FYI April 08, 2021

On This Day

1911 – Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes discovers superconductivity.
Superconductivity is a set of physical properties observed in certain materials where electrical resistance vanishes and magnetic flux fields are expelled from the material. Any material exhibiting these properties is a superconductor. Unlike an ordinary metallic conductor, whose resistance decreases gradually as its temperature is lowered even down to near absolute zero, a superconductor has a characteristic critical temperature below which the resistance drops abruptly to zero. An electric current through a loop of superconducting wire can persist indefinitely with no power source.[1][2][3][4]

The superconductivity phenomenon was discovered in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes. Like ferromagnetism and atomic spectral lines, superconductivity is a phenomenon which can only be explained by quantum mechanics. It is characterized by the Meissner effect, the complete ejection of magnetic field lines from the interior of the superconductor during its transitions into the superconducting state. The occurrence of the Meissner effect indicates that superconductivity cannot be understood simply as the idealization of perfect conductivity in classical physics.

In 1986, it was discovered that some cuprate-perovskite ceramic materials have a critical temperature above 90 K (−183 °C).[5] Such a high transition temperature is theoretically impossible for a conventional superconductor, leading the materials to be termed high-temperature superconductors. The cheaply available coolant liquid nitrogen boils at 77 K, and thus the existence of superconductivity at higher temperatures than this facilitates many experiments and applications that are less practical at lower temperatures.

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Born On This Day

1900 – Marie Byles, Australian solicitor (d. 1979) [12]
Marie Beuzeville Byles (8 April 1900 – 21 November 1979) was an Australian conservationist, pacifist, the first practising female solicitor in New South Wales (NSW), mountaineer, explorer and avid bushwalker, feminist, journalist, and an original member of the Buddhist Society in New South Wales. She was also a travel and non-fiction writer.[1][2]

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FYI

 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: The Fairbanks Freight
 
 
 
 
The Colossal: Speckled with Light, Glowing Glass Sculptures React to Viewers with Shifts in Brightness; A Soothing Stop-Motion Animation Bakes a Rich Chocolate Layer Cake Entirely from LEGO; Shots of Snuggling Swans and Ravenous Shags Best the 2021 Bird Photographer of the Year Contest and more ->
 
 
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Fly-bys
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: How the pandemic resurrected Britain’s ancient borders; Vet Hospital on Wheels; Yellowstone’s Zone of Death and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Jane Friedman: What Every Writer Needs to Know About Email Newsletters (They’re Not Going Away)
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
NSFW

Recipes

By John Mitzewich, The Spruce Eats: McDonald’s Special Sauce Recipe


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

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Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

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