Tag: FYI

FYI May 10, 2021

On This Day

1801 – First Barbary War: The Barbary pirates of Tripoli declare war on the United States of America.[13]
The First Barbary War (1801–1805), also known as the Tripolitanian War and the Barbary Coast War, was the first of two Barbary Wars, in which the United States and Sweden fought against the four North African states known collectively as the “Barbary States”. Three of these were autonomous, but nominally provinces of the Ottoman Empire: Tripoli, Algiers, and Tunis. The fourth was the independent Sultanate of Morocco.[5]

The cause of the U.S. participation was pirates from the Barbary States seizing American merchant ships and holding the crews for ransom, demanding the U.S. pay tribute to the Barbary rulers. United States President Thomas Jefferson refused to pay this tribute. Sweden had been at war with the Tripolitans since 1800.[6]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1900 – Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, English-American astronomer and astrophysicist (d. 1979)[82]
Cecilia Helena Payne-Gaposchkin (née Payne; May 10, 1900 – December 7, 1979) was a British-born American astronomer and astrophysicist who proposed in her 1925 doctoral thesis that stars were composed primarily of hydrogen and helium.[1] Her groundbreaking conclusion was initially rejected because it contradicted the scientific wisdom of the time, which held that there were no significant elemental differences between the Sun and Earth. Independent observations eventually proved she was correct.

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FYI

Capital Concerts: PBS’ NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY CONCERT: A NIGHT OF REMEMBRANCE Returns With Performances And Tributes From Washington, D.C. And Around The Country Honoring All Of Our American Heroes
 
 
 
 

By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DLIII): Bill Gates’ Mugshot; This Perfect Little Cottage for Rent in the French Alps; Documenting the toilets of the Alps; What It’s Like To Be Stuck In The Mount Everest Traffic Jam 20,000 Feet Above Sea Level; Rower Women of 15th Century Sweden; Draining and cleaning a Venice canal, 1950s.; This Colourful Village on a Bridge in China; “Colette,” the Oscar-Winning Short Documentary about a French resistance fighter and more ->
 
 
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Oregon Coast Notebook: Coos County
 
 
 
 

BloominThyme: Cure for Ant Bites
 
 
 
 

Marion Owen: 25 years of writing about gardening in Kodiak, Alaska (Column #1300)
 
 
 
 
Maggie from Bliss Blog & Shop and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Publishers Weekly: School Libraries Are the Bedrocks of Freedom
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Jane Friedman: How to Find Compelling Comps for Your Book
 
 
 
 
By Doyle Rice, USA Today: ‘Extraordinary discovery:’ Remains of nine Neanderthals found in Italian cave; they were likely killed and eaten by hyenas
 
 
 
 
By Paula Span, The New York Times: ‘I Need to Know I Tried’ Time-limited trials offer I.C.U. patients and their families a sense of empowerment in the face of low odds.
 
 
 
 
By Ryan Warrender, Product Partnerships Manager, Google Web Creators: Raise the visibility of your Web Stories
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tanbusch, Blog Profiles: Marine Life Blogs
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Anja, Food Talk Daily: Sourdough Life-changing Bread
 
 
By Arlene Erlbach, Taste of Home: Cauliflower Dill Kugel
 
 
By Kelli Foster, The Kitchn: Every Single Summer Salad Recipe You’ll Ever Need
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: How to Make a Dump-and-Go Rice Casserole with Any Ingredients
 
 
Taste of Home: Italian Spaghetti Salad; Judy Garland’s Vegetable Salad; 40 Vegetarian Picnic Salads for Summer and more ->
 
 
By Jessie Sheehan, The Spruce Eats: Cream Cheese Stuffed Chocolate Cookies


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 09, 2021

On This Day

1945 – World War II: The final German Instrument of Surrender is signed at the Soviet headquarters in Berlin-Karlshorst.
The German Instrument of Surrender (German: Bedingungslose Kapitulation der Wehrmacht; Russian: Акт о капитуляции Германии) was the legal document that effected the extinction of Nazi Germany and ended World War II in Europe. The definitive text was signed in Karlshorst, Berlin, on the night of 8 May 1945 by representatives of the three armed services of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW) and the Allied Expeditionary Force together with the Supreme High Command of the Soviet Red Army, with further French and US representatives signing as witnesses. The signing took place 8 May 1945 at 21:20 local time.

An earlier version of the text had been signed in a ceremony in Reims in the early hours of 7 May 1945. In most of Europe, 8 May is celebrated as Victory in Europe Day; 9 May is celebrated as Victory Day in Russia, Belarus, Serbia and Israel.

There were three language versions of the surrender document – Russian, English and German – with the Russian and English versions proclaimed, in the text itself, as the only authoritative ones.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1921 – Sophie Scholl, German activist (d. 1943)
Sophia Magdalena Scholl[a] (9 May 1921 – 22 February 1943) was a German student and anti-Nazi political activist, active within the White Rose non-violent resistance group in Nazi Germany.[1][2]

She was convicted of high treason after having been found distributing anti-war leaflets at the University of Munich (LMU) with her brother, Hans. As a result, she was executed by guillotine. Since the 1970s, Scholl has been extensively commemorated for her anti-Nazi resistance work.

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FYI

The Rural Blog: Eula Hall, one of the best friends the poor in E. Ky. ever had, dies at 93; one of the region’s saints, congressman says
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Carroll Joye: From aircraft mechanic in Vietnam to topflight Flight Instructor
 
 
 
 
Posts from swissmiss for 05/09/2021
 
 
 
 
LoLo Paige: Happy Mothers Day!
ALASKA SPARK will be free in the week leading up to the release of ALASKA INFERNO, May 26-30.
 
 
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Continuing Spring Sun (at least for part of the day)
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Sitka Nature Show #235 – Zach LaPerriere
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Moths and Birds
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Spring Birds (and more)
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Morning Birding
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Totem Park Shorebirds and Waterfowl
 
 
 
 

NPR: NPR At 50: Founding Mothers Reflect On Radio Past And Present
 
 
 
 
King River Life: Aunt Peggy: From Fearful Pup to Love Bug; KCUSD Teacher Spotlight: Kirby Kauk; Murder My Past By Delia C. Pitts: Review/Giveaway/Interview and more ->
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: Keith Haring on creativity and empathy, how hummingbirds hover between science and magic, the mystery of why NYC became “The Big Apple” 100 years ago
 
 
 
 
Craig Medred: The last cowboys
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By babybayrs: DIY Grow Light and Grow Strong Seedlings
 
 

Recipes

Roasty Coffee: How to Make Latte Art: Best Tips for The Perfect Pour
 
 
By Nicole – The Yummy Muffin: Old Bay Candied Bacon
 
 
By tom.santens: Homemade Fizzy Lemonade
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Brazilian Cheese Bread (Pão De Queijo)


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 07 & 08, 2021

On This Day

1946 – Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering (later renamed Sony) is founded.[11]
Sony Group Corporation (ソニーグループ株式会社, Sonī Gurūpu kabushiki gaisha, /ˈsoʊni/ SOH-nee, commonly known as Sony and stylized as SONY) is a Japanese multinational conglomerate corporation headquartered in Kōnan, Minato, Tokyo.[11] The company operates as one of the world’s largest manufacturers of consumer and professional electronic products, the largest video game console company, the second largest video game publisher, the largest record company, as well as one of the most comprehensive media companies,[12][13] being the largest Japanese media conglomerate by size overtaking the privately held, family-owned Yomiuri Shimbun Holdings, the largest Japanese media conglomerate by revenue.

Sony, with its 55 percent market share in the image sensor market, is among the semiconductor sales leaders[14][15] and, as of 2015, the second-largest television manufacturer in the world by annual sales figures. It is the world’s largest player in the premium TV market for a television of at least 55 inches (140 centimeters) with a price higher than $2,500 as well second largest TV brand by market share.[16][17]

Sony Group Corporation is the holding company of the Sony Group (ソニー・グループ, Sonī Gurūpu), which comprises Sony Corporation, Sony Semiconductor Solutions, Sony Pictures, Sony Music, Sony Interactive Entertainment, Sony Financial Holdings, and others.

The company’s slogan is Be Moved. Their former slogans were The One and Only (1979–1982), It’s a Sony (1982–2005), like.no.other (2005–2009)[18] and make.believe (2009–2013).[19]

Sony has a weak tie to the Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group (SMFG) corporate group, the successor to the Mitsui group.[20] Sony is listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange (in which it is a constituent of the Nikkei 225 and TOPIX Core30 indexes) with an additional listing in the form of American depositary receipts listed in the New York Stock Exchange (traded since 1970, making it the oldest Japanese company to be listed in an American exchange), and was ranked 122nd on the 2020 Fortune Global 500 list.[21]

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453 BC – Spring and Autumn period: The house of Zhao defeats the house of Zhi, ending the Battle of Jinyang, a military conflict between the elite families of the State of Jin.
The Spring and Autumn period was a period in Chinese history from approximately 771 to 476 BCE (or according to some authorities until 403 BCE[a])[2] which corresponds roughly to the first half of the Eastern Zhou period. The period’s name derives from the Spring and Autumn Annals, a chronicle of the state of Lu between 722 and 479 BCE, which tradition associates with Confucius (551–479 BCE).

During this period, the Zhou royal authority over the various feudal states eroded as more and more dukes and marquesses obtained de facto regional autonomy, defying the king’s court in Luoyi and waging wars amongst themselves. The gradual Partition of Jin, one of the most powerful states, marked the end of the Spring and Autumn period and the beginning of the Warring States period.

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Born On This Day

1909 – Dorothy Sunrise Lorentino, Native American teacher (d. 2005) [25]
Dorothy Sunrise Lorentino (May 7, 1909 – August 4, 2005) was a Comanche teacher from Oklahoma. As a child, she won a landmark education judgement against the Cache Consolidated School District of Comanche County, Oklahoma for Native American children to attend public schools rather than government mandated Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools. It was a precursor case to both the Alice Piper v. Pine School District (1924) which allowed Native American children to attend school in California and Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which decided separate schooling based on race was unconstitutional. Language from her judgement was incorporated into the Indian Citizenship Act (1924). Having won the right to attend public school, she went on to earn credentials as a special education teacher and taught for over forty years. In 1997, she was the first Native American and the first Oklahoman to be inducted into the National Teachers Hall of Fame.

Read more ->

 
 
1922 – Mary Q. Steele, American naturalist and author (d. 1992)

Mary Quintard Govan Steele (May 8, 1922 – July 6, 1992) was a noted American author and naturalist. She wrote over twenty books: some adult-style, but mostly children’s books. One of her books, Journey Outside, was a Newbery Honor Book. Steele sometimes wrote under the names Wilson Gage and J. N. Darby.

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FYI

By Douglas Jones, 11 Alive: Iconic 1980s music video star and actress Tawny Kitaen dead at 59
 
 
 
 
Leading Blog: Never Say Never: The Importance of Word Choice in Leadership Communication
 
 
 
 
By Nicoletta Lanese, Live Science: First genetically modified mosquitoes released in US
 
 
 
 
Richelle Rada For Pacific Daily News: Understanding the habit of stress eating
 
 
 
 
BBC News: Belgian farmer accidentally moves French border
 
 
 
 
By Pauline Frommer: Which Countries Are the Best—and Worst—for Digital Nomads?
 
 
 
 
Author: Scott Broom, John Henry, 11 Alive: Local hero rescues toddler from Maryland bay after car crash
 
 
 
 
By Mark Wilson, Fast Company: Pepsi Apple Pie and Candy Kraft Mac & Cheese: Why food giants are designing extreme new flavors Pumpkin Spice Kraft Mac & Cheese. Pepsi Peeps (pink). Pepsi Peeps (yellow). Have the food and beverage giants gone mad?
 
 
 
 
Car Culture where you live is?
By Nili Blanck; Photographs by Kristin Bedford, SMITHSONIANMAG.COM: The Vibrant History of Lowrider Car Culture in L.A.
 
 
 
 

Excellent!

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

We left for this road trip on March 6th. Jeb, Jerry, and I load up my 2015 Chevy Silverado and head for Fairbanks Alaska. Stick around to see our adventures, and a jeep rescue!
 
 

Ideas

Everything Pretty: Mermaid Soap, How to Make Whipped Soap from Melt and Pour
 
 
 
 

Recipes

Food Network: Our 50 Most-Saved Recipes Count down through the 50 recipes our fans love most – and then save them in your online recipe box!
 
 
By Rashanda Cobbins, Taste of Home: 60 Easy Dessert Recipes for a Graduation Celebration
 
 
By Molly Yeh, Food Network: Monster Cookie Dough
 
 
By Amy, My Recipe Treasures: Cutlers Frosted Peanut Butter Cookies
 
 
By Intensive Cake Unit, Food Talk Daily: Cake Mix Chocolate Waffle Cake


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 06, 2021

On This Day

1882 – The United States Congress passes the Chinese Exclusion Act.
The Chinese Exclusion Act was a United States federal law signed by President Chester A. Arthur on May 6, 1882, prohibiting all immigration of Chinese laborers. Building on the earlier Page Act of 1875 which banned Chinese women from immigrating to the United States, the Chinese Exclusion Act was the first, and remains the only law to have been implemented, to prevent all members of a specific ethnic or national group from immigrating to the United States.

The act followed the Angell Treaty of 1880, a set of revisions to the U.S.–China Burlingame Treaty of 1868 that allowed the U.S. to suspend Chinese immigration. The act was initially intended to last for 10 years, but was renewed and strengthened in 1892 with the Geary Act and made permanent in 1902. These laws attempted to stop all Chinese immigration into the United States for ten years, with exceptions for diplomats, teachers, students, merchants, and travelers. The laws were widely evaded.[1]

Exclusion was repealed by the Magnuson Act on December 17, 1943, which allowed 105 Chinese to enter per year. Chinese immigration later increased with the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, which abolished direct racial barriers, and later by the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, which abolished the National Origins Formula.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1929 – Rosemary Cramp, English archaeologist and academic
Dame Rosemary Jean Cramp, DBE, FSA, FBA (born 6 May 1929) is a British archaeologist and academic specialising in the Anglo-Saxons. She was the first female professor appointed at Durham University and was Professor of Archaeology from 1971 to 1990. She served as President of the Society of Antiquaries of London from 2001 to 2004.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By AILSA CHANG, HOST, NPR: Ed Ward, Rock Critic And Historian, Dead At 72
 
 
 
 
By Emily Stewart, Vox: Lumber mania is sweeping North America A lumber frenzy has taken over homebuilding, Home Depot, and the internet.
 
 
 
 
By Chris Welch, The Verge: Google will soon switch on two-factor authentication by default
 
 
By Paul Bakaus, Google Web Creators: Three steps for turning a video into a Web Story
 
 
 
 
By TALI ARBEL, APNews: NY: Broadband cos paid for 8.5M fake net neutrality comments
 
 
 
 
Excellent!
The Passive Voice, From Public Books: Spatial Abolition and Disability Justice

James F Brown
May 6, 2021 at 2:37 PM

A smart lady. NEVER count on anybody other than you to provide ANY equipment needed for your presentation. Seen this bite too many speakers in the heinie with no time to fix or do a workaround.
This especially applies to AV and computer equipment.

 
 
 
 
By Bill Murphy Jr. Inc.: Want to Raise Successful Kids? Jeff Bezos Says Practice This 1 Simple Habit. (Science Backs It Up)If you’ve been trained to do the opposite, you’re not alone.
This is a story about Jeff Bezos, raising kids, and maximizing success. If you like it, I think you’ll also enjoy two of my free e-books, How to Raise Successful Kids and Jeff Bezos Regrets Nothing.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
By Dennis Hetzel|, Book Trib: “November 400CP Is Missing” Takes a Wild Ride From Alaska to Sumatra

Harp offers strong credentials to write about these things. As a Marine, he taught arctic survival and mountaineering and was stationed around the globe, including as officer in charge of the Marine’s Crisis Action Team during the invasion of Afghanistan. And, like Will Parker, he’s also a pilot.

Harp combined his life experiences with a master’s degree in fine arts in literary fiction and has participated in USO authors’ tours to hazardous duty locations around the world with other thriller writers such as Brad Metzler and Michael Connelly. Perhaps as a result of his military upbringing, he has a “radical clarity” writing style that becomes an omniscient voice of explanation, somewhat like the late Tom Clancy. It takes some adjustment, but it works fine.
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Cessna A185E Skywagon, N185SZ: Accident occurred May 05, 2020 in Palmer, Alaska
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N215MC: Accident occurred April 03, 2021 in Fairbanks, Alaska
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Richardson and His Highway
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
The rape happened in Alaska.

 
 

 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 

Ideas

By DonnaZ8: Fairy House Log Planter
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Gathered In The Kitchen: 3 Ingredient Cheesy Sausage Breakfast Balls
 
 
By Chocolate Covered Katie: 10 Recipes To Make This Weekend!
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Hack Your Biscuits From Breakfast to Dessert
 
 
By Befferoni and Cheese: How to Make Oreo Muffins
 
 
By Ronna Farley: BIG Chocolate Sandwich Cookie – Cake


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 05, 2021

On This Day

1654 – Cromwell’s Act of Grace, aimed at reconciliation with the Scots, proclaimed in Edinburgh.
Cromwell’s Act of Grace, or more formally the Act of Pardon and Grace to the People of Scotland,[1] was an Act of the Parliament of England that declared that the people of Scotland (with certain exceptions) were pardoned for any crimes they might have committed during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. It was proclaimed at the Mercat Cross in Edinburgh on 5 May 1654. General George Monck, the English military governor of Scotland, was present in Edinburgh, having arrived the day before for two proclamations also delivered at the Mercat Cross, the first declaring Oliver Cromwell to be the protector of England, Ireland and Scotland, and that Scotland was united with the Commonwealth of England.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1883 – Anna Johnson Pell Wheeler, American mathematician (d. 1966)[12]
Anna Johnson Pell Wheeler (May 5, 1883 – March 26, 1966) was an American mathematician. She is best known for early work on linear algebra in infinite dimensions, which has later become a part of functional analysis.[1]

Biography
Anna Johnson was born on May 5, 1883 to Swedish immigrant parents in Hawarden, Iowa in the United States. At the age of nine her family moved to Akron, Iowa and she was enrolled in a private school. In 1903 she graduated from the University of South Dakota and began graduate work at the University of Iowa. Her thesis, titled The extension of Galois theory to linear differential equations, earned her a master’s degree in 1904. She obtained a second graduate degree one year later from Radcliffe College, where she took courses from Maxime Bôcher and William Fogg Osgood.[1][2][3]

In 1905 she won an Alice Freeman Palmer Fellowship from Wellesley College to spend a year at the University of Göttingen, where she studied under David Hilbert, Felix Klein, Hermann Minkowski, and Karl Schwarzschild. As she worked toward a doctorate, her relationship with Alexander Pell, a former professor from the University of South Dakota, intensified. He traveled to Göttingen and they were married in July 1907.[2][3] This trip posed a significant threat to Pell’s life, since he was a former Russian double agent whose real name was Sergey Degayev.[2]

After the wedding, the Pells returned to Vermillion, South Dakota, where she taught classes in the theory of functions and differential equations. By 1908 she was back in Göttingen, working on her dissertation; an argument with Hilbert, however, made its completion impossible. She moved with her husband to Chicago, where she worked with E. H. Moore to finish her dissertation, Biorthogonal Systems of Functions with Applications to the Theory of Integral Equations, and received a Ph.D. in 1909.[2][3][4]

She began looking for a teaching position, but found hostility in every mathematics department. She wrote to a friend: “I had hoped for a position in one of the good univ. like Wisc., Ill. etc., but there is such an objection to women that they prefer a man even if he is inferior both in training and research”.[5] In 1911 her husband suffered a stroke and she, after teaching his classes at the Armout Institute for the remainder of the semester, accepted a position at Mount Holyoke College. She taught there for seven years.[3][5]

In 1917, her last year at Mount Holyoke College, she published (together with R. L. Gordon) a paper regarding Sturm’s theorem.[6] In that they solved a problem that had eluded J. J. Sylvester (1853) and E. B. Van Vleck (1899). That paper (along with their theorem) was forgotten for almost 100 years until it was recently rediscovered.[7]

In 1918 she became an associate professor at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania. Three years later she became the head of the Bryn Mawr mathematics department, and became a full professor in 1925. In the same year she married a colleague named Arthur Wheeler, who soon went to Princeton University. She moved with him, commuting to Bryn Mawr, teaching part-time, and becoming active in Princeton’s mathematics society. In 1927 she became the first woman to present a lecture at the American Mathematical Society Colloquium.[8] After Wheeler died in 1932, she returned to Bryn Mawr and taught full-time.[3][5]

Wheeler was instrumental in bringing German mathematician Emmy Noether to Bryn Mawr in 1933, after the latter’s expulsion from the University of Göttingen by the Nazi government. The two women worked together happily for two years, until Noether died suddenly after an operation in 1935. Wheeler continued teaching at Bryn Mawr until she retired in 1948.[3] She died in 1966 after suffering a stroke.[5] Her doctoral students included Dorothy Maharam and Marion Cameron Gray.

 
 

FYI

By Angel Chernoff, Marc and Angel Hack Life: 21 Tiny Stories For Those Who Have Lost Their Motivation
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Kermit the Frog Gives a TED Talk About Creativity & the Power of “Ridiculous Optimism”
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Watch a New Director’s Cut of Prince’s Blistering “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” Guitar Solo (2004)
 
 By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: The Story of the Rolling Stones: A Selection of Documentaries on the Quintessential Rock-and-Roll Band
 
 
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: Hear the First Japanese Visitor to the United States & Europe Describe Life in the West (1860-1862)
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: How the Internet Archive Has Digitized More than 250,000 78 R.P.M. Records: See the Painstaking Process Up-Close
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: The Isolator: A 1925 Helmet Designed to Eliminate Distractions & Increase Productivity (Created by SciFi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback)
 
 
Open Culture: Magnus Carlsen’s Mind-Blowing Memory of Historic Chess Matches
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Watch 400+ Documentaries from German Broadcaster Deutsche Welle: Art Forgery, Fashion Photography, the Mona Lisa, and More
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Critics Celebrate Two-Lane Blacktop, the 1971 Existential Road-Movie Masterpiece by Monte Hellman (RIP), Starring James Taylor & Dennis Wilson
 
 
Monte Hellman (/ˈmɒnti/; born Monte Jay Himmelbaum;[2] July 12, 1929 – April 20, 2021) was an American film director, producer, writer, and editor. Hellman began his career as an editor’s apprentice at ABC TV, and made his directorial debut with the horror film Beast from Haunted Cave (1959), produced by Roger Corman.

He would later gain critical recognition for the Westerns The Shooting and Ride in the Whirlwind (both 1966) starring Jack Nicholson, and the independent road movie Two-Lane Blacktop (1971) starring James Taylor and Dennis Wilson. His later directorial work included the 1989 slasher film Silent Night, Deadly Night 3: Better Watch Out! and the independent thriller Road to Nowhere (2010).

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Eat Your Words from Edible Alaska: #6: Are you being beef-baited?
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
By Marmee Rooke, Tatum Report: Teacher ‘Reminds’ Cop That He Will Never Be White
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: How to Make a Sheet-Pan Dinner with Any Ingredients
 
 
Taste of Home: Tacorrific recipes!


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 04, 2021

On This Day

1919 – May Fourth Movement: Student demonstrations take place in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China, protesting the Treaty of Versailles, which transferred Chinese territory to Japan.
The May Fourth Movement was a Chinese anti-imperialist, cultural, and political movement which grew out of student protests in Beijing on 4 May 1919.

In retaliation to the Chinese government’s weak response to the Treaty of Versailles, students protested against the government’s decision to allow Japan to retain territories in Shandong that had been surrendered by Germany after the Siege of Tsingtao in 1914. The demonstrations sparked nation-wide protests and spurred an upsurge in Chinese nationalism, a shift towards political mobilization, a shift away from cultural activities, a move towards a populist base and a move away from traditional intellectual and political elites.

The May Fourth Movement was an anti-feudal movement in the form of an interweaving of new and old ideas, and was carried out step by step, not overnight. As Wesleyan University professor Vera Schwarcz, said: “At the beginning of the May Fourth Movement, self-styled ‘new youths’ still saw themselves in terms of a traditional modal”.[1] Many radical, political, and social leaders of the next five decades emerged at this time. In a broader sense, the term “May Fourth Movement” is sometimes used to refer to the period during 1915–1921 more often called the “New Culture Movement”.

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Born On This Day

1916 – Jane Jacobs, American-Canadian journalist, author, and activist (d. 2006)
Jane Jacobs OC OOnt (née Butzner; May 4, 1916 – April 25, 2006) was an American-Canadian journalist, author, theorist, and activist who influenced urban studies, sociology, and economics. Her book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), argued that “urban renewal” and “slum clearance” did not respect the needs of city-dwellers.[2][3]

Jacobs organized grassroots efforts to protect neighborhoods from “urban renewal” and “slum clearance”, in particular, plans by Robert Moses to overhaul her own Greenwich Village neighborhood. She was instrumental in the eventual cancellation of the Lower Manhattan Expressway,[4] which would have passed directly through an area of Manhattan that later became known as SoHo, as well as part of Little Italy and Chinatown.[5] She was arrested in 1968 for inciting a crowd at a public hearing on that project.[6] After moving to Toronto in 1968, she joined the opposition to the Spadina Expressway and the associated network of expressways in Toronto that were planned and under construction.[7][8]

As a woman and a writer who criticized experts in the male-dominated field of urban planning,[9][10] Jacobs endured scorn from established figures.[who?] Routinely, she was described first as a housewife,[11] as she did not have a college degree or any formal training in urban planning; as a result, her lack of credentials was seized upon as grounds for criticism,[12][13] however, the influence of her concepts eventually was acknowledged by highly respected professionals.[citation needed]

Read more ->

 
 
1916 – Richard Proenneke, American soldier, carpenter, and meteorologist (d. 2003)
Richard Louis Proenneke (/ˈprɛnəkiː/; May 4, 1916 – April 20, 2003) was an American self-educated naturalist, conservationist, writer, and wildlife photographer who, from the age of about 53, lived alone for nearly thirty years (1969–1999) in the mountains of Alaska in a log cabin that he constructed by hand near the shore of Twin Lakes. Proenneke hunted, fished, raised and gathered his own food, and also had supplies flown in occasionally. He documented his activities in journals and on film, and also recorded valuable meteorological and natural data.[1][2] The journals and film were later used by others to write books and produce documentaries about his time in the wilderness.

Proenneke bequeathed his cabin to the National Park Service upon his death and it was included in the National Register of Historic Places four years later. The cabin is a popular attraction of Lake Clark National Park.

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FYI

ILSR’s Community Broadband Initiative: Recently in Community Networks… Week of 5/03; Christopher Mitchell Talks About How Cities Can Expand Internet Access on The Broadband Bunch Podcast; Watch Connect This! Episode 10 – How Communities Can Prepare for Broadband Funding in the American Rescue Plan and more ->
 
 
 
 

Limecello: Guest Review: Gilded Age Cocktails: History, Lore and Recipes from America’s Golden Age by Cecelia Tichi
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: How personal ads helped conquer the Wild West; The Institute of Illegal Images; Glass Eel Survival and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Deep, dark apples with notes of cherry, cinnamon, & vanilla; A home for the last purebred Ligurian bees and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Francesca Street, CNN: Mystery of 60-year-old Alaska tourist photos is solved
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By JohnW539: Micro Farming: Growing Wheat in Your Backyard
 
 

Recipes

By curryandvanilla: Cheesy Bread Bondas
 
 
By Crystal from Crumb-Snatched, Food Talk Daily: Creamy Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes
 
 
By Everyday Edits, Food Talk Daily: One-Pot Mexican Spaghetti
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 35 Dinners That Make Mom Feel Special All Day


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 03, 2021

On This Day

1481 – The largest of three earthquakes strikes the island of Rhodes and causes an estimated 30,000 casualties.
The 1481 Rhodes earthquake occurred at 3:00 in the morning on 3 May. It triggered a small tsunami, which caused local flooding. There were an estimated 30,000 casualties. It was the largest of a series of earthquakes that affected Rhodes, starting on 15 March 1481, continuing until January 1482.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1632 – Catherine of St. Augustine, French-Canadian nurse and saint, founded the Hôtel-Dieu de Québec (d. 1668)
Mary Catherine of St. Augustine, OSA, (French: Marie-Catherine de Saint-Augustin) (3 May 1632 – 8 May 1668) was a French canoness regular who was instrumental in the development of the Hôtel-Dieu de Québec in service to the colony of New France. She has been beatified by the Catholic Church.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DLII): This used to be the richest silver mine in the world; Bishop’s Castle (built by one guy); Inside a Custom 1920s Rolls-Royce Phantom; Indohyus – the earliest known ancestor of the whale and more ->
 
 
 
 
exutopia: Hero of Chernobyl: An Interview with Alexei Ananenko
 
 
exutopia: Landscapes of Armenia
 
 
 
 
By Celina Anton, Beyond Bylines, Blogs We Love: Blog Profiles: Mommy Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Loralyn Mears PhD, Grit Daily News: Like a boss podcast This Veteran Knows a Thing or Two About Grit
 
 
 
 
Hugh’s Views & News: Did You Miss Any Of These? Monthly Round-Up – April 2021
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Largest firefighting plane may be sold for COVID-19 response
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Medium: Why IQ Determines Everything in Your Life (the Sad Truth)
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Publishers Weekly: The Synergy Between Bookselling and Writing
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Chocolate Covered Katie: Vegan Alfredo Sauce
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Mother’s Day Breakfast in Bed Ideas
 
 
By Hayley Breshears, Food Talk Daily: Roasted Cabbage Steaks With Dijon Sauce
 
 
By Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Authentic Carnitas Michoacanas
 
 
By Sara Tane, The Kitchn: I Tried the Winner of Trader Joe’s Grilled Cheese Contest (There Were 1,700 Submissions)


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 02, 2021

On This Day

1876 – The April Uprising breaks out in Ottoman Bulgaria.
The April Uprising (Bulgarian: Априлско въстание, Aprilsko vǎstanie), called the Bulgarian Horrors or Bulgarian atrocities in Britain, was an insurrection organised by the Bulgarians in the Ottoman Empire from April to May 1876, which was brutally suppressed. It indirectly resulted in the re-establishment of Bulgaria in 1878.[2] The regular Ottoman Army and irregular bashi-bazouk units brutally suppressed the rebels, resulting in a public outcry in Europe, with many famous intellectuals condemning the atrocities by the Ottomans and supporting the oppressed Bulgarian population.

The 1876 uprising involved only those parts of the Ottoman territories populated predominantly by Bulgarians. The emergence of Bulgarian national sentiments was closely related to the re-establishment of the independent Bulgarian Orthodox Church in 1870.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1882 – Isabel González, Puerto Rican activist who helped pave the way for Puerto Ricans’ American citizenship (d. 1971)
Isabel González (May 2, 1882 – June 11, 1971)[1] was a Puerto Rican activist who helped pave the way for Puerto Ricans to be given United States citizenship. As a young unwed pregnant woman, González had her plans to find and marry the father of her unborn child derailed by the United States Treasury Department when she was excluded as an alien “likely to become a public charge” upon her arrival in New York City. González challenged the Government of the United States in the groundbreaking case Gonzales v. Williams (192 U.S. 1 (1904)). Officially the case was known as Isabella Gonzales, Appellant, v. William Williams, United States Commissioner of Immigration at the Port of New York No. 225, argued December 4, 7, 1903, and decided January 4, 1904. Her case was an appeal from the Circuit Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York, filed February 27, 1903, after also having her Writ of Habeas Corpus (HC. 1-187) dismissed. Her Supreme Court case is the first time that the Court confronted the citizenship status of inhabitants of territories acquired by the United States. González actively pursued the cause of U.S. citizenship for all Puerto Ricans by writing letters published in The New York Times.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Nate Berg, Fast Company: ‘Home Depot architecture’: How one developer is turning farm storage into sleek apartments In Detroit, one developer has turned Quonset huts—better known for their use on farms and military bases—into affordable, efficient housing.
 
 
By Mark Wilson, Fast Company: Apple AirTags could enable domestic abuse in terrifying ways AirTags are powerful surveillance technology. And the National Network to End Domestic Violence believes Apple has more work to do to fix them.
 
 
By Michael Grothaus, Fast Company: How Apple designed AirTags to be privacy-first and stalker-proof AirTag users, owners of other Apple devices, and even people who don’t own a single Apple product—the company wants its new tracker to respect everybody’s privacy.
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Grievous Error–Mine
 
 
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience, The William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge: Finley NWR Notebook: April 2021
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Niagara Gazette: Time for a woman’s view with Miss Ann Powell
Moving along to 1789 and a trip involving a Miss Ann Powell. Her journal is a graphic description of the difficulties and inconvenience of travel in her day. I found it interesting enough to select some her writings, as they were found to be of great value historically, not only for the light which it throws upon the general state of the country, about Niagara and for the description of the Falls, but for the information which it contains relative to the Indians whom Miss Powell was so fortunate as to see in council assembled on the present site of Buffalo and for evidence as to conditions on the Niagara frontier just after the Revolution.
Read more ->
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Writers Helping Writers: Relationship Thesaurus Entry: In-laws
 
 
Nuance of sarcasm…
The Passive Voice, From Writer Unboxed: The Seven Habits of Successful Writers
 
 
 
 
Dave’s True Stories (Dave Grohl): Bonebrake
Upon returning home to my mother’s little house in Springfield, Virginia after Nirvana’s 1992 world tour, I followed my usual homecoming routine of dumping my entire suitcase full of soiled clothes into her old washing machine in the garage, rooting through her fridge full of delicious, comfort-food leftovers like a raccoon in a dumpster, and sitting down to months and months’ of mail that had been sent to her address for me while I was away. This was the house that I grew up in, after all, so my mother’s mailbox was always the best bet if you wanted to…

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By Shoaib Mehedi, devgenious: As a tech guy, you will thank me for these websites Every day we do some technical things that we can fully handover to these websites
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Landing Area Undershoot: de Havilland DHC-2T, N456SF; accident occurred May 03, 2019 in McCarthy, Alaska
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Angered by dust cloud, soccer fans prevent helicopter ambulance from landing
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: Love and symmetry, David Whyte on poetry and silence, the woman who saved the hawks and catalyzed conservation
 
 
 
 
By Jay Wallis, 11Alive: VERIFY: Yes, the Blue Cross Blue Shield settlement is real Blue Cross Blue Shield reached a $2.67 billion settlement in a class-action antitrust lawsuit in October 2020.
 
 
 
 
JOAN REEVES aka SlingWords: Need an Attitude Adjustment? Try These 5 Videos
 
 
 
 
Swiss Miss: GIF Art by Romain Laurent
 
 
Swiss Miss: Glowing Geometric Light Paintings
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By seamster: Backyard Guardian: Steel Drum Fire Pit
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By PieBaby89: Creamy Cheese Nuggets
 
 
By ElisesEats: Delicious Cheesy Garlic Bread
 
 
By Exzerin: How to Make Labneh (Yogurt Cheese)
 
 
Food Network Recipes: Our Very Best Rhubarb Recipes
 
 
By Diana Rattray, The Spruce Eats: Southern Tuna Salad for Sandwiches
 
 
Taste of Home: Stir-Fry Chicken Lo Mein
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Budget-Friendly Mexican Dinners
 
 
By Patty Catalano, The Kitchn: I Tried the Glossy Fudge Brownies Reddit Is Obsessed With. Spoiler Alert: They’re Perfect.


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI May 01, 2021

On This Day

880 – The Nea Ekklesia is inaugurated in Constantinople, setting the model for all later cross-in-square Orthodox churches.
The Nea Ekklēsia (Greek: Νέα Ἐκκλησία, “New Church”; known in English as “The Nea”) was a church built by Byzantine Emperor Basil I the Macedonian in Constantinople between 876 and 880. It was the first monumental church built in the Byzantine capital after the Hagia Sophia in the 6th century, and marks the beginning of the middle period of Byzantine architecture. It continued in use until the Palaiologan period. Used as a gunpowder magazine by the Ottomans, the building was destroyed in 1490 after being struck by lightning.

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Born On This Day

1864 – Anna Jarvis, American founder of Mother’s Day (d. 1948)[16]
Anna Maria Jarvis (May 1, 1864 – November 24, 1948) was the founder of Mother’s Day in the United States. Her mother had frequently expressed a desire for the establishment of such a holiday, and after her mother’s death, Jarvis led the movement for the commemoration. However, as the years passed, Jarvis grew disenchanted with the growing commercialization of the observation (she herself did not profit from the day) and even attempted to have Mother’s Day rescinded. She died in a sanitarium, her medical bills paid by people in the floral and greeting card industries.

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FYI

 
 

By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Low Tide at Totem Park
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Rainy Day Walks at Totem Park
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Spring Birds on a Record Setting Warm Day
 
 
By Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Sunny Spring Day Outings
 
 
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Return of Bird of the Week: Andean Flicker
 
 
 
 
Paranormal Romantics: Festivals & World Building by Diane Burton
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Literary Hub: The Long Road to Publication
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From CrimeReads, the Mystery Writers of America nominees for the 75th annual Edgar Awards discuss the state of crime fiction in 2021: The State of the Crime Novel in 2021: Writing During the Pandemic
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Why apple farmers in Italy are coating their orchards in ice; A historic Boston dessert recipe that’s big in Japan; When soldiers pick a new name for meat on bread and more ->
 
 
 
 

Where does this door lead to, or what is behind it?

Zillow Anchorage: 4101 Galactica Dr, Anchorage, AK 99517

 
 
 
 
The Blonde Abroad: The Ultimate Land Rover Defender Camping Setup
 
 
 
 
A Cup of Jo: Have a Lovely Weekend.
 
 
 
 
The Guardian: ‘It was so gripping I read it in two sittings’: 11 books to pull you out of a reading rut
 
 
 
 
By Todd Furniss, Grit Daily: Spending More on Primary Care Doctors is Key to Cutting Healthcare Costs
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

Everything Pretty: How to Make Pillow Mist For Sleep
 
 

Recipes

By SuperMom Shuffle: Easy One-Pot Cheesy Meat Bake
 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Southwestern Chicken and Rice
 
 
Taste of Home: 30-Minute Mexican Dinners and more ->
 
 
By Grace Elkus, The Kitchn: I Tried the DoubleTree Signature Cookie Recipe
 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Cheesecake Brownie Cupcakes with Frosting
 
 
By Sara’s Tiny Kitchen: Peanut Butter Chocolate Marshmallow Cups


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI April 30, 2021

On This Day

1812 – The Territory of Orleans becomes the 18th U.S. state under the name Louisiana.
The Territory of Orleans or Orleans Territory was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from October 1, 1804,[1] until April 30, 1812,[2] when it was admitted to the Union as the State of Louisiana.


Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1866 – Mary Haviland Stilwell Kuesel, American pioneer dentist (d. 1936)
Mary Haviland Stilwell Kuesel sometimes spelled Stillwell-Kuesel (April 30, 1866 – June 22, 1936) was a pioneer American dentist.[1] She was the founder of the Women’s Dental Association of the United States, which she founded in 1892 with 12 charter members.[2]

Biography
Mary Haviland Stilwell was born April 30, 1866 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1892, she founded the Women’s Dental Association of the U.S. with 12 charter members.[2][3][4]

In 1902, she married Dr. George C. Kuesel,[5] a medical doctor.[6] They were associate members of the Fairmount Park Art Association.[7] She died June 22, 1936 in Philadelphia of coronary thrombosis.[5] Her correspondence is held in a collection by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.[8]

 
 

FYI

Fireside Books: presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Friday, April 30, 2021
 
 
 
 
Rasmuson Foundation: Foundation announces senior fellow, IT manager
 
 
 
 
KTOO The Signal: This week from The Signal
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Talking About the Pandemic
 
 
The Passive Voice, From SF Crowsnest: Taskforce set up to tackle Disney’s attempts to weasel out of paying its genre authors
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Nerves of Steel!: Watch People Climb Tall Buildings During the 1920s.
 
 
 
 
Ray Flynt: Welcoming New Subscribers
 
 
 
 
By: Canadian Press, Alaska Highway News: Jason Matthews, author of ‘Red Sparrow’ thrillers, dies
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: McGee, Sam McGee, and the 18th Engineers
 
 
 
 

NSFW

 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: The 10 Most Popular Recipes of April 2021
 
 
Rebecca at Soap Deli News Blog: Mango Strawberry Fruit Popsicles: Healthy Frozen Treats for Summer; Healthy Zucchini Egg Cups Recipe: Low Carb Breakfast Idea and more ->
 
 
By Mary @ Home is Where the Boat Is: Cinco De Mayo Margarita Cookies + Ice Cream Sandwiches


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?