FYI June 28, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1936 – The Japanese puppet state of Mengjiang is formed in northern China.

Mengjiang (Mengkiang; Chinese: 蒙疆; pinyin: Měngjiāng; Wade–Giles: Meng3-chiang1; Hepburn: Mōkyō), also known in English as Mongol Border Land[3] or the Mongol United Autonomous Government, was an autonomous area in Inner Mongolia, existing initially as a puppet state of the Empire of Japan before being under nominal Chinese sovereignty of the Nanjing Nationalist Government from 1940 (which itself was a puppet state). Formed in 1939, it consisted of the then-Chinese provinces of Chahar and Suiyuan,[4] corresponding to the central part of modern Inner Mongolia. It has also been called Mongukuo[5] or Mengguguo (or Mengkukuo; Chinese: 蒙古國) (in analogy to Manchukuo, another Japanese puppet state in Manchuria). The capital was Kalgan, from where it was ruled by the Mongol nobleman Prince Demchugdongrub. The territory returned to Chinese control after the defeat of the Japanese Empire in 1945.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1906 – Maria Goeppert-Mayer, Polish-American physicist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1972)
Maria Goeppert Mayer (June 28, 1906 – February 20, 1972) was a German-born American theoretical physicist, and Nobel laureate in Physics for proposing the nuclear shell model of the atomic nucleus. She was the second woman to win a Nobel Prize in physics, after Marie Curie.

A graduate of the University of Göttingen, Goeppert Mayer wrote her doctorate on the theory of possible two-photon absorption by atoms. At the time, the chances of experimentally verifying her thesis seemed remote, but the development of the laser permitted this. Today, the unit for the two-photon absorption cross section is named the Goeppert Mayer (GM) unit.

Maria Goeppert married Joseph Edward Mayer and moved to the United States, where he was an associate professor at Johns Hopkins University. Strict rules against nepotism prevented Johns Hopkins University from taking her on as a faculty member, but she was given a job as an assistant and published a landmark paper on double beta decay in 1935. In 1937, she moved to Columbia University, where she took an unpaid position. During World War II, she worked for the Manhattan Project at Columbia on isotope separation, and with Edward Teller at the Los Alamos Laboratory on the development of the Teller’s “Super” bomb.

After the war, Goeppert Mayer became a voluntary associate professor of Physics at the University of Chicago (where Teller and her husband worked) and a senior physicist at the nearby Argonne National Laboratory. She developed a mathematical model for the structure of nuclear shells, for which she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963, which she shared with J. Hans D. Jensen and Eugene Wigner. In 1960, she was appointed full professor of physics at the University of California, San Diego.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

Written by Marc Chernoff: 10 Truths to Keep You Going When Everything Goes Wrong
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Neat Experiment Suggests Crows Are Even Better Toolmakers Than We Thought
 
 
 
 
By Tanza Loudenback, Libby Kane: These 22 sketches make complicated financial concepts simple enough to fit on a napkin
 
 
 
 
By Frida Garza: Donald Glover and Rashida Jones Outline the Do’s (and Mostly Don’ts) of Sexual Harassment at Work
 
 
 
 
By Andrew Couts: The Best Gas Grill You Can Buy Without Breaking the Bank
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: School program aims to bridge gap for Native Americans. A new program in Oregon aims to help students raised on rural Native American reservations close the achievement gap in school.
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Rural telecoms companies fill a variety of community needs
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Column: Why do we value rural folk more than city people?
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: State of New York Debuts Open Foil NY, a Centralized Location to File Requests, View Documents Released Under New York’s Freedom of Information Law (FOIL)

 
 
 
 
Better Ways to Say “This Sucks” Go on…make your English teacher proud.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura by Daniel Crown: The Board Game at the Heart of Viking Culture An ancient game known as “hnefatafl” held immense symbolic and religious significance.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The RMS Queen Mary The awe-inspiring ship from the golden era of cruising has an incomparable history and a reputation as one of the world’s most haunted places.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 17 Ways to Build a Gorgeous Garden Trellis This Summer
 
 
 
 
Rob & Courtney M, Hometalk Team Hometalker Brooklyn, NY: Rob & Courtney M, Hometalk Team Hometalker Brooklyn, NY Tire Rim Water Hose Holder
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Open Culture Ayun Halliday: How to Make Nettle Pudding: One of the World’s Oldest Known Recipes That Dates Back 6,000 BC
 
 
 
 
Scrappy Geek: Easy Four Bean Salad
 
 
 
 
Scrappy Geek: Easy Grilled Corn on the Cob

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars