Category: FYI

FYI

FYI May 27& 28, 2022

On This Day

1644 – Manchu regent Dorgon defeats rebel leader Li Zicheng of the Shun dynasty at the Battle of Shanhai Pass, allowing the Manchus to enter and conquer the capital city of Beijing.
The Battle of Shanhai Pass, fought on May 27, 1644 at Shanhai Pass at the eastern end of the Great Wall, was a decisive battle leading to the beginning of the Qing dynasty rule in China proper. There, the Qing prince-regent Dorgon allied with former Ming general Wu Sangui to defeat rebel leader Li Zicheng of the Shun dynasty, allowing Dorgon and the Qing army to rapidly conquer Beijing.

Read more ->

 
 
1936 – Alan Turing submits On Computable Numbers for publication.
Turing’s proof is a proof by Alan Turing, first published in January 1937 with the title “On Computable Numbers, with an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem.” It was the second proof (after Church’s theorem) of the conjecture that some purely mathematical yes–no questions can never be answered by computation; more technically, that some decision problems are “undecidable” in the sense that there is no single algorithm that infallibly gives a correct “yes” or “no” answer to each instance of the problem. In Turing’s own words: “…what I shall prove is quite different from the well-known results of Gödel … I shall now show that there is no general method which tells whether a given formula U is provable in K [Principia Mathematica]…” (Undecidable, p. 145).

Turing followed this proof with two others. The second and third both rely on the first. All rely on his development of typewriter-like “computing machines” that obey a simple set of rules and his subsequent development of a “universal computing machine”. 936 – Alan Turing submits On Computable Numbers for publication.


Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1883 – Jessie Arms Botke, American painter (d. 1971)
Jessie Hazel Arms Botke (May 27, 1883 – October 2, 1971) was an Illinois and California painter noted for her bird images and use of gold leaf highlights.[1]
Read more ->

 
 
1872 – Marian Smoluchowski, Polish physicist and mountaineer (d. 1917)
Marian Smoluchowski (Polish: [ˈmarjan smɔluˈxɔfski]; 28 May 1872 – 5 September 1917) was a Polish physicist who worked in the Polish territories of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. He was a pioneer of statistical physics, and an avid mountaineer.

Read more ->
 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

The New York Times: 88 Books to Bring Your Summer Alive The season’s thrillers, true crime, romances and plenty more will delight readers of all stripes and feathers.

The New York Times: Many Ice Creams, but One Cone to Rule Them All Joy Baking Group has cornered much of the market with one guiding principle: When it comes to cones, people want what they know.
 
 
 
 
Axios: The 2022 Axios Harris Poll 100 reputation rankings

 
 
 
 
By Ed Cunningham, Time Out: Google Maps has launched a cool and fascinating new ‘time travel’ feature To celebrate the 15th birthday of Street View, the company is letting users travel 15 years back in time
 
 
 
 
By Mike Pomranz, Food & Wine: Oreo and Ritz Made a Cookie and Cracker Mashup Nobody Saw Coming The “very limited-edition” combo will only be available online while supplies last.

 
 
 
 
Sheriff Grady Judd addresses school safety following Texas shooting
 
 
May 27, 2022 – Sheriff Grady Judd & Ryan Petty discuss school safety
 
 
 
 
1:06, Agree!
Colion Noir: Media Didn’t Expect Buffalo Shooter Witness To be So Honest

 
 
 
 


 
 
Fearless Motivation: Confuse Them With Your Silence (THE SONG!)
 
 
 
 

Recipes

SAVEUR Editors: Saveur’s Best Skillet Recipes Our favorite one-dish skillet recipes for an easy and delicious meal (and equally easy cleanup).
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 26, 2022

On This Day

1637 – Pequot War: A combined English and Mohegan force under John Mason attacks a village in Connecticut, massacring approximately 500 Pequots.
The Pequot War was an armed conflict that took place between 1636 and 1638 in New England between the Pequot tribe and an alliance of the colonists from the Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, and Saybrook colonies and their allies from the Narragansett and Mohegan tribes. The war concluded with the decisive defeat of the Pequot. At the end, about 700 Pequots had been killed or taken into captivity.[1] Hundreds of prisoners were sold into slavery to colonists in Bermuda or the West Indies;[2] other survivors were dispersed as captives to the victorious tribes.

The result was the elimination of the Pequot tribe as a viable polity in Southern New England, and the colonial authorities classified them as extinct. Survivors who remained in the area were absorbed into other local tribes.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1822 – Edmond de Goncourt, French author and critic, founded the Académie Goncourt (d. 1896)
Edmond Louis Antoine Huot de Goncourt (pronounced [ɛdmɔ̃ də ɡɔ̃kuʁ]; 26 May 1822 – 16 July 1896) was a French writer, literary critic, art critic, book publisher and the founder of the Académie Goncourt.[1]
Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

Author: LINDSEY BAHR and MARTIN ADAMES, Associated Press: Actor Ray Liotta dies at 67 The “Goodfellas” and “Field of Dreams” star died in his sleep while in the Dominican Republic, where he was filming a movie.

 
 
Raymond Allen Liotta (Italian: [liˈɔtta]; December 18, 1954 – May 26, 2022) was an American actor and producer. His best-known roles include Shoeless Joe Jackson in Field of Dreams (1989), Henry Hill in Goodfellas (1990) and Tommy Vercetti in the video game Grand Theft Auto: Vice City (2002).

His other roles included Ray Sinclair in Something Wild (1986), for which he received a Golden Globe nomination, as well as starring in Unlawful Entry (1992), Cop Land (1997), Hannibal (2001), Blow (2001), John Q (2002), Identity (2003), Observe and Report (2009), Killing Them Softly (2012), The Place Beyond the Pines (2012), and Marriage Story (2019), as well as the drama series Shades of Blue (2016–2018).

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Pocket Editors: Surprising Stories of Accidental Inventions From life-changing penicillin to the whimsical wonder that is Play-Doh.
 
 
 
 

By James Clear: 3-2-1: Happiness, the opinions of others, and accepting the reality of slow progress
 
 
 
 

Wickersham’s Conscience: A Parula Puzzle
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Why Woodpeckers Are Maddening
 
 
 
 

By Lauren N. Henley, Truly*Adventurous: The Richest Black Girl in America When an 11-year-old Black girl in Jim Crow America discovers a seemingly worthless plot of land she has inherited is worth millions, everything in her life changes — and the walls begin to close in.
 
 
 
 

By Rachel Metz, CNN Business: She thought a dark moment in her past was forgotten. Then she scanned her face online
 
 
 
 

By Sara Barnes, My Modern Met: Photographer Is Helping Overlooked Shelter Pets Get Adopted Through Striking Pawtraits

 
 
 
 

By Susan Fowler, Smart Brief: Trying times: Release negativity and lead with vitality
 
 
 
 

By Mark Sanborn: Going from Zero to Hero
 
 
 
 

By Anne Sugar, Havard Business Review: Stop Rambling in Meetings — and Start Getting Your Message Across
 
 
 
 

By Michael Zhang, PetaPixel: Billions of Fireflies Light Up Indian Tiger Reserve
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

I Wash You dry: Grilled BBQ Meatloaf Skewers

 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 25, 2022

On This Day

1878 – Gilbert and Sullivan’s comic opera H.M.S. Pinafore opens at the Opera Comique in London.
H.M.S. Pinafore; or, The Lass That Loved a Sailor is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and a libretto by W. S. Gilbert. It opened at the Opera Comique in London, on 25 May 1878 and ran for 571 performances, which was the second-longest run of any musical theatre piece up to that time. H.M.S. Pinafore was Gilbert and Sullivan’s fourth operatic collaboration and their first international sensation.

The story takes place aboard the Royal Navy ship HMS Pinafore. The captain’s daughter, Josephine, is in love with a lower-class sailor, Ralph Rackstraw, although her father intends her to marry Sir Joseph Porter, the First Lord of the Admiralty. She abides by her father’s wishes at first, but Sir Joseph’s advocacy of the equality of humankind encourages Ralph and Josephine to overturn conventional social order. They declare their love for each other and eventually plan to elope. The Captain discovers this plan, but, as in many of the Gilbert and Sullivan operas, a surprise disclosure changes things dramatically near the end of the story.

Drawing on several of his earlier “Bab Ballad” poems, Gilbert imbued this plot with mirth and silliness. The opera’s humour focuses on love between members of different social classes and lampoons the British class system in general. Pinafore also pokes good-natured fun at patriotism, party politics, the Royal Navy, and the rise of unqualified people to positions of authority. The title of the piece comically applies the name of a garment for girls and women, a pinafore, to the fearsome symbol of a warship.

Pinafore’s extraordinary popularity in Britain, America and elsewhere was followed by the similar success of a series of Gilbert and Sullivan works, including The Pirates of Penzance and The Mikado. Their works, later known as the Savoy operas, dominated the musical stage on both sides of the Atlantic for more than a decade and continue to be performed today. The structure and style of these operas, particularly Pinafore, were much copied and contributed significantly to the development of modern musical theatre.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1048 – Emperor Shenzong of Song (d. 1085)
Emperor Shenzong of Song (25 May 1048 – 1 April 1085), personal name Zhao Xu, was the sixth emperor of the Song dynasty of China. His original personal name was Zhao Zhongzhen but he changed it to “Zhao Xu” after his coronation. He reigned from 1067 until his death in 1085.[citation needed]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

By Egill Bjarnason, Hakai Magazine: It’s 10 PM. Do You Know Where Your Cat Is? In Iceland, traditionally a land of cat lovers, bans and curfews are redefining the human relationship with domestic cats.

In April, Akureyri—the largest municipality in the country’s north, with a population of 19,000 people and some 2,000 to 3,000 cats—decided to ban their feline residents from night roaming outside. Neighboring Húsavík banned cats several years ago from going outdoors day and night. Other Icelandic towns are considering bans as the issue of free-roaming cats increasingly makes its way from online forums to local politics, with the arguments generally falling into two categories. Some people—the “no animals in my backyard” or NAIMBY-ists—proclaim free-roaming cats are nuisances that should be confined like any other pet. Others think beyond the anthropocentric: cats kill birds and disrupt ecosystems.
 
 
 
 

Leadership freak: 4 Hard Things Leaders Do
 
 
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Misleading vintage ads about the dietary benefits of sugar, 1950s-1960s
 
 
 
 

By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: How Korean Things Are Made: Watch Mesmerizing Videos Showing the Making of Traditional Clothes, Teapots, Buddhist Instruments & More
 
 
 
 

Ernie Smith, Tedium: By Andrew Egan: Inventing Daylight On the evolution and growth of fluorescent colors in modern culture—especially in bright, neon, DayGlo form.

 
 
 
 

Quartz Obsession: A brief history of automats
 
 
 
 

By Cory Max Montoya, Beyond Bylines Blogs We Love: 6 Skincare Vloggers Your Skin Will Thank You For This Summer & Beyond

 
 
 
 

Another School Shooting in a Place where teachers and staff were banned from carrying guns: Robb Elementary School in the Uvalde, Texas CISD
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Atlas Obscura: Digging into the history of strawberry curry and more ->
 
 
Homemade on a Weeknight: Jalapeno Dill Dressing
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 24, 2022

On This Day

1667 – The French Royal Army crosses the border into the Spanish Netherlands, starting the War of Devolution opposing France to the Spanish Empire and the Triple Alliance.
In the 1667 to 1668 War of Devolution (French: Guerre de Dévolution, Dutch: Devolutieoorlog), France occupied large parts of the Spanish Netherlands and Franche-Comté, both then provinces of Spain. The name derives from an obscure law known as the Jus Devolutionis, used by Louis XIV of France to claim that these territories had “devolved” to him by right of marriage to Maria Theresa of Spain.

In the fighting, the French encountered minimal resistance; however, Louis was more concerned with asserting his inheritance rights in the Spanish Empire, and consequently returned much of his gains in the May 1668 Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle. The terms were agreed by Emperor Leopold I in January 1668, reinforced by the Triple Alliance of England, Sweden and the Dutch Republic.

The conflict marked the end of the long-standing Franco-Dutch alliance, and was the first of the French wars of expansion that dominated Europe for the next 50 years.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1686 – Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit, Polish-German physicist and engineer, developed the Fahrenheit scale (d. 1736)
Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit FRS (/ˈfærənhaɪt/; German: [ˈfaːʁn̩haɪt]; 24 May 1686 – 16 September 1736)[1] was a physicist, inventor, and scientific instrument maker. Born in Poland to a family of German extraction, he later moved to the Dutch Republic at age 15, where he spent the rest of his life (1701–1736) and was one of the notable figures in the Golden Age of Dutch science and technology.

A pioneer of exact thermometry,[2] he helped lay the foundations for the era of precision thermometry by inventing the mercury-in-glass thermometer (first widely used, practical, accurate thermometer) and Fahrenheit scale (first standardized temperature scale to be widely used).[3] In other words, Fahrenheit’s inventions ushered in the first revolution in the history of thermometry (branch of physics concerned with methods of temperature measurement). From the early 1710s until the beginnings of the electronic era, mercury-in-glass thermometers were among the most reliable and accurate thermometers ever invented.[4]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 
Important
Anchorage recently had a house fire on the hillside, fortunately no one was harmed. I noticed folks (neighbors) were not communicating with each other and had no information on evacuating and returning. What methods (apps, websites, etc.) do you use to keep in contact with your neighbors and what does your city/town use to keep you informed?
 
 
 
 
BBC News: Star Wars spacecraft designer Colin Cantwell dies aged 90
 
 
Wiki: Colin Cantwell (August 22, 1932 – May 21, 2022)
 
 
 
 
By Jonathan Franklin, NPR: Bird-watcher wrongfully accused in Central Park video gets a bird-watching TV show
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Pulliam Bailey, The Washington Post: Southern Baptist leaders covered up sex abuse, kept secret database, report says Among the findings was a previously unknown case of a pastor who was credibly accused of assaulting a woman a month after leaving the presidency of the Southern Baptist Convention
 
 
Report of the Independent Investigation The Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee’s Response to Sexual Abuse Allegations and an Audit of the Procedures and Actions of the Credentials Committee May 15, 2022 WARNING: This report includes information and descriptions related to sexual assault. This may be triggering to readers who have had similar experiences. We encourage you to care for your safety and well-being.
 
 
Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: Fentanyl drove record number of drug-related deaths in 2020; teens often score the pills on social media; Southern Baptists reeling in wake of sex abuse report; it’s an opportunity for local action and local coverage; Telehealth is the future of rural health care, CEO of the National Rural Health Association says at telehealth meeting and more ->
 
 
 
 
By REGINA GARCIA CANO, AP News: On Venezuelan roads, old cars prevail, break down everywhere
He’s philosophical about the need to keep repairing his vintage truck: “It’s not like the current cars that have a computer and have a lot of things at the system level. I say that (old trucks) are trustworthy and more reliable because they use nothing but gasoline and water.”
 
 
 
 
Craig Medred: Copper River bust
 
 
By Tony Schick, Oregon Public Broadcasting, and Irena Hwang, ProPublica, photography by Kristyna Wentz-Graff, Oregon Public Broadcasting, Pro-Publica: The U.S. Has Spent More Than $2 Billion on a Plan to Save Salmon. The Fish Are Vanishing Anyway.
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Behold the Augsburg Book of Miracles, a Brilliantly-Illuminated Manuscript of Supernatural Phenomena from Renaissance Germany
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Helen Keller Was a “Firebrand” Socialist (or How History Whitewashed Her Political Life)
 
 
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: Martin Scorsese Foundation Launches Virtual Screening Room, Letting You Watch Restored Classic Films for Free
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: The Scream Explained: What’s Really Happening in Edvard Munch’s World-Famous Painting
 
 
 
 
BirdCast: Migration Dashboard

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Randomona: Wire Rimmed Hot Glue Gems / Charms
 
 
By Ryan110: Playground Restoration
 
 
Mike’s Backyard Nursery: Planting Blueberry Bushes
 
 

Recipes

Gastro Obscura: Meet Germany’s cute meat hedgehog and more ->
 
 
By Alicia W., Food Talk Daily: Campbell Soup Hacks
 
 
The Yummy Bowl: Easy Zucchini And Corn Fritters
 
 
By cookwewill: Braised Chicken Thighs
 
 
By Sandra – She’s Not Cookin’, Food Talk Daily: Walking Taco Casserole
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 22 & 23, 2022

On This Day

1246 – Henry Raspe is elected anti-king of the Kingdom of Germany in opposition to Conrad IV.
Henry Raspe (German: Heinrich Raspe; c. 1204 – 16 February 1247) was the Landgrave of Thuringia from 1231 until 1239 and again from 1241 until his death. In 1246, with the support of the Papacy, he was elected King of Germany in opposition to Conrad IV, but his contested reign lasted a mere nine months.
Read more ->

 
 
1846 – Mexican–American War: President Mariano Paredes of Mexico unofficially declares war on the United States.
The Mexican–American War,[a] also known in the United States as the Mexican War and in Mexico as the Intervención estadounidense en México (U.S. intervention in Mexico),[b] was an armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848. It followed the 1845 U.S. annexation of Texas, which Mexico considered Mexican territory since the Mexican government did not recognize the Velasco treaty signed by Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna when he was a prisoner of the Texian Army during the 1836 Texas Revolution. The Republic of Texas was de facto an independent country, but most of its citizens wished to be annexed by the United States.[4] Domestic sectional politics in the U.S. were preventing annexation since Texas would have been a slave state, upsetting the balance of power between Northern free states and Southern slave states.[5] In the 1844 United States presidential election, Democrat James K. Polk was elected on a platform of expanding U.S. territory in Oregon and Texas. Polk advocated expansion by either peaceful means or armed force, with the 1845 annexation of Texas furthering that goal by peaceful means.[6] However, the boundary between Texas and Mexico was disputed, with the Republic of Texas and the U.S. asserting it to be the Rio Grande and Mexico claiming it to be the more-northern Nueces River. Both Mexico and the U.S. claimed the disputed area and sent troops. Polk sent U.S. Army troops to the area; he also sent a diplomatic mission to Mexico to try to negotiate the sale of territory. U.S. troops’ presence was designed to lure Mexico into starting the conflict, putting the onus on Mexico and allowing Polk to argue to Congress that a declaration of war should be issued.[7] Mexican forces attacked U.S. forces, and the United States Congress declared war.[8]

Beyond the disputed area of Texas, U.S. forces quickly occupied the regional capital of Santa Fe de Nuevo México along the upper Rio Grande, which had trade relations with the U.S. via the Santa Fe Trail between Missouri and New Mexico. U.S. forces also moved against the province of Alta California and then moved south. The Pacific Squadron of the U.S. Navy blockaded the Pacific coast farther south in the lower Baja California Territory. The Mexican government refused to be pressured into signing a peace treaty at this point, making the U.S. invasion of the Mexican heartland under Major General Winfield Scott and its capture of the capital Mexico City a strategy to force peace negotiations. Although Mexico was defeated on the battlefield, politically its government’s negotiating a treaty remained a fraught issue, with some factions refusing to consider any recognition of its loss of territory. Although Polk formally relieved his peace envoy, Nicholas Trist, of his post as negotiator, Trist ignored the order and successfully concluded the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. It ended the war, and Mexico recognized the Mexican Cession, areas not part of disputed Texas but conquered by the U.S. Army. These were northern territories of Alta California and Santa Fe de Nuevo México. The U.S. agreed to pay $15 million for the physical damage of the war and assumed $3.25 million of debt already owed by the Mexican government to U.S. citizens. Mexico acknowledged the independence of what became the State of Texas and accepted the Rio Grande as its northern border with the United States.

The victory and territorial expansion Polk envisioned[9] inspired patriotism among some sections of the United States, but the war and treaty drew fierce criticism for the casualties, monetary cost, and heavy-handedness,[10][11] particularly early on. The question of how to treat the new acquisitions also intensified the debate over slavery in the United States. Although the Wilmot Proviso that explicitly forbade the extension of slavery into conquered Mexican territory was not adopted by Congress, debates about it heightened sectional tensions. Some scholars see the Mexican–American War as leading to the American Civil War, with many officers trained at West Point, who saw action in Mexico, playing prominent leadership roles on each side during the conflict.

In Mexico, the war worsened domestic political turmoil. Since the war was fought on home ground, Mexico suffered a large loss of life of both its soldiers and its civilian population. The nation’s financial foundations were undermined, territory was lost, and national prestige left it in what a group of Mexican writers including Ramón Alcaraz and José María del Castillo Velasco called a “state of degradation and ruin…” This group did not acknowledge Mexico’s refusal to admit the independence of Texas as a cause of the war, instead proclaiming “[As for] the true origin of the war, it is sufficient to say that the insatiable ambition of the United States, favored by our weakness, caused it.”[12]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1828 – Albrecht von Graefe, German ophthalmologist and academic (d. 1870)
Friedrich Wilhelm Ernst Albrecht von Gräfe,[1] often Anglicized to Graefe[2] (22 May 1828 – 20 July 1870), was a Prussian pioneer of German ophthalmology. Graefe was born in Finkenheerd, Brandenburg, the son of Karl Ferdinand von Graefe (1787–1840). He was the father of the far right politician Albrecht von Graefe (1868–1933).

Read more ->

 
 

1837 – Anatole Mallet, Swiss mechanical engineer and inventor (d. 1919)
Jules T. Anatole Mallet (23 May 1837 – 10 October 1919) was a Swiss mechanical engineer, who was the inventor of the first successful compound system for a railway steam locomotive, patented in 1874.[1] He is known for having invented three important forms of compound locomotive.

In 1876 he introduced a series of small two-cylinder compound 0-4-2T tank locomotives for the Bayonne-Anglet-Biarritz Railway in France.[2]

He subsequently designed an articulated compound system with a rigid chassis at the rear carrying two high-pressure cylinders, and two low-pressure ones mounted on a swivelling front truck. This was patented in 1884[1] with full rights granted in 1885.[3] This was first used for a series of 600 mm (1 ft 11+5⁄8 in) narrow gauge locomotives specially built by the Decauville Company in 1888 for the Paris Exposition of 1889.[3] This arrangement became known as the Mallet locomotive. The final developments of these in the USA were some of the largest steam locomotives ever built.

A third compound locomotive, less well-known, was a tandem compound developed in 1890 for SACM as a collaboration with Alfred de Glehn and the Russian A. Borodine.[4] The high and low pressure cylinders were mounted on a common axis, with the high pressure ahead. Unlike the US tandem compounds, the high and low pressure cylinders were cross-connected between sides, which also required them to be receiver compounds with an intermediate reservoir as a pair of curved pipes passing through the smokebox. Large numbers of these, mostly a 2-8-0 derivative, were built for Russian and Hungarian railways making them the most-produced type of tandem compound locomotive. Z. Kordina’s design for Hungarian State Railways was a similar 4-4-0, although outside-framed and with the low-pressure cylinders ahead of the high pressure.[4]

He was awarded the Elliott Cresson Medal of The Franklin Institute in 1908.

See more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

The only cure for grief is time. Not one to forget but time to figure out, “How do we live now that our loved one is gone?”

By La’Tasha Givens, 11 Alive: Church holds service for beloved pastor who was murdered while ministering to former inmate Members at Connections at Metropolitan UMC church said it was their faith helped them to still wake up and praise this Sunday.
 
 
 
 

Rare Historical Photos: Stunning color photos of Egypt from the 1920s
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Adhesive Bras: The stick-on bra swimsuit that was quite distinctive, 1949
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: A weird relic from the past: The 1979 Cocaine Calendar
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Colorful photographs from the 1972 Texas State Fair show people sampling a wide variety of the products of their state
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DCIV): Abandoned Wine Cellars in Southern Italy; Jazz Age Yiddish Drag King: Pepi Litman; Delores Costello, Drew Barrymore’s grandmother, 1928; Virginia Woolf and her cat; Six month old grapes, still fresh, preserved by farmers in Afghanistan; All the pretty drawings in this Iconographic Encyclopaedia of Science, Literature & Art; The Remarkable Printing Process of the English Poet, Artist & Visionary, William Blake and more ->

 
 
 
 
Creative Caffeine: Getting the Most out of Managing Creative Talent Without Micromanaging Them

 
 
 
 
Our neighbor’s went to Talkeenta this wknd and their coolant connector failed. The part is plastic, gets old and brittle… Fortunately the store up there had both the part and tool to fix things. Paul went over to CarQuest this morning and picked up parts for our trucks. Connection is Dorman 809-400 and tool set is Lisle 39400 (Green one works on Chevy’s).
 
 

Neighbor’s truck showing the part replacement.


 
 

Connection part


 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Amy Maoz, Pocket: How to Make Better Coffee A handy guide to upping your coffee game, from weighing different prep methods to troubleshooting your process.

 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

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BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

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eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 21, 2022

On This Day

1725 – The Order of St. Alexander Nevsky is instituted in Russia by Empress Catherine I. It would later be discontinued and then reinstated by the Soviet government in 1942 as the Order of Alexander Nevsky.
The Imperial Order of Saint Alexander Nevsky was an order of chivalry of the Russian Empire first awarded on 1 June [O.S. 21 May] 1725 by Empress Catherine I of Russia.[1]

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Born On This Day

1867 – Anne Walter Fearn, American physician (d. 1939)[20]
Anne Walter Fearn (May 21, 1867 – April 28, 1939) was an American physician who went to Shanghai, China, on a temporary posting in 1893, and remained there for 40 years.

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FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 
By Jon Burlingame, Variety: Vangelis, Oscar-Winning Composer for ‘Chariots of Fire,’ Dies at 79

 
 
 
 

HILLEL ITALIE, AP National Writer: Longtime New Yorker writer, editor Roger Angell dies

 
 
 
 

By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Social Imagineering Despite what you’ve heard, the word “imagineering” is not unique to Disney. In fact, it’s a phrase that was first used in World War II corporate propaganda.
 
 
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Vintage computer ads that show how far we’ve progressed, 1970-1990
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: These historical mug shots reveal intriguing criminal stories, 1880-1930

 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Exploring the internet’s hidden food shops
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Why does the U.S. have a billion-pound stash of cheese?
 
 
 
 

Fixing Toxic Relationships

Are there people in your life who regularly cause you to feel bad about yourself? Most of us care what others think of us, so knowing that someone doesn’t like or approve of the judgments we’ve made or how we look can be hurtful. And when we’re judged by someone whose approval we crave, such as a parent, spouse, teacher, or boss, the criticism can cause intense distress and damage self-esteem.

Harsh or relentless disparagement from people who love us, often clothed as caring advice or helpful prodding, can be particularly toxic.

It’s helpful to realize that it’s one thing to feel bad when someone doesn’t approve of us; it’s quite another to allow their disapproval to shape our self-image.

Eleanor Roosevelt said, “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” She was absolutely right. Negative comments about our lives are opinions, not facts.

How we feel, however, is a fact, and an important one at that. Thus, it’s rational and healthy to nurture relationships that bring out the best in us and to cut off or distance ourselves from those that bring us down.

There are, however, two strategies worth trying before you limit or eliminate contact with critical people whom you care about.

Try to fix the relationship by respectfully confronting the negative influences in your life. Don’t attack them for hurting you, just explain how you feel when they criticize you and see if they care about you enough to modify their conduct.

If that doesn’t work, try to build immunity to their negativity. Think of the hurtful comments of your incorrigible critic as irrational ravings – and ignore them.
Michael Josephson
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Allison_Leung: Laminar Flow Fountain
 
 
By petachock: Faceted Curved Wooden Chair
 
 

Recipes

By Angel_vbc: Ecuadorian-style Baked Short Rib Sandwich
 
 
By andimadethings: Origami Cake With Buttercream Frosting
 
 
By Marianholdings: Wanna-Be Little Debbie’s Oatmeal Cream Cookie Sandwiches
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

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The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

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Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 20, 2022

On This Day

685 – The Battle of Dun Nechtain is fought between a Pictish army under King Bridei III and the invading Northumbrians under King Ecgfrith, who are decisively defeated.
The Battle of Dun Nechtain or Battle of Nechtansmere (Scottish Gaelic: Blàr Dhùn Neachdain, Old Irish: Dún Nechtain, Old Welsh: Gueith Linn Garan, Modern Welsh: Gwaith Llyn Garan, Old English: Nechtansmere) was fought between the Picts, led by King Bridei Mac Bili, and the Northumbrians, led by King Ecgfrith, on 20 May 685.

The Northumbrian hegemony over northern Britain, won by Ecgfrith’s predecessors, had begun to disintegrate. Several of Northumbria’s subject nations had rebelled in recent years, leading to a number of large-scale battles against the Picts, Mercians and Irish, with varied success. After sieges of neighbouring territories carried out by the Picts, Ecgfrith led his forces against them, despite advice to the contrary, in an effort to reassert his suzerainty over the Pictish nations.

A feigned retreat by the Picts drew the Northumbrians into an ambush at Dun Nechtain near the lake of Linn Garan. The battle site has long been thought to have been near the present-day village of Dunnichen in Angus. Recent research, however, has suggested a more northerly location near Dunachton, on the shores of Loch Insh in Badenoch and Strathspey.

The battle ended with a decisive Pictish victory which severely weakened Northumbria’s power in northern Britain. Ecgfrith was killed in battle, along with the greater part of his army. The Pictish victory marked their independence from Northumbria, who never regained their dominance in the north.

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Born On This Day

1537 – Hieronymus Fabricius, Italian anatomist (d. 1619)
Girolamo Fabrici d’Acquapendente, also known as Girolamo Fabrizio or Hieronymus Fabricius (20 May 1533 – 21 May 1619), was a pioneering anatomist and surgeon known in medical science as “The Father of Embryology.”

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FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

 
 
 
 

By Olivia Hoeft, Google: NativeNonprofit.day highlights Native-led organizations The Native Ways Federation is launching NativeNonprofit.day to drive awareness for Native-led nonprofits that are systematically underfunded. Learn how you can support Native nonprofits doing critical work for Native communities.
 
 
By Monika Janota, Google: Finding courage and inspiration in the developer community
 
 
 
 

By Emily Temple, Literary Hub: Read Anne Sexton’s Response to Her Worst-Ever Review “Dickey at ‘Esquire’ is my enemy as you know.”

 
 
 
 
Quartz Weekly Obsession: Dyslexia We have dyslexia to thank for what brand’s famous product names?
 
 
 
 
By Sam Gilberg, BigThink: This 715-song playlist is scientifically verified to give you the chills, thanks to “frisson” Listening to some songs can cause a powerful physiological response known as “frisson.” What is it, and why does it happen?

 
 
 
 
Campspot: Introducing the First Campspot Outdoor Almanac

 
 
 
 

Be they wearing fur or feathers!

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Easy Strawberry Dump Cake
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 19, 2022

On This Day

1921 – The United States Congress passes the Emergency Quota Act establishing national quotas on immigration.
The Emergency Quota Act, also known as the Emergency Immigration Act of 1921, the Immigration Restriction Act of 1921, the Per Centum Law, and the Johnson Quota Act (ch. 8, 42 Stat. 5 of May 19, 1921), was formulated mainly in response to the large influx of Southern and Eastern Europeans and successfully restricted their immigration as well as that of other “undesirables” to the United States. Although intended as temporary legislation, it “proved, in the long run, the most important turning-point in American immigration policy”[2] because it added two new features to American immigration law: numerical limits on immigration and the use of a quota system for establishing those limits, which came to be known as the National Origins Formula.

The Emergency Quota Act restricted the number of immigrants admitted from any country annually to 3% of the number of residents from that country living in the United States as of the 1910 Census.[3] That meant that people from Northern and Western Europe had a higher quota and were more likely to be admitted to the US than those from Eastern or Southern Europe or from non-European countries.

However, professionals were to be admitted without regard to their country of origin and no limits were set on immigration from Latin America. The act did not apply to countries with bilateral agreements with the US or to Asian countries listed in the Immigration Act of 1917, known as the Asiatic Barred Zone Act.[1] However, the act was not seen as restrictive enough since millions of immigrants from Eastern and Southern Europe had come into the US since 1890.

The Immigration Act of 1924 reduced the quota to 2% of countries’ representation in the 1890 census, when a fairly small percentage of the population was from the regions that were regarded as less than desirable. To execute the new quota, the visa system that is still in use today was implemented in 1924.[4] It mandated all non-citizens seeking to enter the US to obtain and present a visa obtained from a US embassy or consulate before they arrived to the US.[5]

Immigration inspectors handled the visa packets depending on whether they were non-immigrant (visitor) or immigrant (permanent admission).[5] Non-immigrant visas were kept at the ports of entry and were later destroyed, but immigrant visas were sent to the Central Office, in Washington, DC, for processing and filing.[5]

Based on the formula, the number of new immigrants admitted fell from 805,228 in 1920 to 309,556 in 1921-22.[6] The average annual inflow of immigrants prior to 1921 was 175,983 from Northern and Western Europe and 685,531 from other countries, mainly Southern and Eastern Europe. In 1921, there was a drastic reduction in immigration levels from other countries, principally Southern and Eastern Europe.[citation needed]

After the end of World War I, both Europe and the United States were experiencing economic and social upheaval. In Europe, the war’s destruction, the Russian Revolution, and the dissolutions of both the Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire led to an increase of immigration to the United States. In the US, an economic downturn after the postwar demobilization increased unemployment. The combination of increased immigration from Europe at the time of higher American unemployment strengthened the anti-immigrant movement.

The act, sponsored by US Representative Albert Johnson (R-Washington),[7] was passed without a recorded vote in the US House of Representatives and by a vote of 90-2-4 in the US Senate.[8]

The act was revised by the Immigration Act of 1924.

The use of the National Origins Formula continued until it was replaced by the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, which introduced a system of preferences, based on immigrants’ skills and family relationships with US citizens or US residents.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1909 – Nicholas Winton, English banker and humanitarian (d. 2015)
Sir Nicholas George Winton MBE (born Wertheim; 19 May 1909 – 1 July 2015) was a British humanitarian who helped to rescue children who were at risk from oppression by Nazi Germany. Born to German-Jewish parents who had emigrated to Britain at the beginning of the 20th century, Winton assisted in the rescue of 669 children, most of them Jewish, from Czechoslovakia on the eve of World War II. On a brief visit to Czechoslovakia he helped compile a list of children needing rescue and, returning to Britain, he worked to fulfill the legal requirements of bringing the children to Britain and finding homes and sponsors for them.[1] This operation was later known as the Czech Kindertransport (German for “children’s transport”).

His humanitarian accomplishments went unnoticed by the world for nearly 50 years until 1988 when he was invited to the BBC television programme That’s Life!, where he was reunited with dozens of the children he had helped come to Britain and was introduced to many of their children and grandchildren. The British press celebrated him and dubbed him the “British Schindler”.[2] In 2003, Winton was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for “services to humanity, in saving Jewish children from Nazi Germany occupied Czechoslovakia”.[3] On 28 October 2014, he was awarded the highest honour of the Czech Republic, the Order of the White Lion (1st class), by Czech President Miloš Zeman. He died in his sleep, in 2015, at the age of 106.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day

 
 
 
 

Apple Newsroom: Apple previews innovative accessibility features combining the power of hardware, software, and machine learning
Software features coming later this year offer users with disabilities new tools for navigation, health, communication, and more

 
 
 
 

By Jessica Stewart, My Modern Met: Astrophotographers Around the World Share Their Best Photos of the Milky Way

 
 
 
 
By Michael Zhang, Peta Pixel: Navy Fighter Jet Seen with ‘Shockwave Lines’ as It Nears Speed of Sound

 
 
 
 
By Ferris Jabr, The New York Times Magazine: The Man Who Controls Computers With His Mind 16 years ago, Dennis DeGray was paralyzed in an accident. Now, implants in his brain allow him some semblance of control.

 
 
 
 

By PETER DOCKRILL, Science Alert: Mind-Altering Parasite May Make Infected People More Attractive, Study Suggests
 
 
 
 
James Clear: 3-2-1: The effect of criticism, a gift you can give yourself, and the ultimate luxury
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

 
 
I Wash You Dry: Creamy Corn Salad Recipe
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 16, 17 & 18, 2022

On This Day

1812 – Imperial Russia signs the Treaty of Bucharest, ending the Russo-Turkish War. The Ottoman Empire cedes Bessarabia to Russia.[8]
The Treaty of Bucharest between the Ottoman Empire and the Russian Empire, was signed on 28 May 1812, in Manuc’s Inn in Bucharest, and ratified on 5 July 1812, at the end of the Russo-Turkish War of 1806–1812.[1] The Ottomans had done poorly in the war. The Sublime Porte above all wanted to stay out of the impending conflict between Napoleon’s France and Russia. The Russians didn’t want a war on two fronts, thus they made peace in order to be free for the upcoming war with France. The Ottomans had extricated themselves from a potentially disastrous war with a slight loss of territory. This treaty became the basis for future Russo-Ottoman relations.[2]

Under its terms, the Budjak and the eastern half of the Principality of Moldavia, between Prut and Dniester Rivers, with an area of 45,630 km2 (17,617.8 sq mi) (Bessarabia), was ceded by the Ottoman Empire (to which Moldavia was a vassal) to Russia. Also, Russia obtained trading rights on the Danube.

In Transcaucasia, the Ottomans renounced their claims to most of western Georgia by accepting the Russian annexation of the Kingdom of Imereti, in 1810.[3][4] In return they retained control of Akhalkalaki, Poti, and Anapa previously captured by the Russo-Georgian troops in the course of the war[5]

Furthermore a truce was signed (Article 8 of the Treaty) with the rebelling Serbs and autonomy given to Serbia.[6]

The Treaty of Bucharest, signed by the Russian commander Mikhail Kutuzov, was ratified by Alexander I of Russia 13 days before Napoleon’s invasion of Russia.

In 17 April 2011, Action 2012, a coalition of organizations supporting unification between Moldova and Romania, was founded. This coalition is named after the year 2012, which marked the 200th anniversary of the Treaty of Bucharest.[7][8]

 
 
1902 – Greek archaeologist Valerios Stais discovers the Antikythera mechanism, an ancient mechanical analog computer.
The Antikythera mechanism (/ˌæntɪkɪˈθɪərə/ AN-tih-kih-THEER-ə) is an Ancient Greek hand-powered orrery, described as the oldest example of an analogue computer[1][2][3] used to predict astronomical positions and eclipses decades in advance.[4][5][6] It could also be used to track the four-year cycle of athletic games which was similar to an Olympiad, the cycle of the ancient Olympic Games.[7][8][9]

This artefact was among wreckage retrieved from a shipwreck off the coast of the Greek island Antikythera in 1901.[10][11] On 17 May 1902, it was identified as containing a gear by archaeologist Valerios Stais.[12] The device, housed in the remains of a 34 cm × 18 cm × 9 cm (13.4 in × 7.1 in × 3.5 in) wooden box, was found as one lump, later separated into three main fragments which are now divided into 82 separate fragments after conservation efforts. Four of these fragments contain gears, while inscriptions are found on many others.[13][14] The largest gear is approximately 13 centimetres (5.1 in) in diameter and originally had 223 teeth.[15]

In 2008, a team led by Mike Edmunds and Tony Freeth at Cardiff University used modern computer x-ray tomography and high resolution surface scanning to image inside fragments of the crust-encased mechanism and read the faintest inscriptions that once covered the outer casing of the machine. This suggests that it had 37 meshing bronze gears enabling it to follow the movements of the Moon and the Sun through the zodiac, to predict eclipses and to model the irregular orbit of the Moon, where the Moon’s velocity is higher in its perigee than in its apogee. This motion was studied in the 2nd century BC by astronomer Hipparchus of Rhodes, and it is speculated that he may have been consulted in the machine’s construction.[16] There is speculation that a portion of the mechanism is missing and it also calculated the positions of the five classical planets.

The instrument is believed to have been designed and constructed by Greek scientists and has been variously dated to about 87 BC,[17] or between 150 and 100 BC,[4] or to 205 BC.[18][19] In any case, it must have been constructed before the shipwreck, which has been dated by multiple lines of evidence to approximately 70–60 BC.[20][21] In 2022 researchers proposed that the initial calibration date of the machine could have been 23 December 178 BC. Other experts disagree proposing a date in the summer of 204 BC as a more likely calibration date.[22][23] Machines with similar complexity did not appear again until the astronomical clocks of Richard of Wallingford and Giovanni de’ Dondi in the fourteenth century.[24]

All known fragments of the Antikythera mechanism are now kept at the National Archaeological Museum, Athens, along with a number of artistic reconstructions and replicas[25][26] to demonstrate how it may have looked and worked.[27]
Read more ->

 
 
332 – Emperor Constantine the Great announces free distributions of food to the citizens in Constantinople.[1]
Constantine I (Latin: Flavius Valerius Constantinus; Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος Konstantinos; 27 February c. 272 – 22 May 337), also known as Constantine the Great or just Constantine, was Roman emperor who reigned from 306 to 337 AD, and was the first Roman emperor to convert to Christianity. Born in Naissus, Dacia Mediterranea (now Niš, Serbia), he was the son of Flavius Constantius, a Roman army officer who had been one of the four rulers of the Tetrarchy. His mother, Helena, was Greek and of low birth.[6][7][8] Constantine served with distinction under the Roman emperors Diocletian and Galerius. He began his career by campaigning in the eastern provinces (against barbarians and the Persians) before being recalled in the west (in AD 305) to fight alongside his father in Britain. After his father’s death in 306, Constantine became emperor. He was acclaimed by his army at Eboracum (York, England), and eventually emerged victorious in the civil wars against emperors Maxentius and Licinius to become the sole ruler of the Roman Empire by 324.

Upon his ascension to emperor, Constantine enacted numerous reforms to strengthen the empire. He restructured the government, separating civil and military authorities. To combat inflation, he introduced the solidus, a new gold coin that became the standard for Byzantine and European currencies for more than a thousand years. The Roman army was reorganized to consist of mobile units (comitatenses) and garrison troops (limitanei), which were capable of countering internal threats and barbarian invasions. Constantine pursued successful campaigns against the tribes on the Roman frontiers—such as the Franks, the Alamanni, the Goths and the Sarmatians—and resettled territories abandoned by his predecessors during the Crisis of the Third Century with citizens of Roman culture.

Constantine was the first Roman emperor to convert to Christianity.[notes 2] Although he lived much of his life as a pagan, and later as a catechumen, he began to favor Christianity beginning in 312, finally becoming a Christian and being baptised by either Eusebius of Nicomedia, an Arian bishop, as attested by many notable Arian historical figures, or Pope Sylvester I, which is maintained by the Catholic Church and the Coptic Orthodox Church. He played an influential role in the proclamation of the Edict of Milan in 313, which declared tolerance for Christianity in the Roman Empire. He convoked the First Council of Nicaea in 325 which produced the statement of Christian belief known as the Nicene Creed.[10] The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built on his orders at the purported site of Jesus’ tomb in Jerusalem and was deemed the holiest place in all of Christendom. The papal claim to temporal power in the High Middle Ages was based on the fabricated Donation of Constantine. He has historically been referred to as the “First Christian Emperor” and he did favor the Christian Church. While some modern scholars debate his beliefs and even his comprehension of Christianity,[notes 3] he is venerated as a saint in Eastern Christianity, and did much for pushing Christianity towards the mainstream of Roman culture.

The age of Constantine marked a distinct epoch in the history of the Roman Empire and a pivotal moment in the transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages.[13] He built a new imperial residence at the city of Byzantium and renamed it Constantinople (now Istanbul) after himself. It subsequently became the capital of the empire for more than a thousand years, the later Eastern Roman Empire being referred to as the Byzantine Empire by modern historians. His more immediate political legacy was that he replaced Diocletian’s Tetrarchy with the de facto principle of dynastic succession, by leaving the empire to his sons and other members of the Constantinian dynasty. His reputation flourished during the lifetime of his children and for centuries after his reign. The medieval church held him up as a paragon of virtue, while secular rulers invoked him as a prototype, a point of reference and the symbol of imperial legitimacy and identity.[14] Beginning with the Renaissance, there were more critical appraisals of his reign, due to the rediscovery of anti-Constantinian sources. Trends in modern and recent scholarship have attempted to balance the extremes of previous scholarship.

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Born On This Day

1890 – Edith Grace White, American ichthyologist (d. 1975)[26]
Edith Grace White (May 16, 1890 – December 1, 1975) was an American zoologist known for her studies of elasmobranchs (sharks and rays). She was a professor of biology at Wilson College, and was a research associate of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.

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1768 – Caroline of Brunswick (d. 1821)
Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (Caroline Amelia Elizabeth; 17 May 1768 – 7 August 1821) was Queen of the United Kingdom and Hanover as the wife of King George IV from 29 January 1820 until her death in 1821. She was Princess of Wales from 1795 to 1820.

The daughter of Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick, and Princess Augusta of Great Britain, Caroline was engaged to her cousin George in 1794, despite their never having met. He was already illegally married to Maria Fitzherbert. George and Caroline married the following year but separated shortly after the birth of their only child, Princess Charlotte of Wales, in 1796. By 1806, rumours that Caroline had taken lovers and had an illegitimate child led to an investigation into her private life. The dignitaries who led the investigation concluded that there was “no foundation” to the rumours, but Caroline’s access to her daughter was nonetheless restricted. In 1814, Caroline moved to Italy, where she employed Bartolomeo Pergami as a servant. Pergami soon became Caroline’s closest companion, and it was widely assumed that they were lovers. In 1817, Caroline was devastated when Charlotte died in childbirth. She heard the news from a passing courier as George had refused to write and tell her. He was determined to divorce Caroline, and set up a second investigation to collect evidence of her adultery.

In January 1820, George became King of the United Kingdom and Hanover, and Caroline nominally became queen. George insisted on a divorce from Caroline, which she refused. A legal divorce was possible but difficult to obtain. Caroline returned to Britain to assert her position as queen. She was wildly popular with the British people, who sympathised with her and despised the new king for his immoral behaviour. On the basis of the loose evidence collected against her, George attempted to divorce Caroline by introducing the Pains and Penalties Bill 1820 to Parliament, but he and the bill were so unpopular, and Caroline so popular with the masses, that it was withdrawn by the Liverpool ministry. The King barred Caroline from his coronation in July 1821. She fell ill in London and died three weeks later. Her funeral procession passed through London on its way to her native Braunschweig, where she was buried.

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1850 – Oliver Heaviside, English engineer, mathematician, and physicist (d. 1925)
Oliver Heaviside FRS[1] (/ˈhɛvisaɪd/; 18 May 1850 – 3 February 1925) was an English self-taught mathematician and physicist who brought complex numbers to circuit analysis, invented a new technique for solving differential equations (equivalent to the Laplace transform), independently developed vector calculus, and rewrote Maxwell’s equations in the form commonly used today. He significantly shaped the way Maxwell’s equations are understood and applied in the decades following Maxwell’s death. His formulation of the telegrapher’s equations became commercially important during his own lifetime, after their significance went unremarked for a long while, as few others were versed at the time in his novel methodology.[2] Although at odds with the scientific establishment for most of his life, Heaviside changed the face of telecommunications, mathematics, and science.[2]

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FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

 
 
 
 

Rare Historical Photos: Stunning photos of Jayne Mansfield: One of the most famous beauty icons of the 1950s and 1960s
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DCIII): Renaissance Grotto Design; This instagram dedicated to Venetian tiled floors; World War I Camouflage Trees; Iconic Ukrainian artist and fashion designer Lyubov Panchenko (killed last month in the Russian 2022 invasion); The Lost book of “Inventio Fortunata,” a Medieval Journey to the Arctic North; A teenage treasure hunter pulled a safe containing thousands of dollars out of a river, returned it to its rightful owner; Arctic Circle people have been protecting their eyes from snow blindness for over 4,000 years with snow goggles and more ->
 
 
 
 
Rasmuson Foundation dedicates $3 million to support statewide broadband efforts
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Hans Zimmer Was in the First-Ever Video Aired on MTV, The Buggles’ “Video Killed the Radio Star”
 
 
 
 
Quartz Obsession: What to know about Oreos
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Stumbled Into a Discount Cheap Tickets, one of the first big digital travel companies, has a hell of a corporate history—one with nothing to do with the internet.
 
 
 
 
By Nathan Yau, FlowingData: How Much Time We Spend Alone and With Others
 
 
 
 
By Marley Dickinson, Running: Meet the famous duck who ran the Long Island Marathon Wrinkle set a one-kilometre world duck record of 18 minutes and eight seconds
 
 
 
 
By Bill Chappell, NPR: A nonspeaking valedictorian with autism gives her college’s commencement speech
 
 
 
 
By Ian Sherr, Erin Carson, CNET: Johnny Depp v. Amber Heard Videos Are Everywhere. Here’s Why How TikTok and YouTube Turned Depp v. Heard Into the New ‘Trial of the Century’ (CNET)
 
 
 
 
ARS Technica, Lily Hay Newman, wired.com: Some top 100,000 websites collect everything you type—before you hit submit A number of websites include keyloggers that covertly snag your keyboard inputs.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

BloominThyme: Beneficials in the Garden
 
 
BloominThyme: Tropical Orb Weaver Spider
 
 

Recipes

BloominThyme: Ricotta-Stuffed Squash Blossoms
 
 
I Wash You Dry: Cheesy Zucchini Corn Fritters
 
 
By vanweb: Sandwich: Chicken & Bruschetta on Focaccia
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 15, 2022

On This Day

1252 – Pope Innocent IV issues the papal bull ad extirpanda, which authorizes, but also limits, the torture of heretics in the Medieval Inquisition.
Ad extirpanda (“To eradicate”; named for its Latin incipit) was a papal bull promulgated on Wednesday, May 15, 1252 by Pope Innocent IV which authorized in limited and defined circumstances the use of torture by the Inquisition as a tool for interrogation.[1]

Context
The bull was issued in the wake of the murder of the papal inquisitor of Lombardy, St. Peter of Verona, who was killed by a conspiracy of Cathar sympathizers on 6 April 1252. It was addressed to the heads of state or rulers, ministers and citizens established in the states and districts of Lombardy, Riviera di Romagnola (in Emilia-Romagna), and Marchia Tervisina in the Veneto. Judicial torture had become a common practice in the 11th and 12th centuries, following the rediscovery of Roman law. By 1252, it was regarded as an established method by secular tribunals.[1]

Content
The bull argued that as heretics are “murderers of souls as well as robbers of God’s sacraments and of the Christian faith …”, they are “to be coerced—as are thieves and bandits—into confessing their errors and accusing others, although one must stop short of danger to life or limb.”[2] The following parameters were placed on the use of torture:[3]

that it did not cause loss of life or limb (citra membri diminutionem et mortis periculum)
that it was used only once
that the Inquisitor deemed the evidence against the accused to be virtually certain.

The bull conceded to the State a portion of the property to be confiscated from convicted heretics.[4] The State in return assumed the burden of carrying out the penalty. The relevant portion of the bull read: “When those adjudged guilty of heresy have been given up to the civil power by the bishop or his representative, or the Inquisition, the podestà or chief magistrate of the city shall take them at once, and shall, within five days at the most, execute the laws made against them.”[5]

 
 

Born On This Day

1857 – Williamina Fleming, Scottish-American astronomer and academic (d. 1911)[15]
Williamina Paton Stevens Fleming (15 May 1857 – 21 May 1911) was a Scottish astronomer active in the United States. During her career, she helped develop a common designation system for stars and cataloged thousands of stars and other astronomical phenomena. Among several career achievements that advanced astronomy, Fleming is noted for her discovery of the Horsehead Nebula in 1888.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 
By Open Culture: Google Unveils a Digital Marketing & E-Commerce Certificate: 7 Courses Will Help Prepare Students for an Entry-Level Job in 6 Months
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Forgotten Women of Surrealism: A Magical, Short Animated Film

 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice, From The Wall Street Journal: Patton’s Payback
 
 
 
 

Rare Historical Photos: Color photos of young Raquel Welch: The classic beauty of the 1960s

 
 
 
 

The Hustle: Why a small candy company is Warren Buffett’s ‘dream’ investment The story of See’s Candies reminds us of the importance of consistency, quality, and long-term growth in investing.
 
 
 
 

The Marginalian by Maria Popova: Things to Look Forward to: An Illustrated Celebration of Living with Presence in Uncertain Times, Disguised as a Love Letter to the Future
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By joeywbell: Talking Head: a Talking Hat
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By LaviBakeHouse: Japanese Fruit Sando Using Homemade Shokupan Bread
 
 
By siennaolen: Pesto, Tomato, and Mozzarella Sandwich With Homemade Artisan Bread and a Refreshing Side Salad
 
 
By Momos75: Loaded Sourdough Ciabatta
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Crispy Air Fryer Cod
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: BROOKIES From Scratch
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Easy Hamantaschen (Pie Crust Cookies)
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?