FYI November 26, 2017


1805 – Official opening of Thomas Telford’s Pontcysyllte Aqueduct.
The Pontcysyllte Aqueduct (Welsh pronunciation: [ˌpɔntkəˈsəɬtɛ], full name in Welsh: Traphont Ddŵr Pontcysyllte) is a navigable aqueduct that carries the Llangollen Canal across the River Dee in north east Wales. The 18-arched stone and cast iron structure, which took ten years to design and build, was completed in 1805. It is now the oldest and longest navigable aqueduct in Great Britain and the highest in the world.

The aqueduct was to be a key part of the central section of the proposed Ellesmere Canal, an industrial waterway that would create a commercial link between the River Severn at Shrewsbury and the Port of Liverpool on the River Mersey. However, only parts of the canal route were completed because the expected revenues required to complete the entire project were never generated. Most major work ceased after the completion of the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct in 1805. Although a cheaper construction course was surveyed further to the east, the westerly high-ground route across the Vale of Llangollen was preferred because it would have taken the canal through the mineral-rich coalfields of North East Wales.

The structure is a Grade I listed building[1] and a World Heritage Site.

Etymology
The name Pontcysyllte in the Welsh language means “Cysyllte Bridge”.[2] It is derived from the township of Cysyllte. The completed aqueduct linked the villages of Froncysyllte, at the southern end of the bridge in the Cysyllte township of Llangollen parish (from where it takes its name[2]), and Trevor (Trefor in Welsh), at the northern end of the bridge in the Trefor Isaf township, also of Llangollen parish.

The aqueduct was originally known as Pont y Cysyllte (“Bridge of Cysyllte”). Other translations such as “Bridge of the Junction” or “The Bridge that links” are a modern definition. They are derived from the word cysylltau (plural of cyswllt) which means connections or links.

More on wiki:

 
 
 
 


1832 – Mary Edwards Walker, American surgeon and activist, Medal of Honor recipient (d. 1919)
Mary Edwards Walker (November 26, 1832 – February 21, 1919), commonly referred to as Dr. Mary Walker, was an American abolitionist, prohibitionist, prisoner of war and surgeon. As of 2017, she is the only woman ever to receive the Medal of Honor.[1]

In 1855, she earned her medical degree at Syracuse Medical College in New York,[2] married and started a medical practice. She volunteered with the Union Army at the outbreak of the American Civil War and served as a surgeon at a temporary hospital in Washington, DC, even though at the time women and sectarian physicians were considered unfit for the Union Army Examining Board.[3] She was captured by Confederate forces[2] after crossing enemy lines to treat wounded civilians and arrested as a spy. She was sent as a prisoner of war to Richmond, Virginia, until released in a prisoner exchange.

After the war, she was approved for the highest United States Armed Forces decoration for bravery, the Medal of Honor, for her efforts during the Civil War. She is the only woman to receive the medal and one of only eight civilians to receive it. Her name was deleted from the Army Medal of Honor Roll in 1917 (along with over 900 others); however, it was restored in 1977.[2] After the war, she was a writer and lecturer supporting the women’s suffrage movement until her death in 1919.

More on wiki:

 
 
 
 


 
 


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


Widget not in any sidebars