Category: FYI

FYI

FYI June 20, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
2003 – The Wikimedia Foundation is founded in St. Petersburg, Florida.

The Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. (WMF, or simply Wikimedia) is an American non-profit and charitable organization headquartered in San Francisco, California.[6] It is mostly known for participating in the Wikimedia movement. It owns the internet domain names of most movement projects and hosts sites like Wikipedia. The foundation was founded in 2003 by Jimmy Wales as a way to fund Wikipedia and its sister projects through non-profit means.[7][8]

As of 2015, the foundation employs over 280 people, with annual revenues in excess of US$75 million.[9] Christophe Henner is chair of the board.[10] Katherine Maher is the executive director since March 2016.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1899 – Jean Moulin, French soldier and engineer (d. 1943)
Jean Moulin (20 June 1899 – 8 July 1943) was a high-profile member of the Resistance in France during World War II.[1] He is remembered today as an important symbol of the Resistance, owing mainly to his role in unifying the French resistance under Charles de Gaulle and his death while in Gestapo custody.

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FYI

 
 

If one is wealthy and famous how much help will it be for their survivors (family or business) to donate money to suicide prevention programs? Where should these funds go and how should they be disbursed/earmarked? These funds are to the programs, not management.
By Hazel Cills: Kate Spade New York Pledges $1 Million to Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Organizations
 
 
 
 
By Stef Schrader: ‘No One Except Sweet Baby Jesus’ Could Stop Dad From Pulling His Son Out Of A Burning Race Car

 
 
 
 
By Brian Kahn: You Need These Award-Winning Nature Photos Right Now (The Nature Conservancy)
 
 
 
 

Open Culture Josh Jnoes: The French Village Designed to Promote the Well-Being of Alzheimer’s Patients: A Visual Introduction to the Pioneering Experiment


 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Many rural cemeteries are abandoned; who will tend them?
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Small daily in Ohio helps force resignation of the mayor
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Milestones: The United States Patent and Trademark Office Issues Patent Number 10,000,000
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Research Tools: Online Version of “Mississippi Encyclopedia” Now Available (Free to Access)
 
 
 
 

Suspense Radio Online Radio by Suspense Radio
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: FROM THE ARCHIVE | Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives
 
 
 
 
By Sean Captain: The U.S. is opening prime urban sky to commercial drones
 
 
 
 
By JG Pasterjak: 5 Unique Ford-Powered Cars
 
 
 
 
By Robert Bowen: Midlife Crisis: Forget Exotics, A Subaru Can Scratch That Itch
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: The Mazda RX-7 Turns 40 And Remains A Sports Car Legend
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Amanda C, Hometalk Team Hometalker Brooklyn, NY: William Sonoma Knockoff Vertical Herb Garden
 
 
 
 
Jim Cox Tutorial Team Springfield, MO: Micro-mini Greenhouse Planter
 
 
 
 
By Rebecca Dunkle Hometalker: $3 Front Door Update
 
 
 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #92)
 
 
 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Talk Of The Town Party 128
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI June 19, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1953 – Cold War: Julius and Ethel Rosenberg are executed at Sing Sing, in New York.

Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were United States citizens who spied for the Soviet Union and were tried, convicted, and executed by the United States government. They provided top-secret information about radar, sonar, and jet propulsion engines to the USSR and were accused of transmitting nuclear weapon designs to the Soviet Union; at that time the United States was the only country with nuclear weapons.[1][2][3]

Other convicted co-conspirators were imprisoned, including Ethel’s brother, David Greenglass, who supplied documents from Los Alamos to Julius and who served 10 years of a 15-year sentence; Harry Gold, who identified Greenglass and served 15 years in federal prison as the courier for Greenglass. Klaus Fuchs, a German scientist working in Los Alamos and handled by Gold, provided vastly more important information to the Soviets. He was convicted in Great Britain and served nine years and four months in prison.[4][5]

For decades, the Rosenbergs’ sons Michael and Robert Meeropol and many other defenders maintained that Julius and Ethel were innocent of spying on their country and victims of Cold War paranoia. After the fall of the Soviet Union, much information concerning them was declassified, including a trove of decoded Soviet cables, code-named VENONA, which detailed Julius’s role as a courier and recruiter for the Soviets and Ethel’s role as an accessory. Their sons’ current position is that Julius was legally guilty of the conspiracy charge, though not of atomic spying, while Ethel was only generally aware of his activities. The children say that their father did not deserve the death penalty and that their mother was wrongly convicted. They continue to campaign for Ethel to be posthumously and legally exonerated.[6]

In 2014, five historians who had published on the Rosenberg case wrote that Soviet documents show that Ethel Rosenberg “hid money and espionage paraphernalia for Julius, served as an intermediary for communications with his Soviet intelligence contacts, provided her personal evaluation of individuals Julius considered recruiting, and was present at meetings with his sources.” They also demonstrate that Julius reported to the KGB that Ethel persuaded Ruth Greenglass to travel to New Mexico to recruit David as a spy.[3]

There is a consensus among historians that Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were guilty, but their trial was marred by clear judicial and legal improprieties and they should not have been executed.[1][7] Distilling this consensus, Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz wrote that the Rosenbergs were “guilty – and framed.”[8][9]

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Born On This Day

1816 – William H. Webb, American shipbuilder and philanthropist, founded the Webb Institute (d. 1899)
William Henry Webb (19 June 1816 – 30 October 1899) was a 19th-century New York shipbuilder and philanthropist, who has been called America’s first true naval architect.

Webb inherited his father’s shipyard, Webb & Allen, in 1840, renamed it William H. Webb, and turned it into America’s most prolific shipyard, building 133 vessels between 1840 and 1865. Webb designed some of the fastest and most successful sailing packets and clipper ships ever built, and he also built some of the largest and most celebrated steamboats and steamships of his era, including the giant ironclad USS Dunderberg, in its day the world’s longest wooden-hulled ship.

After the American Civil War, the U.S. shipbuilding industry experienced a prolonged slump, and Webb, having already made a considerable fortune, decided to close his shipyard and turn his energies toward philanthropic goals. He chaired an anti-corruption council, became a founding member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, and established the Webb Academy and Home for Shipbuilders, which today is known as the Webb Institute.

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FYI

 
 
By Barry Petchesky: Umpire Dutch Rennert Has Died, But His Strikeout Call Is Probably Still Echoing
 
 
 
 
By Mark Hogan: Diplomatic Immunity Won’t Save You From Parking Tickets In New York
 
 
 
 
By Nick Martin: Sweaty Softball Parents Try To Brawl, Roll Around For A Bit, Ruin Daughters’ Weekend
 
 
 
 

By Jake Buehler: Giant Clam Shells May Help Predict Future Tropical Storms
 
 
 
 
Colossal: A knitting machine, woven bamboo, and a dachshund bench.
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Travis McDade -> New Librarian-Authored Book Recounts Pillaging Of Rare Illustrations From University Libraries
 
 
 
 
Official YouTube Blog: YouTube Music and YouTube Premium launch in 17 countries: It’s all here
 
 
 
 

The Verdict on Cook County Court Sentencing Data, Part 2
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tanbusch: Blog Profiles: Video Game Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Speaking of rural broadband…
Here’s an ironic update on an item we reported recently:

The Farm Foundation, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and several other organizations have created a series of listening sessions on how to improve rural broadband. Today’s is being held at the Rice County Fairgrounds in Faribault, Minn., and the Farm Foundation promised a live webcast of the session would be available.

However, we’ve just received an email saying that they had discovered that low internet speed in the Faribault area will make a live stream impossible. The Farm Foundation’s Vice President of Communication, Mary Thompson, wrote in the email: “We regret that we are not able to share the live session with you. This complication does, however, emphasize the need to improve broadband connectivity in rural America.”

Click here
to see a video of the session afterward.
 
 
 
 

By Al Cross: Americans have a slippery grasp of fact and opinion, and that’s not all their fault. News outlets should self-examine.
 
 
 
 
Scandalicious: Guest Post: The Challenge of Strong Female Characters by Beth Woodward
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: How a 19th-century biologist became an underwater photography pioneer, A New Accent in Kansas, Why Cities Are Full of Squirrels and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura Anne Ewbank: During the Great Depression, ‘Penny Restaurants’ Fed the Unemployed
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By clang60: Unicorn Hobby Horse
 
 
 
 
Natural Living Ideas Hometalker: Essential Oil Gel Air Fresheners
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By randofo: Key Lime Pie Ice Cream


 
 

 
 

FYI June 18, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1900 – Empress Dowager Cixi of China orders all foreigners killed, including foreign diplomats and their families.
Empress Dowager Cixi1 (Chinese: 慈禧太后; pinyin: Cíxǐ Tàihòu; Manchu: Tsysi taiheo; 29 November 1835 – 15 November 1908), of the Manchu Yehenara clan, was a Chinese empress dowager and regent who effectively controlled the Chinese government in the late Qing dynasty for 47 years from 1861 until her death in 1908.

Selected as an imperial concubine of the Xianfeng Emperor in her adolescence, she gave birth to a son, Zaichun, in 1856. After the Xianfeng Emperor’s death in 1861, the young boy became the Tongzhi Emperor, and she became the Empress Dowager. Cixi ousted a group of regents appointed by the late emperor and assumed regency, which she shared with Empress Dowager Ci’an. Cixi then consolidated control over the dynasty when she installed her nephew as the Guangxu Emperor at the death of the Tongzhi Emperor in 1875, contrary to the traditional rules of succession of the Qing dynasty that had ruled China since 1644.

Although Cixi refused to adopt Western models of government, she supported technological and military reforms and the Self-Strengthening Movement. She agreed with the principles of the Hundred Days’ Reforms of 1898, but feared that sudden implementation, without bureaucratic support, would be disruptive and that the Japanese and other foreign powers would take advantage of any weakness. She placed the Guangxu Emperor, who she thought had tried assassinate her, under virtual house arrest for supporting radical reformers. After the Boxer Uprising led to invasion by Allied armies, Cixi initially backed the Boxer groups as defenders of the dynasty and declared war on all the invaders. The ensuing defeat was a stunning humiliation. When Cixi returned to Beijing from Xi’an, where she had taken the emperor, she became friendly to foreigners in the capital and began to implement fiscal and institutional reforms that began to turn China into a constitutional monarchy. The death of both Cixi and the Guangxu Emperor in 1908 left the court in the hands of Manchu conservatives, a child, Puyi, on the throne, and a restless, rebellious public.

Historians both in China and abroad have debated her reputation. The long time view portrayed her as a ruthless despot whose reactionary policies led to the fall of the Qing dynasty. Revisionists suggested that reformers and revolutionaries succeeded in blaming her for long term problems beyond her control and that she prevented political disorder, was no more ruthless than other rulers of her time, and that she was an effective reformer in the last years of her life.[1]

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Born On This Day

1900 – Vlasta Vraz, Czech-American relief worker, editor, and fundraiser (d. 1989)
Vlasta Adele Vraz (June 18, 1900 — August 22, 1989) was a Czech American relief worker, editor, and fundraiser. She was director of American Relief for Czechoslovakia, and president of the Czechoslovak National Council of America. In 1949 she was arrested by Czech authorities on espionage charges, but quickly released after pressure from the United States.

Early life
Vlasta Adele Vraz was born in Chicago and raised in Czech California, South Lawndale, Chicago. Her father was Enrique Stanko Vraz (1860-1932), a naturalist and explorer born in Bulgaria to Czech parents.[1] Her mother was also called Vlasta Vraz (1875-1961).[2] Her maternal grandfather August Geringer (1842-1930) published a Czech-language Daily, Svornost, in the United States, starting in 1875.[3]

Career
She lived in Prague as a young woman, from 1919 to 1939, at first helping her father who was lecturing there before he died in 1932. During World War II she returned to the United States with her widowed mother, and was a secretary in Washington, D. C. for the Czech government in exile. In 1945, she was back in Prague, directing American Relief for Czechoslovakia.[4] She was responsible for distributing $4 million in food, medicine, clothing and other supports. She was inducted into the Order of the White Lion by Jan Masaryk in 1946, for her relief work. But in 1949, Vraz was arrested by the Communist authorities, on espionage charges, sparking protests from the United States.[5]

Upon release after a week in custody,[6] Vraz returned to the United States,[7] where she became president of the Czechoslovak National Council of America, and edited two national publications for the Czechoslovak-American community.[3] She was called upon for reactions during the 1968 Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia.[8]

Personal life
Vlasta Vraz died in 1989, aged 89 years.[3] Her remains were buried in the Bohemian National Cemetery in Chicago, near those of her mother and her brother, Victor E. Vraz, an economics professor at Northwestern University. Some of her papers are in the Geringer Family Papers, archived at the Chicago History Museum.[9] The rest of her papers was bequeathed to the Náprstek Museum in Prague, Czech Republic. The same institution owns extensive personal papers of her father Enrique Stanko Vráz.

 
 
 
 

FYI

Google Analytics: Measure Matters: A New Video Series to Keep You Up to Date on Your Data
 
 
 
 

By Geoffrey A. Fowler: Hands off my data! 15 more default privacy settings you should change on your TV, cellphone plan, LinkedIn and more.
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Research Tools: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Releases Updated National Levee Database
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: So You Admire Your Neighbour’s House? Best Not to Copy the Design, Among the writers of all ages, The Bats Help Preserve Old Books But They Drive Librarians, Well, Batty, ‘Ruling Through Ritual’: An Interview with Guo Yuhua, Carnegie medal winner slams children’s book publishers for ‘accessible’ prose, Amazon KDP Print or CreateSpace for Paperbacks? 2018 Update
 
 
 
 

Design Luck Community

Hi there,

Thank you for taking the time to join me.

Let’s get into it.

….

Here is the new article of the week:

The Best Way to Understand Reality – It’s rumored that Nikola Tesla could envision his complex inventions in his mind and then recreate them exactly as he predicted without any drawings to guide him and any mistakes to derail him. In this piece, I talk about what I think is the most effective way to interact with the world (Pocket).

Here is another piece that I wrote:

The Most Important Skill Nobody Taught You – It’s solitude; the art of being alone. A few thoughts here about the perils of connection and why most of us aren’t quite addicted to specific things but more so to a state of anti-boredom (Pocket).

A quote that I’ve been pondering:

“I’m a human being who remained independent, resisted conditioning, never belonged to any religion, political party, organization, nation, race. I’ve been myself, without any adjective. That has given me integrity, individuality, authenticity, and the bliss of fulfillment.” – Osho

A book that I’ve been enjoying:

Models of My Life – This is the autobiography of Herbert Simon, a polymath who made contributions to psychology, artificial intelligence, and information science. Oh, and he also won the Nobel Prize in Economics on the side. A forewarning – the book is fairly expensive. It’s also a little long at times, and not for everyone, but I liked it.

An idea that I’ve been playing with:

Memes (or ideas) survive and replicate in culture just like genes do in bodies; the effective endure. If something has beat the test of time and you can’t see its value, it’s more likely that you are wrong and don’t understand what is at play than the thing in question being useless. The wisdom of nature almost always prevails.

An interesting question to think about:

If you had to live this life again and again for eternity, would you be happy with that?

….

As always, thoughts and criticisms are more than welcome, too. Press reply.

Talk soon,

Zat Rana

More by Design Luck

Library: Browse articles and essays on ideas, lessons, and humanity.
 
 

Book List: Our research on the best overall reads in 10 different subjects.

 
 
Make Me Think: Collection of thoughts that aim to provoke reflection.

————————–

P.S. – If you were forwarded this email, feel free to join the Reader Community.
 
 
 
 

I have to admit – it’s always been a dream. Not to have a “…mobile command center with a controlled environmental room…”, like the 1972 International Harvester…


By Garr Larson: Preppers Paradise: 1972 IH 1710 Rolling Lab
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Bugs in your eats?
Erin@UpcycledUgly Hometalker Mc Kinney, TX: Mostly Pallet Wood Farmhouse Table With Gutter Succulent Planter
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 14 Amazing Basket Ideas From Highly Creative Moms
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: Our Favorite Taco Salad


 
 

 
 

FYI June 17, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1397 – The Kalmar Union is formed under the rule of Margaret I of Denmark.
The Kalmar Union or Union of Kalmaris (Danish, Norwegian and Swedish: Kalmarunionen; Latin: Unio Calmariensis) was a personal union that from 1397 to 1523[1] joined under a single monarch the three kingdoms of Denmark, Sweden (then including most of Finland’s populated areas), and Norway, together with Norway’s overseas dependencies (then including Iceland, Greenland,[N 1] the Faroe Islands and the Northern Isles). The union was not quite continuous; there were several short interruptions. Legally the countries remained separate sovereign states, but with their domestic and foreign policies being directed by a common monarch.

One main impetus for its formation was to block German expansion northward into the Baltic region. The main reason for its failure to survive was the perpetual struggle between the monarch, who wanted a strong unified state, and the Swedish and Danish nobility which did not.[2] Diverging interests (especially the Swedish nobility’s dissatisfaction with the dominant role played by Denmark and Holstein) gave rise to a conflict that would hamper the union in several intervals from the 1430s until its definitive breakup in 1523 when Gustav Vasa became king of Sweden.[3]

Norway continued to remain a part of the realm of Denmark–Norway under the Oldenburg dynasty for nearly three centuries until its dissolution in 1814. Then Union between Sweden and Norway lasted until 1905, when a grandson of the incumbent king of Denmark was elected its king, whose direct descendants still reign in Norway.

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Born On This Day

1865 – Susan La Flesche Picotte, Native American physician (d. 1915)
Susan LaFlesche Picotte (June 17, 1865 – September 18, 1915) was an Omaha Native American doctor and reformer in the late 19th century. She is widely acknowledged as the first Native American to earn a medical degree.[1] She campaigned for public health and for the formal, legal allotment of land to members of the Omaha tribe.

Picotte was an active social reformer as well as a physician. She worked to discourage drinking on the reservation where she worked as the physician, as part of the temperance movement of the 19th century. Picotte also campaigned to prevent and treat tuberculosis, which then had no cure, as part of a public health campaign on the reservation. She also worked to help other Omaha navigate the bureaucracy of the Office of Indian Affairs and receive the money owed to them for the sale of their land.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
Interesting chain of comments~
By Whitney Kimball: Saturday Night Social: Congrats to This Couple Who Wedded on a Swing Hanging from a Motorcycle on a Tightrope!
 
 
 
 
By Clayton Collins: Drive With Your Kid
 
 
 
 
By Timothy Burke: A Regular Reminder That Being An Idiot On The Field Can Be Hazardous To Your Health [UPDATE]
 
 
 
 
By Valerie Myers: Erie-area collectors find pieces of prehistoric ‘monster’ fish
 
 
wiki: Dunkleosteus is an extinct genus of arthrodire placoderm fish that existed during the Late Devonian period, about 358–382 million years ago.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
Sarah Grabski: Going for ghosts in Girard
 
 
 
 
By Shoshi Parks: These women were the toughest performers in the Wild West Don’t try horse diving at home
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: New Research Article: “Sharing Success: A Review of Strategic Planning, Annual Reports, and Publicly Available Information from Academic Libraries”
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life Magazine: The 80s Redux: Three Lindsay Gordons By Val McDermid, Fresno Bully Rescue: River, Fresno County Fruit Trail, Hetty Wainthropp Investigations: Online Streaming Entertainment and more ->
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: 200 Years of Frankenstein: Mary Shelley’s Masterpiece as a Lens on Today’s Most Pressing Questions of Science, Ethics, and Human Creativity, Walking the City with Jane: An Illustrated Celebration of Jane Jacobs and Her Legacy of Livable Cities and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Use WEST SYSTEM (Marine) Two-Part Epoxy If you are going to all this work, do it once correctly.
Forma Color y Textura Hometalker Miami, FL: AMAZING CAMPHOR COFFEE TABLE
 
 
 
 
Fiberartsy Hometalker Crestwood, KY: How to Make a Cool Glass Garden Art Totem
 
 
 
 
Adele DuranGO Tutorial Team Bayfield, CO: Easiest Way to Get Rid Of Ants on Feeders
 
 
 
 
By Rhonda Chase Design: Amazing Faux Amber Beads
 
 
 
 
By MadeByBarb: Printing With Nature’s Amazing ‘Colour Bug’
 
 
 
 
By audreyobscura: Free Online Glue Class


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Josh Katz: Smoked Chicken Thighs with Saffron and Orange Blossom Caramel, Hazelnut Dukkah and Basil
 
 
 
 
By randofo: Waffle Fries
 
 
 
 
By Tye Rannosaurus: In-Dentured Jello
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI June 16, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1871 – The University Tests Act allows students to enter the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge and Durham without religious tests (except for those intending to study theology).
The Universities Tests Act 1871[1] in the United Kingdom abolished the communion “Tests” and allowed Roman Catholics, non-conformists and non-Christians to take up fellowships at the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, London and Durham.

Passed during the course of William Ewart Gladstone’s first ministry, the act was to obtain support from the non-conformists since these were a major support group for the Liberal Party.[citation needed]

The direct instigation for this legislation was the widely publicised case of Numa Edward Hartog, the first Jewish Senior Wrangler in the history of Cambridge University, who could not accept the fellowship that would otherwise routinely be offered, because he could not subscribe to the required test on account of his religion. His testimony before the House of Lords helped secure passage of the bill, after the Lords had twice blocked similar legislation in 1869 and 1870.[2]
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1738 – Mary Katherine Goddard, American publisher (d. 1816)
Mary Katherine Goddard (June 16, 1738 – August 12, 1816) was an early American publisher, and the postmaster of the Baltimore Post Office from 1775 to 1789. She was the second printer to print the Declaration of Independence. Her copy, the Goddard Broadside, was commissioned by Congress in 1777, and was the first to include the names of the signatories.[1][2]

In 1998, Goddard was posthumously inducted into the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame.[3]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

By William Hughes: R.I.P. blues man and Blues Brothers bandmate Matt “Guitar” Murphy
 
 
 
 
“You May Want to Marry My Husband,” the late author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal gave her husband Jason very public permission to move on and find happiness.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: One of the world’s largest steam locomotives is about to make a triumphant return, Christine Reid documenting mountaineering and skiing in the 1920s and 1930s, A Church Covered in Green originally constructed in 1884, this fairytale-like building is the last turf church ever built in Iceland. More ->
 
 
 
 
By René Bruemmer, Montreal Gazette: McGill music student awarded $350,000 after girlfriend stalls career She wrote an email posing as him, turning down a $50,000-a-year scholarship so that he wouldn’t leave
 
 

 
 
Good news!Abramovitz earned a position with the Nashville Symphony Orchestra. Last March, it was announced he was appointed associate principal clarinet of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
 
 
 
 
By Alexia Nader: The Compelling New Female Face of California Noir
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Kessler: The Crazy Hacks One Woman Used to Make Money on Mechanical Turk
 
 
 
 
By M. Berk Talay: How Ford made America fall in love with pickup trucks The F-150 has been the king of trucks for decades in large part because of its ingenious design.
 
 
 
 

2003 NEVCO Gizmo


By Lee Aaron: Not Quite a Tesla: 2003 NEVCO Gizmo
 
 
 
 

Boeing Engineer Built: 1966 GMC Camper


By Scotty gilbertson: Boeing Engineer Built: 1966 GMC Camper
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 

Everything Pretty: 15 Liquid Castile Soap Uses
 
 
 
 
Everything Pretty: Dynatrap FlyLight Insect Trap Review and Giveaway Ends 6/25/18
 
 
 
 
CeeJai Hometalker Stockbridge, GA: Yard Art From My Heart
 
 
 
 
Becky at Flipping the Flip Hometalker Chicago, IL: How to: Grout in Bright Colors!
 
 
Becky at Flipping the Flip
 
 
 
 
Nancy at Craft Your Happiness Hometalker Hot Springs National Park, AR: Self Watering Planters From Soda Bottles
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 31 American Flag Ideas That Will Fill You With Pride
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: Copy One Of These Lovely Lattice Ideas For Your Home
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 15, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1936 – First flight of the Vickers Wellington bomber.
The Vickers Wellington was a British twin-engined, long-range medium bomber. It was designed during the mid-1930s at Brooklands in Weybridge, Surrey, led by Vickers-Armstrongs’ chief designer Rex Pierson; a key feature of the aircraft is its geodetic airframe fuselage structure, principally designed by Barnes Wallis. Development had been started in response to Air Ministry Specification B.9/32; issued in the middle of 1932, this called for a twin-engined day bomber capable of delivering higher performance than any previous design. Other aircraft developed to the same specification include the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley and the Handley Page Hampden. During the development process, performance requirements such as for the tare weight changed substantially, as well as the powerplant for the type being swapped.

The Wellington was used as a night bomber in the early years of the Second World War, performing as one of the principal bombers used by Bomber Command. During 1943, it started to be superseded as a bomber by the larger four-engined “heavies” such as the Avro Lancaster. The Wellington continued to serve throughout the war in other duties, particularly as an anti-submarine aircraft. It holds the distinction of being the only British bomber to be produced for the duration of the war and of being produced in a greater quantity than any other British-built bomber. The Wellington remained as first-line equipment when the war ended, although it had been increasingly relegated to secondary roles. The Wellington was one of two bombers named after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, the other being the Vickers Wellesley.

A larger heavy bomber aircraft designed to Specification B.1/35, the Vickers Warwick, was developed in parallel with the Wellington; the two aircraft shared around 85% of their structural components. Many elements of the Wellington were also reused in a civil derivative, the Vickers VC.1 Viking.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1894 – Nikolai Chebotaryov, Ukrainian-Russian mathematician and theorist (d. 1947)
Nikolai Grigorievich Chebotaryov (often spelled Chebotarov or Chebotarev, Russian: Никола́й Григо́рьевич Чеботарёв, Ukrainian: Микола Григорович Чоботарьов) (15 June [O.S. 3 June] 1894 – 2 July 1947) was a noted Russian and Soviet mathematician.[1] He is best known for the Chebotaryov density theorem.[2]

He was a student of Dmitry Grave, a famous Russian mathematician.[3] Chebotaryov worked on the algebra of polynomials, in particular examining the distribution of the zeros. He also studied Galois theory and wrote an influential textbook on the subject titled Basic Galois Theory. His ideas were used by Emil Artin to prove the Artin reciprocity law.[4] He worked with his student Anatoly Dorodnov on a generalization of the quadrature of the lune,[5] and proved the conjecture now known as the Chebotaryov theorem on roots of unity.

Early life
Nikolai Chebotaryov was born on 15 June 1894 in Kamianets-Podilskyi, Russian Empire (modern-day Ukraine). He entered the department of physics and mathematics at Kiev University in 1912. In 1928 he became a professor at Kazan University, remaining there for the rest of his life. He died on 2 July 1947. He was an atheist.[6] On 14 May 2010 a memorial plaque for Nikolai Chebotaryov was unveiled on the main administration building of I.I. Mechnikov Odessa National University.[7]

 
 
 
 

FYI

Alabama:
By Heather Chapman: Ala. town council bans press, which editor calls ‘flat illegal’
 
 
 
 

Alabama:
By Christine Schmidt: With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Broadband providers and users in the Upper Midwest invited to offer perspectives in June 19 listening session
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: FCC chair calls for increase for rural telemedicine fund
 
 
 
 
By Andrew P. Collins: This 200,000-Mile Air-Cooled Porsche 911 Has The Best And Worst Craigslist Ad
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Where the “no ending a sentence with a preposition” rule comes from, Capturing Old London, Iceland’s Tomatoes, The Largest U.S. Hooverville and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Emma Tucker: 7 Moscow restaurants with instagramable interiors
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: An Open Letter to Jeff Bezos, Amazon comes under fire for removal of book reviews, How One Video Game Helped Me Overcome Writer’s Block and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Emily Conover: In her short life, mathematician Emmy Noether changed the face of physics – Noether linked two important concepts in physics: conservation laws and symmetries
 
 

wiki: Amalie Emmy Noether[a] (German: [ˈnøːtɐ]; 23 March 1882 – 14 April 1935) was a German mathematician known for her important contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. She invariably used the name “Emmy Noether” in her life and publications.[a]

She was described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl and Norbert Wiener as the most important woman in the history of mathematics.[1][2] As one of the leading mathematicians of her time, she developed the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. In physics, Noether’s theorem explains the connection between symmetry and conservation laws.[3]

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Two Nerdy History Girls: Friday Video: Wilma Rudolph, the Unstoppable
 
 
 
 

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FYI June 14, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1822 – Charles Babbage proposes a difference engine in a paper to the Royal Astronomical Society entitled “Note on the application of machinery to the computation of astronomical and mathematical tables”.
A difference engine is an automatic mechanical calculator designed to tabulate polynomial functions. The name derives from the method of divided differences, a way to interpolate or tabulate functions by using a small set of polynomial coefficients. Most mathematical functions commonly used by engineers, scientists and navigators, including logarithmic and trigonometric functions, can be approximated by polynomials, so a difference engine can compute many useful tables of numbers.

The historical difficulty in producing error-free tables by teams of mathematicians and human “computers” spurred Charles Babbage’s desire to build a mechanism to automate the process.

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Born On This Day

1900 – Ruth Nanda Anshen, American writer, editor, and philosopher (d. 2003)
Ruth Nanda Anshen (June 14, 1900 – December 2, 2003) was an American philosopher, author and editor. She was the author of several books including The Anatomy of Evil, Biography of An Idea, Morals Equals Manners and The Mystery of Consciousness: A Prescription for Human Survival.
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FYI

 
 
 
 

By Adam Clark Estes: The Very Best Beginner Drone
 
 
 
 
By Patrick Redford: Pair Of Port-A-Potties Departs This Earthly Plane
 
 
 
 
By Jennings Brown: Sheriff Says Campers Burning Poop in a Hole Started 500-Plus Acre Fire
 
 
 
 
By Maggie Taylor: Radiotopia Launches ‘ZigZag’
Welcome to ZigZag, our brand new podcast about changing the course of capitalism, journalism and women in technology.

Produced by Manoush Zomorodi and Jen Poyant, formerly of Note to Self, and in partnership with Civil, the show is a first-hand account of their experiences quitting salaried jobs in public radio to co-found a media company.
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: The Passive Voice – Words-to-be-read are losing ground to words-to-be-heard, a new stage of digital content evolution
 
 
 
 
By Sean Hayes, Tenor: 31st anniversary of the GIF: give your terminal some personality with Tenor GIF for CLI
 
 
 
 

By Melissa Patrick: People with positive attitudes about aging likely to live longer, have better health; rural populations tend to be older
 
 
 
 
By Jared Newman: Amazon’s Ring Alarm security system undercuts Nest and ADT
 
 
 
 
Ducks eating watermelon is one of the strangest things you’ll ever see (Video)

 
 
 
 
Dad and baby jump in to help a nervous ballerina (Video)

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
 
 
Debbie HometalkerGlen Mills, PA: Pretty Sliding Barn Door. It Slides Behind a Dresser.
 
 
 
 
By Kara S. Hometalker Jersey City, NJ: Custom Stained Glass
 
 
 
 
Andrew @ ScrappyGeek.com Hometalker Enfield, NH: We Built Steps on a Slope
 
 
 
 
By bekathwia: Free Online Jewelry Class
 
 
 
 
By Jessyratfink: How to Repot Container Plants
 
 
 
 
By Licheness: Ziplock Toilet Paper Dispenser – Camping and Canoeing
 
 
 
 
By Techgenie: How to Fix Any Remote at Home


 
 

 
 

 
 

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FYI June 13, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1514 – Henry Grace à Dieu, at over 1,000 tons the largest warship in the world at this time, built at the new Woolwich Dockyard in England, is dedicated.
Henry Grace à Dieu (“Henry Grace of God”), also known as Great Harry, was an English carrack or “great ship” of the King’s Fleet in the 16th century. Contemporary with the Mary Rose, Henry Grace à Dieu was even larger. The Great Harry was Henry VIII’s flagship. She had a large forecastle four decks high, and a stern castle two decks high. She was 165 feet (50 m) long, weighing 1,000–1,500 tons and having a complement of 700–1,000 men. It is said that she was ordered by Henry VIII in response to construction of the Scottish ship Michael, launched in 1511.
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Born On This Day

1923 – Lloyd Conover, American chemist and inventor (d. 2017)
Lloyd Hillyard Conover (June 13, 1923 – March 11, 2017) was an American chemist and the inventor of tetracycline. For this invention, he was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.[1] Conover was the first to make an antibiotic by chemically modifying a naturally produced drug.[2] He had close to 300 patents to his name.
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FYI

By Kelli Kennedy, Associated Press: Coaches killed in Florida shooting to receive ESPY awards
 
 
 
 
By Bryan Menegus: On Amazon’s Time
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Here’s How You Can Watch (And Stream) All Of The 2018 24 Hours Of Le Mans
 
 
 
 
By Reid McCarter: Your attention, please: The Minnesota skyscraper raccoon is safe
 
 
 
 
By Christine Schmidt: A definitive playbook: How to DIY a local nonprofit news outlet
 
 
 
 

David Spangenthal Google Cloud Account Executive: Find a blood drive near you on World Blood Donor Day June 14th
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Ky. editor who takes stands and tackles tough subjects wins award for public service through community journalism
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Interior official met repeatedly with coal-industry lobbyists before canceling study on health effects of strip mining
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Poisoned newspaper owner files civil suit against suspects

 
 
 
 
By Zat Rana: Elon Musk: Sustaining Motivation
 
 
 
 
By Zat Rana: J.K. Rowling: Dealing with Failure
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: National Academies of Science Releases “Sexual Harassment of Women Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine” Report
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Digital Collections: American Foundation for the Blind Launches First Fully Accessible Digital Archive of the Helen Keller Collection (More than 160,000 Artifacts)
 
 
 
 
By Adweek Staff: 10 Writers and Editors Who Are Changing the National Conversation The authors, novelists, curators and essayists you should know
 
 
 
 

By Kayleigh Donaldson: Book Stuffing, Bribery and Bullying: The Self-Publishing Problem Plaguing Amazon
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: An island’s spiritual history, documented in haunting photographs, Skeleton Man Walking Skeleton Dinosaur and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Josh Jones: Enter a Digitized Collection of 38,000 Pamphlets & Periodicals From the French Revolution
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Josh Jones: The Causes & Prevalence of Suicide Explained by Two Videos from Alain de Botton’s School of Life
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Nancy Craigmiles Hometalker: My Stenciled Porch!
 
 
 
 
Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: Not a Lattice Privacy Screen
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #91)
 
 
 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Talk Of The Town Party 127
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

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FYI June 12, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1817 – The earliest form of bicycle, the dandy horse, is driven by Karl von Drais.
The dandy horse is a human-powered vehicle that, being the first means of transport to make use of the two-wheeler principle, is regarded as the forerunner of the bicycle. Powered by the rider’s feet on the ground in lieu of the pedals of later bicycles, the dandy horse was invented by Karl Drais—who called it a Laufmaschine (German: [ˈlaʊfmaˌʃiːnə], “running machine”)—in Mannheim, Germany, and patented in France in February 1818. It is also known as a draisine (German: [dʁaɪˈziːnə] (About this sound listen), a term now used primarily for light auxiliary railcars regardless of their form of propulsion), the French form draisienne (French: [drɛzjɛn], or by the broader designation velocipede.
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Born On This Day

1888 – Zygmunt Janiszewski, Polish mathematician and academic (d. 1920)

While Janiszewski best remembered for his many contributions to topological mathematics in the early 20th century, for the founding of Fundamenta Mathematicae, and for his enthusiasm for teaching young minds, his loyalty to his homeland during World War I perhaps gives the greatest insight into his psyche. The orphans’ shelter that he set up during the war doubtlessly saved many lives, and is perhaps his greatest contribution to the world.
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FYI

Condolences
By Chris Thompson: Bode Miller’s 19-Month-Old Daughter Dies After Drowning Incident In Swimming Pool
 
 
 
 
By Alanis King: Watch How A Virtual Race Track Is Built
 
 
 
 
By Ken Saito: I Met Japan’s Highway Racers In The Middle Of The Sea
 
 
 
 
By Kelly Faircloth: This Bear in a Swimming Pool Is a Big Summer Mood
 
 
 
 
By Alanis King: Here’s Just How Well (Or Poorly) Current Midsize SUVs Will Protect Front Passengers In A Crash
 
 
 
 
By Erin Marquis: My First Drive After Cancer
 
 
 
 
By Paul Maroon: Ask an indie rock veteran: Is 45 too old to start a band?
 
 
 
 
By Dimitrios Mitsopoulos Popular Mechanics: All the Nuclear Missile Submarines in the World in One Chart
 
 
 
 
Rebecca at Soap Deli News: Ten Tips for Getting Your Mojo Back & A Lush Inspired Massage Bar
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: This map shows 42 sites of British suffragette protest and sabotage, Guardian of the Gulch, Yacht Aqueduct and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Charles Chu: Alone and Self-Obsessed: Why are we getting more and more depressed?
 
 
 
 
By David at Raptitude: Two Ways to Stop Caring What Others Think
Firstly, we need to recognize that it’s impossible to be fairly judged. Nobody will ever understand you perfectly. You will continually be both underestimated and overestimated, shortchanged and given undue credit.
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Web Archiving: Webrecorder Adds New Tools and Features in Latest Release
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Washington State Library Announces Launch of “Primarily Washington” a New Educational Resource
 
 
 
 
The Tim Ferriss Show Transcripts: Seth Godin on How to Think Small to Go Big
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Imagine, if you will… these drawings done by Scott Adams (Dilbert), Gary Larson (The Far Side), Berkeley Breathed (Bloom County)?
Via Atlas Obscura Josh Jones: Visualizing Dante’s Hell: See Maps & Drawings of Dante’s Inferno from the Renaissance Through Today
 
 
 
 
By Stephen Guise: I Can’t Believe How Quickly Home Automation Has Changed My Life (Amazon Echo Alexa, Hue Light Bulbs, and the Power of Routine)
 
 
 
 
By JR Raphael: 18 Gmail settings that will change how you think about your inbox Make your inbox more efficient and effective with these easily overlooked options.
 
 
 
 
From Debra Lynn Dadd: *SURVEY*, insect repellent, stuffed toys, nail polish, and much more…
 
 
 
 
By Rachel Becker: Why repeating words sound like music to your brain
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk Hits: 15 Genius Hacks to Keep Pests Away While You Camp
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 15 Fabulous Fire Pits For Your Backyard
 
 
 
 
By Cll7568214 Tutorial Team: Vertical Sunshine Garden
 
 
 
 
By Dale N. Hometalker Richmond, TX: Backyard Redo
 
 
 
 
By MadeByBarb: Super Cleanse Scrubber Soap Made in a Crock Pot
 
 
 
 
By Penelopy Bulnick: Pieced Crochet Dishcloth/Washcloth
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

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FYI June 11, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1748 – Denmark adopts the characteristic Nordic Cross flag later taken up by all other Scandinavian countries.
The Nordic Cross flag is any of certain flags bearing the design of the Nordic or Scandinavian cross, a cross symbol in a rectangular field, with the center of the cross shifted towards the hoist.

All of the Nordic countries except Greenland have adopted such flags in the modern period, and while the Scandinavian cross is named for its use in the national flags of the Scandinavian nations, the term is used universally by vexillologists, in reference not only to the flags of the Nordic countries.[1]

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Born On This Day

1815 – Julia Margaret Cameron, Indian-Sri Lankan photographer (d. 1879)
Julia Margaret Cameron (née Pattle; 11 June 1815 Calcutta – 26 January 1879 Kalutara, Ceylon) was a British photographer.[1] She became known for her portraits of celebrities of the time, and for photographs with Arthurian and other legendary or heroic themes.

Cameron’s photographic career was short, spanning eleven years of her life (1864–1875). She took up photography at the relatively late age of 48, when she was given a camera as a present.[2] Her style was not widely appreciated in her own day: her choice to use a soft focus and to treat photography as an art as well as a science, by manipulating the wet collodion process, caused her works to be viewed as “slovenly”, marred by “mistakes” and bad photography. She found more acceptance among pre-Raphaelite artists than among photographers.[3] Her work has influenced modern photographers, especially her closely cropped portraits.[4] Her house, Dimbola Lodge, on the Isle of Wight is open to the public.

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FYI

By Michael Ballaban: The NXT 360 Is The Next-Gen Humvee
 
 
 
 
Car colors: Where’s the Fire Red and Speeding Ticket Blue. Drive as fast as you can afford.
By Alanis King: The New Mazda Miata Will Have 181 HP And A 7,500-RPM Redline
 
 
 
 
By Nick Martin: Finally, There’s Video Of The Mizzou Arena Joyride
 
 
 
 
By Dan Neilan: Elon Musk starts fixing L.A.’s traffic by handing out flamethrowers
 
 
 
 
By Yessenia Funes: Let’s Call Gang Violence What It Is: Pollution

 
 
 
 
Fangirl Nation Live with Narrator Erin Bennett!: 8 p.m. EDT/ 7 p.m. CDT/ 6 p.m. MDT/ 5 p.m. PDT at the Cozy Mystery Corner Facebook page for a live chat with narrator Erin Bennett.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Rediscovering lost literary treasures of the American Midwest, The Newspaper Archives of Black Chicago, The Future of the National Dish and more ->
 
 
 
 
Suffragette march.png Suhair Khan Program Manager, Google Arts & Culture: The Suffragettes and the Road to Equality on Google Arts & Culture
 
 
 
 
By Wendy Minter: Blog Profiles: Breakfast Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Rural funders urge philanthropists to let communities lead
 
 
 
 

Glacier Hub Weekly Newsletter 06-11-18: Meet the writers of GlacierHub, 2017/2018 edition. This year, our writers hail from across four continents.
 
 
 
 
By Zat Rana: There Are Two Ways to Read — One Is Useless
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Colin Marshall: Watch Anthony Bourdain’s Free Show, Raw Craft Where He Visits Craftsmen Making Guitars, Tattoos, Motorcycles & More (RIP)
 
 
 
 
Messy Nessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today Vol. (Vol. CCXCI): A Welsh Island for sale (for less than an average one bedroom flat in London), Aida Overton Walker, a star of the black vaudeville circuit.,This old church built on top of the 17th century graveyard (which now hides in the basement), Abandoned Masonic Hall, Bannack, Montana and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk Hits: 16 Ways to Showcase Your Herb Garden
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: These Coffee Table Ideas Will Inspire You To Make Your Own
 
 
Jenna Lantern Lane Designs Jenna Lantern Lane Designs Hometalker Granville, OH: DIY Marbled Vases
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: Easy Frisbee Golf For Your Backyard!
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

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