FYI May 11, 2018


 
 

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On This Day

868 – A copy of the Diamond Sutra is printed in China, making it the oldest known dated printed book.

The Diamond Sūtra (Sanskrit:Vajracchedikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra) is a Mahāyāna (Buddhist) sūtra from the Prajñāpāramitā sutras which means “Perfection of Wisdom” genre. Diamond Sūtra is a very rare scripture because most Mahāyāna sutras did not preach the process that intentionally reached Vajrayana or Śrāvakayāna, which means “Mount Vajra” or “Mount Bhumi”. However, Diamond Sūtra do not preached until the training method of it.

A copy of the Tang-dynasty Chinese version of Diamond Sūtra, found among the Dunhuang manuscripts in 1907 by Aurel Stein, was dated back to 11 May 868.[1] It is, in the words of the British Library, “the earliest complete survival of a dated printed book.”[2]

In it can be found the dedication: “for universal free distribution”, so it is also the first creative work with an explicit public domain dedication.[3]

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Born On This Day

1799 – John Lowell, Jr., American businessman and philanthropist, founded Lowell Institute (d. 1836)
John Lowell Jr. (May 11, 1799 – March 4, 1836) was a U.S. businessman, early philanthropist, and through his will, founder of the Lowell Institute.

Family
Lowell was the son of pioneer industrialist Francis Cabot Lowell (1775–1817), one of the founders of the region’s textile industry, and Hannah Jackson, sister of Patrick Tracy Jackson, another industrial pioneer. His grandfather and namesake, Judge John Lowell (1743–1802), referred to as The Old Judge, served in the Congress of the Confederation in 1782 and was appointed later to federal benches by Presidents George Washington and John Adams.[1]

After receiving his early education in the Boston public schools, young Lowell was taken by his father to Europe and placed at the high school of Edinburgh. In 1813, at the age of 14, he returned to America and entered Harvard College. Plagued with ill health, he left college after two years and entered his family’s mercantile firm, sailing before the mast to India, the East Indies, and England.[2]

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FYI

By Katie Rife: R.I.P. Frightened Rabbit’s Scott Hutchison
They add that Hutchison had “battled bravely with his own issues” for many years. “Depression is a horrendous illness that does not give you any alert or indication as to when it will take hold of you … We are immensely proud of [Scott] for being so open with his struggles. His willingness to discuss these matters in the public domain undoubtedly raised awareness of mental health issues and gave others confidence and belief to discuss their own issues.”
 
 
 
 
 
By Hannah Gold: Woman Who Allegedly Sent Man 65,000 Texts Has Been Arrested on Stalking Charges
 
 
 
 

By Patrick Redford: Dinosaur-Sized Gator Enjoys Casual Stroll On The Golf Course With His Friends The Deer
 
 
 
 
By Oliver Sava: Discover the wonders of fungi in this Mushroom Fan Club exclusive
 
 
 
 
By Jake Buehler: We Finally Know Where the World’s Deadliest Amphibian Plague Got Started
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Colin Marshall: Erich Fromm’s Six Rules of Listening: Learn the Keys to Understanding Other People from the Famed Psychologist
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: New Journal Article: “Support Your Data: A Research Data Management Guide for Researchers”
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Research Tools: IRS Launches “Expanded Access” to Information on Tax-Exempt Organizations; Images of Newly-Filed 990 Forms Now Available

Publicly-available data from electronically-filed 990 forms will continue to be available in a machine-readable format through Amazon Web Services.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The Isolated Life of the Saturation Diver Saturation divers are men who do construction and demolition work at depths up to 1,000 feet or more below the surface of the ocean. It’s one of the world’s most hazardous jobs. and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: How a special diet kept the Knights Templar fighting fit, Hard Rock Music, VARANASI, INDIA Leaning Temple and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Nick Fouriezos: She Flew Helicopters for the U.S. — Now She Wants to Turn D.C. Blue
Still, Sherrill, 46, isn’t some Stepford Wife. After leaving high school in exurban northern Virginia, she graduated from the Naval Academy with prisoner-of-war training that included being punched, smoked-out and waterboarded. Then she flew a Sea King helicopter for a decade in Europe and the Middle East. The former assistant U.S. attorney for New Jersey has raised nearly $2.5 million after launching a bid for Congress more than a year ago. Her 11th district is one of four competitive Republican-held New Jersey seats, making the Garden State suburbs critical turf in the battle for control of the House.
 
 
 
 
By Wesley Tomaselli: This Doc Fights for Women in Colombia’s Acid Attack Epidemic
 
 
 
 

Vector’s World: Meter and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Stef Schrader: The Nürburgring 24 Hours Is Too Incredible To Miss So Here’s How To Watch
 
 
 
 
By Garr Larson: More “UV” than “SUV”: 1969 International Harvester Travelall
But in 1969 the Travelall advertisements read “…sleeps 4, rides 9, tows 3 tons…goes anywhere beautifully.”
 
 
 
 
The Spaces: Top architects design ‘infill’ prefab homes, holiday home of the week is a rural Moroccan retreat and more ->
 
 
 
 
Debra Lynn Dadd Live Toxic Free: Updated Newsletter
 
 
 
 
By Judymgibbs Tutorial Team Charlotte, NC: My Happy Place, a Small Shady Garden
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 30 Great Ideas For Every Pet Owner!
 
 
 
 

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