Quotes December 20, 2019

“I knew the United States was in the war, up to the neck and in to the death. I went to bed and slept the sleep of the saved and thankful.”
Winston Churchill, 1941
 
 
 
 
“I hear a lot of crap about what a glorious thing it is to die for your country. It isn’t glorious—it’s stupid! You don’t go into battle to die for your country. You go into battle to make the other bastard die for his country.”
General George S. Patton, Jr., speaking to troops in 1941
 
 
 
 
“There is Jackson standing like a stone wall. Let us determine to die here, and we will conquer.”
Brigadier General Barnard Elliott Bee, Bull Run, 1861
 
 
 
 
“I have just read your dispatch about sore-tongued and fatigued horses. Will you pardon me for asking what the horses of yours have done since the Battle of Antietam that fatigue anything?”
Abraham Lincoln, telegram in frustration to General McClellan, 1862
 
 
 
 
“Lafayette, we are here.”
Colonel Charles E. Stanton, at the tomb of Lafayette in Paris, July 4, 1917, referring to the arrival of the American Expeditionary Forces
 
 
 
 
“The time is now at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own…The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of brave resistance, or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or die.”
President George Washington, July 2, 1776, Writings Of George Washington
 
 
 
 
“Stand your ground. Don’t fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!”
Capt. John Parker to his 77 Minutemen at Lexington, Massachusetts, April 19, 1775
 
 
 
 
“Don’t fire until you see the whites of their eyes.”
William Prescott, Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775
 
 
 
 
By the rude bridge that arched the flood,
Their flag to April’s breeze unfurled,
Here once the embattled farmers stood
And fired the shot heard round the world.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Concord Hymn” (1837)