Category: FYI

FYI

FYI March 02, 2021

On This Day

1867 – The U.S. Congress passes the first Reconstruction Act.
The Reconstruction Acts, or Military Reconstruction Acts, (March 2, 1867, 14 Stat. 428-430, c.153; March 23, 1867, 15 Stat. 2-5, c.6; July 19, 1867, 15 Stat. 14-16, c.30; and March 11, 1868, 15 Stat. 41, c.25) were four statutes passed during the Reconstruction Era by the 40th United States Congress addressing requirement for Southern States to be readmitted to the Union. The actual title of the initial legislation was “An act to provide for the more efficient government of the Rebel States”[1] and it was passed on March 4, 1867. Fulfillment of the requirements of the Acts was necessary for the former Confederate States to be readmitted to the Union from military and Federal control imposed during and after the American Civil War. The Acts excluded Tennessee, which had already ratified the 14th Amendment and had been readmitted to the Union on July 24, 1866.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1860 – Susanna M. Salter, American activist and politician (d. 1961)
Susanna Madora Salter (née Kinsey; March 2, 1860 – March 17, 1961) was an American politician and activist. She served as mayor of Argonia, Kansas, becoming the first woman elected as mayor and one of the first women to serve in any political office in the United States.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Lauren Harris , CJR.org: They won the Alaska newspaper giveaway. Then the pandemic arrived. ‘Our fates are going to be the same.’
 
 
 
 
ILSR’s Community Broadband Initiative: Recently in Community Networks… Week of 2/22
 
 
 
 
Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: Project shows local journalist ‘essential workers’ during the pandemic; some Republican lawmakers spread misinformation about riots, pandemic . . . more ->
 
 
 
 
Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Tuesday, March 2, 2021
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliay, Open Culture: The Little-Known Female Scientists Who Mapped 400,000 Stars Over a Century Ago: An Introduction to the “Harvard Computers”

Recipes

By КысьБ: Warming Tea With Spices and Fruits
 
 
By Garbanzo21: No-Knead Rustic Raisin Bread
 
 
By craftisian: Simple But Delicious Sourdough Bread
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Let’s Make Bangers and Mash!
 
 
By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: Here Are 8 Weeks of Easy Big-Batch Meal Plans (That Leave You with Plenty of Leftovers)
 
 
Smart School House: DIY Easter Ideas


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI March 01, 2021

On This Day

1914 – China joins the Universal Postal Union.
The Universal Postal Union (UPU, French: Union postale universelle), established by the Treaty of Bern of 1874,[1] is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) that coordinates postal policies among member nations, in addition to the worldwide postal system. The UPU contains four bodies consisting of the Congress, the Council of Administration (CA), the Postal Operations Council (POC) and the International Bureau (IB). It also oversees the Telematics and Express Mail Service (EMS) cooperatives. Each member agrees to the same terms for conducting international postal duties. The UPU’s headquarters are located in Bern, Switzerland.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1952 – Nevada Barr, American actress and author
Nevada Barr (born March 1, 1952) is an American author of mystery fiction. She is known for her Anna Pigeon series, which is primarily set in a series of national parks and other protected areas of the United States.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Constance Grady, Vox.com: How Dolly Parton became a secular American saint
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DXLIV): These Kitschy Jell-O molds are actually Lamps; Billy Meier’s UFOs; An Asian-American owned store in 1942; The Surreal Architecture of Michael Sorkin; Los Alamos National Laboratory. Working on nuclear testing projects. 1974 and more ->
 
 
 
 
NSFW, good advice.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Meals to Make March Exciting


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI February 28, 2021

On This Day

1638 – The Scottish National Covenant is signed in Edinburgh.
The National Covenant (Scottish Gaelic: An Cùmhnant Nàiseanta)[1][2] was an agreement signed by the people of Scotland in 1638 in opposition to the proposed reforms of the Church of Scotland (also known as The Kirk) by King Charles I. The king’s efforts to impose changes on the church in the 1630s caused widespread protests across Scotland, leading to the organisation of committees to coordinate opposition to the king. Facing royal opposition to the movement, its leaders arranged the creation of the National Covenant, which was designed to bolster the movement by tapping into patriotic fervour and became widely adopted throughout most of Scotland.

The Covenant opposed changes to the Church of Scotland, and committed its signatories to stand together in the defence of the nation’s religion. Charles saw this as an act of rebellion against his rule, leading to the Bishops’ Wars, the result of which required him to call an English Parliament. This parliament passed acts limiting the king’s authority, and these disputes ultimately led to the First English Civil War.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1896 – Philip Showalter Hench, American physician and endocrinologist, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965)[21]
Philip Showalter Hench (February 28, 1896 – March 30, 1965[1]) was an American physician. Hench, along with his Mayo Clinic co-worker Edward Calvin Kendall and Swiss chemist Tadeus Reichstein was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1950 for the discovery of the hormone cortisone, and its application for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The Nobel Committee bestowed the award for the trio’s “discoveries relating to the hormones of the adrenal cortex, their structure and biological effects.”[2]

Hench received his undergraduate education at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania, and received his medical training at the United States Army Medical Corps and the University of Pittsburgh. He began working at Mayo Clinic in 1923, later serving as the head of the Department of Rheumatology. In addition to the Nobel Prize, Hench received many other awards and honors throughout his career. He also had a lifelong interest in the history and discovery of yellow fever.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

News From Science: The first organism to use oxygen may have appeared surprisingly early; Hungry teen dinosaurs crowded out their competitors; New, more inclusive journal policies ease author name changes on published papers read more ->
 
 
 
 
EarthSky News: Feb 27 – Top Stories This Week
 
 
 
 
By Marc Chernoff, Marc & Angel Hack Life: 20 Things to Stop Letting People Do to You (Setting Boundaries in Relationships 101)
 
 
 
 
Debra & Larry at Lifely: Lifely – 28 February 2021
 
 
 
 
By Jordan Babineaux, Real Leaders: Former NFL Player Shows You How to Pivot to Win
 
 
 
 
By Adam Grant, Havard Business Review: Persuading the Unpersuadable
 
 
 
 
By Kayla Kibbe, Inside Hook: Meet Japan’s New Minister of Loneliness
 
 
 
 

Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: The Pattern Inside the Pattern: Fractals, the Hidden Order Beneath Chaos, and the Story of the Refugee Who Revolutionized the Mathematics of Reality
 
 
 
 

STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Flight Nurses
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Photographer of the Alaska Highway Project

 
 
 
 
Wonder what Alaska looks like?
Kathryn’s Report: Middleton Municipal Airport – Morey Field (C29): Town Discusses Lead from Airplane Emissions
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Loss of Control on Ground: Sportsman 2+2, N5045X; accident occurred March 27, 2020 at Leisurewood Airstrip (9AK6), Wasilla, Alaska
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Missoula man sentenced for aiming laser pointer at airplane
 
 
 
 
Caffeinated Reviewer: Sunday Post #461 Melting
 
 
 
 
Make a Living Writing: Use the Cow-Farts Method to Find a Lucrative Writing Niche
 
 
 
 
Dana Stabenow: This month we launched the 5th Liam Campbell novel!
 
 
 
 
Well+Good: This Cheap Iced Coffee Maker Is Saving Me $700 a Year on Coffee; Hundreds of People Share This One Refrigerator, Thanks to Two Women Who Keep It Stocked

Ideas

By Crafts with Klara: Ugly-Miracle Moisturizing Tropical Goop
 
 
By Zac Builds: Heavy Duty Rolling Tool Base
 
 
By BradG76: (LED) “Plasma” Lamp

Recipes

By Ronna Farley: Immunity-Boosting Frozen Elderberry Drops
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Easy Lemon Curd
 
 
By akshaymomaya: Butter Garlic Naan (Spicy Indian Flat Bread)
 
 
By Diana Rattray, The Spruce Eats: Reuben Casserole With Crumb Topping
 
 
By Cathy Jacobs, The Spruce Eats: 14 Easy and Economical Steak Recipes
 
 
By cookwewill: Hungarian Beef Goulash
 
 
Food Network: Buffalo Chicken Pot Pie
 
 

By Jaime Osnato, Livestrong.com: How to Turn a Tub of Greek Yogurt Into a Week’s Worth of Protein-Rich Dinners and more ->

By Gathered At My Table: Spiced Caramel Chocolate Lava Cakes
 
 
By Amy Manes, Food Talk Daily: Double Dark Chocolate Cupcakes
 
 
CutterLight: Salmonberry Sour Cream Crumble Cake for Four (Or two. Or one.)


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI February 27, 2021

On This Day

1617 – Sweden and Russia sign the Treaty of Stolbovo, ending the Ingrian War and shutting Russia out of the Baltic Sea.
The Treaty of Stolbovo (Freden i Stolbova) was a peace treaty which ended the Ingrian War (Swedish: Ingermanländska kriget) which had been fought between Sweden and Russia between 1610 and 1617.[1][2]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1859 – Bertha Pappenheim, Austrian-German activist and author (d. 1936)[11]
Bertha Pappenheim (27 February 1859 – 28 May 1936) was an Austrian-Jewish feminist, a social pioneer, and the founder of the Jewish Women’s Association (Jüdischer Frauenbund). Under the pseudonym Anna O., she was also one of Josef Breuer’s best documented patients because of Freud’s writing on Breuer’s case.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Josh Jones, Open Culture: RIP Radical Poet and Revolutionary Publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti (1919-2021)
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Witness the Birth of Kermit the Frog in Jim Henson’s Live TV Show, Sam and Friends (1955)
 
 
 
 
By Mick Dumke, ProPublica: The Murder Chicago Didn’t Want to Solve
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: A gravestone with a grudge that lives on; Montezuma Castle and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: This isolated island is fiercely defending its lobsters; Found: Lost Fort and more ->
 
 
 
 
Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Island Birds
 
 
Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Sandy Beach Views
 
 
Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Sun, Snow, Song Birds, and Surf
 
 
Matt Goff, Sitka Nature: Starrigavan Birds
 
 
 
 
CutterLight: Chignik Lake in 29 Photos: High Tide
 
 
CutterLight: Chignik Lake in 29 Photos: Swan Barque
 
 
CutterLight: Birds of Chignik Lake – Emperor Goose: Alaska’s Painted Beauty
 
 
CutterLight: Birds of Chignik Lake: Cackling Goose (Aleutian Form) – Picture a Canada Goose with a White Necklace
 
 
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Return of Bird of the Week: Acorn Woodpecker
 
 
 
 
Excellent!
James Clear: 3-2-1: On eliminating clutter, reinventing yourself, and unity
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Desperate for more planes, cargo airlines are buying up aging passenger jets: Here’s how they’re converted to fly Amazon packages instead of people
 
 
Kathyn’s Report: United Airlines will pay $49 million to settle air mail fraud case
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The gently competitive world of giant vegetable growing; Learn about how an Arizonan company turns cacti into candy and more ->
 
 
 
 

Brain Pickings Maria Popova: The Evolutionary Mystery of Left-Handedness From Medieval sword-fighters to Broca’s brains, or why the hand may hold the key to the link between creativity and mental illness.
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Rustic Fougasse Bread Recipe
 
 
By Sara Tane, The Kitchn: I Tried This Brilliant “Egg Pocket” Trick for Making Breakfast Sandwiches
 
 
Joan Reeves: Saturday Share: Recipe, Stovetop Chicken Casserole
 
 
By Sweet Girl Treats, Food Talk Daily: Cookie Dough-Stuffed Mini Cheesecakes
 
 
Charlotte Grainger, Taste of Home: 10 Tricks to Make Boxed Cake Mix Taste Homemade


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI February 26, 2021

On This Day

1979 – The Superliner railcar enters revenue service with Amtrak.
The Superliner is a type of bilevel intercity railroad passenger car used by Amtrak, the national rail passenger carrier in the United States. Amtrak ordered the cars to replace older single-level cars on its long-distance trains in the Western United States. The design was based on the Budd Hi-Level vehicles, employed by the Santa Fe Railway on its El Capitan trains. Pullman-Standard built 284 cars, known as Superliner I, from 1975 to 1981; Bombardier Transportation built 195, known as Superliner II, from 1991 to 1996. The Superliner I cars were the last passenger cars built by Pullman.

Car types include coaches, dining cars, lounges, and sleeping cars. Most passenger spaces are on the upper level, which features a row of windows on both sides. The Sightseer Lounge observation cars have distinctive floor-to-ceiling windows on the upper level. Boarding is on the lower level; passengers climb up a center stairwell to reach the upper level.

The first Superliner I cars entered service in February 1979, with deliveries continuing through 1981. Amtrak assigned the cars to both long-distance and short-distance trains in the Western United States. The first permanent assignment, in October 1979, was to the Chicago–Seattle Empire Builder. Superliner II deliveries began in 1993; the additional cars enabled the retirement of the aging Hi-Level cars and the assignment of Superliners to trains in the Eastern United States. Tunnel clearances prevent their use on the Northeast Corridor.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1893 – Dorothy Whipple, English novelist (d. 1966)
Dorothy Whipple (née Stirrup) (26 February 1893 in Blackburn, Lancashire – 14 September 1966, Blackburn, Lancashire) was an English writer of popular fiction and children’s books.[1] Her work gained popularity between the world wars and again in the 2000s.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: Patchwork federal oversight makes CAFO reform difficult; public transit inequalities hurt rural residents . . .
 
 
 
 
By Jatt Goff: Visiting Solitaire – Swans Departing?
 
 
 
 

By Ted Mills, Open Culture: Watch The True History Of The Traveling Wilburys, a Free Film Documenting the Making of the 1980s Super Group
 
 
Open Culture: Journey’s Road Crew Performs a Pretty Flawless Version of “Separate Ways”
 
 
 
 
Courtesy of my friend George!

It occurred to me that the number of Americans who have died from Covid is about the same as the number of Americans who attended Woodstock in 1969.
It looked like this.


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Lisa Kaminski, Taste of Home: 21 Breakfast Recipes Cowboys and Cowgirls Will Love
 
 
Food Network Kitchen: The Best Chewy Chocolate Chip Cookies


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

907 Updates February 26, 2021

KTUU Alaska’s News Source: ‘It’s not just me’: Rasmussen says sexist remarks by fellow Anchorage lawmaker highlight culture women face; AWAIC shelter adds new beds with completed expansion; 36th Ave. & New Seward Hwy. interchange plan seeks public input; Pipeline Vocal Project hopes to breathe new life into the vocal scene in Alaska and more ->
 
 
 
 
KTOO Alaska’s New Source: LISTEN: In Alaska crab boat’s deadly sinking, expert witnesses point to flawed stability calculations; ‘Something pure and good’: Anchorage hospital workers step up to cuddle Alaska’s tiniest babies; For Alaska’s railbelt, electric vehicle charging corridor may be on road to reality and more ->
 
 
 
 
KYUK Public Media for Alaska’s Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta: Outside Investment Firm Acquires Grant Aviation; Indigenous Leaders Hopeful US Rep. Debra Haaland Will Protect Yuuyaraq and more ->
 
 
 
 
Alaska Native News: Shooting Shotgun off Porch and Threatening Neighbor with the Weapon Lands Wasilla Woman in Jail; Malaspina Glacier Gets Up and Goes; This Day In Alaska History February 26th, 1917 and more ->
 
 
 
 
Fairbanks News Webcenter 11: Alaska Law Enforcement agencies arrest suspect in December drug shooting; Fairbanks school district to receive new fleet of buses and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Arctic Sounder: Reflections on Alaska’s last serum run; George, Schachle win Iron Dog; Internet firms look to space for the Last Frontier and more ->
 
 
 
 
Suzanne Downing, Editor, Must Read Alaska’s Friday Newsletter, in honor of Bud Fate edition
 
 
 
 
Craig Medred: Winning losers
 
 
 
 

FYI February 25, 2021

On This Day

1939 – As part of British air raid precautions, the first of 2​1⁄2 million Anderson shelters is constructed in a garden in Islington, north London.[14]
Air raid shelters, are structures for the protection of non-combatants as well as combatants against enemy attacks from the air. They are similar to bunkers in many regards, although they are not designed to defend against ground attack (but many have been used as defensive structures in such situations).[citation needed]

Prior to World War II, in May 1924, an Air Raid Precautions Committee was set up in the United Kingdom. For years, little progress was made with shelters because of the apparently irreconcilable conflict between the need to send the public underground for shelter and the need to keep them above ground for protection against gas attacks. In February 1936 the Home Secretary appointed a technical Committee on Structural Precautions against Air Attack.

By November 1937, there had only been slow progress, because of a serious lack of data on which to base any design recommendations and the Committee proposed that the Home Office should have its own department for research into structural precautions, rather than relying on research work done by the Bombing Test Committee to support the development of bomb design and strategy. This proposal was eventually implemented in January 1939.[1]

During the Munich crisis, local authorities dug trenches to provide shelter. After the crisis, the British Government decided to make these a permanent feature, with a standard design of precast concrete trench lining. Unfortunately these turned out to perform very poorly. They also decided to issue free to poorer households the Anderson shelter, and to provide steel props to create shelters in suitable basements.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1908 – Mary Locke Petermann, cellular biochemist (d. 1975)[71][72]
Mary Locke Petermann (February 25, 1908 – December 13, 1975) was an American cellular biochemist known for her key role in the discovery and characterization of animal ribosomes, the molecular complexes that carry out protein synthesis.[1] She was the first woman to become a full professor at Cornell University’s medical school.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

The Awesomer: Honest Trailer: The Simpsons Movie; Bat Out of Hell on Banjolele; Side-by-Side Swing and more ->
 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: Before Plymouth and the pilgrims, there was Patuxet and more ->

 
 
 
 

Wickersham’s Conscience: Book Review: In Wild Trust, by Jeff Fair and Larry Aumiller
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: A Perfect Lesson: U.N.A.
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Los Angeles Review of Books: Lesya Ukrainka’s Revisionist Mythmaking
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Ideas

By B_Free42: Ice Arch – 6′ Freestanding
 
 

Recipes

By Chocolate Covered Katie: English Muffin French Toast
 
 
By nirL: No-Knead Festive Braided Bread (Challa)


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI February 24, 2021

On This Day

1538 – Treaty of Nagyvárad between Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I and King John Zápolya of Hungary and Croatia.[6]
The Treaty of Nagyvárad (or Treaty of Grosswardein) was a secret peace agreement between Emperor Ferdinand I and John Zápolya, rival claimants to the Kingdom of Hungary, signed in Grosswardein / Várad (modern-day Oradea, Romania) on February 24, 1538.[1] In the treaty, they divided Hungary between them.

Ferdinand recognized Zápolya as John I, King of Hungary and ruler of two-thirds of the Kingdom, while Zápolya conceded the rule of Ferdinand over western Hungary, and recognized him as heir to the Hungarian throne, since Zápolya was childless.

But in 1540, just before Zápolya’s death, his wife bore him a son, John Sigismund Zápolya, and the agreement failed. John Sigismund was elected King of Hungary as John II by the Hungarian nobility. Ottoman Sultan Suleyman I, to whom John I had once sworn fealty, also recognized John II as King and his vassal. The struggle with Ferdinand and his successors resumed until 1571.

 
 

Born On This Day

1827 – Lydia Becker, English-French activist (d. 1890)
Lydia Ernestine Becker (24 February 1827 – 18 July 1890) was a leader in the early British suffrage movement, as well as an amateur scientist with interests in biology and astronomy. She is best remembered for founding and publishing the Women’s Suffrage Journal between 1870 and 1890.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Jacob Cohen, The Hustle: Better late than never: America is speeding up its broadband strategy America has a long history of limited internet access for steep prices. 2021 may be the year of real progress.
 
 
 
 
Great upcoming books from Fireside Books. Order now! Everyone Dies Famous in a Small Town and more ->
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: Midweek pick-me-up: Philosopher Martin Buber on how trees help us become more human and master the difficult art of seeing others as they truly are
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life: How to Help Someone With a Loss of a Pet
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Complete Works of Hilma af Klint Will Get Published for the First Time in a Beautiful, Seven-Volume Collection
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: The 69 Pages of Writing Advice Denis Johnson Collected from Flannery O’Connor, Jack Kerouac, Stephen King, Hunter Thompson, Werner Herzog & Many Others
 
 
 
 
Matt Goff Sitka Nature: Townsend’s Solitaire Drops By
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
Swimming to Freedom: My Escape from China and the Cultural Revolution Hardcover – April 27, 2021. When Kent Wong was a young boy, his father, a patriotic Chinese official in the customs office in Hong Kong, joined an insurrection at work and returned with the family to the newly established People’s Republic of China.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
NSFW

Recipes

By Susan Garoutte, Taste of Home: Mexican Chicken Corn Chowder
 
 
By Jesse Szewczyk, The Kitchn: Crispy, Cheesy Pan Pizza Is in a League of Its Own — Here’s How to Make It at Home
 
 
I Wash You Dry: Easy Chicken Fajitas Recipe
 
 
By Lauren Tom, The Food Network: 5 Recipes That Prove Chocolate and Salt Belong Togeth


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI February 23, 2021

On This Day

1883 – Alabama becomes the first U.S. state to enact an anti-trust law.
Competition law is a law that promotes or seeks to maintain market competition by regulating anti-competitive conduct by companies.[1][2] Competition law is implemented through public and private enforcement.[3] Competition law is known as antitrust law in the United States for historical reasons, and as anti-monopoly law in China[1] and Russia. In previous years it has been known as trade practices law in the United Kingdom and Australia. In the European Union, it is referred to as both antitrust[4] and competition law.[5][6]

The history of competition law reaches back to the Roman Empire. The business practices of market traders, guilds and governments have always been subject to scrutiny, and sometimes severe sanctions. Since the 20th century, competition law has become global.[7] The two largest and most influential systems of competition regulation are United States antitrust law and European Union competition law. National and regional competition authorities across the world have formed international support and enforcement networks.

Modern competition law has historically evolved on a national level to promote and maintain fair competition in markets principally within the territorial boundaries of nation-states. National competition law usually does not cover activity beyond territorial borders unless it has significant effects at nation-state level.[2] Countries may allow for extraterritorial jurisdiction in competition cases based on so-called “effects doctrine”.[2][8] The protection of international competition is governed by international competition agreements. In 1945, during the negotiations preceding the adoption of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1947, limited international competition obligations were proposed within the Charter for an International Trade Organisation. These obligations were not included in GATT, but in 1994, with the conclusion of the Uruguay Round of GATT multilateral negotiations, the World Trade Organization (WTO) was created. The Agreement Establishing the WTO included a range of limited provisions on various cross-border competition issues on a sector specific basis.[9]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1892 – Agnes Smedley, American journalist and writer (d. 1950)[12]
Agnes Smedley (February 23, 1892 – May 6, 1950) was an American journalist and writer, well known for her semi-autobiographical novel Daughter of Earth as well as for her sympathetic chronicling of the Communist forces in the Chinese Civil War. During World War I, she worked in the United States for the independence of India from the United Kingdom, receiving financial support from the government of Germany. Subsequently, she went to China, where she is suspected of acting as a spy for the Comintern. As the lover of Soviet spy Richard Sorge in Shanghai in the early 1930s, she helped get him established for his final and greatest work as spymaster in Tokyo. She also worked on behalf of various causes including women’s rights, birth control, and children’s welfare. Smedley wrote six books, including a novel, reportage, and a biography of the Chinese general Zhu De, reported for newspapers such as New York Call, Frankfurter Zeitung and Manchester Guardian, and wrote for periodicals such as the Modern Review, New Masses, Asia, New Republic, and Nation.[1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Rabbit Trails Galore!
Twisted Sifter: The Shirk Report – Volume 618
 
 
Twisted Sifter: I Was Today Years Old When I Learned About Tadpole Migrations and It’s Amazing to See
 
 
Twisted Sifter: Guy Puts Giant Steel Saw Blades on His Bike and It Works Shockingly Well
 
 
Twisted Sifter: Someone Gave These Birds Guitars and It Was the Best Idea Ever
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: How the Internet Archive Digitizes 3,500 Books a Day–the Hard Way, One Page at a Time
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: De-Stress with 30 Minutes of Relaxing Visuals from Director Hayao Miyazaki
 
 
 
 
Al Macy: Al’s Instant Root Beer Float or Creamsicle
 
 
 
 
By Samantha Hogan, The Maine Monitor, and Agnel Philip, ProPublica: Lawyers Who Were Ineligible to Handle Serious Criminal Charges Were Given Thousands of These Cases Anyway In the only state with no public defenders, people charged with murder and other serious crimes can get assigned attorneys who are legally ineligible to take on their cases. The state claims it was unaware.
 
 
 
 
CutterLight: Chignik Lake in 29 Photos: There is a river…
 
 
 
 
By Jason Asenap, High Country News: ‘Wild Indian’ is much more than just an Indigenous film Lyle Mitchell Corbine Jr.’s new picture pushes Indigenous cinema into the realm of the thriller genre, but does it go far enough?
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By da Bulldog: Accordion Pocket Journal
 
 
By speyegrl: LCD Chalkboard Smart Sign: Running Magic Mirror on a Raspberry Pi ZeroW
 
 

Recipes

By Miriam_A: No Oven-Flat Bread
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Homemade Donut Pan/Tray
 
 
By Kelli Foster, The Kitchn: This Is the One and Only Way I Ever Want to Cook Eggs
 
 
By Linda Larsen, The Spruce Eats: Crazy Crust Pizza
 
 
By Cindee Ness, Taste of Home: Burrito Bake
 
 
By Naomi Tomky, The Kitchn: 13 High-Protein Slow Cooker Recipes
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Beyond Basic Spaghetti Dinners
 
 
By Katie Bandurski, Taste of Home: The Secret Cookie Recipes Grandma (Almost) Wouldn’t Share


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI February 22, 2021

On This Day

1316 – The Battle of Picotin, between Ferdinand of Majorca and the forces of Matilda of Hainaut, ends in victory for Ferdinand.[1]
The Battle of Picotin was fought on 22 February 1316 between the Catalan forces of the infante Ferdinand of Majorca, claimant to the Principality of Achaea, and the forces loyal to Princess Matilda of Hainaut, comprising native levies from the barons loyal to the Princess as well as Burgundian knights. The battle ended in a crushing victory for Ferdinand, but he was later engaged and killed by the troops of Matilda’s husband, Louis of Burgundy, at the Battle of Manolada.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1805 – Sarah Fuller Flower Adams, English poet and hymnwriter (d. 1848)[8]
Sarah Fuller Flower Adams (or Sally Adams)[1] (22 February 1805 – 14 August 1848) was an English poet and hymnwriter, best known for writing the words of the hymn “Nearer, My God, to Thee”.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Cision, The Marriott, Inc.: Marriott International Announces the Unexpected Passing of Arne M. Sorenson, President and CEO
 
 
 
 
Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: What’s in the House economic aid bill; Pfizer says hospitals don’t have to store vaccines in ultra-cold freezers; Rural Texans face disproportionate struggles during winter weather emergency, but many say they can count on neighbors and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Cory Max Montoya, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: 3 Health & Wellness Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Aris Folley, The Hill: New Jersey governor signs bills legalizing marijuana
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Scire, Nieman Lab: The Charleston Post and Courier launches a watchdog project to combat corruption and “news deserts” “Sunlight can disinfect, but South Carolina has lost some light.”
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Distorting The Electron Gun
 
 
 
 

By Paul Voose, Science: Radiocarbon from a 42,000-year-old kauri tree in New Zealand helped unravel Earth’s last magnetic upheaval. JONATHAN PALMER Ancient kauri trees capture last collapse of Earth’s magnetic field
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice, Writers Helping Writers: Story Resolutions: Mastering the Happy-Sad Ending
 
 
 
 

Fierce Telecom: TDS Telecom to double its fiber footprint in 2021 and more ->
 
 
 
 

MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DXLIII): This Dreamy Paris Artist Atelier For Sale; Jodie Foster and her Forgotten French Singing Career; Women’s Secret Confessions 1980s Hotline Commercial; Jacobin Pigeons; A Catalogue for Glasshouses, circa 1901; A Real-Life Yellow Submarine for Rent and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
NSFW

Recipes

The Kitchn: We Tried 4 Ways of Making a Spicy Margarita and Our Favorite Was Super Easy
 
 
By Matea, The Food Network: The Most Delicious Nutella Sourdough Cruffins
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Crispy Buffalo Chicken Salad
 
 
By Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Cotechino
 
 
Chocolate Covered Katie: Vegan Banana Pudding
 
 
Taste of Home Vegetarian Cooking: SUGAR COOKIE CAKE and more ->


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?