Tag: Army Spc. Sion Kim

Military February 08, 2018

By Blake Essig: Operation Afghanistan: Interpreters risk their own lives for a better oneIt took Ansari about two and a half years to learn to read, write and speak English. He says with no native speakers to teach the proper pronunciation of words, he learned by watching movies and translating books from English to Dari.

Most of the interpreters working for the U.S. military are on two-year contracts, earning between $300 and $900 a month. Upon completion of their contract, linguists are able to apply for a Special Immigrant Visa, a program which allows up to 50 people annually, who have worked for the U.S. Armed Forces in Afghanistan or Iraq, to be issued a visa to enter the United States.
 
 
 
 
By Blake Essig Operation Afghanistan: Soldier puts musical dreams on hold to answer call to dutyBy Scott Gross: Can Alaska properly respond to a catastrophic emergency?
 
 
 
 
By Jim Garamone DoD News, Defense Media Activity: U.S.-Thai Leaders Reaffirm Military-to-Military Relationship
 
 
 
 
By Army Spc. Noelle E. Wiehe, 1st Security Force Assistance Brigade: Face of Defense: Combat Medic Looks Forward to First Deployment
 
 
 
 
By Shireen Bedi, Office of the Air Force Surgeon General: Robotic Surgery Training Program Aims at Improving Patient Outcomes
 
 
 
 
Timeline: Sophie Scholl was beheaded at 21 for standing up to the Nazis
Sophia Magdalena Scholl (9 May 1921 – 22 February 1943) was a German student and anti-Nazi political activist, active within the White Rose non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany.[1][2]

She was convicted of high treason after having been found distributing anti-war leaflets at the University of Munich (LMU) with her brother, Hans. As a result, they were both executed by guillotine. Since the 1970s, Scholl has been extensively commemorated for her anti-Nazi resistance work.
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Francis ‘Jeep’ Sanza, General Patton’s Driver During World War II, Has Died At Age 99
The article states that, according to Sanza’s son, Nick, Francis didn’t talk about the war until he was in his ’70s. By then, he had married a woman who had helped build battleships and submarines during the war, and then settled in Napa, had children, and spent time working in an ammunition depot. In 1959, he became a beer distribution driver for Olympia Beer, and later a supervisor in 1975.