Tag: History

Videos March 27, 2018

Vector’s World: His Lucky Day

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Baby parrots, not parakeets.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

delanceyplace archive | daily eclectic excerpts by editor Richard Vague | the founding fathers made scottish lords rich — 11/3/17

delanceyplace archive | daily eclectic excerpts by editor Richard Vague | www.delanceyplace.com

Women pioneers talk early Alaska days

Graduation held in an airport hangar, harrowing commutes to work across the tumultuous Cook Inlet, and mail dropped by airplanes overhead. While these may sound like situations of the far-off past, some Homer residents alive and well today are here to dispel that notion.

Women pioneers talk early Alaska days

The Public Domain Review: Latest Newsletter


Race and the White Elephant War of 1884

Feuding impresarios, a white-but-not-white-enough elephant, and racist ads for soap — Ross Bullen on how a bizarre episode in circus history became an unlikely forum for discussing 19th-century theories of race, and inadvertently laid bare the ideological constructions at their heart.

The Civil War Sketches of Adolph Metzner (1861–64)

Remarkable collection of sketches, drawings, and watercolours left to us by Adolph Metzner, during his three years of service with the 1st German, 32nd Regiment Indiana Infantry.

Source: Latest Newsletter | The Public Domain Review

THE 19th CENTURY RARE BOOK & PHOTOGRAPH SHOP: AMERICAN HISTORY Books & Photographs

The 19th Century Rare Book & Photograph Shop

New Orleans Has Been Using the Same Technology to Drain the City Since the 1910s – Atlas Obscura

The Wood screw pumps are mechanical marvels, but the turbines that power them are another story.

Source: New Orleans Has Been Using the Same Technology to Drain the City Since the 1910s – Atlas Obscura

Delanceyplace: Manchester, Children, and Sunlight

“A century before the role of the sun in preventing rickets was established, a doctor testifying before a parliamentary com­mission investigating night work by children in the factories argued that sunlight was critical to children’s growth. He pointed out that the deformities common in the industrial towns were absent among Mexicans and Peruvians, who were continu­ously exposed to light. These concerns were brushed aside by Dr. Andrew Ure, who wrote a lengthy defense of the factory sys­tem in his 1835 book The Philosophy of Manufactures, and who was certain that the brilliant coal-gas lighting of a cotton mill was more than adequate to meet the developmental needs of the young ‘factory inmates.’ ”

Daily eclectic excerpts by editor Richard Vague |Delanceyplace: Manchester, Children, and Sunlight

delanceyplace archive by editor Richard Vague Hobo Teenagers — 10/04/17

Hobo Teenagers — 10/04/17

Today’s selection — from The Great Railroad Revolution by Christian Wolmar. The two predominant eras for hoboes — the common slang term for migrant laborers, especially those who illegally traveled on trains — were the years after the Civil War and the years of the Great Depression:

delanceyplace archive by editor Richard Vague Hobo Teenagers — 10/04/17

Deserted Places: Tiki Palace: An abandoned Playboy mansion in Tennessee

Source: Deserted Places: Tiki Palace: An abandoned Playboy mansion in Tennessee

Chicken and Waffles: The Most Complete Expression of Southern Culinary Skills, Part 2


The small town of Gordonsville, Virginia, located at an intersection that connected Richmond with the Shenandoah Valley, gained fame for the quality of its fried chicken, sold trackside to passengers by an army of waiter-carriers.

Source: Chicken and Waffles: The Most Complete Expression of Southern Culinary Skills, Part 2