Category: FYI

FYI

FYI October 27, 2021

On This Day

1838 – Missouri governor Lilburn Boggs issues the Extermination Order, which orders all Mormons to leave the state or be killed.
Missouri Executive Order 44, commonly known as the Mormon Extermination Order,[1][2] was an executive order issued on October 27, 1838, by the Governor of Missouri, Lilburn Boggs. The order was issued in the aftermath of the Battle of Crooked River, a clash between Mormons and a unit of the Missouri State Militia in northern Ray County, Missouri, during the 1838 Mormon War. Claiming that the Mormons had committed open and avowed defiance of the law and had made war upon the people of Missouri, Governor Boggs directed that “the Mormons must be treated as enemies, and must be exterminated or driven from the State if necessary for the public peace—their outrages are beyond all description”.[2] The Militia and other state authorities—General John B. Clark, among them—used the executive order to violently expel the Mormons from their lands in the state following their capitulation, which in turn led to their forced migration to Nauvoo, Illinois. The order was supported by most northwest Missouri citizens but was questioned or denounced by a few. However, no determination of the order’s legality was ever made. On June 25, 1976, Governor Kit Bond issued an executive order rescinding the Extermination Order, recognizing its legal invalidity and formally apologizing on behalf of the State of Missouri for the suffering it had caused the Mormons.[3]

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Born On This Day

1910 – Margaret Hutchinson Rousseau, American chemical engineer (d. 2000)
Margaret Hutchinson Rousseau (27 October 1910 – 12 January 2000) was an American chemical engineer who designed the first commercial penicillin production plant.[1][2] She was the first female member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.[3]

Life
Hutchinson was born in 1910 in Houston, Texas, the daughter of a clothing store owner. She received her Bachelor of Science degree from Rice Institute in 1932 and her Doctor of Science degree in chemical engineering from MIT in 1937, the first woman to earn a doctorate in the subject in the USA.[4] Her thesis topic was The effect of solute on the liquid film resistance in gas absorption.[2]

On 1 May 1939, she married William Caubu Rousseau, a co-worker at E.B. Badger & Sons, who was later a chemical engineering lecturer at MIT. They had one son, William.[citation needed]

She died 12 January 2000, aged 89, at her home in Weston, Massachusetts.[4]

Career
Hutchinson started her professional career with E. B. Badger in Boston. During the Second World War, she oversaw the design of production plants for the strategically important materials of penicillin and synthetic rubber.[5] Her development of deep-tank fermentation of penicillium mold enabled large-scale production of penicillin.[2][6] She worked on the development of high-octane gasoline for aviation fuel.[2] Her later work included improved distillation column design and plants for the production of ethylene glycol and glacial acetic acid.[5]

Hutchinson retired in 1961, and later became an overseer of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.[7]

Honors
In 1945, Hutchinson became the first woman to be accepted as a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.[8][3] In 1955 she received the Achievement Award of the Society of Women Engineers.[7][9] In 1983 she was the first female recipient of the prestigious Founders Award of the AIChE.[3]

 
 

FYI

Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: Rural community colleges can help with nursing shortage; start shopping early for the holidays, Verizon and Amazon team up on major rural satellite broadband system and more ->
 
 
 
 
Wynning History: Letters from War: Irvin Schwartz’s World War II correspondence with the West Schuylkill Press-Herald
 
 
 
 
National Science Foundation Update: Ready for some spooky science? Brace yourself, and dive into a dreadful dozen … If you dare And remember – it’s all true
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smiht, Tedium: The Animal Years
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Yale Professor Jason Stanley Identifies 10 Tactics of Fascism: The “Cult of the Leader,” Law & Order, Victimhood and More
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 26, 2021

On This Day

1597 – Imjin War: Korean Admiral Yi Sun-sin routs the Japanese Navy of 300 ships with only 13 ships at the Battle of Myeongnyang.
In the Battle of Myeongnyang, on October 26, 1597, the Korean Joseon Kingdom’s navy, led by Admiral Yi Sun-sin, fought the Japanese navy in the Myeongnyang Strait, near Jindo Island, off the southwest corner of the Korean peninsula.

With only 13 ships remaining from Admiral Won Gyun’s disastrous defeat at the Battle of Chilchonryang, Admiral Yi held the strait as a “last stand” battle against the Japanese navy, who were sailing to support their land army’s advance towards the Joseon capital of Hanyang (modern-day Seoul).

The actual numeric strength of the Japanese fleet that Admiral Yi fought is unclear; various sources indicate the number of Japanese ships could have been anywhere between 120 and 330 ships, though the low end of this range appears to be a count of actual warships and the high end appears to be referring to the entire Japanese fleet (including roughly 200 supporting non-combatant ships).[2]: 312 [5] Regardless of the size of the Japanese fleet, all sources indicate that the Japanese ships heavily outnumbered the Korean ships, by at least a ten-to-one ratio.[1]: 302  In total 30 Japanese warships were sunk or crippled during the battle. Tōdō Takatora, the commander of the Japanese navy, was wounded during the battle and half of his subordinate officers were also wounded or killed.[4] Given the disparity in numbers of ships, the naval battle is regarded as one of the most tactically brilliant victories in the history of warfare, and a humiliating naval defeat for the Japanese. Even after the victory, however, the Joseon navy was still outnumbered by remaining Japanese forces, so Admiral Yi withdrew to the Yellow Sea to resupply his fleet and have more space for a mobile defense.[6] After the Korean navy withdrew, the Japanese navy made an incursion into the western coast of Korea, near some islands in Yeonggwang County.

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1892 – Ida B. Wells publishes Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases.
Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931) was an American investigative journalist, educator, and early leader in the civil rights movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).[1] Over the course of a lifetime dedicated to combating prejudice and violence, and the fight for African-American equality, especially that of women, Wells arguably became the most famous Black woman in America.[2]

Born into slavery in Holly Springs, Mississippi, Wells was freed by the Emancipation Proclamation during the American Civil War. At the age of 16, she lost both her parents and her infant brother in the 1878 yellow fever epidemic. She went to work and kept the rest of the family together with the help of her grandmother. Later, moving with some of her siblings to Memphis, Tennessee, she found better pay as a teacher. Soon, Wells co-owned and wrote for the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight newspaper. Her reporting covered incidents of racial segregation and inequality.

In the 1890s, Wells documented lynching in the United States in articles and through her pamphlet called Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in all its Phases, investigating frequent claims of whites that lynchings were reserved for Black criminals only. Wells exposed lynching as a barbaric practice of whites in the South used to intimidate and oppress African Americans who created economic and political competition—and a subsequent threat of loss of power—for whites. A white mob destroyed her newspaper office and presses as her investigative reporting was carried nationally in Black-owned newspapers. Subjected to continued threats, Wells left Memphis for Chicago. She married Ferdinand L. Barnett in 1895 and had a family while continuing her work writing, speaking, and organizing for civil rights and the women’s movement for the rest of her life.

While her work contains extensive documentation of lynchings — she was one of the first to do so — her work is notable for its real-time reporting on the prevalent incendiary propaganda about Black rape that was used to justify the practice.[3]

Wells was outspoken regarding her beliefs as a Black female activist and faced regular public disapproval, sometimes including from other leaders within the civil rights movement and the women’s suffrage movement. She was active in women’s rights and the women’s suffrage movement, establishing several notable women’s organizations. A skilled and persuasive speaker, Wells traveled nationally and internationally on lecture tours.[4]

In 2020, Wells was posthumously honored with a Pulitzer Prize special citation “[f]or her outstanding and courageous reporting on the horrific and vicious violence against African Americans during the era of lynching.”[5]
 
 
Read more ->

Born On This Day

1902 – Henrietta Hill Swope, American astronomer and academic (d. 1980)
Henrietta Hill Swope (October 26, 1902 – November 24, 1980)[2] was an American astronomer who studied variable stars. In particular, she measured the period-luminosity relation for Cepheid stars, which are bright variable stars whose periods of variability relate directly to their intrinsic luminosities. Their measured periods can therefore be related to their distances and used to measure the size of the Milky Way and distances to other galaxies.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

The Passive Voice, From Digital Pubbing: 7 Simple Social Media Tips for Successful Authors
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By IreteH: Light Up the Darkness – Halloween Costume
 
 
Instructables: Unusual Uses Contest!
 
 

Recipes

By In The Kitchen With Matt: Barbie Cake
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 24 & 25, 2021

On This Day

1930 – A bloodless coup d’état in Brazil ends the First Republic, replacing it with the Vargas Era.
The Revolution of 1930 (Portuguese: Revolução de 1930), also known as the 1930 Revolution, was an armed insurrection which ended the First Brazilian Republic. Initiated by political elites in the states of Minas Gerais, Paraíba and Rio Grande do Sul, it was fueled by dissent in the military and by economic turmoil caused by a collapse in the price of coffee. The revolution ousted then President Washington Luís on October 24, 1930, prevented the inauguration of President–elect Júlio Prestes, and installed Getúlio Vargas as the new president.[1]

Prior to 1929, Brazilian politics was controlled by an alliance between the two largest state economies; known as “coffee with milk politics”, coffee growers in São Paulo combined with the dairy industry centred in Minas Gerais to create an oligarchy,[2][3] with the Presidency alternating between the two states. This practice was broken when the leaders of São Paulo and President Luís nominated their fellow Paulista Júlio Prestes as candidate for the presidential elections in 1930. In response, Minas Gerais, Rio Grande do Sul and Paraíba formed a ‘Liberal Alliance’ backing opposition candidate, Getúlio Vargas.

When Prestes won the March 1930 Presidential election, the Alliance denounced his victory as fraudulent, while Vargas’s running mate, João Pessoa, was assassinated in July. The revolution began on October 3, 1930, and quickly spread throughout the country; by October 10, both Rio Grande do Sul and Minas Gerais had announced their support. Luís was deposed on October 24, and the Brazilian Military Junta of 1930 took over; Vargas assumed leadership of the junta on November 3, 1930, marking the end of the First Republic [3] and beginning of the Vargas Era.[4]

The 1932 Constitutionalist Revolution led to a new Brazilian Constitution in 1934. However, in 1937, following an attempted fascist revolt, the constitution was annulled and Vargas became a dictator in the name of law and order. His reign occupies two periods of Brazilian history, the Second Brazilian Republic and the Third Brazilian Republic, known as the Estado Novo.

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1854 – The Battle of Balaclava takes place during the Crimean War. It is soon memorialized in verse as The Charge of the Light Brigade.
The Battle of Balaclava, fought on 25 October 1854 during the Crimean War, was part of the Siege of Sevastopol (1854–55), an Allied attempt to capture the port and fortress of Sevastopol, Russia’s principal naval base on the Black Sea. The engagement followed the earlier Allied victory in September at the Battle of the Alma, where the Russian General Menshikov had positioned his army in an attempt to stop the Allies progressing south towards their strategic goal.[3] Alma was the first major encounter fought in the Crimean Peninsula since the Allied landings at Kalamita Bay on 14 September, and was a clear battlefield success; but a tardy pursuit by the Allies failed to gain a decisive victory, allowing the Russians to regroup, recover and prepare their defence.

The Russians split their forces. Defending within the allied siege lines was primarily the Navy manning the considerable static defenses of the city and threatening the allies from without was the mobile Army under General Menshikov.

The Allies decided against a slow assault on Sevastopol and instead prepared for a protracted siege. The British, under the command of Lord Raglan, and the French, under Canrobert, positioned their troops to the south of the port on the Chersonese Peninsula: the French Army occupied the bay of Kamiesch on the west coast whilst the British moved to the southern port of Balaclava. However, this position committed the British to the defence of the right flank of the Allied siege operations, for which Raglan had insufficient troops. Taking advantage of this exposure, the Russian General Liprandi, with some 25,000 men, prepared to attack the defences around Balaclava, hoping to disrupt the supply chain between the British base and their siege lines.

The battle began with a Russian artillery and infantry attack on the Ottoman redoubts that formed Balaclava’s first line of defence on the Vorontsov Heights. The Ottoman forces initially resisted the Russian assaults, but lacking support they were eventually forced to retreat. When the redoubts fell, the Russian cavalry moved to engage the second defensive line in the South Valley, held by the Ottoman and the British 93rd Highland Regiment in what came to be known as the “Thin Red Line”. This line held and repelled the attack; as did General James Scarlett’s British Heavy Brigade who charged and defeated the greater proportion of the cavalry advance, forcing the Russians onto the defensive. However, a final Allied cavalry charge, stemming from a misinterpreted order from Raglan, led to one of the most famous and ill-fated events in British military history – the Charge of the Light Brigade.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1885 – Alice Perry, Irish engineer and poet (d. 1969)
Alice Jacqueline Perry (24 October 1885 – 21 April 1969) was the first woman in Europe to graduate with a degree in engineering.[1][2][3]

Early life and education

Born in Wellpark, Galway in 1885, Alice was one of five daughters and a son of Martha Park and James Perry.[4] Her father[5] was the county surveyor in Galway West and co-founded the Galway Electric Light Company.[6] Her uncle, John Perry, was a Fellow of the Royal Society and invented the navigational gyroscope.[7]

After graduating from the High School in Galway, she won a scholarship to study at Queen’s College Galway in 1902. Having excelled in mathematics, she changed from studying for a degree in arts to an engineering degree. She graduated with first class honours in 1906.[1][8]

The family was academically gifted. Her sister Nettie studied modern languages and went on to become a lecturer in Spanish at London University. Sister Agnes Mary (known as Molly) earned BA (1903) and MA (1905) in mathematics from Queen’s College Galway (later UCG then NUIG), taught there in 1903–1904, was a Royal University of Ireland examiner in mathematics in 1906, and later became assistant headmistress at a secondary school in London. She was described as “the most distinguished mathematician of her time in the college”.[9] Her sister Martha married the map scholar, Edward William O’Flaherty Lynam, and their son Joss Lynam also became an engineer. All of the Perry sisters were involved in the suffrage campaign in Galway.[3]

Read more ->

 
 
1800 – Maria Jane Jewsbury, English writer, poet, literary reviewer (d. 1833)[8]
Maria Jane Jewsbury (later Maria Jane Fletcher; 25 October 1800 – 4 October 1833) was an English writer, poet and reviewer. Her Phantasmagoria, containing poetry and prose,[1] Letters to the Young and The Three Histories were highly popular.[2] While bringing up brothers and sisters, she wrote for the Manchester Gazette in 1821.[3] She also developed friendships with many authors. Her religious advice tended to dogmatism and a feeling of Christian right.[4] Phantasmagoria was noticed by William Wordsworth and Dorothy, whom she visited in Lancashire. Other friends were Felicia Hemans, with whom she stayed in Wales in summer 1828, Barbara Hofland, Sara Coleridge, the Henry Roscoes, the Charles Wentworth Dilkes, the Samuel Carter Halls, the Henry Chorleys, and Thomas De Quincey.[4] Through its editor Dilke, she began writing for the Athenaeum in 1830. She married Rev. William Kew Fletcher (died 1867) in 1832, at Penegoes, Montgomeryshire. They sailed for India, but she kept up a journal and had poetry printed in the Athenaeum as The Oceanides.[5]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Washington Update

Dear Alaskans,

I wanted to reach out today to let you know that my office currently has two exciting job opportunities. We are looking for a Legislative Correspondent to work out of my Washington, D.C. office and a Special Assistant who will be based in my Anchorage office. It is important to me to ensure that Alaskans have every opportunity to work in my office on behalf of our state. I encourage you to read the job descriptions below, and share them with friends and family.

Sincerely,

Don Young

Congressman for All Alaska

Special Assistant – Anchorage

I’m looking for a hard-working, well-organized, and detail-orientated individual to fill a Special Assistant position in my Anchorage office.

The Special Assistant monitors and updates our State Director and me on state and local issues. This position acts as my liaison to federal, state, and local agencies, and answers casework correspondence and communications with constituents.

Duties include, but are not limited to, handling constituent casework assignments, assessing issues on the ground that may require legislative action, acting as my proxy at meetings when I am voting in D.C., and compiling and delivering constituent opinions on items before Congress.

Candidates will be part of a high-performing team and work in concert with my staff in Washington, D.C.

The ideal candidate works well under pressure, is willing to work with a flexible schedule that may include nights and weekends, and can grow and maintain relationships with community members and stakeholders in Alaska.

Strong oral and written communication skills, knowledge of Alaska and its culture, a grasp of the legislative process, understanding of local and state issues, and a level temperament are required. Given the range of casework and my office’s commitment to privacy, applicants must be able to maintain confidentiality and exercise discretion.

Travel of up to 10% may be required, and applicants must hold a valid driver’s license.

To apply, send a resume and cover letter to dyapplications@mail.house.gov with “Anchorage Special Assistant” in the subject line.

Legislative Correspondent – Washington, D.C.

I’m looking for a hard-working, well-organized, and detail-orientated individual to fill a Legislative Correspondent opening on my team in D.C.

Responsibilities include answering phones, overseeing constituent communications, managing all incoming and outgoing mail, processing flag and tour requests, supervising the interns’ day-to-day tasks, drafting legislative and non-legislative letters, and other duties as assigned.

Candidates must be able to set and meet deadlines, work well in a team environment, and occasionally work outside of standard business hours, including nights and weekends. Alaska ties are preferred but not required.

To apply, please send a resume, cover letter, and brief writing sample to dyapplications@mail.house.gov with “DC Legislative Correspondent” in the subject line.

 
 
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Sitka Nature Show #248 – Sarah Gravem
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: How Randy Bachman Found His Stolen Favorite Guitar After 45 Years, with the Help of Facial-Recognition Software

 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice, From Nolo: Protecting Fictional Characters Under U.S. Copyright Law
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Forbes: This Founder Created A Social Media Platform For Authors That Aims To Disrupt The Publishing Industry
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Ringer: Music Copyright in the Age of Forgetting
 
 
 
 
By Rocky Parker, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Horror Movie Blogs
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DLXXIV): This Alpine Shelter in the Italian Dolomites, built during World War I at a height of 2760 meters; Stations currently active in Antarctica; Terrifying Early Helicopters; Micheal Jackson’s 1993 patent for his ‘Anti Gravity Shoes’; Highlights from the 31st Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade.; A Perfect American Candy Store, still going; Flip through TV from the ’90s (and other decades) and more ->

 
 
 
 
The People

Some people have begun to come into my dreams
from a long way away,
traveling over the mountain passes
that nobody living knows.
Old people who smell like fog
and the soft bark of redwoods.
They talk together softly.
They know more than I know.
I think they come from home.

Ursula K. Le Guin (2018)
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Stephanefalies: Pumpkin Pie Biscotti!
 
 
By Michele Brosius, Food Talk Daily: Copycat Ruby Tuesday Pasta Salad Recipe
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Tex-Mex Skillet Fried Rice
 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Witch Fingers
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 23, 2021

On This Day

1295 – The first treaty forming the Auld Alliance between Scotland and France against England is signed in Paris.[2]
The Auld Alliance (Scots for “Old Alliance”; French: Vieille Alliance; Scottish Gaelic: An Seann-chaidreachas)[1] was an alliance made in 1295 between the kingdoms of Scotland and France against England. The Scots word auld, meaning old, has become a partly affectionate term for the long-lasting association between the two countries. Although the alliance was never formally revoked, it is considered by some to have ended with the signing of the Treaty of Edinburgh in 1560.[2]

The alliance played a significant role in the relations among Scotland, France and England during those 265 years. The alliance was renewed by all the French and Scottish monarchs of that period except Louis XI.[3] By the late 14th century, the renewal occurred regardless of whether either kingdom was at war with England at the time.[4]

The alliance began with the treaty signed by John Balliol and Philip IV of France in 1295 against Edward I of England. The terms of the treaty stipulated that if either country were attacked by England, the other country would invade English territory. The 1513 Battle of Flodden, where the Scots invaded England in response to the English campaign against France, was one such occasion. Thomas Randolph, Earl of Moray, negotiated the renewal of the alliance in 1326. The alliance played an important role in the Wars of Scottish Independence, the Hundred Years’ War, the War of the League of Cambrai and the War of Rough Wooing.

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Born On This Day

1894 – Emma Vyssotsky, American astronomer and academic (d. 1975)
Emma Vyssotsky (October 23, 1894 – May 12, 1975, born Emma T. R. Williams) was an American astronomer who was honored with the Annie J. Cannon Award in Astronomy in 1946.[1]

Biography
Emma earned her bachelor’s degree in mathematics at Swarthmore College in 1916[1] and worked at Smith College as an astronomy[2]/mathematics[1] demonstrator for a year before finding work at an insurance company as an actuary. In 1927, after receiving a Whitney Fellowship and a Bartol Scholarship, she enrolled in astronomy at Radcliffe College (now part of Harvard).[2] There, she worked with Cecilia Payne on the “spectral line contours of hydrogen and ionized calcium throughout the spectral sequence.”[2]

Emma received her PhD in astronomy from Harvard College in 1930 for her dissertation titled, A Spectrophotometric Study of A Stars.[2] At the time, she was only the third individual to be awarded a PhD in astronomy from Harvard.[1]

She followed her husband, astronomer Alexander N. Vyssotsky, to the University of Virginia, where he was offered a professorship; she was offered an instructor position.[1] She spent her astronomy career at the McCormick Observatory at the university,[2] where her specialty was the motion of stars and the kinematics of the Milky Way. The couple worked together.

[They were] studying stellar parallaxes by applying trigonometric functions to observations made on multiple photographic exposures. They discovered many of these parallaxes by attaching a special objective prism to the observatory’s astrograph. Their research led to accurate calculations of stellar motions and the determination of the structure of galaxies.[1]

She worked at the observatory “for more than a dozen years” before the university promoted her to professor in 1945, but by then she had taken a medical leave of absence after contracting a debilitating illness, Malta Fever, which restricted her activities. Still, she continued to publish.[1]

Personal life

Emma Williams married the Russian-born astronomer Alexander N. Vyssotsky in 1929 and they published jointly and worked together at the McCormick Observatory in Charlottesville, Virginia.[2] They had one son, Victor A. Vyssotsky (a mathematician and computer scientist), who was involved in the Multics project and co-created the Darwin computer game.

Emma died in Winter Park, Florida two years after her husband’s death.[1]

Awards

In 1946, she was awarded the Annie J. Cannon Award in Astronomy by the American Astronomical Society in recognition of her contributions to the field of stellar spectra.[1][3]

Select publications
Emma published much of her research under the name E. T. Williams. The couple would alternate the lead author role on their joint papers, with her name appearing first sometimes, and his name appearing first at other times.[1]

Vyssotsky, E. T. W. (1929). A Spectrophotometric Study of A Stars (Doctoral dissertation, Radcliffe College).
Vyssotsky, A. N., & Williams, E. T. (1933). Color indices and integrated magnitudes of fifteen bright globular clusters. The Astrophysical Journal, 77, 301.
Williams, E. T., & Vyssotsky, A. N. (1935). Color Indices and Integrated Magnitudes of Fifteen Bright Globular Clusters, by AN Wyssotsky and Emma TR Williams. University of Virginia.
Vyssotsky, A. N., & Williams, E. T. (1943). Mccormick Spectral Statistics. The Astrophysical Journal, 98, 185.
Williams, E. T., & Vyssotsky, A. N. (1946). Distribution of faint red giants in galactic longitude as compared with faint A stars. The Astronomical Journal, 52, 51.
Vyssotsky, A. N., & Williams, E. T. (1948). An investigation of stellar motions. XII An interpretation of peculiar motions in terms of galactic structure (Astron. J., vol. 56, 1951, p. 62).

 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 
How to Deal with Rejection (and Get Revenge) Like Edgar Allan Poe
Catherine Baab-Muguira on Doubling Down on Your Ambitions

Huh?
When Edgar Allan Poe was 17 years old, he and John Allan loaded up the family station wagon with all his clothes, posters, and books, and made the 70-mile trek west to Charlottesville, Virginia. Among the rolling hills of that town, Thomas Jefferson had recently founded a university meant to serve the sons of the state—at least, those sons who could afford to spend a few years drinking, gambling, goofing off, and, on occasion, attending the odd lecture, maybe sitting an exam or two. Poe saw his own place in these ranks, and longed to distinguish himself in this fresh social and academic setting.
 
 
 
 

By Clea Simon, Kings River Life: The Song Remains the Same: Writing in the Rock Music World of Hold Me Down
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 22, 2021

On This Day

1844 – The Millerites (followers of Baptist preacher William Miller) anticipate the end of the world in conjunction with the Second Advent of Christ. The following day becomes known as the Great Disappointment.
The Great Disappointment in the Millerite movement was the reaction that followed Baptist preacher William Miller’s proclamations that Jesus Christ would return to the Earth by 1844, what he called the Advent. His study of the Daniel 8 prophecy during the Second Great Awakening led him to the conclusion that Daniel’s “cleansing of the sanctuary” was cleansing of the world from sin when Christ would come, and he and many others prepared, but October 22, 1844 came, and they were disappointed.[1][2][3][4]

These events paved the way for the Adventists who formed the Seventh-day Adventist Church. They contended that what had happened on October 22 was not Jesus’ return, as Miller had thought, but the start of Jesus’ final work of atonement, the cleansing in the heavenly sanctuary, leading up to the Second Coming.[1][2][3][4]

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Born On This Day

1925 – Edith Kawelohea McKinzie, Hawaiian genealogist, author, and hula expert (d. 2014)
Edith Kawelohea Kapule McKinzie (October 22, 1925 – October 21, 2014) was an American genealogist, educator, author, and an expert in hula and chant. She published two books on Hawaiian genealogy, was Director of the Hawaiian Language Newspaper Index Project, and taught traditional hula and chant across the United States. In 2004, she was named a Living Treasure of Hawaii for her contributions to Hawaiian culture and heritage.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Colin Marshall, OpenCulture: How Radiohead Wrote the Perfect James Bond Theme Song
 
 
 
 
By Ron Charles: The Washington Post Book Club: Book Club: Katie Couric’s memoir can’t keep a secret, and Donald Trump’s library needs an archivist
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From MSN: How Amazon Changed Fiction As We Know It
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Wall Street Journal: Of Fear and Strangers
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Electric Lit: 7 Books About People Having a Worse Day Than You
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life: 6 Music Bands: You Must Listen To Before You Die
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Margaret McClatchey, Loveland, Colorado, Taste of Home: French Onion Casserole
 
 
By Hazel Wheaton, Katie Bandurski, Taste of Home: 50 Scary-Good Soups for October
 
 
By Jesse Szewczyk, The Kitchn: Coffee Cake Cookies Are the Coziest Fall Treat Imaginable
 
 
By Grace Elkins, The Kitchn: I Tried the Nana’s Devil’s Food Cake Reddit Is Obsessed With (It Honestly Blew Me Away)
 
 
By Caroline Stanko, Taste of Home: 75 Cute Halloween Treats You Need to Make This Year
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 21, 2021

On This Day

1824 – Portland cement is patented.
Portland cement is the most common type of cement in general use around the world as a basic ingredient of concrete, mortar, stucco, and non-specialty grout. It was developed from other types of hydraulic lime in England in the early 19th century by Joseph Aspdin, and is usually made from limestone. It is a fine powder, produced by heating limestone and clay minerals in a kiln to form clinker, grinding the clinker, and adding 2 to 3 percent of gypsum. Several types of portland cement are available. The most common, called ordinary portland cement (OPC), is grey, but white portland cement is also available. Its name is derived from its resemblance to Portland stone which was quarried on the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England. It was named by Joseph Aspdin who obtained a patent for it in 1824. However, his son William Aspdin is regarded as the inventor of “modern” portland cement due to his developments in the 1840s.[1]

Portland cement is caustic, so it can cause chemical burns.[2] The powder can cause irritation or, with severe exposure, lung cancer, and can contain a number of hazardous components, including crystalline silica and hexavalent chromium. Environmental concerns are the high energy consumption required to mine, manufacture, and transport the cement, and the related air pollution, including the release of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, dioxin,[citation needed] NOx, SO2, and particulates. Production of portland cement contributes about 10% of world carbon dioxide emissions.[3] The International Energy Agency has estimated that cement production will increase by between 12 and 23% by 2050 to meet the needs of the world’s growing population.[4] There are several ongoing researches targeting a suitable replacement of portland cement by supplementary cementitious materials.[5]

The low cost and widespread availability of the limestone, shales, and other naturally-occurring materials used in portland cement make it one of the lowest-cost materials widely used over the last century. Concrete produced from Portland cement is one of the world’s most versatile construction materials.


Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1922 – Liliane Bettencourt, French businesswoman and philanthropist (d. 2017)
Liliane Henriette Charlotte Bettencourt (French pronunciation: ​[lil.jan be.tɑ̃.kuːʁ]; née Schueller; 21 October 1922 – 21 September 2017) was a French heiress, socialite and businesswoman. She was one of the principal shareholders of L’Oréal. At the time of her death, she was the richest woman, and the 14th richest person in the world, with a net worth of US$44.3 billion.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Mozart Sonatas Can Help Treat Epilepsy: A New Study from Dartmouth
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Does and Don’ts of Putting on a Prison Concert: Johnny Cash, BB King, the Grateful Dead, Bonnie Tyler & The Cramps
 
 
 
 
Daily Good, The New York Times: ‘Death Doulas’ Provide Aid at the End of Life End-of-life doulas support people emotionally, physically, spiritually and practically: sitting vigil, giving hand massages, making snacks.
 
 
Daily Good: The Man In The Red Bandanna: A Story Of Heroism On 9/11
On Sept. 11, 2001, one young man led several people down the stairs to safety after a plane hit the south tower of the World Trade Center. The people he helped only knew him as “the man in the red bandanna.” They now know his name was Welles Crowther. He died when the tower collapsed.
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings By Maria Popova: Midweek pick-me-up: An uncommonly tender illustrated story about love, loss, the life-saving power of trees, and the art of savoring unlonely solitude
 
 
 
 
Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: Share of female state troopers has barely increased in past 20 years; series with rural resonance win environmental reporting awards; Incentive programs aim to bring in rural workers; amenities like broadband access can help them succeed and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By half-n-half: Gluten- Free Fresh Pumpkin Cheesecake Caramel Bread
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Air Fryer BBQ Pork Chops
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Instant Pot Sausage and Peppers
 
 
I Wash You Dry: Pumpkin Cheesecake Pie
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 19 & 20, 2021

On This Day

1466 – The Thirteen Years’ War between Poland and the Teutonic Order ends with the Second Treaty of Thorn.
The Peace of Thorn or Toruń of 1466, also known as the Second Peace of Thorn or Toruń (Polish: drugi pokój toruński; German: Zweiter Friede von Thorn), was a peace treaty signed in the Hanseatic city of Thorn (Toruń) on 19 October 1466 between the Polish king Casimir IV Jagiellon and the Teutonic Knights, which ended the Thirteen Years’ War, the longest of Polish–Teutonic wars.

The treaty was signed in the Artus Court,[1] and afterward a mass was held in the Gothic Franciscan Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary to celebrate the peace treaty.[2]

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1818 – The Convention of 1818 is signed between the United States and the United Kingdom, which settles the Canada–United States border on the 49th parallel for most of its length.
The Convention respecting fisheries, boundary and the restoration of slaves, also known as the London Convention, Anglo-American Convention of 1818, Convention of 1818, or simply the Treaty of 1818, is an international treaty signed in 1818 between the United States and the United Kingdom. This treaty resolved standing boundary issues between the two nations. The treaty allowed for joint occupation and settlement of the Oregon Country, known to the British and in Canadian history as the Columbia District of the Hudson’s Bay Company, and including the southern portion of its sister district New Caledonia.

The two nations agreed to a boundary line involving the 49th parallel north, in part because a straight-line boundary would be easier to survey than the pre-existing boundaries based on watersheds. The treaty marked both the United Kingdom’s last permanent major loss of territory in what is now the Continental United States and the United States’ only permanent significant cession of North American territory to a foreign power. The British ceded all of Rupert’s Land south of the 49th parallel and east of the Continental Divide, including all of the Red River Colony south of that latitude, while the United States ceded the northernmost edge of the Missouri Territory north of the 49th parallel.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1868 – Bertha Knight Landes, American academic and politician, Mayor of Seattle (d. 1943)
Bertha Ethel Knight Landes (October 19, 1868, – November 29, 1943) was the first female mayor of a major American city, serving as mayor of Seattle, Washington from 1926 to 1928.[1] After years of civic activism, primarily with women’s organizations, she was elected to the Seattle City Council in 1922 and became council president in 1924.

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1927 – Joyce Brothers, American psychologist, author, and actress (d. 2013)
Joyce Diane Brothers (October 20, 1927 – May 13, 2013) was an American psychologist, television personality, advice columnist, and writer. She first became famous in 1955 for winning the top prize on the American game show The $64,000 Question. [1] Her fame from the game show allowed her to go on to host various advice columns and television shows, which established her as a pioneer in the field of “pop (popular) psychology”.

Brothers is often credited as the first to normalize psychological concepts to the American mainstream.[1] Her syndicated columns were featured in newspapers and magazines, including a monthly column for Good Housekeeping, in which she contributed for nearly 40 years.[2] As Brothers quickly became the “face of psychology” for American audiences, she often appeared in various television roles, usually as herself.[3] From the 1970s onward, she also began to accept fictional roles that parodied her “woman psychologist” persona.[4] She is noted for working continuously for five decades across various genres.[1] Numerous groups recognized Brothers for her strong leadership as a woman in the psychological field and for helping to destigmatize the profession overall.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

I remember when this happened and I applauded the father for killing the predator!

To add to the craziness of those events, Joseph’s father waited at a bank of pay phones at the airport and then shot and killed the abductor as he walked by, all of which was captured on film by a local news crew.
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Legal Genealogist: Inheriting the copyright
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Haunted Spider: Over Sized Skeleton Breaking Out of My Home
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Passion Make: Pumpkin Dinner Buns
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Air Fryer Acorn Squash
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Old Fashioned Mini Pecan Pies
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Star Wars Stormtrooper Cake

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 18, 2021

On This Day

1748 – Signing of the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle ends the War of the Austrian Succession.
The War of the Austrian Succession (German: Österreichischer Erbfolgekrieg) was the last Great Power conflict with the Bourbon-Habsburg dynastic conflict at its heart. It occurred from 1740 to 1748 and marked the rise of Prussia as a major power.[7] Related conflicts included King George’s War, the War of Jenkins’ Ear, the First Carnatic War and the First and the Second Silesian Wars.

The pretext for the war was Maria Theresa’s right to inherit her father Emperor Charles VI’s crown in the Habsburg Monarchy, but France, Prussia and Bavaria really saw it as an opportunity to challenge the Habsburg power. Maria Theresa was backed by Britain, the Dutch Republic and Hanover, which were collectively known as the Pragmatic Allies. As the conflict widened, it drew in other participants, among them Spain, Sardinia, Saxony, Sweden and Russia.

There were four primary theatres of the war: Central Europe, the Austrian Netherlands, Italy, and the seas. Prussia occupied Silesia in 1740 and repulsed Austrian efforts to regain it, and between 1745 and 1748, France conquered most of the Austrian Netherlands. Elsewhere, Austria and Sardinia defeated Spanish attempts to regain territories in Northern Italy, and by 1747, a British naval blockade was crippling French trade.

The war ended with the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748) by which Maria Theresa was confirmed as Archduchess of Austria and Queen of Hungary. The treaty reflected that stalemate since most of the commercial issues that had led to the war were left unresolved, and many of the signatories were unhappy with the terms. Although the war had nearly bankrupted the state, Louis XV of France withdrew from the Low Countries for minimal benefit, to the dismay of France’s nobility and populace. The Spanish considered their gains in Italy inadequate since they had failed to recover Menorca or Gibraltar and viewed the reassertion of British commercial rights in the Americas as an insult.

Although Maria Theresa was acknowledged as her father’s heir, she did not consider that a concession and deeply resented Britain’s role in forcing her to cede Silesia to Prussia. For British statesmen, the war demonstrated the vulnerability of George II’s German possession of Hanover to Prussia, and many politicians considered they had received little benefit from the enormous subsidies paid to Austria.

The result was the realignment known as the Diplomatic Revolution in which Austria aligned itself with France, which marked the end of their centuries-old enmity, and Prussia became an ally of Britain. The new alliances would fight the Seven Years’ War in the following decade.

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Born On This Day

1897 – Isabel Briggs Myers, American theorist and author (d. 1980)
Isabel Briggs Myers (born Isabel Briggs; October 18, 1897 – May 5, 1980[1][2]) was an American writer and co-creator with her mother, Katharine Cook Briggs, of a personality inventory known as the Myers–Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and based on theories of Carl Jung.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice, From Helen Sedwick: How to Use Real People in Your Writing Without Ending Up in Court
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Women Writers, Women’s Books: Writing my Way Through Trauma
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Daily Mail: Spanish crime writer Carmen Mola reveals her most stunning plot twist: She doesn’t exist and her books are penned by three men
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Guardian: Powers and Thrones by Dan Jones audiobook review
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DLXXIII): Take a peek around this Georgian style home for sale; A sofa-suitcase, from the early 20th century in England; The Great Raising of Chicago; The Greek region too remote for maps; Enya’s Secretive Irish Kingdom; Aesthetically pleasing horror movies for interior design inspiration and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Oscar Duran, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Men’s Mental Health Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Richard Whittaker, syndicated from conversations.org: Threshold Choir: An Interview with Kate Munger
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 17, 2021

On This Day

690 – Empress Wu Zetian establishes the Zhou Dynasty of China.[1]
The Wu Zhou (Chinese: 武周), known officially as Zhou (Chinese: 周), also called the Southern Zhou dynasty (Chinese: 南周), Second Zhou dynasty or Restored Zhou dynasty, was a Chinese dynasty that existed between 690 and 705 AD, when Wu Zetian ruled as Empress Regnant. The dynasty began when Wu Zhao, which was Wu Zetian’s personal name, usurped the throne of her son, the Emperor Ruizong of Tang, and lasted until Emperor Zhongzong of Tang was restored to the throne. Historians generally view the Wu Zhou as an interregnum of the Tang dynasty.

The sole ruler of Wu Zhou was Wu Zetian. She took the name “Wu Zhao” upon her coronation. Wu named her dynasty after the ancient Zhou dynasty, from whom she believed herself to be descended.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1919 – Violet Milstead, Canadian World War II aviator and bush pilot (d. 2014)
Violet “Vi” Milstead Warren CM (October 17, 1919 – June 27, 2014) was a Canadian aviator, noted for being the first female Canadian bush pilot and one of only four Canadian women to work in the British Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) during WWII. With over 600 hours of flight time during the war, she was the longest serving female Canadian ATA pilot. She worked as a flight instructor at Barker Field in Toronto, Ontario, and her students included commercial pilot Molly Reilly and author June Callwood. She is a member of the Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame, the Order of Canada, and the Bush Pilots Hall of Fame.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Source Tags & Codes The saga of the Missouri governor reflects a failure by the powerful to embrace curiosity—curiosity encouraged by the HTML language he fails to understand.
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: Alain de Botton on the importance of breakdowns, Thich Nhat Hanh on deep listening and the 3 Buddhist steps to repairing relationships, and more
 
 
 
 
By Lynda Schuster, The Washington Post Magazine: The Gift of Eihab Falah In late 2018, Pittsburgh’s Jewish community was mourning the deadliest antisemitic attack in U.S. history. Then a stranger and his family landed in their midst.
 
 
 
 

Comments?

By Harry Margolis, Market Watch: What’s the difference between a revocable and irrevocable trust?
 
 
 
 
By Judith Hoare, Psyche: One woman’s six-word mantra that has helped to calm millions
 
 
 
 
By John Banks, History Stories: The 18-Year-Old Woman Who Struck Out Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig On April 2, 1931, minor leaguer Jackie Mitchell fanned the Yankees’ sluggers in an exhibition, a feat widely celebrated. But was it a stunt or legit?
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By AlexisS101 Step-by-Step on How to Do an Upside-down Halloween Face
 
 
By MattInDetroit: Pumpkin Lip Sync
 
 
By JasonF205: Halloween Tombstones!

Recipes


 
 
By Emily Racette Parulski, Taste of Home: 51 Farmer-Approved Recipes
 
 
By Risa Lichtman, Taste of Home: We Tried Joanna Gaines’ Peanut Butter Balls Recipe and It’s Getting Dog-Eared Immediately
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Christmas Pavlova
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI October 13, 14, 15 & 16, 2021

On This Day

1775 – The Continental Congress establishes the Continental Navy (predecessor of the United States Navy).
The Continental Navy was the navy of the United States during the American Revolutionary War, and was formed in 1775. The fleet cumulatively became relatively substantial through the efforts of the Continental Navy’s patron John Adams and vigorous Congressional support in the face of stiff opposition, when considering the limitations imposed upon the Patriot supply pool.

The main goal of the navy was to intercept shipments of British matériel and generally disrupt British maritime commercial operations. The initial fleet consisted of converted merchantmen because of the lack of funding, manpower, and resources, with exclusively designed warships being built later in the conflict. The vessels that successfully made it to sea met with success only rarely, and the effort contributed little to the overall outcome of the war.

The fleet did serve to highlight a few examples of Continental resolve, notably launching Captain John Barry into the limelight. It provided needed experience for a generation of officers who went on to command conflicts which involved the early American navy.

After the war, the Continental Navy was dissolved. With the Federal government in need of all available capital, the few remaining ships were sold, the final vessel Alliance being auctioned off in 1785 to a private bidder.

The Continental Navy is the first establishment of what is now the United States Navy.[1]

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1952 – Korean War: The Battle of Triangle Hill is the biggest and bloodiest battle of 1952.
The Battle of Triangle Hill, also known as Operation Showdown or the Shangganling Campaign (Chinese: 上甘岭战役; pinyin: Shànggānlǐng Zhànyì),[nb 3] was a protracted military engagement during the Korean War. The main combatants were two United Nations (UN) infantry divisions, with additional support from the United States Air Force, against elements of the Chinese People’s Volunteer Army (PVA) 15th and 12th Corps.[nb 2] The battle was part of UN attempts to gain control of “The Iron Triangle”, and took place from 14 October to 25 November 1952.

The immediate UN objective was Triangle Hill (38°19′17″N 127°27′52″ECoordinates: 38°19′17″N 127°27′52″E), a forested ridge of high ground 2 kilometers (1.2 mi) north of Gimhwa-eup. The hill was occupied by the veterans of the PVA’s 15th Corps. Over the course of nearly a month, substantial US and Republic of Korea Army (ROK) forces made repeated attempts to capture Triangle Hill and the adjacent Sniper Ridge. Despite clear superiority in artillery and aircraft, escalating UN casualties resulted in the attack being halted after 42 days of fighting, with PVA forces regaining their original positions.

Read more ->

 
 
1582 – Adoption of the Gregorian calendar begins, eventually leading to near-universal adoption.
The adoption of the Gregorian Calendar was an event in the modern history of most cultures and societies, marking a change from their traditional (or old style) dating system to the modern (or new style) dating system, the Gregorian calendar, that is widely used around the world today. Some states adopted the new calendar from 1582, some did not do so before the early twentieth century, and others did so at various dates between; however a number continue to use a different civil calendar. For many the new style calendar is only used for civil purposes and the old style calendar remains used in religious contexts. Today, the Gregorian calendar is the world’s most widely used civil calendar.[1][2][3] During – and for some time after – the change between systems, it has been common to use the terms Old Style and New Style when giving dates, to indicate which calendar was used to reckon them.

The Gregorian calendar was decreed in 1582 by the papal bull Inter gravissimas by Pope Gregory XIII, to correct an error in the Julian calendar. The Julian calendar had been based upon a year lasting 365.25 days, but this was slightly too long; in reality it is about 365.2422 days, and so over the centuries, the calendar was increasingly out of alignment with the earth’s orbit.

Although Gregory’s reform was enacted in the most solemn of forms available to the Church, the bull had no authority beyond the Catholic Church and the Papal States. The changes he was proposing were changes to the civil calendar, over which he had no formal authority. They required adoption by the civil authorities in each country to have legal effect. The bull became the canon law of the Catholic Church in 1582, but it was not recognised by Protestant churches, Eastern Orthodox Churches, and a few others. Consequently, the days on which Easter and related holidays were celebrated by different Christian churches diverged.

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1384 – Jadwiga is crowned King of Poland, although she is a woman.
Jadwiga (Polish: [jadˈvʲiɡa] (About this soundlisten); 1373 or 1374 – 17 July 1399), also known as Hedwig (Hungarian: Hedvig), was the first female monarch of the Kingdom of Poland, reigning from 16 October 1384 until her death. She was the youngest daughter of Louis the Great, King of Hungary and Poland, and his wife Elizabeth of Bosnia. Jadwiga was a member of the Capetian House of Anjou, but she had more close forebears among the Polish Piasts than among the Angevins. In 1997 she was canonized by the Catholic Church.

In 1375 it was planned that she would eventually marry William of Austria, and would live in Vienna from 1378 to 1380. Jadwiga’s father is thought to have regarded her and William as his favoured successors in Hungary after the 1379 death of her eldest sister, Catherine, since the Polish nobility had that same year pledged their homage to Louis’ second daughter, Mary, and Mary’s fiancé, Sigismund of Luxemburg. However, Louis died, and in 1382, at her mother’s insistence, Mary was crowned “King of Hungary”. Sigismund of Luxemburg tried to take control of Poland, but the Polish nobility countered that they would be obedient to a daughter of King Louis only if she settled in Poland. Queen Elizabeth then chose Jadwiga to reign there, but did not send her to Kraków to be crowned. During the interregnum, Siemowit IV, Duke of Masovia, became a candidate for the Polish throne. The nobility of Greater Poland favored him and proposed that he marry Jadwiga. However, Lesser Poland’s nobility opposed him and persuaded Queen Elizabeth to send Jadwiga to Poland.

Jadwiga was crowned “king” in Poland’s capital, Kraków, on 16 October 1384. Her coronation either reflected the Polish nobility’s opposition to her intended husband, William, becoming king without further negotiation, or simply emphasized her status as queen regnant. With her mother’s consent, Jadwiga’s advisors opened negotiations with Jogaila, Grand Duke of Lithuania, who was still a pagan, concerning his potential marriage to Jadwiga. Jogaila signed the Union of Krewo, pledging to convert to Catholicism and to promote his pagan subjects’ conversion. Meanwhile, William hastened to Kraków, hoping to marry his childhood fiancée Jadwiga, but in late August 1385 the Polish nobles expelled him. Jogaila, who took the baptismal name Władysław, married Jadwiga on 15 February 1386. Legend says that she had agreed to marrying him only after lengthy prayer, seeking divine inspiration.

Jogaila, now in Polish styled Władysław Jagiełło, was crowned King of Poland on 4 March 1386. As Jadwiga’s co-ruler, Jagiełło worked closely with his wife. After rebellious nobles of the Kingdom of Hungary-Croatia had imprisoned her mother and sister, she marched into the Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, which had been under Hungarian rule, and persuaded most of the inhabitants to become subjects of the Polish Crown. She mediated between her husband’s quarreling kin, and between Poland and the Teutonic Knights. After her sister Mary died in 1395, Jadwiga and Jagiełło laid claim to Hungary against the widowed Sigismund of Luxemburg, but the Hungarian lords failed to support them.

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Born On This Day

1938 – Shirley Caesar, American gospel singer-songwriter
Shirley Ann Caesar-Williams (born October 13, 1938), known professionally as Shirley Caesar, is an American gospel singer, songwriter and recording artist whose career has spanned seven decades. A multi-award-winning artist, with 12 Grammy Awards along with Dove Awards and Stellar Awards to her credit, she is known as the “First Lady of Gospel Music” and “The Queen of Gospel Music.”[3] She began recording at the age of 12 in 1951 on the Federal recording label[4]

Shirley Caesar has released over forty albums. She has participated in over 16 compilations and three gospel musicals, Mama I Want to Sing, Sing: Mama 2 and Born to sing: Mama 3. She is also the creator of the #unameit challenge, which occurred during one of her song sermonettes. She opened her eponymous store and plans on using the profits to help others during the holiday season.

Caesar’s credits also include a series of commercials for MCI Communications and numerous awards for her recordings. She has won 12 Grammy Awards (including The Lifetime Achievement Grammy Award), 14 Stellar Awards, 18 Doves, 1 RIAA gold certification, an Essence Award, McDonald’s Golden Circle Lifetime Achievement Award, NAACP Lifetime Achievement Award, SESAC Lifetime Achievement Award, Rhapsody & Rhythm Award from the National Museum of African American Music, as well as induction into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame. According to Soundscan, she has sold 2.2 million albums since 1991.[5] She has made several notable appearances, including the televised Live from Disney World Night of Joy, the Gospel According to VH1, a White House performance for George Bush, and a speech on the Evolution of Gospel Music to the US Treasury Department.[6] In 2017, Caesar was honored with a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award from The Recording Academy.[7]

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1845 – Laura Askew Haygood (d. 1900)[17]
Laura Askew Haygood (October 14, 1845 – April 29, 1900) was an American educator and missionary from Georgia. A sister of Atticus Greene Haygood, she founded a school in Atlanta and served as a missionary in China.

Early life
Haygood was born in Watkinsville, Georgia on October 14, 1845 to Greene Berry Haygood and Martha Ann Askew.[1] She was the younger sister of Atticus Greene Haygood, who would later become a bishop in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (MECS).[2] In 1852, her family moved to Atlanta, where she was homeschooled by her mother.[3][4] She would later enroll at Wesleyan College at the age of 16, graduating two years later with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1864.[4][5] Shortly thereafter, she opened her own high school for girls in Atlanta, which ultimately merged with Girls High School. Haygood served as the principal and an educator at Girls following its merger in 1877.[1][6] In 1882, Haygood established the Trinity Home Mission to assist in training women to help the poor in Atlanta.[7]

In 1884, Haygood was sent to China as a missionary by the Woman’s Board of Missions of the MECS.[8] While in Shanghai, she helped found the McTyeire School in 1892, which is now Shanghai No. 3 Girls’ High School.[9][10] Placed on medical furlough between 1894 and 1896, Haygood would afterwards return to China to serve as director of the Woman’s Board.[8][10]

Death and legacy
Haygood died on April 29, 1900 while on mission in Shanghai. She was buried at the Bubbling Well Road Cemetery in the Shanghai International Settlement.[11][10]

In 1916, the Laura Haygood Normal School was established in Soochow.[4][8] In 1926, Haygood Memorial Methodist Church was established in Atlanta’s Morningside neighborhood, named in honor of Laura and her brother.[12] In 2000, she was inducted into the Georgia Women of Achievement.[5]
 
 
1906 – Alicia Patterson, American journalist and publisher, co-founded Newsday (d. 1963)
Alicia Patterson (October 15, 1906 – July 2, 1963) was an American journalist, the founder and editor of Newsday, which became a respected and Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper. With Neysa McMein, she created the Deathless Deer comic strip in 1943.

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1941 – Emma Nicholson, Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne, English computer programmer and politician
Emma Harriet Nicholson, Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne (born 16 October 1941) is a British politician, who has been a life peer since 1997. She was elected as the Conservative Member of Parliament for Torridge and West Devon in 1987, before switching to the Liberal Democrats in 1995. She was also the Liberal Democrat Member of the European Parliament for South East England from 1999 to 2009. In 2016, she announced she was re-joining the Conservative Party “with tremendous pleasure”.[2] In 2017, Baroness Nicholson was appointed as Prime Minister’s Trade Envoy for Kazakhstan.[3]

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FYI

Atlas Obscura: Resurrecting the Spudnut, America’s Forgotten Halloween Treat Bake the recipe remnant of a potato doughnut empire that once stretched from the United States to Japan.
 
 
 
 
By Open Culture: William Shatner in Tears After Becoming the Oldest Person in Space: ‘I’m So Filled with Emotion … I Hope I Never Recover from This”
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Bombing of Pompeii During World War II
 
 
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: A Sneak Peek of Peter Jackson’s New Beatles Documentary Get Back: Watch the New Trailer
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Publishers Weekly: A Writer Says Goodbye to the Twittersphere

 
 
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Observations of (Mostly) Aquatic Organisms
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Cooperative Sabine’s Gull
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Fall Weather and Color
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Renard_Bleu: Tree Monster
 
 
By ke4mcl: Intro to Cassette Recorder Operation, Maintenance, and Repair
 
 

Recipes

The Yummy Bowl: Baked Buffalo Chicken Tostada
 
 
By Susan Bronson, Taste of Home: 35 Recipes Today’s Midwestern Moms Rely on Most
 
 
Food Network: 5-Star Pasta Recipes
 
 
I Wash You Dry: Spooky Delicious Treats for Halloween
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

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Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?