FYI March 24, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

1882 – Robert Koch announces the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium responsible for tuberculosis.
Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an obligate[1] pathogenic bacterial species in the family Mycobacteriaceae and the causative agent of tuberculosis.[2] First discovered in 1882 by Robert Koch, M. tuberculosis has an unusual, waxy coating on its cell surface primarily due to the presence of mycolic acid. This coating makes the cells impervious to Gram staining, and as a result, M. tuberculosis can appear either Gram-negative or Gram-positive.[3] Acid-fast stains such as Ziehl-Neelsen, or fluorescent stains such as auramine are used instead to identify M. tuberculosis with a microscope. The physiology of M. tuberculosis is highly aerobic and requires high levels of oxygen. Primarily a pathogen of the mammalian respiratory system, it infects the lungs. The most frequently used diagnostic methods for tuberculosis are the tuberculin skin test, acid-fast stain, culture, and polymerase chain reaction.[2][4]

The M. tuberculosis genome was sequenced in 1998.[5][6]

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Born On This Day

1826 – Matilda Joslyn Gage, American activist and author (d. 1898)
Matilda Electa Joslyn Gage (March 24, 1826 – March 18, 1898) was a 19th-century women’s suffragist, a Native American rights activist, an abolitionist, a freethinker, and a prolific author, who was “born with a hatred of oppression.”[1]

Gage began her public career as a lecturer at the woman’s rights convention at Syracuse, New York, in 1852, being the youngest speaker present, after which, the enfranchisement of women became the goal of her life. She was a tireless worker and public speaker, and contributed numerous articles to the press, being regarded as “one of the most logical, fearless and scientific writers of her day”. During 1878–1881, she published and edited at Syracuse the National Citizen, a paper devoted to the cause of women. In 1880, she was a delegate from the National Woman Suffrage Association to the Republican and Greenback conventions in Chicago and the Democratic convention in Cincinnati, Ohio. With Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, she was for years in the forefront of the suffrage movement, and collaborated with them in writing the History of Woman Suffrage (1881–1887). She was the author of the Woman’s Rights Catechism (1868); Woman as Inventor (1870); Who Planned the Tennessee Campaign (1880); and Woman, Church and State (1893).[2]

Gage served as president of the New York State Suffrage Association for five years, and president of the National Woman’s Suffrage Association during 1875–76, which was one of the affiliating societies forming the national suffrage association, in 1890; she also held the office of second vice-president, vice-president-at-large and chairman of the executive committee of the original National Woman Suffrage Association.[2]

Gage’s views on suffrage and feminism were considered too radical by many members of the suffrage association, and in consequence, she organized in 1890 the Woman’s National Liberal Union, whose objects were: To assert woman’s natural right to self-government; to show the cause of delay in the recognition of her demand; to preserve the principles of civil and religious liberty; to arouse public opinion to the danger of a union of church and state through an amendment to the constitution, and to denounce the doctrine of woman’s inferiority. She served as president of this union from its inception until her death in Chicago, in 1898.[2]

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FYI

Lt. Col. Arnaud Beltrame
by Phil Helsel and Associated Press: French police officer who traded places with hostage during terror attack dies “France will never forget his heroism, bravery and sacrifice,” the country’s interior minister said.
 
 
 
 
By Staff Writer: Off-duty SWAT officer becomes an instant celebrity after responding to chase while wearing plaid shorts
 
 
 
 
By William Hughes: Chilling legal documents reveal just how shitty the “planning” behind lethal “world’s tallest” waterslide really was
 
 
 
 
By Tom McKay: Operators of Verrückt, World’s Largest Water Slide, Charged in 2016 Death of 10-Year-Old Rider
 
 
 
 
By Adam Clark Estes: Why We Finally Feel Betrayed by Facebook
 
 
 
 
By Kristen Lee: How Subaru Outsmarted A Bad Consumer Reports Review And Took Over America
 
 
Road & Track story -> By Bob Sorokanich: How Subaru Became the Unofficial Car of Vermont … and New Hampshire, and Maine, and Massachusetts, and Washington, and Oregon.
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Line Up, Ladies, The 1912 Baker Model-V Was Made For You
 
 
 
 
By Giaco Furino for HBO’s Barry: In entertainment, even the most famous celebrities started from the bottom
 
 
 
 
By William Hughes: Dinosaur park’s animatronic T-Rex burns down, and it is absolutely metal as fuck
 
 
 
 
By Daniel Terdiman: At Amazon’s MARS Conference, Jeff Bezos Plots The Future With 200 (Very) Big Brains
 
 
 
 
By Christina Dodd: Bringing Back Gothic Mysteries To New Readers
 
 
 
 
Scott Myers Saturday Hot Links
 
 
 
 
Lit Hub Weekly March 19 -23, 2018: On the recent success of feminist presses. Jill Lepore on Rachel Carson, poet of the sea. Chris Kraus interviews Leslie Jamison about her new book The Recovering. The best, least annoying books to read to children. Before his death, Bill Cunningham secretly wrote a memoir, and we’re all going to get to read it. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith talks the process behind her new book. Porochista Khakpour on celebrating Nowruz. More ->
 
 
 
 
By Lindsey McCord Hometalker Bowdon, GA: Hand-Sewn Floor Pouf
 
 
 
 

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