Tag: Pvt. James P. “Alvin” Shaw

Military April 05, 2019

Go For Broke: Army Unit’s Motto Now a National Day
But why choose April 5 to become “Go For Broke” Day? It was on April 5, 1945, that the 442nd RCT’s first Medal of Honor recipient, Pfc. Sadao Munemori, was killed in action near Seravezza, Italy.

Sadao Munemori (Japanese: 旨森 貞雄, August 17, 1922 – April 5, 1945) was a United States Army soldier[1] and posthumous recipient of the Medal of Honor, after he sacrificed his life to save those of his fellow soldiers at Seravezza, Italy during World War II.[2][3]

Munemori was a private first class in the United States Army, in Company A, 100th Infantry Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team.[4] For his actions, when the 442nd was part of the 92d Infantry Division, he was the only Japanese American to be awarded the Medal of Honor during or immediately after World War II.[5]

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By Associated Press: Funeral Set for US Soldier who Died in North Korea in 1951
 
 
 
 
By Sara-Megan Walsh: WWII Aircraft Prepared to Retrace D-Day Flight
“We’re not trying to glorify war in the Commemorative Air Force, we’re trying to teach history and to honor those who served,” he said.

Travis said he’s had the honor of bringing many military veterans up in different aircraft to reflect their past experiences. His own father served in the U.S. Army during World War II, where he was killed in Italy 14 days before the fighting ended.

“It’s important to teach history to kids,” he said. “What [veterans] went through to give them the freedoms they have today.”
 
 
 
 
By Danielle Ohl: McSally to Service Academies: Stop Putting 19-Year-Olds in Charge of 18-Year-Olds
 
 
 
 
Special Operations Forces Profile: Chris Kyle
 
 
 
 
The Associated Press: Navy: 1 Hurt in ‘Domestic’ Shooting at NAS Oceana, Shooter Killed
 
 
 
 
By Reuters: The Pentagon has kicked off its new ‘narrowly-scoped’ Niger ambush review
 
 
 
 
The Angry Staff Officer Friday Fuming: WWII and Expectation Management
WWII and the Marshall Plan worked too well. They ruined the expectations of military leaders and policy wonks for generations to come. Which is why, if you hear “Well it worked in WWII,” run swiftly in the other direction, because it is the siren song of the best of all possible wars.