Word of the Day

National Day Calendar

Shorpy

Alaska Safety, Road & Weather Information and ADF&G Cameras

LexisNexis Community Crime Map

 
Quick View of  Traffic Cameras, Road Conditions, etc.
 
 
Alaska Weather Links
Weather Camera’s including FAA, Observation & Forecast Links, NWS Forecasts, Satellite & Radar Imagary, Other
 
 
Weather Underground
 
 
Tim Kelley: Crust Outlook Alaska
 
 

Virtual Viewing Webcams: Trail & Wildlife

FYI October 27, 2021

On This Day

1838 – Missouri governor Lilburn Boggs issues the Extermination Order, which orders all Mormons to leave the state or be killed.
Missouri Executive Order 44, commonly known as the Mormon Extermination Order,[1][2] was an executive order issued on October 27, 1838, by the Governor of Missouri, Lilburn Boggs. The order was issued in the aftermath of the Battle of Crooked River, a clash between Mormons and a unit of the Missouri State Militia in northern Ray County, Missouri, during the 1838 Mormon War. Claiming that the Mormons had committed open and avowed defiance of the law and had made war upon the people of Missouri, Governor Boggs directed that “the Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the State if necessary for the public peace—their outrages are beyond all description”.[2] The Militia and other state authorities—General John B. Clark, among them—used the executive order to violently expel the Mormons from their lands in the state following their capitulation, which in turn led to their forced migration to Nauvoo, Illinois. The order was supported by most northwest Missouri citizens but was questioned or denounced by a few. However, no determination of the order’s legality was ever made. On June 25, 1976, Governor Kit Bond issued an executive order rescinding the Extermination Order, recognizing its legal invalidity and formally apologizing on behalf of the State of Missouri for the suffering it had caused the Mormons.[3]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1910 – Margaret Hutchinson Rousseau, American chemical engineer (d. 2000)
Margaret Hutchinson Rousseau (27 October 1910 – 12 January 2000) was an American chemical engineer who designed the first commercial penicillin production plant.[1][2] She was the first female member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.[3]

Life
Hutchinson was born in 1910 in Houston, Texas, the daughter of a clothing store owner. She received her Bachelor of Science degree from Rice Institute in 1932 and her Doctor of Science degree in chemical engineering from MIT in 1937, the first woman to earn a doctorate in the subject in the USA.[4] Her thesis topic was The effect of solute on the liquid film resistance in gas absorption.[2]

On 1 May 1939, she married William Caubu Rousseau, a co-worker at E.B. Badger & Sons, who was later a chemical engineering lecturer at MIT. They had one son, William.[citation needed]

She died 12 January 2000, aged 89, at her home in Weston, Massachusetts.[4]

Career
Hutchinson started her professional career with E. B. Badger in Boston. During the Second World War, she oversaw the design of production plants for the strategically important materials of penicillin and synthetic rubber.[5] Her development of deep-tank fermentation of penicillium mold enabled large-scale production of penicillin.[2][6] She worked on the development of high-octane gasoline for aviation fuel.[2] Her later work included improved distillation column design and plants for the production of ethylene glycol and glacial acetic acid.[5]

Hutchinson retired in 1961, and later became an overseer of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.[7]

Honors
In 1945, Hutchinson became the first woman to be accepted as a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.[8][3] In 1955 she received the Achievement Award of the Society of Women Engineers.[7][9] In 1983 she was the first female recipient of the prestigious Founders Award of the AIChE.[3]

 
 

FYI

Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: Rural community colleges can help with nursing shortage; start shopping early for the holidays, Verizon and Amazon team up on major rural satellite broadband system and more ->
 
 
 
 
Wynning History: Letters from War: Irvin Schwartz’s World War II correspondence with the West Schuylkill Press-Herald
 
 
 
 
National Science Foundation Update: Ready for some spooky science? Brace yourself, and dive into a dreadful dozen … If you dare And remember – it’s all true
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smiht, Tedium: The Animal Years
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Yale Professor Jason Stanley Identifies 10 Tactics of Fascism: The “Cult of the Leader,” Law & Order, Victimhood and More
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

907 Updates October 27, 2021

KTUU Alaska’s News Source: Body found in Wasilla house fire A body was discovered in a structure fire late Tuesday in Wasilla.; UAA to expand capacity of the bachelor’s degree in its nursing program; Alaska Mushing District unveils part of project’s decorations and more ->
 
 
 
 
Alaska Native News: This Day In Alaska History October 27th, 1778 and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Seward Journal: October 27 to November 02, 2021
 
 
 
 
2021 Alaska Women Veterans Conference NOVEMBER 9, 2021 | ONLINE
 
 
University Of Alaska Anchorage: Latest Issue Of Elevation Now Available
 
 
University of Alaska Fairbanks: Your fall 2021 Aurora: Shaking up the aging process, squeezing secrets from trees and more!
 
 
 
 
Suzanne Downing, Editor, Must Read Alaska: Wednesday Newsletter – Recall Zaletel results are in and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Spirit Wraps Around You Closing Ceremony
by LAM Webmaster on October 27th, 2021 | Comments

For Immediate Release
October 25, 2021

Juneau – Two dozen Chilkat and Ravenstail woven robes were brought together for the first time, telling the story from origins to present day. To celebrate the robes, their histories, and their weavers at the end of the exhibit, members of the All Nations dance group Yées Ku.oo donned a selection of the robes and danced them back into accessible storage, where most will be returned to their owners and clans who regularly use them in ceremonies.

Featuring the Yées Ku.oo dance group: Alfie Price, David Lang, Disney Williams, Heather Evoy, Nancy C. Barnes, and Walter A. Soboleff Jr.

Special thanks to Nancy Kovalic and Ray Watkins for giving permission for their robes to be included and to Lily Hope for organizing this event.

The closing ceremony can be viewed at https://lam.alaska.gov/sway and at ktoo.org/show/at-the-apk/.

A person experiencing a disability who needs accommodation for events hosted by the Alaska State Library, Archives, and Museum can contact the Division’s ADA coordinator at (907) 465-2912 a week in advance to make any necessary arrangements.

Museum admission fees: adult $9, senior (65 & older) $8; all youth (18 years & younger), as well as Friends members and museum pass holders are free. Assistance is available for visitors with special needs. Please contact Visitor Services at 465-2901 before the visit.

Media Contact:

Patience Frederiksen
Director, Division of Libraries, Archives and Museums
907.465.2911
patience.frederiksen@alaska.gov
lam.alaska.gov

Military October 27, 2021

Military.com: Why Army Vet Mort Sahl Was The Beatles of Comedy and more ->
 
 
Morton Lyon Sahl (May 11, 1927 – October 26, 2021) was a Canadian-born American comedian, actor, and social satirist, considered the first modern comedian in the United States since Will Rogers.[1][2] Sahl pioneered a style of social satire that pokes fun at political and current event topics using improvised monologues and only a newspaper as a prop.

Sahl spent his early years in Los Angeles and moved to the San Francisco Bay Area where he made his professional stage debut at the hungry i nightclub in 1953.[3] His popularity grew quickly, and after a year at the club he traveled the country doing shows at established nightclubs, theaters, and college campuses. In 1960 he became the first comedian to have a cover story written about him by Time magazine. He appeared on various television shows, played a number of film roles, and performed a one-man show on Broadway.

Television host Steve Allen said that Sahl was “the only real political philosopher we have in modern comedy”. His social satire performances broke new ground in live entertainment, as a stand-up comic talking about the real world of politics at that time was considered “revolutionary”. It inspired many later comics to become stage comedians, including Lenny Bruce, Jonathan Winters, George Carlin, and Woody Allen. Allen credits Sahl’s new style of humor with “opening up vistas for people like me”.[4]: 545 

Numerous politicians became his fans, with John F. Kennedy asking him to write his jokes for campaign speeches, though Sahl later turned his barbs at the president. After Kennedy’s assassination in 1963, Sahl focused on the Warren Report’s inaccuracies and conclusions, and spoke about it often during his shows. This alienated much of his audience and led to a decline in his popularity for the remainder of the 1960s. By the 1970s, his shows and popularity staged a partial comeback that continued over the ensuing decades.[5] A biography of Sahl, Last Man Standing, by James Curtis, was released in 2017.[6]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Task & Purpose: We finally know why the Army fired its three-star general in charge of housing The Army’s housing chief was relieved in August 2019. And more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

NSFW

Quotes October 27, 2021

Courtesy of Henrik Edberg, The Positivity Blog Thoughts of Brené Brown

 
 
“I now see how owning our story and loving ourselves through that process is the bravest thing that we will ever do.”
 
 
 
 
“It’s not about ‘what can I accomplish?’ but ‘what do I want to accomplish?’ Paradigm shift.”
 
 
 
 
“I want to be in the arena. I want to be brave with my life. And when we make the choice to dare greatly, we sign up to get our asses kicked. We can choose courage or we can choose comfort, but we can’t have both. Not at the same time.”
 
 
 
 
“To love ourselves and support each other in the process of becoming real is perhaps the greatest single act of daring greatly.”
 
 
 
 
“Daring to set boundaries is about having the courage to love ourselves even when we risk disappointing others.”
 
 
 
 
“When I see people stand fully in their truth, or when I see someone fall down, get back up, and say, ‘Damn. That really hurt, but this is important to me and I’m going in again’—my gut reaction is, ‘What a badass.’”
 
 
 
 
“We run from grief because loss scares us, yet our hearts reach toward grief because the broken parts want to mend.”
 
 
 
 
“Talk about your failures without apologizing.”
 
 
 
 
“Our job is not to deny the story, but to defy the ending—to rise strong, recognize our story, and rumble with the truth until we get to a place where we think, Yes. This is what happened. And I will choose how the story ends.”

Music October 27, 2021

 
 
 
 

FYI October 26, 2021

On This Day

1597 – Imjin War: Korean Admiral Yi Sun-sin routs the Japanese Navy of 300 ships with only 13 ships at the Battle of Myeongnyang.
In the Battle of Myeongnyang, on October 26, 1597, the Korean Joseon Kingdom’s navy, led by Admiral Yi Sun-sin, fought the Japanese navy in the Myeongnyang Strait, near Jindo Island, off the southwest corner of the Korean peninsula.

With only 13 ships remaining from Admiral Won Gyun’s disastrous defeat at the Battle of Chilchonryang, Admiral Yi held the strait as a “last stand” battle against the Japanese navy, who were sailing to support their land army’s advance towards the Joseon capital of Hanyang (modern-day Seoul).

The actual numeric strength of the Japanese fleet that Admiral Yi fought is unclear; various sources indicate the number of Japanese ships could have been anywhere between 120 and 330 ships, though the low end of this range appears to be a count of actual warships and the high end appears to be referring to the entire Japanese fleet (including roughly 200 supporting non-combatant ships).[2]: 312 [5] Regardless of the size of the Japanese fleet, all sources indicate that the Japanese ships heavily outnumbered the Korean ships, by at least a ten-to-one ratio.[1]: 302  In total 30 Japanese warships were sunk or crippled during the battle. Tōdō Takatora, the commander of the Japanese navy, was wounded during the battle and half of his subordinate officers were also wounded or killed.[4] Given the disparity in numbers of ships, the naval battle is regarded as one of the most tactically brilliant victories in the history of warfare, and a humiliating naval defeat for the Japanese. Even after the victory, however, the Joseon navy was still outnumbered by remaining Japanese forces, so Admiral Yi withdrew to the Yellow Sea to resupply his fleet and have more space for a mobile defense.[6] After the Korean navy withdrew, the Japanese navy made an incursion into the western coast of Korea, near some islands in Yeonggwang County.

Read more ->

 
 
1892 – Ida B. Wells publishes Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases.
Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931) was an American investigative journalist, educator, and early leader in the civil rights movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).[1] Over the course of a lifetime dedicated to combating prejudice and violence, and the fight for African-American equality, especially that of women, Wells arguably became the most famous Black woman in America.[2]

Born into slavery in Holly Springs, Mississippi, Wells was freed by the Emancipation Proclamation during the American Civil War. At the age of 16, she lost both her parents and her infant brother in the 1878 yellow fever epidemic. She went to work and kept the rest of the family together with the help of her grandmother. Later, moving with some of her siblings to Memphis, Tennessee, she found better pay as a teacher. Soon, Wells co-owned and wrote for the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight newspaper. Her reporting covered incidents of racial segregation and inequality.

In the 1890s, Wells documented lynching in the United States in articles and through her pamphlet called Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in all its Phases, investigating frequent claims of whites that lynchings were reserved for Black criminals only. Wells exposed lynching as a barbaric practice of whites in the South used to intimidate and oppress African Americans who created economic and political competition—and a subsequent threat of loss of power—for whites. A white mob destroyed her newspaper office and presses as her investigative reporting was carried nationally in Black-owned newspapers. Subjected to continued threats, Wells left Memphis for Chicago. She married Ferdinand L. Barnett in 1895 and had a family while continuing her work writing, speaking, and organizing for civil rights and the women’s movement for the rest of her life.

While her work contains extensive documentation of lynchings — she was one of the first to do so — her work is notable for its real-time reporting on the prevalent incendiary propaganda about Black rape that was used to justify the practice.[3]

Wells was outspoken regarding her beliefs as a Black female activist and faced regular public disapproval, sometimes including from other leaders within the civil rights movement and the women’s suffrage movement. She was active in women’s rights and the women’s suffrage movement, establishing several notable women’s organizations. A skilled and persuasive speaker, Wells traveled nationally and internationally on lecture tours.[4]

In 2020, Wells was posthumously honored with a Pulitzer Prize special citation “[f]or her outstanding and courageous reporting on the horrific and vicious violence against African Americans during the era of lynching.”[5]
 
 
Read more ->

Born On This Day

1902 – Henrietta Hill Swope, American astronomer and academic (d. 1980)
Henrietta Hill Swope (October 26, 1902 – November 24, 1980)[2] was an American astronomer who studied variable stars. In particular, she measured the period-luminosity relation for Cepheid stars, which are bright variable stars whose periods of variability relate directly to their intrinsic luminosities. Their measured periods can therefore be related to their distances and used to measure the size of the Milky Way and distances to other galaxies.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

The Passive Voice, From Digital Pubbing: 7 Simple Social Media Tips for Successful Authors
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By IreteH: Light Up the Darkness – Halloween Costume
 
 
Instructables: Unusual Uses Contest!
 
 

Recipes

By In The Kitchen With Matt: Barbie Cake
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

907 Updates October 26, 2021

KTUU Alaska’s News Source: Open container case dropped against Alaska lawmaker; Mayor Bronson delivers State of the City address The mayor appeared remotely due to being a close contact of a positive COVID-19 case
Anchorage, Alaska. And more ->

 
 
Go Revak!
The charge was dropped because the trooper who issued it is no longer employed with the state after being accused of sexual abuse of a minor. Revak wanted to challenge the ticket, and now says he’ll donate the $220 to a sobriety group.

 
 
 
 
KTOO Alaska’s Public Media: Alaska Air National Guard reports first incursion of Russian military planes since January and more ->
 
 
 
 
Alaska Native News: This Day In Alaska History October 26th, 1909 and more ->
 
 
 
 
Fairbanks News Webcenter 11: The Governor urges lawmakers to work on a second PFD and more ->
 
 
 
 
KRBD: After a $1.6 million transformation, a former Ketchikan jail will reopen as a shelter for survivors of domestic abuse and sexual assault and more ->

Military October 26, 2021

11 Alive: WWII veteran turns 100 years young David Barber was recognized in the UT vs. Ole Miss football game Saturday night.
 
 
 
 
Task & Purpose: The difference between Air Force and Navy pilots in one short video “One is gentle and graceful, and the other is a full-send yeet.”; Air Force uniform that covered sleeping Afghan child in evacuation photo headed to a museum “It was heartwarming to see.” And more ->
 
 
 
 
DoD: Sports Heroes Who Served: National Guardsmen Realize Olympic Dream and more ->
 
 
 
 
Military.com: House Votes to Award Congressional Gold Medal to Troops Killed in Kabul Airport Blast; Marine Veteran and Thoroughbred Industry Icon Turns 100, Credits Corps with Shaping His Life; Famous Veterans: Mr. T; Senators Say They Won’t Wait 9 Years for Pentagon to Make Planned Sexual Assault Reforms and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Quotes October 26, 2021

Quotes courtesy of Lori Deschene/Tiny Buddha


 
 
“Sometimes you get what you want. Other times, you get a lesson in patience, timing, alignment, empathy, compassion, faith, perseverance, resilience, humility, trust, meaning, awareness, resistance, purpose, clarity, grief, beauty, and life. Either way, you win.”
Brianna Wiest
 
 
 
 
“The only person you can now or ever change is yourself. The only person that it is your business to control is yourself.”
Melody Beattie
 
 
 
 
“It’s okay to be scared. Being scared means you’re about to do something really, really brave.”
Mandy Hale
 
 
 
 
“Don’t use a lot where a little will do.”
Proverb
 
 
 
 
“Every new beginning comes from some other beginning’s end.”
Seneca
 
 
 
 
“The one thing you learn is when you can step out of your comfort zone and be uncomfortable, you see what you’re made of and who you are.”
Sue Bird
 
 
 
 
“Never be afraid to try new things and make some mistakes. It’s all part of life and learning.”
Unknown

Music October 26, 2021