FYI March 19, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1649 – The House of Commons of England passes an act abolishing the House of Lords, declaring it “useless and dangerous to the people of England”.
The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England (which incorporated Wales) from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Origins
The Parliament of England developed from the Magnum Concilium that advised the English monarch in medieval times. This royal council, meeting for short periods, included ecclesiastics, noblemen, as well as representatives of the counties (known as “knights of the shire”). The chief duty of the council was to approve taxes proposed by the Crown. In many cases, however, the council demanded the redress of the people’s grievances before proceeding to vote on taxation. Thus, it developed legislative powers.[1]

The first parliament to invite representatives of the major towns was Montfort’s Parliament in 1265. At the “Model Parliament” of 1295, representatives of the boroughs (including towns and cities) were admitted. Thus, it became settled practice that each county send two knights of the shire, and that each borough send two burgesses. At first, the burgesses were almost entirely powerless; while the right to representation of each English county quickly became indisputable, the monarch could enfranchise or disfranchise boroughs at pleasure. Any show of independence by burgesses would thus be likely to lead to the exclusion of their towns from Parliament. The knights of the shire were in a better position, although less powerful than their noble and clerical counterparts in what was still a unicameral Parliament.Read more ->

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Born On This Day

1933 – Renée Taylor, American actress, producer, and screenwriter
Renée Taylor (née Renée Wexler; March 19, 1933)[1] is an American actress and writer. She is known for playing Fran Drescher’s title character’s outspoken mother, Sylvia Fine, on the TV series The Nanny.

Career
Taylor was born in The Bronx, New York to Charles and Frieda (née Silverstein) Wexler. Taylor worked as a comedian in the early 1960s at the New York City nightclub Bon Soir. Her opening act was a then-unknown Barbra Streisand.[2] In 1968, Taylor played Eva Braun in Mel Brooks’ feature film The Producers, a role she got while performing the play Luv with Gene Wilder, whom Brooks decided to cast as protagonist Leo Bloom.[3]

Taylor and her husband, Joseph Bologna, co-wrote the Broadway hit comedy Lovers and Other Strangers, and received Oscar nominations for having written the 1970 film adaptation. In 1971, the couple co-wrote and starred in the film Made for Each Other. Their screenplay received a nomination for the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Comedy. Taylor played Arlene Sherwood, co-producer of a television show along with Jerry Orbach and John Candy in the 1991 film Delirious.[4]

From 1992-94, Taylor played the overbearing Jewish mother of Brian Benben’s lead character on the HBO series Dream On. In 1993, she was cast as the mother of Richard Lewis, and the ex-wife of Don Rickles, in the Fox sitcom Daddy Dearest, which was cancelled after a two-month run in the fall. Also in 1993, Taylor was slated for sporadic guest appearances on the new CBS sitcom The Nanny, playing Sylvia Fine, the mother of Fran Drescher’s title character. After the cancellation of Daddy Dearest, Taylor was upgraded to a recurring cast member during the first season of The Nanny and eventually a full-time cast member by the third season. Her roles on the two broadcast network series were concurrent with her work on Dream On.[4] Taylor is most often recognized for her role in The Nanny. Her character is intent on helping daughter Fran find a husband and has a passionate love for food. Taylor’s husband, Joseph Bologna, made two guest appearances on The Nanny, the first as an egomaniacal actor named Allan Beck, who tormented Maxwell Sheffield (Charles Shaughnessy); and, in the final season, Bologna again guest-starred as a doctor and admirer of Sylvia in the episode “Maternal Affairs”.[4]

In recent years, Taylor guest-starred as Ted Mosby’s neighbor, Mrs. Matsen, on How I Met Your Mother. She also had a guest-starring role on the Disney show, Shake It Up, portraying a cranky, mean elderly woman in a retirement home as Mrs. Lacasio, as well as a guest-starring role on the Nickelodeon show, Victorious as Robbie’s cranky grandmother who needed Robbie’s help with the internet.[4]

In addition to her numerous guest-starring appearances, Taylor has worked as a voice-actor as the character Mrs. Start in the animated feature film Ice Age: The Meltdown, and in a recurring role as Linda’s mother Gloria in the animated Fox series Bob’s Burgers. Taylor also played Martha Benson in the film Opposite Day, released in 2009.[4]

Taylor also appeared on Fran Drescher’s latest show Happily Divorced as the best friend of Fran’s mother. In 2011, Taylor was cast in the short-lived Fox cartoon Allen Gregory, in which she voiced the character of Principal Gottlieb. In 2013, she starred in the Tyler Perry film Temptation: Confessions of a Marriage Counselor as Ms. Waco Chapman, the owner of Chapman drug company.[4]

In 2016, Taylor starred in the Netflix movie The Do-Over with Adam Sandler as the role of Mrs. Kessler and in the TV show Rock in a Hard Place.[5] Recently, Taylor appeared in the 2017 film How To Be A Latin Lover.[6]

Taylor had a role in Tango Shalom,[7] which she acted alongside her husband, in his final film role before his death.

Personal life
Taylor married actor Joseph Bologna on August 7, 1965, in Stamford, Connecticut. They have two children, a son, Gabriel who is an actor and a daughter, Zizi who works as a film producer.[4][8] They were married until Bologna’s death in August 2017.

Taylor is Jewish.[9]

 
 
 
 

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