Category: FYI

FYI

FYI July 26, 2021

On This Day

1775 – The office that would later become the United States Post Office Department is established by the Second Continental Congress. Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania takes office as Postmaster General.
The United States Post Office Department (USPOD; also known as the Post Office or U.S. Mail) was the predecessor of the United States Postal Service, in the form of a Cabinet department, officially from 1872 to 1971. It was headed by the postmaster general.

The Postal Service Act, signed by U.S. president George Washington on February 20, 1792, established the department. Postmaster General John McLean, in office from 1823 to 1829, was the first to call it the Post Office Department rather than just the “Post Office.” The organization received a boost in prestige when President Andrew Jackson invited his postmaster general, William T. Barry, to sit as a member of the Cabinet in 1829.[1] The Post Office Act of 1872 (17 Stat. 283) elevated the Post Office Department to Cabinet status.[2]

During the American Civil War (1861–1865), postal services in the Confederate States of America were provided by the Confederate States of America Post-office Department, headed by Postmaster General John Henninger Reagan.

The Postal Reorganization Act was signed by President Richard Nixon on August 12, 1970. It replaced the cabinet-level Post Office Department with the independent United States Postal Service on July 1, 1971. The regulatory role of the postal services was then transferred to the Postal Regulatory Commission.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1926 – Dorothy E. Smith, Canadian sociologist[5]
Dorothy Edith Smith CM (born July 6, 1926) is a Canadian sociologist with research interests in a variety of disciplines, including women’s studies, feminist theory, psychology, and educational studies, as well as in certain subfields of sociology, such as the sociology of knowledge, family studies, and methodology. Smith founded the sociological sub-disciplines of feminist standpoint theory and institutional ethnography.

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FYI

By Tia Ghose – Assistant Managing Editor, Live Science: Steven Weinberg, Nobel Prize-winning physicist, has died
 
 
 
 
By James Clear: 3-2-1: How to find opportunities, and what it takes to improve
 
 
 
 
By Wickersham’s Conscience: Return of Bird of the Week: Rusty Blackbird
 
 
By Wickersham’s Conscience: Return of Bird of the Week: Tricolored Blackbird
 
 
 
 
By Oscar Duran, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Food Blogs, Volume 4
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Harriet Pullen, Queen of Skagway
 
 
 
 
By Open Culture: Epidemics in Western Society Since 1600: A Free Online Course from Yale University
 
 
 
 
By Tim Suddard, Grass Roots Motor Sports: Miata Mod Squad: Boosted Miatas Compared
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Publishers Weekly: Reading Beyond Neurodivergent Sterotypes
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Book Riot: The Goodreads Bot Problem
 
 
 
 
I like to write junk…: McCLEARY BEAR FESTIVAL OR BUST “We laughed all the way to Astoria, knowing that we’d just made history in McCleary, as being the two biggest idiots to ever hit town.”
 
 
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Field Notes: Cress Creek Nature Trail
 
 
 
 
Zillow Anchorage: 6730 Reedyke Cir, Anchorage, AK 99507

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

HALO, Huffman/O’Malley & Rabbit Creek Community Councils Present
Firewise Saturday
11AM-3PM July 31, 2021
Trinity Presbyterian Church
12310 Lorrain St., Anchorage (Huffman & Lorrain)
Featuring
Team Rubicon
A national volunteer organization active in Alaska wildfire response designed by our nation’s Veterans who unite in response to wildfires, disasters and humanitarian crises across the nation. www.TeamRubiconUSA.org

Mini Seminars, Demonstrations and Displays including:

AFD Firewise Program
DIY Firewise Home Evaluation
Team Rubicon Alaska
Chainsaw Techniques, Care and Maintenance
Home Evacuation Preparation
Alaska Division of Forestry and “Spruce the Moose”
AFD Brush Fire Apparatus
Tree Care & Pruning
Chugach Electric’s Dangerous Trees Program for Homeowners

Demonstrations and Displays including:

Alaska Division of Forestry and mascot Spruce the Moose
AFD Brush Fire Apparatus
AFD Station Crew
Tree Care & Pruning
Chugach Electric’s Dangerous Trees Program for Homeowners

Thank You to Participants, including:
Spruce the Moose from the Alaska Division of Forestry, Forester John See (Ret.), Paul’s Tree Service, Anchorage Fire Department, Tall Trees, State of Alaska Department of Forestry, Greatland Trees, Rabbit Creek Community Council, Huffman/O’Malley Community Council, and Team Rubicon

For more resources, visit, https://bit.ly/NeighborhoodResilience or join us at Firewise Saturday. For more information about this event, contact Katie Nolan at presidenthalo@gmail.com or Ky at ky@kyholland.com (907 727 2735).

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

The Yummy Bowl
 
 
Ruby Williams, Bogalusa, Louisiana, Taste of Home: Sausage and Vegetable Skillet
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Best Recipes to Spice up Dinnertime
 
 
Taste of Home Slow Cooker & Casseroles Mexican foods
 
 
By Kristie Collado, The Food Network: 7 Kids Birthday Party Treats That Are Better Than Cake
 
 
By Jesse Szewczyk, The Kitchn: I’ve Made Hundreds of Batches of Cookies — This Is Hands-Down the Best Recipe
 
 
By Sweet Girl Treats, Food Talk Daily: Unicorn Cheesecake

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 25, 2021

On This Day

864 – The Edict of Pistres of Charles the Bald orders defensive measures against the Vikings.
The Edict of Pîtres (Medieval Latin: Edictum Pistense) was a capitulary promulgated at Pîtres on 25 June 864. It is often cited by historians as an example of successful government action on the part of Charles the Bald, King of West Francia.

At the time Vikings more than annually ravaged not only the Frankish coastlands but, with the aid of Europe’s numerous navigable rivers, much of the interior also. A king was most valued who could defeat them in the field and prevent their attacks in the future. The purpose and primary effect of the Edict was long thought to be the protection of the cities and countryside from Viking raids.

Charles created a large force of cavalry upon which he could call as needed. He ordered all men who had horses or could afford horses to serve in the army as cavalrymen. This was one of the beginnings of the French chivalry so famous for the next seven centuries. The intention of Charles was to have a mobile force with which to descend upon the raiders before they could up and leave with their booty.

To prevent the Vikings from even attaining a great booty, Charles also declared that fortified bridges should be built at all towns on rivers. This was to prevent the dreaded longships from sailing into the interior. Simon Coupland believes that only two bridges, at Pont-de-l’Arche (near Pîtres) on the Seine and at Les Ponts-de-Cé on the Loire, were ever fortified, though a few others that had fallen into disrepair were rebuilt “in times of crisis in order to increase troop mobility”.[1] Charles also prohibited all trade in weapons with the Vikings, in order to prevent them from establishing bases in Gaul.[2] The penalty for selling horses to the Vikings was death. Since the prohibition on the sale of horses was new, it is probable that mounted Viking raids were on the rise.[3]

Aside from its auspicious military reforms, the Edict had political and economic consequences. King Pepin II of Aquitaine, against whom Charles had been fighting for decades, had been captured in 864 and was formally deposed at Pîtres. Economically, besides the prohibitions on commerce with the enemy, Charles tightened his control of the mints and regulated the punishment for counterfeiting. Prior to this edict at least nine places in France had the right of minting but these were reduced to three. Charles also made an attempt to control the building of private castles, but this failed and even minor lords constructed fortresses of their own on local hilltops to defend themselves and their peasants from the constant threat of Scandinavian invasion.

 
 

Born On This Day

1806 – Maria Weston Chapman, American abolitionist (d. 1885)
Maria Weston Chapman (July 25, 1806 – July 12, 1885)[1] was an American abolitionist. She was elected to the executive committee of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1839 and from 1839 until 1842, she served as editor of the anti-slavery journal The Non-Resistant.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, The Wall Street Journal: Hong Kong Police Arrest Five Over Children’s Books
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Writer Beware®: Bad Contract Alert: Bytedance’s Fictum Reading/Writing
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Kristine Kathryn Rusch: Business Musings: Expletives Deleted
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: Art and Aliveness: Willa Cather on Attention and the Life of the Senses as the Key to Creativity
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Making Mistakes in Louisiana
 
 
 
 
Cleo Coyle Shares a Brewed Awakening + Giveaway
 
 
 
 
By Kristin Limoges, Domino: The Best Way to Wash Your Face Is Actually a 200-Year-Old Method Turns out there is a right and wrong way to do it, too.
 
 
 
 

 
 

Ideas

By kura_kura: Stain Your Wood Purple Using Red Cabbage
 
 
By grp 19: Easy Fishing Rod Holder for a Kayak
 
 

Recipes

Faith Durand, The Kitchn: Dan Kluger’s Fresh-Corn Polenta with Butter and Herbs
 
 
By Eats By The Beach (Millie Brinkley): BEANS AND GREENS WITH CORN DODGERS
 
 
CutterLight: Peach Melba Reimagined as Summertime Salmonberry Peach Muffins
 
 
The Food Network: 25 Chocolate Cakes You’ll Bake Again and Again
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 24, 2021

On This Day

1411 – Battle of Harlaw, one of the bloodiest battles in Scotland, takes place.
The Battle of Harlaw (Scottish Gaelic: Cath Gairbheach) was a Scottish clan battle fought on 24 July 1411 just north of Inverurie in Aberdeenshire. It was one of a series of battles fought during the Middle Ages between the barons of northeast Scotland against those from the west coast.

The battle was fought to resolve competing claims to the Earldom of Ross, a large region of northern Scotland. Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland, had taken control of the earldom as guardian of his niece Euphemia Leslie. This claim was contested by Donald, Lord of the Isles, who had married Euphemia’s aunt Mariota. Donald invaded Ross with the intention of seizing the earldom by force.

First he defeated a large force of Mackays at the Battle of Dingwall. He captured Dingwall Castle and then advanced on Aberdeen with 10,000 clansmen. Near Inverurie he was met by 1,000–2,000 of the local gentry, many in armour, hastily assembled by the Earl of Mar. After a day of fierce fighting there was no clear victor; Donald had lost 900 men before retreating to the Western Isles, and Mar had lost 600. The latter could claim a strategic victory in that Aberdeen was saved, and within a year Albany had recaptured Ross and forced Donald to surrender. However Mariota was later awarded the earldom of Ross in 1424 and the Lordship of the Isles would keep the title for much of the 15th century.

The ferocity of the battle gave it the nickname “Red Harlaw”. It is commemorated by a 40-foot (12 m) high memorial on the battlefield near Inverurie, supposedly by the church at Chapel of Garioch, and by ballads and music.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1889 – Agnes Meyer Driscoll, American cryptanalyst (d. 1971)
Agnes Meyer Driscoll (July 24, 1889 – September 16, 1971), known as “Miss Aggie” or “Madame X'”, was an American cryptanalyst during both World War I and World War II.

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FYI

By Wickersham’s Conscience: Field Notes: Long Valley, Part 1
 
 
By Wickersham’s Conscience: Field Notes: Long Valley, Part 2
 
 
BY Wickersham’s Conscience: Field Notes: Long Valley, Part 3
 
 
By Wickersham’s Conscience: Field Notes: Joyas voladoras
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Field Notes: Sapsucker Wells
 
 
 
 
By Audrey Conklin, Andrew Murray, Fox News: Herschel Walker on Olympic protests: ‘If people don’t like the rules, why are you here?’ Walker was also one of few Black athletes who participated in the 1992 Winter Olympics
 
 
 
 
Mary Wasch Alaska Author

Mary Wasche was first published at age seventeen after winning a state writing contest in Minnesota. During the ensuing decades, she has had hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles and photos published. She works from Alaska and Minnesota and has several novels in progress.

Since graduating from the University of Minnesota, Mary has worked as a dental hygienist, teacher, small business owner, and bank executive while continuing to be a contributing writer to national and regional publications. She has served as President of the Alaska Chapter of Romance Writers of America, Editor of the Chugiak Eagle River Historical Society newsletter, founded a book club, and held membership in the Alaska Writers Guild, the Chugach Writers Group, the Pacific Northwest Writers Association, 49Writers and the Independent Book Publishers Association.
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Behold, a preserved Victorian wedding cake baked in 1898; When Americans dreamed of kitchen computers; The legacy of a civil rights icon’s vegetarian cookbook and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Mike’s Backyard Nursery: The Correct or Proper Way to Trim Shrubs.
 
 
 
 

Recipes

My Recipe Treasures: Mountain Man Crock Pot Breakfast
 
 
The Yummy Bowl: Crockpot Chicken Enchilada
 
 
Taste of Home: Assorted Vintage Recipes
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 23, 2021

On This Day

1921 – The Communist Party of China (CPC) is established at the founding National Congress.
The Communist Party of China (CPC),[23][note 2] commonly known as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP),[24] is the founding and sole governing political party of the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The CCP leads eight other legally permitted subordinate minor parties together as the United Front. The CCP was founded in 1921, mainly by Chen Duxiu and Li Dazhao, with the help of the Far Eastern Bureau of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and Far Eastern Secretariat of the Communist International.[25][26] The party grew quickly, and by 1949 it had driven the Kuomintang (KMT)’s Nationalist Government from mainland China to Taiwan after the Chinese Civil War, leading to the establishment of the People’s Republic of China on 1 October 1949. It controls the country’s armed forces, the People’s Liberation Army (PLA). It is also one of the two major historical contemporary parties in Chinese history, the other being the Kuomintang.

The CCP is officially organized on the basis of democratic centralism, a principle conceived by Russian Marxist theoretician Vladimir Lenin which entails a democratic and open discussion on policy on the condition of unity in upholding the agreed-upon policies. Theoretically, the highest body of the CCP is the National Congress, convened every fifth year. When the National Congress is not in session, the Central Committee is the highest body, but since the body meets normally only once a year most duties and responsibilities are vested in the Politburo and its Standing Committee, members of the latter seen as the top leadership of the Party and the State.[27] The party’s leader recently holds the offices of general secretary (responsible for civilian party duties), Chairman of the Central Military Commission (CMC) (responsible for military affairs) and State President (a largely ceremonial position). Through these posts, the party leader is the country’s paramount leader. The current leader is general secretary Xi Jinping, elected at the 18th Central Committee held on 15 November 2012.

Officially, the CCP is committed to communism and continues to participate in the International Meeting of Communist and Workers’ Parties each year. According to the party constitution, the CCP adheres to Marxism–Leninism, Mao Zedong Thought, socialism with Chinese characteristics, Deng Xiaoping Theory, the Three Represents, the Scientific Outlook on Development, and Xi Jinping Thought. The official explanation for China’s economic reforms is that the country is in the primary stage of socialism, a developmental stage similar to the capitalist mode of production. The command economy established under Mao Zedong was replaced by the socialist market economy under Deng Xiaoping, the current economic system, on the basis that “Practice is the Sole Criterion for the Truth”.

Since the collapse of Eastern European communist governments in 1989–1990 and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, the CCP has emphasized its party-to-party relations with the ruling parties of the remaining socialist states. While the CCP still maintains party-to-party relations with non-ruling communist parties around the world, since the 1980s it has established relations with several non-communist parties, most notably with ruling parties of one-party states (whatever their ideology), dominant parties in democracies (whatever their ideology) and social democratic parties. As of 2021, the CCP is the second largest political party in the world with over 95 million members after India’s Bharatiya Janata Party.[28]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1891 – Louis T. Wright, American surgeon and civil rights activist (d. 1952)
Louis Tompkins Wright, MD, FACS[1] (July 23, 1891 – October 8, 1952)[2] was an American surgeon and civil rights activist. In his position at Harlem Hospital he was the first African-American on the surgical staff of a non-segregated hospital in New York City. He was influential for his medical research as well as his efforts pushing for racial equality in medicine and involvement with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), which he served as chairman for nearly two decades.[3][4]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Vector’s World: Dad wanted a sports car, but Mom held out for her bus
 
 
 
 
News from Science: Blood tests for Alzheimer’s disease, and what earthquakes on Mars reveal about the Red Planet’s core and more ->
 
 
 
 
Inside History: How Dangerous Was the Moon Landing? And more ->
 
 
 
 
Frank Zafiro: Wrong Place, Write Crime.
Wrong Place, Write Crime is a podcast about crime fiction authors, mysteries, art and life featuring Frank Zafiro as host. Feature Episodes occur monthly and include an in-depth guest interviews (primarily with authors of crime fiction, but not always), as well as quick hit book reviews from the experts (mystery bookstore employees, reviewers, authors). Open & Shut Episodes of Wrong Place, Write Crime are shorter episodes that consist of a short introductory conversation with the guest, followed by a brief discussion of the guest’s work, epecially the newest release. Open & Shut episodes will drop almost every Wednesday during the season.
 
 
 
 
Quartz Weekly Obsession: Surfing: A swell sport
 
 
 
 
Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: North Carolina family with seven decades of courage, integrity and tenacity honored with Tom and Pat Gish Award; Quick hits: feral hogs pollute environment as much as 1.1 million cars; family farm swaps cows for goats to stay afloat and more ->
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: Midweek pick-me-up: The Ship of Theseus — a brilliant Ancient Greek thought experiment exploring what makes you you
 
 
 
 
Sheldon Jackson Museum Artist-in-Residence Rico Worl (Tlingit and Athabascan) To Give Artist Talk
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Bookseller: Pay the writer
 
 
The Passive Voice: Lukashenko Regime Tells PEN Belarus That It’s To Be Closed
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smith, Tedium: The Dial-Up Volunteer Army
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Do You See It?
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Rebecca at Soap Deli News Blog: Fun Summer Activities for the Family; Playdough Soap Recipe; DIY Goldfish in a Bag Soap and more ->
 
 

Recipes

By Caroline Stanko, Taste of Home: 70 Hot Breakfasts Quick Enough for a Weekday
 
 
By Ree Drummond, The Food Network: Chicken Taco Salad
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Betty’s Best Birthday Cake Ideas

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 21 & 22, 2021

On This Day

356 BC – The Temple of Artemis in Ephesus, one of the Seven Wonders of the World, is destroyed by arson.
The Temple of Artemis or Artemision (Greek: Ἀρτεμίσιον; Turkish: Artemis Tapınağı), also known as the Temple of Diana, was a Greek temple dedicated to an ancient, local form of the goddess Artemis (associated with Diana, a Roman goddess). It was located in Ephesus (near the modern town of Selçuk in present-day Turkey). It was completely rebuilt twice, once after a devastating flood and three hundred years later after an act of arson, and in its final form was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. By 401 AD it had been ruined or destroyed.[1] Only foundations and fragments of the last temple remain at the site.

The earliest version of the temple (a temenos) antedated the Ionic immigration by many years, and dates to the Bronze Age. Callimachus, in his Hymn to Artemis, attributed it to the Amazons. In the 7th century BC, it was destroyed by a flood. Its reconstruction, in more grandiose form, began around 550 BC, under Chersiphron, the Cretan architect, and his son Metagenes. The project was funded by Croesus of Lydia, and took 10 years to complete. This version of the temple was destroyed in 356 BC by Herostratus in an act of arson.

The next, greatest and last form of the temple, funded by the Ephesians themselves, is described in Antipater of Sidon’s list of the world’s Seven Wonders:

I have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the colossus of the Sun, and the huge labour of the high pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus; but when I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy, and I said, “Lo, apart from Olympus, the Sun never looked on aught so grand”.[2]

Read more ->

 
 
1893 – Katharine Lee Bates writes “America the Beautiful” after admiring the view from the top of Pikes Peak near Colorado Springs, Colorado.
“America the Beautiful” is a patriotic American song. Its lyrics were written by Katharine Lee Bates and its music was composed by church organist and choirmaster Samuel A. Ward at Grace Episcopal Church in Newark, New Jersey.[1] The two never met.[2]

Bates wrote the words as a poem originally entitled “Pikes Peak”. It was first published in the Fourth of July 1895 edition of the church periodical, The Congregationalist. It was at that time that the poem was first entitled “America”.

Ward had initially composed the song’s melody in 1882 to accompany lyrics to “Materna”, basis of the hymn, “O Mother dear, Jerusalem”, though the hymn was not first published until 1892.[3] The combination of Ward’s melody and Bates’s poem was first entitled “America the Beautiful” in 1910. The song is one of the most popular of the many U.S. patriotic songs.[4]

Read more ->

Born On This Day

1896 – Sophie Bledsoe Aberle, Native American anthropologist, physician and nutritionist (d. 1996)
Sophie Bledsoe Aberle (née Herrick; July 21, 1896 – October 1996) was an American anthropologist, physician and nutritionist known for her work with Pueblo people. She was one of two women first appointed to the National Science Board.

Read more ->

 
 
1910 – Ruthie Tompson, American animator and artist
Ruthie Tompson (born July 22, 1910)[1] is an American former camera technician, artist, and supercentenarian.[2] She is known for her work on animated features at The Walt Disney Company.

Read more ->

FYI

Robert Eugene Steinhardt (May 25, 1950 – July 17, 2021)was an American rock violinist and singer best known for his work with the group Kansas, for which he was co-lead singer/”frontman” and MC along with keyboardist Steve Walsh, from 1973 to 1982 and from 1997 to 2006.[1] He and Steve Walsh were the only original members of the band not from Topeka.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
I don’t gamble, because winning a hundred dollars doesn’t give me great pleasure. But losing a hundred dollars pisses me off.
Alex Trebek, born July 22, 1940
 
 
Sometimes you get the best light from a burning bridge.
Don Henley, born July 22, 1947
 
 
You can either look at things in a brutal, truthful way that’s depressing, or you can screw around and have fun.
David Spade, born July 22, 1964
 
 
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Sitka Nature Show #241 – Alia Lesnek
 
 
 
 
By Daniella Genovese, Fox News: High school students build wheelchair stroller to help father walk his newborn. After project was completed, instructions to build the models were posted online
 
 
 
 
Neighbor’s house down the street is for sale, $445,000-
They have no yard and an awkward access to the garage.
6641 Teshlar Dr, Anchorage, AK 99507

6641 Teshlar Drive Anchorage, AK 99507


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Pavlovafowl: Greenhouse Extension – Making a Safe Living, Nesting & Brooding Area for Organic Coturnix Quail
 
 
By principal_john: Ultralight Backpacking Handwashing Station
 
 
By Fernmakes: DIY Banana PLUSHIES ! | Whole & Peeled Fruit Sewing Patterns
 
 
By David Yakos: How to Catch Grasshoppers… for Pet Food. a Grasshopper Trap
 
 
By Garage Avenger: The Reverse Hot Tub / Luxury Ice Bath
 
 
By Jill Nystul, One Good Thing: These DIY Fly Paper Strips Eliminate The Most Annoying Kitchen Pest
 
 

Recipes

By Cookwell: Pork Schnitzel With a Traditional Potato & Mayonnaise Salad
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Slow Cooker Sausage and Potatoes
 
 
By Denise Patterson, Bainbridge, Ohio, Taste of Home: Beef & Spinach Lo Mein
 
 
By Liv Wan, The Spruce Eats: 10 Quick and Easy Beginner Chinese Recipes
 
 
By Momos75: Oreo-crust Blackberry Cheesecake Bars (No Bake)
 
 
By Haylee Jane Monteiro, Food Talk Daily: Pancake Mix Protein Donuts – Easy 5 Ingredient Recipe
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 19 & 20, 2021

On This Day

AD 64 – The Great Fire of Rome causes widespread devastation and rages on for six days, destroying half of the city.[1]
The Great Fire of Rome (Latin: incendium magnum Romae), was an urban fire that occurred in July, 64 AD.[1] The fire began in the merchant shops around Rome’s chariot stadium, Circus Maximus, on the night of 19 July. After six days, the fire was brought under control, but before the damage could be assessed, the fire reignited and burned for another three days. In the aftermath of the fire, two thirds of Rome had been destroyed.[2]

According to Tacitus and later Christian tradition, Emperor Nero blamed the devastation on the Christian community in the city, initiating the empire’s first persecution against the Christians.[3] However, some modern historians, including the Princeton classicist Brent Shaw, have cast doubt on the traditional view that Nero blamed the Christians for the fire.[4][5]

Read more ->

 
 
1848 – The first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York, a two-day event, concludes.
The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women’s rights convention.[1] It advertised itself as “a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of woman”.[2][3] Held in the Wesleyan Chapel of the town of Seneca Falls, New York, it spanned two days over July 19–20, 1848. Attracting widespread attention, it was soon followed by other women’s rights conventions, including the Rochester Women’s Rights Convention in Rochester, New York, two weeks later. In 1850 the first in a series of annual National Women’s Rights Conventions met in Worchester, Massachusetts.

Female Quakers local to the area organized the meeting along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who was not a Quaker. They planned the event during a visit to the area by Philadelphia-based Lucretia Mott. Mott, a Quaker, was famous for her oratorical ability, which was rare for non-Quaker women during an era in which women were often not allowed to speak in public.

The meeting comprised six sessions including a lecture on law, a humorous presentation, and multiple discussions about the role of women in society. Stanton and the Quaker women presented two prepared documents, the Declaration of Sentiments and an accompanying list of resolutions, to be debated and modified before being put forward for signatures. A heated debate sprang up regarding women’s right to vote, with many – including Mott – urging the removal of this concept, but Frederick Douglass, who was the convention’s sole African American attendee, argued eloquently for its inclusion, and the suffrage resolution was retained. Exactly 100 of approximately 300 attendees signed the document, mostly women.

The convention was seen by some of its contemporaries, including featured speaker Mott, as one important step among many others in the continuing effort by women to gain for themselves a greater proportion of social, civil and moral rights,[4] while it was viewed by others as a revolutionary beginning to the struggle by women for complete equality with men. Stanton considered the Seneca Falls Convention to be the beginning of the women’s rights movement, an opinion that was echoed in the History of Woman Suffrage, which Stanton co-wrote.[4]

The convention’s Declaration of Sentiments became “the single most important factor in spreading news of the women’s rights movement around the country in 1848 and into the future”, according to Judith Wellman, a historian of the convention.[5] By the time of the National Women’s Rights Convention of 1851, the issue of women’s right to vote had become a central tenet of the United States women’s rights movement.[6] These conventions became annual events until the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861.

Read more ->

Born On This Day

1875 – Alice Dunbar Nelson, American poet and activist (d. 1935)
Alice Dunbar Nelson (July 19, 1875 – September 18, 1935) was an American poet, journalist, and political activist. Among the first generation born free in the South after the Civil War, she was one of the prominent African Americans involved in the artistic flourishing of the Harlem Renaissance. Her first husband was the poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. After his death, she married physician Henry A. Callis; and, lastly, was married to Robert J. Nelson, a poet and civil rights activist. She achieved prominence as a poet, author of short stories and dramas, newspaper columnist, activist for women’s rights, and editor of two anthologies.

Read more ->

 
 1882 – Olga Hahn-Neurath, Austrian mathematician and philosopher (d. 1937)
Olga Hahn-Neurath (German: [haːn ˈnɔʏʀaːt]; Hebrew: אולגה האן-נוירת‎; 20 July 1882 – 20 July 1937) was an Austrian mathematician and philosopher. She is best known for being a member of the Vienna Circle. She was sister of the mathematician Hans Hahn.
Biography
Born in Vienna, Hahn enrolled as a student for math and philosophy studies at the University of Vienna in 1902.[1] She became blind in 1904, when she was 22. In 1911, she became the third ever female graduate in philosophy at Vienna University.[1] Her doctoral thesis, published at 1911, received great compliments from her instructor, Adolf Stöhr, the successor to the chair of Ludwig Boltzmann. Her main interest in math was in the field of Boolean algebra.

In 1912 she married Otto Neurath whom she met during her studies.[2] Olga became a regular participant in the Vienna Circle discussions. Following the defeat of Red Vienna in the Austrian Civil War (February 1934), she fled, through Poland and Denmark to the Netherlands, where she joined her husband. She died on her birthday three years later in The Hague, of a lung infection following an operation.[2]

FYI

Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Tuesday, July 20, 2021
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Like Dirt in Front of a Dozer Blade
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DLXIII): Inside America’s Largest Abandoned Mansion with over 110 rooms; “What Makes A Good Party”- a 1959 Instructional Video; This 1989 Documentary about Greyhound Buses and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: She brewed root beer alone in a million-acre wilderness; Locally famous foods are now getting plaques like historical sites and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Watch 15 Hours of The Pink Panther for Free
 
 
 
 
The Canadian Press, Alaska Highway News: Book review: Can mighty Facebook control false information?
 
 
 
 
By Tim MacWelch, Outdoor Life: 8 Natural Ways to Repel Insects Without Bug Spray
 
 
 
 
NeighborWho.com
This information is (mostly current/correct)
Using your search engine, type in your/the street name and after everything displays, then scroll down for NeighborWho.com results.
If you want in-depth property information, it is a paying service.

 
 
 
 
By Colleen Mondoor, Narratively: Flying Dead Bodies Across the Land of the Midnight Sun
When there’s a murder or mysterious death in remote areas of Alaska, corpses are flown in to the state morgue. This is what it’s like to run that airborne operation.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 18, 2021

On This Day

1914 – The U.S. Congress forms the Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps, giving official status to aircraft within the U.S. Army for the first time.
The Aviation Section, Signal Corps,[1] was the aerial warfare service of the United States from 1914 to 1918, and a direct statutory ancestor of the United States Air Force. It absorbed and replaced the Aeronautical Division, Signal Corps, and conducted the activities of Army aviation until its statutory responsibilities were suspended by President Woodrow Wilson in 1918. The Aviation Section organized the first squadrons of the aviation arm and conducted the first military operations by United States aviation on foreign soil.

The Aviation Section, Signal Corps was created by the 63rd Congress (Public Law 143) on 18 July 1914 after earlier legislation to make the aviation service independent from the Signal Corps died in committee. From July 1914 until May 1918 the aviation section of the Signal Corps was familiarly known by the title of its administrative headquarters component at the time, seen variously as the Aeronautical Division, Air Division, Division of Military Aeronautics, and others. For historic convenience, however, the air arm is most commonly referred to by its official designation, the Aviation Section, Signal Corps (ASSC), and is the designation recognized by the United States Air Force as its predecessor for this period.[1]

The Aviation Section began in turbulence, first as an alternative to making aviation in the Army a corps independent of the Signal Corps, then with friction between its pilots, who were all young and on temporary detail from other branches, and its leadership, who were more established Signal Corps officers and non-pilots. Despite the assignment of Lieutenant Colonel George O. Squier as chief to bring stability to Army aviation, the Signal Corps found itself wholly inadequate to the task of supporting the Army in combat after the United States entered World War I on 6 April 1917. It attempted to expand and organize a competent arm but its efforts were largely chaotic and in the spring of 1918 aviation was removed, first from the jurisdiction of the Office of the Chief of Signal where it had resided since its inception, and then from the Signal Corps altogether. The duties of the section were not resumed following World War I and it was formally disestablished by the creation of the Air Service in 1920.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1900 – Nathalie Sarraute, French lawyer and author (d. 1999)
Nathalie Sarraute (French: [natali saʁot]; born Natalia Ilinichna Tcherniak (Russian: Ната́лья Ильи́нична Черня́к); 18 July [O.S. 5 July] 1900 – 19 October 1999) was a French writer and lawyer.[1]

Personal Life

Sarraute was born in Ivanovo-Voznesensk (now Ivanovo), 300 km north-east of Moscow. She was the daughter of Pauline (née Chatounovsky), a writer, and Ilya Tcherniak, a chemist.[2] She was of Russian Jewish origin. Following the divorce of her parents, she spent her childhood shuttled between France and Russia. In 1909 she moved to Paris with her father. Sarraute studied law and literature at the prestigious Sorbonne, having a particular fondness for contemporary literature and the works of Marcel Proust and Virginia Woolf, who greatly affected her conception of the novel, then later studied history at Oxford and sociology in Berlin, before passing the French bar exam (1926–1941) and becoming a lawyer.

In 1925, she married Raymond Sarraute, a fellow lawyer, with whom she would have three daughters. In 1932 she wrote her first book, Tropismes, a series of brief sketches and memories that set the tone for her entire oeuvre. The novel was first published in 1939, although the impact of World War II stunted its popularity. In 1941, Sarraute, who was Jewish, was barred from working as a lawyer as a result of the Vichy regime’s anti-Jewish laws. During this time, she went into hiding and made arrangements to divorce her husband in an effort to protect him (although they would eventually stay together).

Sarraute died at the age of 99 in Paris, France. Her daughter, the journalist Claude Sarraute, was married to French Academician Jean-François Revel.

Read more ->
 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 
By Lynne Curry, Workplace Coach Blog: You Love Being Your Own Boss: Tips for Finding Higher Quality, Better Paying Freelance Work
 
 
 
 
By Charlyne Mattox, Country Living: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Buttermilk We’ve got the 411 on the fermented dairy drink.
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: Do people change, the art of ending painful relationships, Hannah Arendt on what forgiveness (really) means, poet Naomi Shihab Nye’s advice on writing
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From GrammarlyBlog: How to Write a Great Summary
 
 
 
 

STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: The Juggernaut
 
 
 
 
Rolla Skate Club A Bad-Ass Community of Empowered Women on Wheels
Rolla online
Got a 5ft by 5ft spot? Roll with us from the comfort of your own home
 
 
 
 
By Chris Heath Photographs by Ilona Szwarc, Shadowland, The Atlantic: The Truth Behind the Amazon Mystery Seeds Why did so many Americans receive strange packages they didn’t think they’d ordered?
 
 
 
 
WTF? There is no such thing as an ugly dog (horse, cat, bird, etc.). There are only those who can not see love, devotion and loyalty.

The End of an Era

The great pandemic of 2020-2037 has affected all of us. For some though, it has opened doors of opportunity and been a catalyst to seek out one’s true calling in life. This is Lexxi’s story. He started his side business, “Sexy Lexxi’s Prettiest Pets,” to bring in money for Botox during the lockdown. But something miraculous happened. He realized that his love for making pets pretty was greater than his love for being pretty himself. Lexxi discovered a greater love. Possibly, the greatest love of all.

Lexxi has chosen to hang up his mirror and focus on his newfound passion. Making ugly dogs pretty. Anyway, after nearly 40 years of rocking together and taking Steel Panther from the Viper Room to headlining Wembley Arena, it is with heavy hearts – but great heavy metal memories – that we bid Lexxi Foxx farewell. We love you and we wish you a wonderful future putting eyeliner on chihuahuas.

Steel Panther will continue to rock the world. And though we may not ever find a bassist quite as beautiful as Lexxi, it shouldn’t be hard to find one to match his towering intellect.

Good Luck… And goodbye Lexxi Foxx!!

 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Ronna Farley: Frozen Strawberry Lemonade Slushies
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Air Fryer Cheese Sticks
 
 
By Mersedeh Prewer, The Kitchn: Crispy, Cheesy Persian Makaroni Is My Comfort Food MVP
 
 
By Rachel Blackston, Mauk, Georgia, Taste of Home: Cream Cheese Cookie Cups
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 17, 2021

On This Day

180 – Twelve inhabitants of Scillium (near Kasserine, modern-day Tunisia) in North Africa are executed for being Christians. This is the earliest record of Christianity in that part of the world.
The Scillitan Martyrs were a company of twelve North African Christians who were executed for their beliefs on 17 July 180 AD. The martyrs take their name from Scilla (or Scillium), a town in Numidia. The Acts of the Scillitan Martyrs are considered to be the earliest documents of the church of Africa and also the earliest specimen of Christian Latin.[1]

It was the last of the persecutions during the reign of Marcus Aurelius, which is best known from the sufferings of the churches of Vienne and Lyon in South Gaul. Marcus Aurelius died on 17 March of the year in question, and persecution ceased sometime after the accession of his son Commodus. A group of sufferers called the Madaurian martyrs seems to belong to the same period: for in the correspondence of St Augustine, Namphamo, one of their number, is spoken of as “archimartyr,” which appears to mean protomartyr of Africa.

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Born On This Day

1898 – Berenice Abbott, American photographer (d. 1991)[7]
Berenice Alice Abbott (July 17, 1898 – December 9, 1991)[2] was an American photographer best known for her portraits of between-the-wars 20th century cultural figures, New York City photographs of architecture and urban design of the 1930s, and science interpretation in the 1940s to 1960s.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: Midweek pick-me-up: Mathematician Lillian Lieber on infinity, creativity, the meaning of freedom, and how to be a finite but complete human being
 
 
 
 
The Anchorage Press: Alaska’s musical prodigy, Ava Earl and more ->
Alaska’s musical prodigy, Ava Earl, releases her fourth album between high school and college. The momentum behind the young artist has been building with every release, and while this album was recently recorded in Nashville, Earl says it has roots all the way back to 2017.
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: A Dancer Pays a Gravity-Defying Tribute to Claude Debussy
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

One Good Thing by Jillee: The 3-Ingredient Spray You Need If You Hate Ironing and more ->
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Cara Strickland, Cubby: 20+ Easy On-the-Go Snacks for Kids That Involve Zero Cooking
 
 
By Julie Blanner: Oven Grilled Cheese
 
 
By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: Everything Bagel Salmon with Broccoli and Capers
 
 
By Ubish Yaren, The Spruce Eats: Birria Tacos and more ->
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: A Dozen Egg Bakes to Make for a Crowd
 
 
By Reina Gattuso, Atlas Obscura: Celebrate the Heyday of Sweet American ‘Salads’ With These 7 Dishes Highlights from an era of convenience, creativity, and Cool Whip.
 
 
By Perry Santanachote, The Kitchn: Red Velvet Waffles with Cream Cheese Glaze

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 16, 2021

On This Day

1054 – Three Roman legates break relations between Western and Eastern Christian Churches through the act of placing an Papal bull (of doubtful validity) of Excommunication on the altar of Hagia Sophia during Saturday afternoon divine liturgy. Historians frequently describe the event as the start of the East–West Schism.
The East–West Schism (also the Great Schism or Schism of 1054) is the break of communion since the 11th century between the Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church.[1] The schism was the culmination of theological and political differences which had developed during the preceding centuries between Eastern and Western Christianity.

A succession of ecclesiastical differences and theological disputes between the Greek East and Latin West preceded the formal split that occurred in 1054.[1][2][3] Prominent among these were: the procession of the Holy Spirit (Filioque), whether leavened or unleavened bread should be used in the Eucharist,[a] the bishop of Rome’s claim to universal jurisdiction, and the place of the See of Constantinople in relation to the pentarchy.[7]

In 1053, the first step in the process which led to a formal schism was taken: the Greek churches in southern Italy were forced to conform to Latin practices and if any of them did not, they were forced to close.[8][9][10] In retaliation, Patriarch Michael I Cerularius of Constantinople ordered the closure of all Latin churches in Constantinople. In 1054, the papal legate sent by Leo IX travelled to Constantinople for purposes that included refusing Cerularius the title of “ecumenical patriarch” and insisting that he recognize the pope’s claim to be the head of all of the churches.[1] The main purposes of the papal legation were to seek help from the Byzantine emperor, Constantine IX Monomachos, in view of the Norman conquest of southern Italy and deal with recent attacks by Leo of Ohrid against the use of unleavened bread and other Western customs,[11] attacks that had the support of Cerularius. The historian Axel Bayer says the legation was sent in response to two letters, one from the emperor seeking assistance in arranging a common military campaign by the eastern and western empires against the Normans, and the other from Cerularius.[12] On the refusal of Cerularius to accept the demand, the leader of the legation, Cardinal Humbert of Silva Candida, O.S.B., excommunicated him, and in return Cerularius excommunicated Humbert and the other legates.[1]

The validity of the Western legates’ act is doubtful because Pope Leo died and Cerularius’ excommunication only applied to the legates personally.[1] Still, the Church split along doctrinal, theological, linguistic, political, and geographical lines, and the fundamental breach has never been healed, with each side sometimes accusing the other of falling into heresy and initiating the division. The Latin-led Crusades, the Massacre of the Latins in 1182, the West’s retaliation in the Sacking of Thessalonica in 1185, the capture and pillaging of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade in 1204, and the imposition of Latin patriarchs made reconciliation more difficult.[1] Establishing Latin hierarchies in the Crusader states meant that there were two rival claimants to each of the patriarchal sees of Antioch, Constantinople, and Jerusalem, making the existence of schism clear.[13] Several attempts at reconciliation did not bear fruit.

In 1965, Pope Paul VI and Ecumenical Patriarch Athenagoras I nullified the anathemas of 1054,[1] although this nullification of measures which were taken against a few individuals was essentially a goodwill gesture and did not constitute any sort of reunion. The absence of full communion between the churches is even explicitly mentioned when the Code of Canon Law accords Catholic ministers permission to administer the sacraments of penance, the Eucharist and the anointing of the sick to spontaneously requesting members of eastern churches such as the Eastern Orthodox Church (as well as the Oriental Orthodox churches and the Church of the East) and members of western churches such as the Old Catholic Church.[14] Contacts between the two sides continue. Every year a delegation from each joins in the other’s celebration of its patronal feast, Saints Peter and Paul (29 June) for Rome and Saint Andrew (30 November) for Constantinople, and there have been several visits by the head of each to the other. The efforts of the ecumenical patriarchs towards reconciliation with the Catholic Church have often been the target of sharp criticism from some fellow Orthodox.[15]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1882 – Violette Neatley Anderson, American judge (d. 1937)[17]
Violette Neatley Anderson (July 16, 1882 – December 24, 1937)[1][2] she became the first African-American woman to practice law before the United States Supreme Court on January 29, 1926. She was one of the most prominent advocates of a landmark piece of legislation that helped secure rights and economic mobility for sharecroppers in the South, the Bankhead-Jones Act.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: Capital Gazette gunman found guilty; Report for America seeks rural newsrooms for reporter placements in summer 2022; Rural Americans invited to share their internet bills to help shed a spotlight on fair prices and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Changing The Channel Analyzing the complicated state of affairs, and the long goodbyes, that come when one TV network or cable channel replaces another. Here are 10 examples.
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: How American Bandstand Changed American Culture: Revisit Scenes from the Iconic Music Show
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Independent Publishing Magazine: Selling and Distributing Your Book: What Self-Published Authors Need to Know
 
 
 
 
Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Friday, July 16, 2021
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: See the psychedelic colors of a sea urchin and more ->
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Leah Maroney, The Spruce Eats: Crispy Smashed Potatoes Smothered in a rich garlic butter
 
 
By Leah Maroney, The Spruce Eats: Sweet Potato Noodles
 
 
By Joanne Fazio, Carbondale, Pennsylvania, Taste of Home: Zucchini Cobbler
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI July 15, 2021

On This Day

1799 – The Rosetta Stone is found in the Egyptian village of Rosetta by French Captain Pierre-François Bouchard during Napoleon’s Egyptian Campaign.
The Rosetta Stone is a granodiorite stele inscribed with three versions of a decree issued in Memphis, Egypt in 196 BC during the Ptolemaic dynasty on behalf of King Ptolemy V Epiphanes. The top and middle texts are in Ancient Egyptian using hieroglyphic and Demotic scripts respectively, while the bottom is in Ancient Greek. The decree has only minor differences between the three versions, making the Rosetta Stone key to deciphering the Egyptian scripts.

The stone was carved during the Hellenistic period and is believed to have originally been displayed within a temple, possibly at nearby Sais. It was probably moved in late antiquity or during the Mameluk period, and was eventually used as building material in the construction of Fort Julien near the town of Rashid (Rosetta) in the Nile Delta. It was discovered there in July 1799 by French officer Pierre-François Bouchard during the Napoleonic campaign in Egypt. It was the first Ancient Egyptian bilingual text recovered in modern times, and it aroused widespread public interest with its potential to decipher this previously untranslated hieroglyphic script. Lithographic copies and plaster casts soon began circulating among European museums and scholars. When the British defeated the French they took the stone to London under the Capitulation of Alexandria in 1801. It has been on public display at the British Museum almost continuously since 1802 and is the most visited object there.

Study of the decree was already underway when the first complete translation of the Greek text was published in 1803. Jean-François Champollion announced the transliteration of the Egyptian scripts in Paris in 1822; it took longer still before scholars were able to read Ancient Egyptian inscriptions and literature confidently. Major advances in the decoding were recognition that the stone offered three versions of the same text (1799); that the demotic text used phonetic characters to spell foreign names (1802); that the hieroglyphic text did so as well, and had pervasive similarities to the demotic (1814); and that phonetic characters were also used to spell native Egyptian words (1822–1824).

Three other fragmentary copies of the same decree were discovered later, and several similar Egyptian bilingual or trilingual inscriptions are now known, including three slightly earlier Ptolemaic decrees: the Decree of Alexandria in 243 BC, the Decree of Canopus in 238 BC, and the Memphis decree of Ptolemy IV, c. 218 BC. The Rosetta Stone is no longer unique, but it was the essential key to the modern understanding of ancient Egyptian literature and civilisation. The term ‘Rosetta Stone’ is now used to refer to the essential clue to a new field of knowledge.

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Born On This Day

1858 – Emmeline Pankhurst, English political activist and suffragist (d. 1928)
Emmeline Pankhurst (née Goulden; 15 July 1858 – 14 June 1928) was a British political activist. She is best remembered for organizing the UK suffragette movement and helping women win the right to vote. In 1999, Time named her as one of the 100 Most Important People of the 20th Century, stating that “she shaped an idea of objects for our time” and “shook society into a new pattern from which there could be no going back”.[1] She was widely criticised for her militant tactics, and historians disagree about their effectiveness, but her work is recognised as a crucial element in achieving women’s suffrage in the United Kingdom.[2][3]

Born in the Moss Side district of Manchester to politically active parents, Pankhurst was introduced at the age of 14 to the women’s suffrage movement. She founded and became involved with the Women’s Franchise League, which advocated suffrage for both married and unmarried women. When that organisation broke apart, she tried to join the left-leaning Independent Labour Party through her friendship with socialist Keir Hardie but was initially refused membership by the local branch on account of her sex. While working as a Poor Law Guardian, she was shocked at the harsh conditions she encountered in Manchester’s workhouses.

In 1903 Pankhurst founded the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), an all-women suffrage advocacy organisation dedicated to “deeds, not words” .[4] The group identified as independent from – and often in opposition to – political parties. It became known for physical confrontations: its members smashed windows and assaulted police officers. Pankhurst, her daughters, and other WSPU activists received repeated prison sentences, where they staged hunger strikes to secure better conditions, and were often force-fed. As Pankhurst’s eldest daughter Christabel took leadership of the WSPU, antagonism between the group and the government grew. Eventually the group adopted arson as a tactic, and more moderate organisations spoke out against the Pankhurst family. In 1913 several prominent individuals left the WSPU, among them Pankhurst’s younger daughters, Adela and Sylvia. Emmeline was so furious that she “gave [Adela] a ticket, £20, and a letter of introduction to a suffragette in Australia, and firmly insisted that she emigrate”.[5] Adela complied and the family rift was never healed. Sylvia became a socialist.

With the advent of the First World War, Emmeline and Christabel called an immediate halt to the militant terrorism in support of the British government’s stand against the “German Peril”.[6] Emmeline organised and led a massive procession called the Women’s Right to Serve demonstration[7] to illustrate women’s contribution to the war effort. Emmeline and Christabel urged women to aid industrial production and encouraged young men to fight, becoming prominent figures in the white feather movement.[8] In 1918, the Representation of the People Act granted votes to all men over the age of 21 and women over the age of 30. This discrepancy was intended to ensure that men did not become minority voters as a consequence of the huge number of deaths suffered during the First World War.[9]

She transformed the WSPU machinery into the Women’s Party, which was dedicated to promoting women’s equality in public life. In her later years, she became concerned with what she perceived as the menace posed by Bolshevism and joined the Conservative Party. She was selected as the Conservative candidate for Whitechapel and St Georges in 1927.[10][11] She died on 14 June 1928, only weeks before the Conservative government’s Representation of the People (Equal Franchise) Act 1928 extended the vote to all women over 21 years of age on 2 July 1928. She was commemorated two years later with a statue in Victoria Tower Gardens, next to the Houses of Parliament.

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FYI

McCormick Is Hiring a Director of Taco Relations The part-time, four-month gig pays $100,000

 
 
 
 
By Jonathan Edwards, The Washington Post: A Wyoming bar sold a shirt promoting violence against gay people miles from Matthew Shepard’s murder site

Wyoming is one of three states that haven’t passed hate-crime legislation since Shepard was killed, the Associated Press reports. A year after his death, lawmakers considered legislation that would have extended hate-crime protections to cover sexual orientation, according to a Wyoming State Historical Society entry. The bill failed on a 30-30 tie two days in a row and hasn’t been seriously considered since.
 
 
 
 
The Washington Post, Morning Mix: A Chinese father never stopped looking for his son, who was kidnapped at age 2. They reunited after 24 years. Guo Gangtang and his wife were reunited with their son, Guo Xinzhen, who’s now in his mid-20s
 
 
 
 
Alaska Hihgways News, The Canadian Press: From tacos to ice cream: Adam Rubin now writing for tweens
 
 
Alaska Highway News, The Canadian Press: Hong Kong book fair sees self-censorship and fewer books
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The tragic life of the last Hawaiian princess; The Proto-Oreo; Spacecraft Cemetery and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

Ideas

By MattZ28: WheeStroll- Wheelchair Stroller Attachment
 
 
 
 

Recipes

Taste of Home Test Kitchen: Slow-Cooker Al Pastor Bowls
 
 
Taste of Home: 49 Mexican Chicken Recipes
 
 
By Momos75: Fish Pops on Lemongrass Sticks
 
 
By Sweet Strawberry: Classy Chocolate Cake Pops
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

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Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

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