was one of the host cities of the 1974 and 2006 FIFA World Cups.

Today, Munich is a global centre of art, science, technology, finance, publishing, culture, innovation, education, business, and tourism and enjoys a very high standard and quality of living, reaching first in Germany and third worldwide according to the 2018 Mercer survey,[6] and being rated the world’s most liveable city by the Monocle’s Quality of Life Survey 2018.[7] According to the Globalization and World Rankings Research Institute, Munich is considered an alpha-world city, as of 2015.[8] It is one of the most prosperous[9] and fastest growing[10] cities in Germany.

Munich’s economy is based on high tech, automobiles, the service sector and creative industries, as well as IT, biotechnology, engineering and electronics among many others. The city houses many multinational companies, such as BMW, Siemens, MAN, Linde, Allianz and MunichRE. It is also home to two research universities, a multitude of scientific institutions, and world class technology and science museums like the Deutsches Museum and BMW Museum.[11] Munich’s numerous architectural and cultural attractions, sports events, exhibitions and its annual Oktoberfest attract considerable tourism.[12] The city is home to more than 530,000 people of foreign background, making up 37.7% of its population.[13]

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Born On This Day

1900 – Ruth Nanda Anshen, American writer, editor, and philosopher (d. 2003)
Ruth Nanda Anshen (June 14, 1900 – December 2, 2003) was an American philosopher, author and editor. She was the author of several books including The Anatomy of Evil, Biography of An Idea, Morals Equals Manners and The Mystery of Consciousness: A Prescription for Human Survival.

Life

Anshen was born on June 14, 1900 in Lynn, Massachusetts to Jewish Russian immigrants.[1] She studied at Boston University under Alfred North Whitehead. During her education, she developed a desire to unite scholars from all over the world from varying fields. In 1941, she put together the Science of Culture Series, hoping to develop a “unitary principle under which there could be subsumed and evaluated the nature of man and the nature of life, the relationship of knowledge to life.” This series continued on for two decades and included Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Thomas Mann, and Whitehead on its board of editors.

She was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts of London, a member of the American Philosophical Association, the History of Science Society, the International Philosophical Society and the Metaphysical Society of America. In 1958, she established the Anshen-Columbia University Seminars on the Nature of Man. Anshen died at age 103.[1]

In the 1990s the Council for the Anshen Transdisciplinary Lectureships in Art, Science and the Philosophy of Culture included Noam Chomsky, Fred Hoyle, Paul O. Kristeller, Edith Porada, Meyer Schapiro, Hugh Thomas, John A. Wheeler, and C. N. Yang.[2]

Career

Anshen was the editor of several series of books, including the World Perspectives Series, published by Harper & Row, of which two volumes were by Erich Fromm: The Art of Loving (Volume 9)[3] and To Have or to Be? (Volume 50). Another notable was Deschooling Society (Volume 44) by Ivan Illich.[4] She also edited the Religious Perspectives Series, published by Harper & Row, Credo Perspectives Series, published by Pocket Books/Simon & Schuster, The Perspectives in Humanism Series, published by World Publishing Company, The Tree of Life Series published by Seabury Press, and The Convergence Series published by Columbia University Press.

Selected works
Freedom: Its Meaning (1940)
Beyond Victory (1943)
The Family: Its Function and Destiny (1949)
Moral Principles of Action: Man’s Ethical Imperative (1952)
Language : an enquiry into its meaning and function (1957)
The Reality of the Devil: The Evil in Man (1974)
The Anatomy of Evil (1985), Revised edition of The Reality of the Devil: Evil in Man (1974)
Biography of An Idea (1986)
Morals Equals Manners (1992)
The Mystery of Consciousness: A Prescription for Human Survival (1994)

 
 

FYI

I like to write junk: TAKING A BULLET
 
 
 
 
The Awesomer: How to Pave a Ditch; Gun Killers; Creative Photos with Sparklers and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Ryan Saavedra, The Daily Wire: The State Of Texas Delivers A ‘Simple’ Message To Rioters Thinking About Trashing The Alamo
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Grammy Award-Winning Jazz Vocalist Cécile McLorin Salvant Reads Audre Lorde’s Poignant Poem “The Bees”
 
 
 
 
By Vince Beiser, MIT Technology Review: Aboard the Giant Sand-Sucking Ships That China Uses to Reshape the World Massive ships, mind-boggling amounts of sand, and an appetite for expansionism in the South China Sea: the recipe for a land grab like no other.
 
 
 
 
The Hustle: Why a small town in Washington is printing its own currency during the pandemic
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Beenyweeny: Pirate Ship
 
 
By AussieAlf: Cartesian Diver
 
 
By Matlek: Smartglove for Cyclists

Recipes

The Ragamuffin Diaries: Bluebell salad
 
 
CutterLight: Almond Lingonberry Scones (with a side of Brown Bea
 
 
By Lisa Kaminski, Taste of Home: How to Make a Cookie Cake—the Dessert That’s the Best of Both Worlds


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 13, 2020

On This Day

313 – The decisions of the Edict of Milan, signed by Constantine the Great and co-emperor Valerius Licinius, granting religious freedom throughout the Roman Empire, are published in Nicomedia.[1]
The Edict of Milan (Latin: Edictum Mediolanense, Greek: Διάταγμα των Μεδιολάνων, Diatagma tōn Mediolanōn) was the February AD 313 agreement to treat Christians benevolently within the Roman Empire.[1] Western Roman Emperor Constantine I and Emperor Licinius, who controlled the Balkans, met in Mediolanum (modern-day Milan) and, among other things, agreed to change policies towards Christians[1] following the Edict of Toleration issued by Emperor Galerius two years earlier in Serdica. The Edict of Milan gave Christianity a legal status, but did not make Christianity the state church of the Roman Empire; this took place under Emperor Theodosius I in AD 380 with the Edict of Thessalonica.

The document is found in Lactantius’ De Mortibus Persecutorum and in Eusebius of Caesarea’s History of the Church with marked divergences between the two.[2] Whether or not there was a formal ‘Edict of Milan’  is debated by some.[who?][1]

The version found in Lactantius is not in the form of an edict.[2] It is a letter from Licinius to the governors of the provinces in the Eastern Empire he had just conquered by defeating Maximinus[3] later in the same year and issued in Nicomedia.[1]

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Born On This Day

1910 – Mary Whitehouse, English activist, founded the National Viewers’ and Listeners’ Association (d. 2001)
Constance Mary Whitehouse CBE (née Hutcheson; 13 June 1910 – 23 November 2001) was a British educator and conservative activist. She campaigned against social liberalism and the mainstream British media, both of which she accused of encouraging a more permissive society. She was the founder and first president of the National Viewers’ and Listeners’ Association, through which she led a longstanding campaign against the BBC. A hard-line social conservative, she was disparagingly termed a reactionary by her socially liberal opponents. Her motivation derived from her traditional Christian beliefs, her aversion to the rapid social and political changes in British society of the 1960s and her work as a teacher of sex education.[2]

Born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, Whitehouse became an art teacher, at the same time becoming involved in evangelical Christian groups such as the Student Christian Movement (which became increasingly more liberal leading up to and after a 1928 split with the Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship) and Moral Re-Armament. She became a public figure via the Clean-Up TV pressure group, established in 1964, in which she was the most prominent figure. The following year she founded the National Viewers’ and Listeners’ Association, using it as a platform to criticise the BBC for what she perceived as a lack of accountability, and excessive use of bad language and portrayals of sex and violence in its programmes. As a result, she became an object of mockery in the media.

During the 1970s she broadened her activities, and was a leading figure in the Nationwide Festival of Light, a Christian campaign that gained mass support for a period. She initiated a successful private prosecution against Gay News on the grounds of blasphemous libel, the first such case for more than 50 years. Another private prosecution was against the director of the play The Romans in Britain, which had been performed at the National Theatre.

Whitehouse’s campaigns continue to divide opinion. Her critics have accused her of being a highly censorious figure, and her traditional moral convictions brought her into direct conflict with advocates of the sexual revolution, feminism, children’s rights and gay rights. Others see her more positively and believe she was attempting to halt a decline in what they perceived as Britain’s moral standards. According to Ben Thompson, the editor of an anthology of Whitehouse-related letters published in 2012: “From … feminist anti-pornography campaigns to the executive naming and shaming strategies of UK Uncut, her ideological and tactical influence has been discernible in all sorts of unexpected places in recent years.”[3]

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FYI

By Kiernan Dunlop, The Standard-Times, New Bedford, Mass: Retired MA Firefighter Dies of ‘Occupational Cancer’
Firefighters face a 1.53 times greater risk of getting multiple myeloma, according to the Firefighter Cancer Support Network.
 
 
 
 

By Steven Ewing, Road Show: 2021 Ford Bronco will finally debut on July 9
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Requiem for the Printing Press
 
 
 
 
Stories of Northern Canada and Alaska: Five Things Define Carcross
But at the hotel Polly the parrot remained to sing operatic arias and offer a running commentary in the form of truly colorful and creative profanity. Johnnie Johns continued to lead hunting parties to bear, sheep and caribou.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Taste of Home: Firecracker Casserole
 
 
Our Crafty Mom: Bailey’s Red Velvet Cupcake Recipe


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 12, 2020

On This Day

910 – Battle of Augsburg: The Hungarians defeat the East Frankish army under King Louis the Child, using the famous feigned retreat tactic of the nomadic warriors.
The Battle of Lechfeld in 910, was an important victory by a Magyar army over Louis the Child’s united Frankish Imperial Army.[1][2] Located south of Augsburg, the Lechfeld is the flood plain that lies along the Lech River. At this time the Grand Prince of Hungary was Zolta, Zoltán of Hungary, but there is no record of him taking part in the battle.

This battle is one of the greatest examples of the success of the famous feigned retreat tactic used by nomadic warriors, and an example of how psychological warfare can be used effectively.

The battle appears as the first Battle of Augsburg[3] in Hungarian historiography.

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Born On This Day

1802 – Harriet Martineau, English sociologist and author (d. 1876)
Harriet Martineau (/ˈmɑːrtənˌoʊ/; 12 June 1802 – 27 June 1876) was a British social theorist and Whig writer, often cited as the first female sociologist.[1]

Martineau wrote many books and a multitude of essays from a sociological, holistic, religious, domestic and, perhaps most controversially, feminine perspective. She also translated various works by Auguste Comte, and [2] she earned enough to support herself entirely by her writing, a rare feat for a woman in the Victorian era.

The young Princess Victoria enjoyed reading Martineau’s publications. She invited Martineau to her coronation in 1838 — an event which Martineau described in great and amusing detail to her many readers. [3][4]

Martineau said of her own approach to writing: “when one studies a society, one must focus on all its aspects, including key political, religious, and social institutions”. She believed a thorough societal analysis was necessary to understand women’s status under men. The novelist Margaret Oliphant said “as a born lecturer and politician [Martineau] was less distinctively affected by her sex than perhaps any other, male or female, of her generation”.[2]

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FYI

Vector’s World: Just one hell of a year… More ->
 
 
 
 

By Michael Simon, PC World: Bizarre internet ‘dot’ glitch lets you watch ad-free YouTube vids and bypass paywalls
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman, The Rural Blog: Rural utility co-ops could bridge the digital gap, says report from group that promotes local-government solutions
 
 
 
 
Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Friday, June 12, 2020
 
 
 
 
By Eric Berger, ARS Technica: NASA’s new chief of human spaceflight has a commercial background
 
 
 
 
By Diane Lincoln, Live Science: Rare quadruplet ‘top quarks’ created at world’s largest atom smasher
 
 
 
 

By Bryan Schatz, High Country News: Catching a band of wildlife killers How a bounty of digital evidence led to the downfall of one of the nation’s deadliest poaching crews.
 
 
 
 

By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: After MLK’s Assassination, a Schoolteacher Conducted a Famous Experiment–“Blue Eyes/Brown Eyes”–to Teach Kids About Discrimination
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: A Rare Smile Captured in a 19th Century Photograph
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Why James Baldwin’s Writing Stays Powerful: An Artfully Animated Introduction to the Author of Notes of a Native Son
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead: How to Dye Candles With Mica Powder

Recipes

Taste of Home: Cauliflower Casserole
 
 
By Jesse Szewczyk , The Kitchn: I Tried Reddit’s Popular “Potato Volcano” (Yes, It Involves Molten Cheese Lava)
 
 
A Taste of Alaska: Grilled Cornish Game Hens and Old Lady Hands
 
 
By Food Network Kitchen courtesy of Ina Garten: Chocolate Ganache Cake


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 11, 2020

On This Day

1429 – Hundred Years’ War: Start of the Battle of Jargeau.
The Battle of Jargeau took place on 11–12 June 1429. It was part of the Loire Campaign during the Hundred Years’ War, where Charles VII’s forces successfully recaptured much of the region following their victory at the siege of Orleans. The battle ended in victory for Charles VII and is notable as Joan of Arc’s first offensive battle.

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Born On This Day

1880 – Jeannette Rankin, American social worker and politician (d. 1973)
Jeannette Pickering Rankin (June 11, 1880 – May 18, 1973) was an American politician and women’s rights advocate, and the first woman to hold federal office in the United States. She was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican from Montana in 1916, and again in 1940.

Each of Rankin’s Congressional terms coincided with initiation of U.S. military intervention in the two World Wars. A lifelong pacifist, she was one of 50 House members who opposed the declaration of war on Germany in 1917. In 1941, she was the only member of Congress to vote against the declaration of war on Japan following the attack on Pearl Harbor.

A suffragist during the Progressive Era, Rankin organized and lobbied for legislation enfranchising women in several states including Montana, New York, and North Dakota. While in Congress, she introduced legislation that eventually became the 19th Constitutional Amendment, granting unrestricted voting rights to women nationwide. She championed a multitude of diverse women’s rights and civil rights causes throughout a career that spanned more than six decades.

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FYI

By Erin Kirkland, AK on the Go: Denali National Park – Unpacking the 2020 season
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Centas: Fiber Optic Star Ceiling | Music Reactive
 
 
By ctstarkdesigns: Growing Hops at Home
 
 

Recipes

By onegoodknife: Tex-Mex Fiesta Brunch
 
 
By Chocolate Covered Katie: Chocolate Oatmeal No Bake Bars


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 10, 2020

On This Day

1596 – Willem Barents and Jacob van Heemskerk discover Bear Island.
Bear Island (Norwegian: Bjørnøya, pronounced [ˈbjø̀ːɳœʏɑ]) is the southernmost island of the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago. The island is located in the western part of the Barents Sea, approximately halfway between Spitsbergen and the North Cape.

Bear Island was discovered by the Dutch explorers Willem Barentsz and Jacob van Heemskerck on 10 June 1596. It was named after a polar bear that was seen swimming nearby. The island was considered terra nullius until the Spitsbergen Treaty of 1920 placed it under Norwegian sovereignty.

Despite its remote location and barren nature, the island has seen commercial activities in past centuries, such as coal mining, fishing and whaling. However, no settlements have lasted more than a few years, and Bear Island is now uninhabited except for personnel working at the island’s meteorological station Herwighamna. Along with the adjacent waters, it was declared a nature reserve in 2002.

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Born On This Day

1835 – Rebecca Latimer Felton, American educator and politician (d. 1930)
Rebecca Ann Latimer Felton (June 10, 1835 – January 24, 1930) was an American writer, lecturer, reformer, and politician who became the first woman to serve in the US Senate, although she served for only one day.[1][2] She was the most prominent woman in Georgia in the Progressive Era, and was honored by appointment to the Senate. She was sworn in November 21, 1922, and served just 24 hours. At 87 years, nine months, and 22 days old, she was the oldest freshman senator to enter the Senate. She was the only woman to have served as a Senator from Georgia until January 6, 2020, when Kelly Loeffler was appointed by Governor Brian Kemp to the seat vacated by the retirement of Sen. Johnny Isakson at the end of 2019. Her husband William Harrell Felton was a member of the United States House of Representatives and Georgia House of Representatives and she ran his campaigns. She was a prominent society woman; an advocate of prison reform, women’s suffrage and educational modernization; a white supremacist and slave owner; and a woman who spoke vigorously in favor of lynching. Numan Bartley wrote that by 1915 she “was championing a lengthy feminist program that ranged from prohibition to equal pay for equal work.”[3]

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FYI

The Rural Blog: Community Newspaper Holdings converts three papers to online-only after merging (in effect closing) several others; Alabama nixes controversial charter school just before opening, the first time the state has shut down a charter; In rural town, virus threatens vital summer tourist revenue and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, Publishing Perspectives: Ten Publishing Things That Will Never Be The Same
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Perez, Tech Crunch: Starbucks to close 400 stores, speed expansion of Pickup locations, curbside and more
 
 
 
 

Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Tuesday, June 9, 2020
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: How the “First Photojournalist,” Mathew Brady, Shocked the Nation with Photos from the Civil War
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Al Jaffee, Iconic Mad Magazine Cartoonist, Retires at Age 99 … and Leaves Behind Advice About Living the Creative Life
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Watch a Mesmerizing Stream of Unwatched YouTube Videos: Astronaut.io Lets You Discover the Hidden Dimensions of the World’s Largest Video Platform
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

The Runner’s Plate: Tater Tot Hotdish


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 08 & 09, 2020

On This Day

1783 – Laki, a volcano in Iceland, begins an eight-month eruption which kills over 9,000 people and starts a seven-year famine.
Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the western part of Vatnajökull National Park, Iceland, not far from the volcanic fissure of Eldgjá and the small village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. The fissure is properly referred to as Lakagígar, while Laki is a mountain that the fissure bisects. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the volcano Grímsvötn and including the volcano Thordarhyrna.[1][2][3] It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction.

The system erupted violently over an eight-month period between June 1783 and February 1784 from the Laki fissure and the adjoining volcano Grímsvötn, pouring out an estimated 42 billion tons or 14 km3 (3.4 cu mi) of basalt lava and clouds of poisonous hydrofluoric acid and sulfur dioxide compounds that contaminated the soil, leading to the death of over 50% of Iceland’s livestock population, and the destruction of the vast majority of all crops. This led to a famine which then killed approximately 25% of the island’s human population.[4] The lava flows also destroyed 20 villages.

The Laki eruption and its aftermath caused a drop in global temperatures, as 120 million tons of sulfur dioxide was spewed into the Northern Hemisphere. This caused crop failures in Europe and may have caused droughts in North Africa and India.

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411 BC – The Athenian coup succeeds, forming a short-lived oligarchy.
The Athenian coup of 411 BC was the result of a revolution that took place during the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta. The coup overthrew the democratic government of ancient Athens and replaced it with a short-lived oligarchy known as the Four Hundred.

In the wake of the fiscal crisis caused by the failed Sicilian Expedition of the Athenian military in 413 BC, some high-status Athenian men, who had disliked the broad-based democracy of the city-state for a long time, sought to establish an oligarchy of the elite. They believed that they could manage foreign, fiscal, and war policies better than the existing government.[1]

The movement toward oligarchy was led by a number of prominent and wealthy Athenians, who held positions of power in the Athenian army at Samos in coordination with Alcibiades.

Read more ->

Born On This Day

1858 – Charlotte Scott, English mathematician (d. 1931)[7]
Charlotte Angas Scott (8 June 1858, Lincoln, England – 10 November 1931, Cambridge, England) was a British mathematician who made her career in the United States and was influential in the development of American mathematics, including the mathematical education of women. Scott played an important role in Cambridge changing the rules for its famous Mathematical Tripos exam.

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1903 – Marcia Davenport, American author and critic (d. 1996)
Marcia Davenport (June 9, 1903 – January 16, 1996) was an American author and music critic. She is best known for her 1932 biography of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the first American published biography of Mozart. Davenport also is known for her novels The Valley of Decision and East Side, West Side, both of which were adapted to film in 1945 and 1949, respectively.

Early life
Marcia Davenport was born Marcia Glick in New York City on June 9, 1903, the daughter of Bernard Glick and the opera singer Alma Gluck. She became the stepdaughter of violinist Efrem Zimbalist when her mother remarried.[1]

Growing up Davenport traveled extensively with her parents and was educated intermittently at the Friends School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr. She began studies at Wellesley College but eloped to Pittsburgh to marry her first husband, Frank Delmas Clarke. Eventually, she earned her B.A. at the University of Grenoble.[2]

Career
After her divorce from Clarke in 1925, Davenport took an advertising copywriting job to support herself and her daughter. In 1928, she joined the editorial staff of The New Yorker, where she worked until 1931. In 1934, she became the music critic of Stage magazine. Through her mother and stepfather, Davenport had close ties to the classical music world, particularly the operatic world of Europe and America. Her first book, Mozart, the first American published biography of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, was published in 1932. Widely praised, the book, which became Davenport’s best known work, has remained continuously in print since its publication.[2][3]

Novels
Davenport also wrote several popular novels, notably The Valley of Decision, a saga which traces the Scott family, prototypical owners of an iron works in Pittsburgh, from 1873 to the events of World War II. Davenport lived in Pittsburgh shortly after her first marriage, later using that background, along with further research on the steel industry, for the 788-page bestseller.[4] In 1947, East Side, West Side was published, also becoming a best-seller. It was one of the last works edited by Maxwell Perkins of the Charles Scribners’ Sons publishing house.[2]

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FYI

Excellent, sound on! Might be the best thing these pilots see before returning home safely.
Directing jet pilots with verve ( thanks to Stephan! )
 
 
 
 

STORIES OF NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Wildlife on the Alaska Highway, Bison
 
 
 
 

By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDXCXVI): The Fisk University Jubilee Singers; “David Bowie Criticizes MTV for Not Playing Videos by Black Artists”, 1983; Fred Rogers drying Francois Clemmons’ feet (and breaking down race barriers), 1969; Tokyo’s Curious Fruit Sandwich Trend; To calm every bit of chaos within, here’s Cellist, Sheku Kanneh-Mason, playing The Swan: and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Savannah Tanbusch, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Social Justice Blogs
 
 
By Tiana Gibbs, Beyond Bylines: 5 Advanced Techniques for Using Google Like a Pro
 
 
 
 
InDTale Magazine: The Best Books on sale this month

 
 
 
 
The Bohemian Blog: Željava Airbase: The Abandoned Yugoslav Airport Inside a Mountain
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: My Experiences Writing and Publishing as a Teen
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

Chocolate Covered Katie: Keto Pancakes
 
 
By Hali Bey Ramdene, The Kitchn: Recipe: Creamy Corn Mac and Cheese
 
 
Food Network Kitchen: Hamburger Stroganoff Skillet
 
 
A Taste of Alaska: Raspberry & White Chocolate Cookies and Laundry Problems


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 07, 2020

On This Day

1099 – First Crusade: The Siege of Jerusalem begins.
The Siege of Jerusalem took place from June 7 to July 15, 1099, during the First Crusade. The climax of the First Crusade, the successful siege saw the Crusaders take Jerusalem from the Fatimid Caliphate and laid the foundations for the Kingdom of Jerusalem.

The siege is notable for the mass slaughter of Muslims and Jews perpetrated by the Christian crusaders, which contemporaneous sources suggest was savage and widespread.[10][11]

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Born On This Day

1884 – Ester Claesson, Swedish landscape architect (d. 1931)
Ester Laura Matilda Claesson (7 June 1884 – 12 November 1931) was a Swedish landscaping pioneer and is considered the first female landscape architect in Sweden.[1]

Biography
Claesson finished her secondary school in Stockholm in 1900, a time when there were no academically trained female landscape architects in Sweden.[2] There were women gardening practitioners, but mainly those who already owned a garden of their own. Those who wanted a professional education had to go abroad, usually Denmark, England or Germany.[3] As Claesson was interested in gardening and architecture, she worked as a gardener on a farm in Tomarp, Skåne. She later continued her education in Denmark, graduating in 1903 from Havebrugs Höjeskole in Charlottenlund.[2]

After graduation, Claesson worked as a landscape architect for Paul Schultze-Naumburg in Germany, and for the architect Joseph Maria Olbrich in Darmstadt and Vienna in Austria.[3] Claesson’s most important work at Darmstadt was a terrace with a rose garden, from a mission made by Joseph Maria Olbrich’s influential costumer Julius Glückert, who owned a furniture factory in the city.[3]

In 1907, the women-oriented weekly magazine Idun declared Claesson Sweden’s first female landscape architect,[2] and her artistic work was further celebrated by the magazines Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration in 1907 and The Studio in 1912.[3] In 1913, Claesson returned to Sweden and worked as an architect with Isak Gustaf Clason. She soon started her own business and introduced Olbrich’s ideas to Sweden. She took her influences mainly from the English Arts and Crafts movement.[3]

Her gardening was influenced by architectural elements. She gained note as a landscape architect and established a co-operation with landscape architects Carl Westman, Isak Gustaf Clason and Ivar Tengbom.[1] During the first decade of the 1900s, she was the best-known and most-published landscape architect in Sweden.[4]

In 1918, Claesson worked as a landscape architect at Villa Brevik in Lidingö, just north of Stockholm.[5] Through her work there she made contact with Erik Axel Karlfeldt, who lived nearby and in 1921 Claesson designed the garden for Karlfeldtsgården (the Karlfeldt summer residence), north of Leksand, which still exists.[4]

Claesson died at age 47, reportedly by a gunshot to the heart, and was buried on 22 November 1931 at Norra begravningsplatsen.[6]

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FYI

By Elle Hunt, The Guardian: What Does It Mean to Be a ‘Karen’? Karens Explain As the meme has become more prominent online, its meaning has become confused – with real-life Karens caught in the crosshairs.
 
 
 
 
By Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Ronald McNair’s Civil Disobedience: The Illustrated Story of How a Little Boy Who Grew Up to Be a Trailblazing Astronaut Fought Segregation at the Public Library
 
 
 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 06, 2020

On This Day

1832 – The June Rebellion in Paris is put down by the National Guard.
The June 1832 Rebellion or the Paris Uprising of 1832 (French: Insurrection républicaine à Paris en juin 1832), was an anti-monarchist insurrection of Parisian republicans on 5 and 6 June 1832.

The rebellion originated in an attempt by the Republicans to reverse the establishment in 1830 of the July Monarchy of Louis-Philippe, shortly after the death of the King’s powerful supporter President of the Council Casimir Pierre Périer on 16 May 1832. On 1 June 1832, Jean Maximilien Lamarque, a popular former Army commander who became a member of the French parliament and was critical of the monarchy, died of cholera. The riots that followed his funeral sparked the rebellion. This was the last outbreak of violence linked with the July Revolution of 1830.

The French author Victor Hugo memorialized the rebellion in his novel Les Misérables, and it figures largely in the stage musical and films that are based on the book.

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Born On This Day

1925 – Frank Chee Willeto, American soldier and politician, 4th Vice President of the Navajo Nation (d. 2013)
Frank Chee Willeto (June 6, 1925 – June 23, 2012) was an American politician and Navajo code talker during World War II.[1][2] Willeto served as the vice president of the Navajo Nation under President Milton Bluehouse, Sr. from his appointment in August 1998 until January 1999, when the Begaye administration took office.[1]

Early life

Willeto was born in Crownpoint, New Mexico, on June 6, 1925.[1] According to the Navajo Times, Willeto was “Bit’ahnii (Folded Arms Clan), born for Tódích’íi’nii (Bitter Water Clan). His chei [mother’s grandfather] was Ta’neeszahnii (Tangle Clan) and his nálí (paternal family) was Naakai dine’é (Mexican People Clan).”[2]

Code talker
He enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in January 1944 during World War II.[3] Willeto joined the 6th Marine Division, serving in the Pacific Theater in Saipan and Okinawa as a Navajo code talker.[3] The code talkers’ role in the war was not disclosed until 1968, when documents on the talkers were declassified.[1] Willeto and other surviving Navajo code talkers were awarded the Congressional Silver Medal in 2001.[1][3]

Career
He returned to the Navajo Nation following the end of World War II. He was employed in the roads department of the Bureau of Indian Affairs from 1946 until 1974.[1] Willeto then joined the United States Department of Education.[4]

Willeto was elected to the Navajo Nation Council in 1974.[4] He remained on the council until 1986, when he was elected as the president of the Pueblo Pintado Chapter.[4] Willeto also served as a judge on the former Navajo Supreme Judicial Council, a precursor to the present-day Supreme Court of the Navajo Nation.[1][4]

On July 23, 1998, Navajo Nation President Thomas Atcitty was removed from office by the Navajo Nation Council for ethics violations.[5] Atcitty was succeeded by Milton Bluehouse, Sr., Atcitty’s vice president, as interim president one day later.[1] Bluehouse appointed Willeto as vice president of the Navajo Nation in August 1998.[1][3] Together, Bluehouse and Willeto ran as running mates for a full, four-year term in the November 1998 presidential election.[6] Kelsey Begaye won the general election and was inaugurated on January 12, 1999. Willeto remained vice president within the Bluehouse administration until Begaye took office.[3]

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FYI

 
 
 
 
By Baba Ahmed | Associated Press: French forces kill Al Qaeda’s North African commander
 
 
 
 
By Christina Ayele Djossa, Atlas Obscura: The First (Documented) Black Woman to Serve in the U.S. Army
 
 
 
 
By Jenn O’Connor, The Washington Post: I learned the impact of prolonged exposure to stress from my foster child
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky, Gizmodo: Surreal Landslide Sweeps Several Homes Into Norwegian Fjord
 
 
 
 
By Lauren Katzenberg Editor, At War, The New York Times: At War: When U.S. veterans marched on Washington
 
 
 
 
Women’s Bureau, U.S. Department of Labor: The Women’s Bureau Turns 100 Today
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Ava DuVernay’s Selma Is Now Free to Stream Online: Watch the Oscar-Winning Director’s Film About Martin Luther King’s 1965 Voting-Rights March
 
 
 
 
Mark Bittman: Support Anti-Racist Food and Farming Organizations
 
 
 
 
By Jefferson Graham, USA TODAY: Work from home, but have no room? Buy an Airstream RV
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Taco Spaghetti Squash Bowls
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Rhubarb Curd Recipe
 
 
By Caroline Stanko, Taste of Home: 100 Father’s Day Desserts Your Dad Will Love


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 05, 2020

On This Day

1257 – Kraków, in Poland, receives city rights.[1]
Kraków (/ˈkrækaʊ, -koʊ/, also US: /ˈkreɪk-, ˈkrɑːkaʊ/, UK: /ˈkrækɒf/,[3][4] Polish: [ˈkrakuf] (About this soundlisten)), written in English as Krakow and traditionally known as Cracow, is the second largest and one of the oldest cities in Poland. Situated on the Vistula River in Lesser Poland Province, the city dates back to the 7th century.[5] Kraków was the official capital of Poland until 1596[6] and has traditionally been one of the leading centres of Polish academic, economic, cultural and artistic life. Cited as one of Europe’s most beautiful cities,[7] its Old Town was declared the first UNESCO World Heritage Site in the world.

The city has grown from a Stone Age settlement to Poland’s second most important city. It began as a hamlet on Wawel Hill and was already being reported as a busy trading centre of Central Europe in 965.[5] With the establishment of new universities and cultural venues at the emergence of the Second Polish Republic in 1918 and throughout the 20th century, Kraków reaffirmed its role as a major national academic and artistic centre. The city has a population of about 770,000, with approximately 8 million additional people living within a 100 km (62 mi) radius of its main square.[8]

After the invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany at the start of World War II, the newly defined Distrikt Krakau (Kraków District) became the capital of Germany’s General Government. The Jewish population of the city was forced into a walled zone known as the Kraków Ghetto, from which they were sent to German extermination camps such as the nearby Auschwitz, and the Nazi concentration camps like Płaszów.[9] However, the city was spared from destruction and major bombing.

In 1978, Karol Wojtyła, archbishop of Kraków, was elevated to the papacy as Pope John Paul II—the first non-Italian pope in 455 years.[10] Also that year, UNESCO approved Kraków’s entire Old Town and historic centre as its first World Heritage List alongside Quito.[11][12] Kraków is classified as a global city with the ranking of high sufficiency by GaWC.[13] Its extensive cultural heritage across the epochs of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque architecture includes the Wawel Cathedral and the Royal Castle on the banks of the Vistula, the St. Mary’s Basilica, Saints Peter and Paul Church and the largest medieval market square in Europe, the Rynek Główny.[14] Kraków is home to Jagiellonian University, one of the oldest universities in the world and traditionally Poland’s most reputable institution of higher learning.

In 2000, Kraków was named European Capital of Culture. In 2013, Kraków was officially approved as a UNESCO City of Literature.[15] The city hosted the World Youth Day in July 2016.[16]

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Born On This Day

1646 – Elena Cornaro Piscopia, Italian mathematician and philosopher (d. 1684)
Elena Lucrezia Cornaro Piscopia (US: /kɔːrˌnɑːroʊ pɪˈskoʊpiə/,[4] Italian: [ˈɛːlena luˈkrɛttsja korˈnaːro piˈskɔːpja]) or Elena Lucrezia Corner (Italian: [korˈnɛr]; 5 June 1646 – 26 July 1684), also known in English as Helen Cornaro, was a Venetian philosopher of noble descent who in 1678 became one of the first women to receive an academic degree from a university, and the first to receive a Doctor of Philosophy degree.

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FYI

 
 
 
 

The Rural Blog: Appeals court bans dicamba-based herbicide sales in U.S. for 6 months; EPA is likely to reauthorize it for next year and more ->
 
 
 
 
Hannah Ellis-Petersen South Asia correspondent, The Guardian: Killing of elephant with explosive-laden fruit causes outrage in India Death of pregnant animal from pineapple filled with firecrackers sparks anger
Kerala chief minister Pinarayi Vijayan confirmed that an investigation was being carried out into the elephant’s death, and that one arrest had been made.

“We want to assure you that your concerns will not go in vain. Justice will prevail,” tweeted Vijayan.

Kerala Forest Department meanwhile pledged that it would “leave no stone unturned to ensure max punishment to the offenders”.
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Jagged Little Tapes
These transitional audio recording formats were briefly dominant—then, quickly grew obscure. The further back you go, the more obscure they get.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Jill Nystul, One Good Thing: The 2 Easy DIY Treatments You Need To Fight Thinning Hair
 
 
 
 

Recipes