FYI March 23, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1965 – NASA launches Gemini 3, the United States’ first two-man space flight (crew: Gus Grissom and John Young).
Gemini 3 was the first manned mission in NASA’s Gemini program, the second American manned space program. On March 23, 1965, astronauts Gus Grissom and John Young flew three low Earth orbits in their spacecraft, which they nicknamed Molly Brown. This was the ninth manned US spaceflight (including two X-15 flights over 100 kilometers), and the 17th world human spaceflight including eight Soviet flights. It was also the final manned flight controlled from Cape Kennedy Air Force Station in Florida, before mission control functions were shifted to a new control center located at the newly opened Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas.

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Gus Grissom
Lieutenant Colonel Virgil Ivan “Gus” Grissom (April 3, 1926 – January 27, 1967) was one of the original NASA Project Mercury astronauts, a United States Air Force test pilot, and a mechanical engineer. He was the second American to fly in space, and the first member of the NASA Astronaut Corps to fly in space twice.

Grissom enlisted in the United States Army Air Forces as an aviation cadet during World War II. As the end of the war neared, Grissom sought to be discharged and married Betty Moore. Grissom enrolled at Purdue University, graduating with a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering in 1950. He reenlisted in the United States Air Force, earning his pilot’s wings in 1951. Grissom flew over 100 combat missions during the Korean War, earning the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with an oak leaf cluster. He was reassigned to work as a flight instructor at Bryan Air Force Base. He attended the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology for a year and earned a bachelor’s degree in aeromechanics.

Selected as one of the Mercury Seven astronauts, Grissom was the pilot of the second American suborbital flight, in the Liberty Bell 7. The hatch on the capsule blew off; causing the craft to fill with water and sink to the bottom of the ocean. His next flight was in the Project Gemini Program in a craft named the Molly Brown, which was a successful mission. He was killed along with fellow astronauts Ed White and Roger Chaffee during a pre-launch test for the Apollo 1 mission at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (then known as Cape Kennedy), Florida. He was the first of the Mercury Seven to die. He was a recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross and, posthumously, the Congressional Space Medal of Honor.

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John Young (astronaut)
John Watts Young (September 24, 1930 – January 5, 2018) was an American astronaut, naval officer and aviator, test pilot, and aeronautical engineer. He became the ninth person to walk on the Moon as Commander of the Apollo 16 mission in 1972. Young enjoyed the longest career of any astronaut, becoming the first person to fly six space missions (with seven launches, counting his lunar liftoff) over the course of 42 years of active NASA service.[1] He was the only person to have piloted, and been commander of, four different classes of spacecraft: Gemini, the Apollo Command/Service Module, the Apollo Lunar Module, and the Space Shuttle.[2]

In 1965, Young flew on the first manned Gemini mission, and commanded another Gemini mission the next year. In 1969 during Apollo 10, he became the first person to fly solo around the Moon.[3] He drove the Lunar Roving Vehicle on the Moon’s surface during Apollo 16, and is one of only three people to have flown to the Moon twice.[4] He also commanded two Space Shuttle flights, including its first launch in 1981, and served as Chief of the Astronaut Office from 1974 to 1987. Young retired from NASA in 2004. He died on January 5, 2018.

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Born On This Day

1882 – Emmy Noether, Jewish German-American mathematician, physicist and academic (d. 1935)
Amalie Emmy Noether[1] (German: [ˈnøːtɐ]; 23 March 1882 – 14 April 1935) was a German mathematician known for her landmark contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. She invariably used the name “Emmy Noether” in her life and publications.[1]

She was described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl, and Norbert Wiener as the most important woman in the history of mathematics.[2][3] As one of the leading mathematicians of her time, she developed the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. In physics, Noether’s theorem explains the connection between symmetry and conservation laws.[4]

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FYI

By Stef Schrader: Hold It In And Don’t Exhale
 
 
 
 

Radiotopia: Radiotopia Turns 4 We’ve got the warm fuzzies thinking back on all your love and support over the last four years, On Showcase: Errthang Errthang, from Al Letson and WIllie Evans Jr., launched today. Hear stories of fatherhood, political unrest and love and more
 
 
 
 
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Open Culture Dan Colman: Watch a Marathon Streaming of All 856 Episodes of Mister Rogers Neighborhood, and the Moving Trailer for the New Documentary, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?
 
 
 
 
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By Gary Price: Finally! Decades in the Making! Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports To Become Publicly Available
 
 
 
 
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By ChickFix Hometalker Canton, GA: How to Correct Your Oven’s Temperature
 
 
 
 

Bluebird of Bitterness: Friday happy dance


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