Tag: WWII

Military February 08, 2018

By Blake Essig: Operation Afghanistan: Interpreters risk their own lives for a better oneIt took Ansari about two and a half years to learn to read, write and speak English. He says with no native speakers to teach the proper pronunciation of words, he learned by watching movies and translating books from English to Dari.

Most of the interpreters working for the U.S. military are on two-year contracts, earning between $300 and $900 a month. Upon completion of their contract, linguists are able to apply for a Special Immigrant Visa, a program which allows up to 50 people annually, who have worked for the U.S. Armed Forces in Afghanistan or Iraq, to be issued a visa to enter the United States.
 
 
 
 
By Blake Essig Operation Afghanistan: Soldier puts musical dreams on hold to answer call to dutyBy Scott Gross: Can Alaska properly respond to a catastrophic emergency?
 
 
 
 
By Jim Garamone DoD News, Defense Media Activity: U.S.-Thai Leaders Reaffirm Military-to-Military Relationship
 
 
 
 
By Army Spc. Noelle E. Wiehe, 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade: Face of Defense: Combat Medic Looks Forward to First Deployment
 
 
 
 
By Shireen Bedi, Office of the Air Force Surgeon General: Robotic Surgery Training Program Aims at Improving Patient Outcomes
 
 
 
 
Timeline: Sophie Scholl was beheaded at 21 for standing up to the Nazis
Sophia Magdalena Scholl (9 May 1921 – 22 February 1943) was a German student and anti-Nazi political activist, active within the White Rose non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany.[1][2]

She was convicted of high treason after having been found distributing anti-war leaflets at the University of Munich (LMU) with her brother, Hans. As a result, they were both executed by guillotine. Since the 1970s, Scholl has been extensively commemorated for her anti-Nazi resistance work.
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Francis ‘Jeep’ Sanza, General Patton’s Driver During World War II, Has Died At Age 99
The article states that, according to Sanza’s son, Nick, Francis didn’t talk about the war until he was in his ’70s. By then, he had married a woman who had helped build battleships and submarines during the war, and then settled in Napa, had children, and spent time working in an ammunition depot. In 1959, he became a beer distribution driver for Olympia Beer, and later a supervisor in 1975.

Military February 03, 2018

By Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin, 18th Wing Public Affairs: Big Gas Mission; Small Team
 
 
 
 
By Katie Lange Defense Media Activity: #OTD: 4 Chaplains Bring Saving Grace to Sinking WWII Ship
Some of the most vital members of the military aren’t those you see on the frontlines, but the ones who stand quietly in the background.

These silent warriors include the members of the Chaplain Corps – the men and women tasked with making sure all service members have spiritual, moral and ethical guidance when they need it. Chaplains serve at all levels and represent many faith groups. They deploy and train with everyone else. And while the chaplains – commissioned ordained clergy – are noncombatants, their enlisted assistants can fight in battle to protect them.

These men and women are bonded to their fellow soldiers. One of the most famous examples of that commitment occurred on Feb. 3, 1943 – a day now known as “Four Chaplains Day.” Here’s why:
 
 
 
 
By Mikaela Cade, Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center: Second Lady Karen Pence Advocates Art Therapy for Wounded Warriors
 
 
 
 
By Senior Airman Kaylee Dubois 633rd Air Base Wing: Face of Defense: Army Service Reunites Military Cousins
 
 
 
 
Guardsmen Assist Police With Super Bowl Security

 
 
 
 
Alaska Soldiers Brave Cold Weather During Arctic Thrust Exercise
 
 
 
 
Week in Photos: Jan. 27-Feb. 2

Military February 01, 2018

Today in the Department of Defense, February 1, 2018
 
 
 
 
By Terri Moon Cronk DoD News, Defense Media Activity: Mattis, Tillerson Co-Host First U.S.-Qatar Strategic Dialogue
 
 
 
 
By Marine Corps Sgt. Mandaline Hatch, 6th Marine Corps District: Face of Defense: Marine Recruiter Volunteers for Father-Daughter Dance
 
 
 
 
By Jim Garamone DoD News, Defense Media Activity: Budget Impasse, Continuing Resolutions Pose Problems for DoD
 
 
 
 
By Alex: WW2 political cartoons are a look into one of history’s most trying times (19 photos)
 
 
 
 
By Anika Burgess: How Photographers Captured the Incarceration of Japanese Americans During WWII
 
 
 
 
By Katie Lange Defense Media Activity: A Day With Cha’lee: What Drove This Navy Comedian to Standup

 
 
 
 
Imminent Threat Solutions: Military Acronyms,Terminology and Slang Reference
 
 
 
 
Glossary of Military Acronyms
 
 
 
 
US Army Acronyms (slang)

A Redleg’s Rides: Sun City Sundial, an old WWII Airfield near Surprise, AZ and Sunset Self Portraits

Friday, while my FIL was doing a very light workout at the Sundial Rec Center in Sun City, I wandered about outside to take pictures of the center’s name sake.

Saturday mid-morning through 1:30PM, explored the area near the regional landfill which had looked promising in terms of trails and off road opportunities. I encountered more fenced off areas than I hoped for so exploration was limited.

Still I did manage to explore what used to be the Wittman Army Air Corps Auxiliary Field back in WWII and is now the Luke AFB Auxiliary Airfield. Per the following link, it’s only used now for practicing approaches by light aircraft without actually landing as the surface conditions are pretty rough. LINK

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Military January 27, 2018

By Shawn Snow: Top Marine warns a ‘big ass fight’ with North Korea will not go according to plan
 
 
 
 
By Shawn Snow: California mountain to be named after Marine killed in Afghanistan
 
 
 
 
By John Fannin: Secretary of Defense Mattis Reads This Book, So Should You

‘Meditations’ of Marcus Aurelius
 
 
 
 
By David B. Larter: US Navy’s top officer to new surface boss: Unite the clans
 
 
 
 
By Nicole Bauke: Army captain honored with Soldier’s Medal two years after death
 
 
 
 
By Kyle Rempfer Military Times: ‘Unlike anything I had ever seen’: Airman to receive Silver Star for actions in fierce Mosul fight
 
 
 
 
By John Fannin: Grunt Style Funny Shorts: YouTube Argument
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday: How the Fences & Railings Adorning London’s Buildings Doubled (by Design) as Civilian Stretchers in World War II

Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPs and WAVES – Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service

Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, or WASPs and WAVES – Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service

“Homefront Heroines” follows a group of quirky, individual and determined women who decided to go where no woman had gone before — into the Navy as WAVES. It tells the story of the more than 100,000 women who joined the Navy during World War II.


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What We Learn From History To Overcome The Toughest Of Challenges

What We Learn From History To Overcome The Toughest Of Challenges
Brian Lee

One of the most raw and intensely emotional documentary which showcases human perseverance, and the ability of one to overcome overwhelming atrocities. Prisoner Number A26188: Henia Bryer is a film that provides great insight of how, even at the edge, one’s spirit overcomes all challenges. It’s truly a monument of a movie that should be preserved for future generations to enjoy and learn from. This movie takes you down the rabbit hole and makes you feel truly indulged.

This movie is perfect for people who want to be motivated as well as be deeply inspired by the challenges that have been portrayed and the life-altering lessons that can be learned from this documentary. It is a testament to how even the toughest of challenges can be overcome.

A glimpse into what it was like living under Nazi ruling, and how one girl’s battle through the odds to survive will give you hope to get through yours.

What We Learn From History To Overcome The Toughest Of Challenges

Military December 14, 2017

Maria Popova Brain Pickings: Code Girls: The Untold Story of the Women Cryptographers Who Fought WWII at the Intersection of Language and Mathematics Liza Mundy
“Virtually as soon as humans developed the ability to speak and write, somebody somewhere felt the desire to say something to somebody else that could not be understood by others.”

More…
 
 
 
 
Another article on Robert Lawrence, Jr.
By Ashawnta Jackson: Remembering the Groundbreaking Life of the First Black Astronaut
Robert Lawrence Jr.’s accomplishments are finally being recognized.

More…
 
 
 
 
By Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Jonah Baase 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit: Face of Defense: Embarkation Marine Lives in the Details
CAMP HANSEN, Japan, Dec. 13, 2017 — Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Vivianlee Aguero thrives in a high operational tempo. “I love putting all of my effort into my job, because I can see it in the product,” she said. “Staying motivated and pushing through the busiest work times is the most satisfying feeling once it’s done.”

More…
 
 
 
 
By Patrick Bray DLIFLC Public Affairs: Afghan Native-Turned Army Linguist Fulfills His American Dream

“I never saw the U.S. as invaders. I saw them as liberators because they liberated me and my family.”
Staff Sgt. Mashal Shekib

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Quotes December 08, 2017

“The battlefront disappeared, and with it the illusion that there had ever been a battlefront. For this was no war of occupation, but a war of quick penetration and obliteration – Blitzkrieg, Lightning War.” – September 25th, 1939
Unknown TIME Magazine Writer
 
 
 
 
“The Germans should have thought of some of these things before they began the war, particularly before attacking the Russians.” – referring to a German soldier’s request to surrender only to British or American forces and not the Russians.
British General Bernard Law Montgomery
 
 
 
 
“In a life and death struggle, we cannot afford to leave our destinies in the hands of failures.” – on the British handling of the war in Norway
British Labor Party Opposition Leader Clement Atlee
 
 
 
 
“The Chinese soldier was tough, brave, and experienced. After all he had been fighting on his own without help for years. He was a veteran among the Allies.”
American General Bill Slim
 
 
 
 
“How horrible, how fantastic, how incredible it is that we should be digging trenches and trying on gas masks here because of a quarrel in a faraway country between people of whom we know nothing.”-1938

“It is evil things we shall be fighting against, brute force, bad faith, injustice, oppression and persecution.”-1939
British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain
 
 
 
 
“They sowed the wind, and now they are going to reap the whirlwind.”
British Air Marshal “Bomber” Harris
 
 
 
 
“The Russian Colossus…has been underestimated by us…whenever a dozen divisions are destroyed the Russians replace them with another dozen.” – Commenting on the might of the Soviet Army following the invasion of the Soviet Union
German Army General Chief of Staff Franz Haldervon Armin

 
 
 
 
The hand that held the dagger has struck it into the back of its neighbor.
President Franklin D. Roosevelt (speaking of when Italy invaded her neighboring country, France)
 
 
 
 
Peace is absurd: Fascism does not believe in it.
Benito Mussolini, Fascist Dictator
 
 
 
 
When I said that British fighter-bombers had shot up my tanks with 40mm shells, the Reichsmarschall who felt himself touched by this, said: ‘That’s completely impossible. The Americans only know how to make razor blades.’ I replied: ‘We could do with some of those razor blades, Herr Reichsmarshall.’
Field Marshall Erwin Rommel
 
 
 
 
“Oh merciful lord… crown our effort with victory… and give us faith in the inevitable power of light over darkness, of justice over evil and brutal force… Of the cross of Christ over the Fascist swastika… so be it, amen.”
Sergei – Archbishop of Moscow – 27th November 1941
 
 
 
 
“Goddam it, you’ll never get the Purple Heart hiding in a foxhole! Follow me!”
Captain Henry P. Jim Crowe – 13th January 1943 – (Guadalcanal)
 
 
 
 
And when he gets to Heaven
To St. Peter he will tell:
‘One more Marine reporting, Sir — I’ve served my time in Hell.’
Sgt. James A. Donahue
First Marine Division

Military December 07, 2017

By Katie Lange Defense Media Activity: As Pearl Harbor Survivors Dwindle, Their Stories Remain Timeless

 
 
 
 

Author: Dan Lamothe, The Washington Post The secrets and service of a World War II family, 76 years after Pearl Harbor
 
 
 
 
Lockheed During World War II: Operation Camouflage
During the afternoon of December 7, 1941, as word of the attack on Pearl Harbor reached California, some 53,000 Lockheed employees, spread across 150 Southern California communities, stepped outside their homes to watch as countless P-38 fighters and Hudson bombers streak across the sky.

In the wake of the attack, orders had been given to get every aircraft that could fly into the air. Some flew west to protect the nation against a potential Japanese attack on the coast. Others were guided inland to protect against feared strafing runs. And still others patrolled the skies to provide the nation a sense of security in a time of crisis.

Three days later, while company officials gathered at Lockheed’s Burbank plant to decide how best to ramp up production, the Army began setting up barricades around the facility and placed an urgent call to a Col. John F. Ohmer stationed at March Field, 70 miles away.

Ohmer’s mission? Find a way to disguise Lockheed’s plant—now one of the most strategic military facilities in the United States—to look like an ordinary California suburb.

More..
 
 
 
 
Edwards AFB Satellite Calibration Targets
 
 
World’s Largest Compass Rose
 
 
 
 
By Army Capt. Robert Taylor, Idaho Army National Guard: Face of Defense: Daughter Follows Father’s Path to National Guard
BOISE, Idaho, Dec. 6, 2017 — On Nov. 2, Army Lt. Col. Paul Boice raised his right hand and cited the oath of enlistment. It was the first time he had ever sworn someone into the Idaho Army National Guard.
The enlistee was Boice’s 17-year-old daughter, Army Pvt. Simmone Boice.
 
 
 
 
By Army Pfc. Calab Franklin, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division: Fort Stewart Soldiers Stand Together to Prevent Suicide
FORT STEWART, Ga., Dec. 6, 2017 — Soldiers and civilians assigned here and to Hunter Army Airfield gathered here Dec. 1 to promote awareness and offer resources to help prevent suicide.

Medical professionals from the 3rd Infantry Division’s 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team and embedded behavioral health specialists from Fort Stewart used the backdrop of a car show to engage participants in conversation surrounding suicide. The event included a guest speaker, personal testimonials, musical entertainment, food trucks and more.

The guest speaker was Jason Roncoroni, a retired Army lieutenant colonel and a mental health advocate. Roncoroni also once served as the garrison commander of Hunter Army Airfield. During his 2015 retirement speech he moved the audience by highlighting his struggle in coping with stress. Roncoroni now uses his story to help and inspire those who deal with similar challenges.