FYI May 23, 2021

On This Day

1430 – Joan of Arc is captured at the Siege of Compiègne by troops from the Burgundian faction after she stayed with the rear guard, holding her banner, and the city’s drawbridge was raised behind them.
The siege of Compiègne (1430) was Joan of Arc’s final military action. Her career as a leader ended with her capture by the Burgundians during a skirmish outside the town on 23 May 1430. Although this was otherwise a minor siege, both politically and militarily, the loss of France’s most charismatic commander was an important event of the Hundred Years’ War.

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Born On This Day

1810 – Margaret Fuller, American journalist and critic (d. 1850)
Sarah Margaret Fuller Ossoli (May 23, 1810 – July 19, 1850) was an American journalist, editor, critic, translator, and women’s rights advocate associated with the American transcendentalism movement. She was the first American female war correspondent, writing for Horace Greeley’s New-York Tribune, and full-time book reviewer in journalism. Her book Woman in the Nineteenth Century is considered the first major feminist work in the United States.

Born Sarah Margaret Fuller in Cambridge, Massachusetts, she was given a substantial early education by her father, Timothy Fuller, who died in 1835 due to cholera.[1] She later had more formal schooling and became a teacher before, in 1839, she began overseeing her Conversations series: classes for women meant to compensate for their lack of access to higher education.[2] She became the first editor of the transcendentalist journal The Dial in 1840, which was the year her writing career started to succeed,[3] before joining the staff of the New York Tribune under Horace Greeley in 1844. By the time she was in her 30s, Fuller had earned a reputation as the best-read person in New England, male or female, and became the first woman allowed to use the library at Harvard College. Her seminal work, Woman in the Nineteenth Century, was published in 1845. A year later, she was sent to Europe for the Tribune as its first female correspondent. She soon became involved with the revolutions in Italy and allied herself with Giuseppe Mazzini. She had a relationship with Giovanni Ossoli, with whom she had a child. All three members of the family died in a shipwreck off Fire Island, New York, as they were traveling to the United States in 1850. Fuller’s body was never recovered.

Fuller was an advocate of women’s rights and, in particular, women’s education and the right to employment. She revolted against Boston-Cambridge’s learned professions because she was barred from entering as a girl.[4] Fuller, along with Coleridge, wanted to stay free of what she called the “strong mental oder” of female teachers.[5] She also encouraged many other reforms in society, including prison reform and the emancipation of slaves in the United States. Many other advocates for women’s rights and feminism, including Susan B. Anthony, cite Fuller as a source of inspiration. Many of her contemporaries, however, were not supportive, including her former friend Harriet Martineau. She said that Fuller was a talker rather than an activist. Shortly after Fuller’s death, her importance faded; the editors who prepared her letters to be published, believing her fame would be short-lived, censored or altered much of her work before publication.

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FYI

Wickersham’s Conscience: WC’s Favorite Patch
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Oregon Coast Notebook: Headed Home
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Oregon Coast Notebook: The Joys of Tidepooling
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Out of Dawson Creek

 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: The Story of Elizebeth Friedman, the Pioneering Cryptologist Who Thwarted the Nazis & Got Burned by J. Edgar Hoover
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Surprising Reason Why Chinatowns Worldwide Share the Same Aesthetic, and How It All Started with the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake
 
 
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: 167 Pieces of Life & Work Advice from Kevin Kelly, Founding Editor of Wired Magazine & The Whole Earth Review
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: A Young Janis Joplin Plays a Passionate Set at One of Her First Gigs in San Francisco (1963)
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

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Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

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