Tag: Military

FYI April 04, 2017 How Military Veterans Turned Entrepreneurs Are Disrupting The Pentagon’s Weapons Program | Fast Company

Source: How Veterans Turned Entrepreneurs Are Disrupting The Pentagon’s Weapons Program | Fast Company

Music March 31, 2017

RED Friday

 

 

 

 

Jeff Baxter
Jeffrey Allen “Skunk” Baxter (born December 13, 1948) is an American guitarist, known for his stints in the rock bands Steely Dan and The Doobie Brothers during the 1970s and Spirit in the 1980s. More recently, he has been working as a defense consultant and chairs a Congressional Advisory Board on missile defense.[1]

 

Doobie Brothers Rock Out for the Troops
They have been playing for troops since the mid-1980s, when vocalist and guitarist Pat Simmons and Johnston went on USO tours of overseas bases as part of all-star bands in successive years.

“I had such a good time on the tour, and we have always believed in supporting our men and women in uniform,” Simmons said. “Other than the fact that we are older, and the troops are younger, I don’t think much has changed. People still love to rock out, and so do we.”

Images March 31, 2017

RED Friday

 

 

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Classic Photograph.

 

Another side of deployment:

A United States serviceman is about to be deployed and is saying goodbye to his newborn daughter.

Quotes March 31, 2017

I am not going to second-guess my old battlefield comrades from Iraq and Afghanistan; each has his own reason for what he has done.
David Petraeus

 

 

There is no God-given right to victory on the battlefield. You win that through the skill and the devotion, the valor and the ferocity of your troops.
James Mattis

 

 

It’s one thing to say don’t commit atrocities on the battlefield. It’s another thing to say don’t get caught doing atrocities.
Oliver North

 

 

On the battlefield, the military pledges to leave no soldier behind. As a nation, let it be our pledge that when they return home, we leave no veteran behind.
Dan Lipinski

 

 

The battlefield is a scene of constant chaos. The winner will be the one who controls that chaos, both his own and the enemies.
Napoleon Bonaparte

 

 

“People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.”
George Orwell

 

 

“It is well that was is so terrible, else we should grow too fond of it.”
General Robert E. Lee

 

 

 

“Tell them of us and say,
For their tomorrow,
We gave our today.”
The Kohima Epitaph

Images March 24, 2017

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military Vietnam war us soldier wounded 1967
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Staff Sgt. Jose A. Medina dances with First Lady Melania Trump during the Salute to Our Armed Services Ball at the National Museum, Washington, D.C., Jan. 20, 2017. The event, one of the three official balls held in celebration of the 58th Presidential Inauguration, paid tribute to members of all branches of the armed forces of the United States, as well as first responders and emergency personnel. (DOD photo by Spc. Abigayle Marks)

 

New Jersey Army National Guard Soldiers from the 1-114 Infantry run through smoke after capturing a high value target during a joint training exercise on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J., Jan. 10, 2017. The Marine Corps Reserve provided airlift and close air support to Alpha Company soldiers of 1-114, which is part of the 50th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Tech. Sgt. Matt Hecht)

 

An Army M109A6 Paladin is the first military vehicle from 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, based in Fort Carson, Colorado, to be loaded onto a railcar for shipment to Poland at the port in Bremerhaven, Germany, Jan. 7, 2017. 3-4 ABCT’s arrival marks the start of back-to-back rotations of armored brigades in Europe as part of Atlantic Resolve. The vehicles and equipment, totaling more than 2,700 pieces, will be shipped to Poland for certification before deploying across Europe for use in training with partner nations. This rotation will enhance deterrence capabilities in the region, improve the U.S. ability to respond to potential crises and defend allies and partners in the European community. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Micah VanDyke)

 

This is the moving moment a Notre Dame player had an emotional surprise reunion with his brother who had returned home from Afghanistan

Hannah Parry: Emotional moment Notre Dame basketball star’s brother returned home early from Afghanistan to surprise him at a game

Quotes March 24, 2017

To different minds, the same world is a hell, and a heaven.
Ralph Waldo Emerson,
writer

 

 

If I died on the battlefield, then that was the way it was supposed to be.
Marcus Luttrell

 

 

The most important 6 inches on the battlefield is between your ears.
James Mattis

 

 

As a veteran, I know firsthand the satisfaction there is in defending the democracy you so strongly believe in, but I can also attest to the trauma encountered from combat on the battlefield.
Charles B. Rangel

 

 

What’s always got me is the fact that when people talked on the telly about Iraq, before Afghanistan kicked off, you’d get only these public-school-type army officers talking about what was going on out there. I kept thinking, ‘Why don’t we get the true voice of the squaddie? Why don’t we hear from the lads on the battlefield?’
Ross Kemp

 

 

America’s fighting men and women sacrifice much to ensure that our great nation stays free. We owe a debt of gratitude to the soldiers that have paid the ultimate price for this cause, as well as for those who are blessed enough to return from the battlefield unscathed.
Allen Boyd

 

 

I have traveled a long road from the battlefield to the peace table.
Moshe Dayan

 

 

The dominant feeling of the battlefield is loneliness.
William Slim

Music March 17, 2017

 

March 15, 2017 U.S. Coast Guard | Alaska Native News

Source: Young Co-Authors Bipartisan Letter Opposing Cuts to U.S. Coast Guard | Alaska Native News

Music & Military March 10, 2017

RED Friday

 

FYI:

Ryan Weaver

 

 

 

Jonathan Miltimore: WARRIOR of the WEEK: John Preston

 

Sylvia Gaenzle: Superman Falls: John Preston’s Mission to Promote Life after Loss

 

The Valkyrie Initiative
The Valkyrie Initiative is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the successful facilitation of the after-downrange transition of Veterans, First Responders and their families.

 

Military March 03, 2017

Leonard P. Matlovich
Receiving the Bronze Star in Vietnam for risking his life to repair base security lighting under nighttime enemy fire.

 

Leonard P. Matlovich
Nearly killed by a landmine, he was hospitalized for months, was awarded the Purple Heart, and still had pieces of shrapnel in him for the rest of his life.

 

Technical Sergeant Leonard P. Matlovich (July 6, 1943 – June 22, 1988)[1] was a Vietnam War veteran, race relations instructor, and recipient of the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star.[2]

Matlovich was the first gay service member to purposely out himself to the military to fight their ban on gays, and perhaps the best-known gay man in America in the 1970s next to Harvey Milk. His fight to stay in the United States Air Force after coming out of the closet became a cause célèbre around which the gay community rallied. His case resulted in articles in newspapers and magazines throughout the country, numerous television interviews, and a television movie on NBC. His photograph appeared on the cover of the September 8, 1975, issue of Time magazine, making him a symbol for thousands of gay and lesbian servicemembers and gay people generally.[3][4][5][6] Matlovich was the first named openly gay person to appear on the cover of a U.S. newsmagazine.[7] According to author Randy Shilts, “It marked the first time the young gay movement had made the cover of a major newsweekly. To a movement still struggling for legitimacy, the event was a major turning point.” [8] In October 2006, Matlovich was honored by LGBT History Month as a leader in the history of the LGBT community.

Early life and early career

Born in Savannah, Georgia, he was the only son of a career Air Force sergeant. He spent his childhood living on military bases, primarily throughout the Southern United States. Matlovich and his sister were raised in the Roman Catholic Church. Not long after he enlisted at 19, the United States increased military action in Vietnam, about ten years after the French had abandoned active colonial rule there. Matlovich volunteered for service in Vietnam and served three tours of duty. He was seriously wounded when he stepped on a landmine in Đà Nẵng.

While stationed in Florida near Fort Walton Beach, he began frequenting gay bars in nearby Pensacola. “I met a bank president, a gas station attendant – they were all homosexual”, Matlovich commented in a later interview. When he was 30, he slept with another man for the first time. He “came out” to his friends, but continued to conceal the fact from his commanding officer. Having realized that the racism he’d grown up around was wrong, he volunteered to teach Air Force Race Relations classes, which had been created after several racial incidents in the military in the late 1960s and early 1970s. He became so successful that the Air Force sent him around the country to coach other instructors. Matlovich gradually came to believe that the discrimination faced by gays was similar to that faced by African Americans.
Activism

In March 1974, previously unaware of the organized gay movement, he read an interview in the Air Force Times with gay activist Frank Kameny, who had counseled several gays in the military over the years. He contacted Kameny, who told him he had long been looking for a gay service member with a perfect record to create a test case to challenge the military’s ban on gays. Four months later, he met with Kameny at the longtime activist’s Washington, D.C. home. After several months of discussion with Kameny and ACLU attorney David Addlestone during which they formulated a plan, he hand-delivered a letter to his Langley AFB commanding officer on March 6, 1975. When his commander asked, “What does this mean?” Matlovich replied, “It means Brown versus the Board of Education” – a reference to the 1954 landmark Supreme Court case outlawing racial segregation in public schools.[9]

Perhaps the most painful aspect of the whole experience for Matlovich was his revelation to his parents. He told his mother by telephone. She was so stunned she refused to tell Matlovich’s father. Her first reaction was that God was punishing her for something she had done, even if her Roman Catholic faith would not have sanctioned that notion. Then, she imagined that her son had not prayed enough or had not seen enough psychiatrists. His father finally found out by reading it in the newspaper, after his challenge became public knowledge on Memorial Day 1975 through an article on the front page of The New York Times and that evening’s CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite. Matlovich recalled, “He cried for about two hours.” After that, he told his wife that, “If he can take it, I can take it.”
Discharge and lawsuit

At that time, the Air Force had a fairly ill-defined exception clause that could allow gays to continue to serve if there were extenuating circumstances. These circumstances might include being immature or drunk, exemplary service, or a one-time experimentation (known sarcastically as the “Queen for a day” rule).[10] During Matlovich’s September 1975 administrative discharge hearing, an Air Force attorney asked him if he would sign a document pledging to “never practice homosexuality again” in exchange for being allowed to remain in the Air Force. Matlovich refused. Despite his exemplary military record, tours of duty in Vietnam, and high performance evaluations, the panel ruled Matlovich unfit for service, and he was recommended for a General (Under Honorable Conditions) discharge. The base commander, Alton J. Thogersen, citing Matlovich’s service record, recommended that it be upgraded to Honorable. The Secretary of the Air Force agreed, confirming Matlovich’s discharge in October 1975.[11] He sued for reinstatement, but the legal process was a long one, with the case moving back and forth between United States District and Circuit Courts.[12] When, by September 1980, the Air Force had failed to provide U.S. District Court Judge Gerhard Gesell an explanation of why Matlovich did not meet its criteria for exception (which by then had been eliminated but still could have applied to him), Gesell ordered him reinstated into the Air Force and promoted. The Air Force offered Matlovich a financial settlement instead. Convinced that the military would find some other reason to discharge him if he reentered the service, or that the conservative Supreme Court would rule against him should the Air Force appeal, Matlovich accepted. The figure, based on back pay, future pay, and pension, was $160,000.[13]
Excommunication

A converted Mormon and church elder when he lived in Hampton, Virginia, Matlovich found himself at odds with the Latter-day Saints and their opposition to homosexual behavior: he was twice excommunicated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for homosexual acts. He was first excommunicated on October 7, 1975, in Norfolk, Virginia, and then again January 17, 1979, after his appearance on the The Phil Donahue Show in 1978, without being rebaptized.[clarification needed] But, by this time, Matlovich had stopped being a believer at all.[7]
Settlement, later life and illness
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From the moment his case was revealed to the public, Matlovich was repeatedly called upon by gay groups to help them with fundraising and advocating against anti-gay discrimination, helping lead campaigns against Anita Bryant’s efforts in Miami, Florida, to overturn a gay nondiscrimination ordinance and John Briggs’ attempt to ban gay teachers in California. Sometimes he was criticized by individuals more to the left than he had become. “I think many gays are forced into liberal camps only because that’s where they can find the kind of support they need to function in society,” Matlovich once noted. After being discharged, he moved from Virginia to Washington, D.C., and, in 1978, to San Francisco. In 1981, he moved to the Russian River town of Guerneville, where he used the proceeds of his settlement to open a pizza restaurant.

With the outbreak of HIV/AIDS in the U.S. in the late 1970s, Leonard’s personal life was caught up in the hysteria about the virus that peaked in the 1980s. He sold his Guerneville restaurant in 1984, moving to Europe for a few months where, during a visit to the joint grave of lovers Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas and the grave of gay writer Oscar Wilde in Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, France, he got the idea for a gay memorial in the United States. He returned briefly to Washington, D.C., in 1985 and, then, to San Francisco where he sold Ford cars and once again became heavily involved in gay rights causes and the fight for adequate HIV-AIDS education and treatment.

In 1986, Matlovich felt fatigued, then contracted a prolonged chest cold he seemed unable to shake. When he finally saw a physician in September of that year, he was diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Too weak to continue his work at the Ford dealership, he was among the first to receive AZT treatments, but his prognosis was not encouraging. He went on disability benefits and became a champion for HIV/AIDS research for the disease which was claiming tens of thousands of lives in the Bay Area and nationally. He announced on Good Morning America in 1987 that he had contracted HIV, and was arrested with other demonstrators in front of the White House that June protesting what they believed was an inadequate response to HIV-AIDS by the administration of President Ronald Reagan.

Despite his deteriorating health, he tearfully made his last public speech on May 7, 1988, in front of the California State Capitol during the March on Sacramento for Gay and Lesbian Rights:

…And I want you to look at the flag, our rainbow flag, and I want you to look at it with pride in your heart, because we too have a dream. And what is our dream? Ours is more than an American dream. It’s a universal dream. Because in South Africa, we’re black and white, and in Northern Ireland, we’re Protestant and Catholic, and in Israel we’re Jew and Muslim. And our mission is to reach out and teach people to love, and not to hate. And you know the reality of the situation is that before we as an individual meet, the only thing we have in common is our sexuality. And in the AIDS crisis – and I have AIDS – and in the AIDS crisis, if there is any one word that describes our community’s reaction to AIDS, that word is love, love, love.

Death

On June 22, 1988, less than a month before his 45th birthday, Matlovich died in Los Angeles of complications from HIV/AIDS[1] beneath a large photo of Martin Luther King, Jr. His tombstone, meant to be a memorial to all gay veterans, does not bear his name. It reads, “When I was in the military, they gave me a medal for killing two men and a discharge for loving one.” Matlovich’s tombstone at Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. is in the same row as that of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover.
Legacy
Matlovich’s tombstone at the Congressional Cemetery, which reads:
“A Gay Vietnam Veteran
When I was in the military, they gave me a medal for killing two men and a discharge for loving one.”

Before his death, Matlovich donated his personal papers and memorabilia to the GLBT Historical Society, a museum, archival and research center in San Francisco.[14] The society has featured Matlovich’s story in two exhibitions: “Out Ranks: GLBT Military Service From World War II to the Iraq War”, which opened in June 2007 at the society’s South of Market gallery space, and “Our Vast Queer Past: Celebrating San Francisco’s GLBT History”, which opened in January 2011 at the society’s new GLBT History Museum in the Castro District.[15][16][17] A bronze plaque in his memory was installed near the entrance of the apartment in which he once lived at the corner of 18th and Castro Streets in San Francisco. In October 2012, another, larger bronze memorial plaque was installed on Chicago’s Halsted Street as a part of the Legacy Walk,[18] an “outdoor museum” of LGBT historical figures including Milk, Wilde, Barbara Gittings, Bayard Rustin, and Alan Turing, and the Legacy Project Education Initiative in Illinois public schools. In 2013, a memorial to Kameny (1925–2011) was added next to his.

San Francisco resident Michael Bedwell, a close friend and the original executor of Matlovich’s estate, created a website in honor of Matlovich and other gay U.S. veterans. The site includes a history of the ban on gays in the U.S. military both before and after its transformation into “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”, and illustrates the role that gay veterans fighting the ban played in the earliest development of the gay rights movement in the United States.[19]

Matlovich’s gravesite has been a site of attraction and ceremony for LGBT rights activists since his interment. Activists including Army Lt. Dan Choi, Army Staff Sergeant Miriam Ben-Shalom and members of GetEQUAL held a vigil at Matlovich’s gravesite on November 10, 2010 before proceeding to chain themselves to the White House fence (and be subsequently arrested) to protest “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”.[20]
In May 2011, gay Iraq veteran Capt. Stephen Hill, who would later become famous for being booed by audience members during a Republican presidential candidates debate for asking whether any would attempt to restore “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”, and his partner Josh Snyder chose to be legally married next to the gravesite to honor Matlovich’s fight against the original ban. The site features a QRpedia Quick Response code which, when scanned by a smart phone, will result in the phone displaying this Wikipedia article.