Category: FYI

FYI

FYI August 18, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1938 – The Thousand Islands Bridge, connecting New York, United States with Ontario, Canada over the Saint Lawrence River, is dedicated by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The Thousand Islands International Bridge (French: Pont des Mille-îles) is an international bridge system over the Saint Lawrence River connecting northern New York in the United States with southeastern Ontario in Canada. Constructed in 1937, with additions in 1959, the bridges span the Canada–US border in the middle of the Thousand Islands region. All bridges in the system carry two lanes of traffic, one in each direction, with pedestrian sidewalks. The bridge is managed by an American company. The actual international border bridge crossing is a set of two parallel 90 ft (27 m) long bridges between Wellesley Island in the United States and Hill Island in Canada.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1921 – Lydia Litvyak, Russian lieutenant and pilot (d. 1943)
Lydia Vladimirovna Litvyak (Лидия Владимировна Литвяк, (August 18, 1921, in Moscow – August 1, 1943, in Krasnyi Luch), also known as Lilya, was a fighter pilot in the Soviet Air Force during World War II.[1] With five solo victories, soviet propaganda claimed up to twelve solo victories and two to four shared kills in 66 combat sorties.[2][3][4][5][5][6] In about two years of operations, she was the first female fighter pilot to shoot down an enemy aircraft, the first of two female fighter pilots who have earned the title of fighter ace and the holder of the record for the greatest number of kills by a female fighter pilot. She was shot down near Orel during the Battle of Kursk as she attacked a formation of German aeroplanes.

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FYI

 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Anne-Cécile Itier and Her Bugatti Dominated the Early French Racing Scene
 
 
Anne-Cécile Rose-Itier , born Itier le July 31 , 1890 in Pomeys ( Rhône ) and died on March 23 , 1980 in Cannes at the age of 89, nicknamed Chicane mobile , was an eclectic driver and co-driver, rallies , rib races, and on circuits (at great prices, and in endurance ).

Career

Her long competitive career stretched from 1926 ( Paris – Pau race, on Brasier , after her divorce at 31 years old) to 1953 ( Rally Monte Carlo ).

She raced frequently in the Cyclecar category from 1929. From 1931 to 1933, she drove a Bugatti T37 , then a T51 (after a brief passage on T39A associated with José Scaron ) from 1934, alternating with a Fiat 508S Balilla from 1935 .

She was also co-driver with the Englishman Kay Petre on Austin and very often with the German Fritz Huschke von Hanstein on Hanomag Diesel (German champion of cars of 1939 and winner of the Mille Miglia in 1940), with which she even a liaison, after the latter had saved her from death during the rally of Morocco in 1937. Her last race before the war was at his side, during the rally of Monte Carlo of 1939.

In 1935, with Jacques Delorme , Germaine Rouault and Hellé Nice, she founded the USA (Union sportive automobile), quickly becoming the ACI (Association for Independent Drivers) that she will continue to administer until the mid -1960s , under the aegis of the French Motor Sport Federation (FFSA). Mrs. Itier was entrusted with organizing the USA 1939 women’s championship (ten competitors aboard Juvaquatre ), for which the events of June 11 (circuit of Péronne , victory of Yvonne Simon ) and August 6 ( circuit of Comminges , winner Hellé Nice) were able to unfold despite the imminence of the war 1 .

During the Second World War , she helped run Jewish children out of France, despite her previous encounter with Von Hanstein. After the war, she ran again on her former Fiat Balilla, then quickly on Renault 4CV and then participated in the Monte Carlo, from 1948 (co-driver Hellé Nice , starlet of the 1930s ) to 1953 (then aged 58).
 
 
By Julia Muncy: Good Afternoon, Here’s Footage of a Shark Fighting A T-Rex From the Final Sharknado Film
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Martenzie Johnson: How a 32-year-old basketball player plans to play professionally with one arm An electric shock cost Robert Whitaker Jr. his left arm as a child, but he’s never lost his determination to play pro basketball
 
 
 
 
By Max Lakin: Keanu Reeves Is Doing a New Thing: Publishing Books
 
 
 
 
By Daniel Terdiman: NBA star Andre Iguodala is turning more players into tech investors
 
 
 
 
I spent a day at Bulletproof Alpha Labs–here’s what happened
Dave Asprey, founder and CEO of Bulletproof, is considered by many to be the father of modern-day biohacking. Fast Company writer John Converse Townsend recently traveled to Asprey’s home lab on Vancouver Island, in Canada, for a crash course in the Bulletproof lifestyle–complete with high-tech, sci-fi-like machines and, of course, a cup of Bulletproof Coffee made by the cult hero himself.
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall via Hyperallergic: Hundreds of Classical Sculptures from the Uffizi Gallery Now Digitized & Put Online: Explore a Collection of 3D Interactive Scans
 
 
 
 

Flashback
Higher Perspective: The Bizarre Tale Of Melanie Griffith And Her “Pet” Lion
“It was stupid beyond belief,” admitted Melanie Griffith, who as a teenager owned a pet lion.
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 32 Space Saving Storage Ideas That’ll Keep Your Home Organized Don’t be alarmed if your house feels 10x larger and more tidy after these!
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By A. A. Newton: How To Make No-Cook Pasta Sauce From Basically Any Vegetable


 
 

 
 

FYI August 17, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1908 – Fantasmagorie, the first animated cartoon, created by Émile Cohl, is shown in Paris, France.
Fantasmagorie is a 1908 French animated film by Émile Cohl. It is one of the earliest examples of traditional (hand-drawn) animation, and considered by film historians to be the first animated cartoon.[1]

Description

The film largely consists of a stick man moving about and encountering all manner of morphing objects, such as a wine bottle that transforms into a flower which becomes an elephant. There are also sections of live action where the animator’s hands enters the scene. The main character is drawn by the artist’s hand on camera, and the main characters are a clown and a gentleman. Other characters include a woman in a film theater wearing a large hat with gigantic feathers.

The film, in all of its wild transformations, is a direct tribute to the by-then forgotten Incoherent movement. The title is a reference to the fantasmograph, a mid-Nineteenth Century variant of the magic lantern that projected ghostly images that floated across the walls.

Cohl worked on Fantasmagorie from February to either May or June 1908. Despite the short running time, the piece was packed with material devised in a stream of consciousness style. The film was released on August 17, 1908.

Production

The film was created by drawing each frame on paper and then shooting each frame onto negative film, which gave the picture a blackboard look. It was made up of 700 drawings, each of which was exposed twice (animated “on twos”), leading to a running time of almost two minutes. It borrowed from J. Stuart Blackton, the chalk-line effect; filming black lines on white paper, then reversing the negative to make it look like white chalk on a black chalkboard. Blackton and Cohl also borrowed some techniques from Georges Méliès, such as the stop trick.
 
 
By Émile Cohl: Fantasmagorie
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1920 – Lida Moser, American photographer and author (d. 2014)
Lida Moser (August 17, 1920 – August 12, 2014) was an American-born photographer and author, with a career that spanned more than six decades, before retiring in her 90s. She was known for her photojournalism and street photography as a member of both the Photo League [1] and the New York School. Her portfolio includes black and white commercial, portrait and documentary photography, with her work continuing to have an impact.

The Photo League was an early center of American documentary photography in the post war years, with membership including many of the most significant photographers of the 20th century. In a retrospective at the Fraser Gallery in Washington DC, she was described as a pioneer in the field of photojournalism.[2]

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FYI

 
 

 
 
 
 
By Erik Shilling: Here’s How to Destroy Your Manual Transmission (And How to Make it Last)
 
 
 
 
Pierce Vollucci Product Manager: Helping you find useful information fast on Search
 
 
 
 

By Al Cross: Small town of Muscle Shoals made Aretha Queen of Soul
 
 
 
 

By Chris Forrester: Faculty, students welcome new Ernie Pyle, Media scholars
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Farmers must work together to prosper, writes Mary Berry, Wendell Berry’s daughter
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: What does rural culture mean?
 
 
 
 
Kayla Conti On-air trends expert The Keyword: The High Five: Put some R-E-S-P-E-C-T on it
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: ALA Council Rescinds Meeting Rooms: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights
 
 
 
 
By Erin Bartnett: 10 Animals Who Have Broken Into the Library Meet an owl with his own visitor card, bats who take care of rare books, and other wild library fans
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The Life of a Canal Lockmaster, A Pacific Coast Road Trip With NPR, Paisley Abbey’s Out-of-This-World Gargoyle and more ->
 
 

Atlas Obscura: Testing Nuclear Weapons Under Mississippi, A Beer-Lover’s Ultimate Summer Friday and more ->
 
 
 
 
By David W. Chen: Surprise Gift: Free Tuition for All N.Y.U. Medical Students
 
 
The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA: Pays for the entire cost of medical school for all four years, including tuition, fees, books and living expenses for roughly 20 percent of its students. But that program is based on merit, not need.
 
 
 
 
By Nick Fouriezos: Here’s How to Hold Priests Accountable for Abuse
 
 
 
 
By Michelle Bruton: When the Austrian Army Saved the Winter Olympics
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Courtenay: The Very Best Homemade Natural Ant Killer
 
 
 
 
Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: PVC Mosaic Planters
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 14 Topiary Techniques That Are Insanely Popular This Fall You’re going to want to make one of these when you see this.
 
 
 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Basement Laundry Room On A $500 Budget
 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Basement Laundry Room Makeover Two – 4 Problems With The Original Design
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Emily Horton: Fresh summer tomatoes take classic Southern red rice to the next level


 
 

 
 

FYI August 16, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1916 – The Migratory Bird Treaty between Canada and the United States is signed.
The Migratory Bird Treaty or Convention is an environmental treaty between Canada and the United States. It was originally signed on 16 August 1916 by the U.S. and the United Kingdom (representing Canada), entered into force in on 6 December 1916, and has since been amended several times.

Whereas, many species of birds in the course of their annual migrations traverse certain parts of the Dominion of Canada and the United States; and

Whereas, many of these species are of great value as a source of food or in destroying insects which are injurious to forests and forage plants on the public domain, as well as to agricultural crops, in both Canada and the United States, but are nevertheless in danger of extermination through lack of adequate protection during the nesting season or while on their way to and from their breeding grounds;

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British dominions beyond the seas, Emperor of India, and the United States of America, being desirous of saving from indiscriminate slaughter and of insuring the preservation of such migratory birds as are either useful to man or are harmless, have resolved to adopt some uniform system of protection which shall effectively accomplish such objects…[1]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1865 – Mary Gilmore, Australian socialist, poet and journalist (d. 1962)
Dame Mary Jean Gilmore DBE (née Cameron; 16 August 1865 – 3 December 1962) was an Australian writer and journalist known for her prolific contributions to Australian literature and the broader national discourse. She wrote both prose and poetry.

Gilmore was born in rural New South Wales, and spent her childhood in and around the Riverina, living both in small bush settlements and in larger country towns like Wagga Wagga. Gilmore qualified as a schoolteacher at the age of 16, and after a period in the country was posted to Sydney. She involved herself with the burgeoning labour movement, and also became a devotee of the utopian socialism views of William Lane. In 1893, Gilmore and 200 others followed Lane to Paraguay, where they formed the New Australia Colony. She started a family there, but the colony did not live up to expectations and they returned to Australia in 1902.

Drawing on her connections in Sydney, Gilmore found work with The Australian Worker as the editor of its women’s section, a position she held from 1908 to 1931. She also wrote for a variety of other publications, including The Bulletin and The Sydney Morning Herald, becoming known as a campaigner for the welfare of the disadvantaged. Gilmore’s first volume of poetry was brought out in 1910; she published prolifically for the rest of her life, mainly poetry but also memoirs and collections of essays. She wrote on a variety of themes, although the public imagination was particularly captured by her evocative views of country life. Her best known work is “No Foe Shall Gather Our Harvest”, which served as a morale booster during World War II.

Gilmore’s greatest recognition came in later life. She was the doyenne of the Sydney literary world, and became something of a national icon, making frequent appearances in the new media of radio and television. Gilmore maintained her prodigious output into old age, publishing her last book of verse in 1954, aged 89. Two years earlier she had begun writing a new column for the Tribune (the official newspaper of the Communist Party), which she continued for almost a decade. Gilmore died at the age of 97 and was accorded a state funeral, a rare honour for a writer. She has featured on the reverse of the Australian ten-dollar note since 1993.

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FYI

 
 


 
 
Notice the folks are standing? “Don’t be disrespecting Aretha.”


 
 

 
 
 
 
By Dvora Meyers: 1988 Olympic Gymnastics Champion Yelena Shushunova Dies At 49
 
 
Yelena Lvovna Shushunova (Russian: Елена Львовна Шушунова; name sometimes rendered Elena Shushunova; 23 April 1969 – 16 August 2018[1][2]) was a Russian gymnast, World, European, and Olympic Champion. Shushunova is one of five women (Larisa Latynina, Vera Caslavska, Ludmilla Tourischeva and Lilia Podkopayeva are the other four) who has won the grand slam of All-Around titles: Olympics, World Championships, European/Continental Championships.[3] Shushunova was renowned for pioneering complex skills as well as for her explosive and dynamic tumbling and high consistency. Unfortunately, she died from complications of pneumonia on August 16, 2018.

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By Ed Cara: FDA Finally Approves a Cheaper, Generic Version of the EpiPen
 
 
 
 
By Rhett Jones: San Francisco’s So Literally Shitty, It’s Getting a ‘Poop Patrol’
The San Francisco Chronicle reports:

In about a month, a team of five Public Works staffers will begin patrolling the alleys around Polk Street and other hot spots in a vehicle equipped with a steam cleaner.

They’ll begin their shifts in the afternoon, as the city starts losing its sheen from overnight cleaning. The Poop Patrol’s mission? To spot and clean piles of feces before anybody complains about them.

“We’re trying to be proactive,” explained Public Works director Mohammed Nuru. “We’re actually out there looking for it.”
 
 
 
 

By Matt Novak: These Medical Miracles Were Supposed to Happen by the Year 2000
 
 
 
 
By Matt Novak: The 1950s Guide to Proper Telephone Etiquette
 
 
 
 
By Janet Burns: Next-Gen Baggies Are Transforming Legal Weed
 
 
 
 
By Danette Chavez: Eric Andre and Josh Weinstein on Disenchantment, Poochie, and why many comedians consider law school
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Spencer Turcott: Local newspaper crossword at a cross paths
“We actually lost subscribers over the crossword” →
New ownership meant a new crossword, but readers “found it too cryptic.” A replacement puzzle was too “difficult to follow.” The solution: running two crosswords daily.

 
 
 
 
By Rose Ciotta: Here’s how collaboration can connect a volunteer editor with your newsroom Do you need extra help to carry out an investigative project?
 
 
 
 

By Avery anapol: White supremacist rally leader gets yelled at by his dad during livestream
“You get out of my room!” That’s how Jason Kessler’s father interrupted a livestream between the “Unite the Right” rally organizer and a fellow White nationalist. Posted June 28, the clip went viral after Kessler’s dismal failure marking the anniversary of his 2017 Charlottesville gathering with a rally in Washington, D.C., last weekend. Kessler’s father can be heard demanding, “I want this to stop in my room, Jason.” Kessler, 34, then explains that the costs of legal action stemming from last year’s deadly violence forced him to move in with his parents.

 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: Votes for Women: The 19th Amendment
 
 
 
 
Via Aeon: NASA Creates a Visualization That Sets Breathtaking Footage of the Moon to Claude Debussy’s “Clair de Lune” (Moonlight)
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Segran: This foot surgeon invented killer heels that won’t kill your feet A podiatrist launches a glamorous shoe startup, making the case that the ultimate luxury is being able to walk without pain.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By kools: Tiny Dumpster House Trailer
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: Make Your Home Smell Amazing With These DIY Fall Scent Ideas Cinnamon, vanilla, pumpkin spice, who wouldn’t want their home to smell like this?
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Limecello: Dark Chocolate Espresso S’mores
 
 
 
 
By ButterMyBiscuits: Organic Black Cherry and Jalapeño Beef Jerky


 
 

 
 

FYI August 15, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1185 – The cave city of Vardzia is consecrated by Queen Tamar of Georgia.
Vardzia (Georgian: ვარძია) is a cave monastery site in southern Georgia, excavated from the slopes of the Erusheti Mountain on the left bank of the Kura River, thirty kilometres from Aspindza. The main period of construction was the second half of the twelfth century. The caves stretch along the cliff for some five hundred meters and in up to nineteen tiers. The Church of the Dormition, dating to the 1180s during the golden age of Tamar and Rustaveli, has an important series of wall paintings. The site was largely abandoned after the Ottoman takeover in the sixteenth century. Now part of a state heritage reserve, the extended area of Vardzia-Khertvisi has been submitted for future inscription on the UNESCO World Heritage List.[1][2][3][4]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1863 – Aleksey Krylov, Russian mathematician and engineer (d. 1945)
Aleksey Nikolaevich Krylov (Russian: Алексе́й Никола́евич Крыло́в; August 15 [O.S. 3 August] 1863 – October 26, 1945) was a Russian naval engineer, applied mathematician and memoirist.

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FYI

 
 
By Melanie Ehrenkranz: A Group of Engineers Say They’ve Created a Way to Detect Bombs and Guns Using Basic Wifi
 
 
 
 
I know I’ve shown this boat before and its self-righting capability still amazes me.
By Erik Shilling: A Life-Saving Charity Just Created the Ultimate Lifeboat
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Jesse Hassenger: Dogs get their own origin story with the gorgeous, old-fashioned survival yarn Alpha
 
 
 
 
By Sean Michael Regan: Medicine Ignored This Insulin Problem. Hackers Solved It.
 
 
 
 
By Ben Freeland: Is My Record Collection Trying To Kill Me? The chicken/egg dilemma of dark music and clinical depression
 
 
 
 
By TOR.com: Download a Free Ebook of Acheron by Sherrilyn Kenyon Before August 18, 2018!
 
 
 
 
By Bob Mayer: Who Were the ENIAC Six?
 
 
 
 
Disgusting & disrespectful. If our nation’s capitol is burning what else is going on?
By John Bowden: Pearl Jam criticized for poster featuring dead Trump, burning White House
 
 
 
 
Criminal charges?
By Emily Birnbaum: University of Maryland accepts responsibility in football player’s death
The president of the University of Maryland said during a press conference on Tuesday that the school accepts “legal and moral responsibility” for the death of football player Jordan McNair, who died of heatstroke after a strenuous practice.
 
 
 
 

By Matt Enis: State Library of Ohio Launches Custom Infographic Tool
 
 
 
 
By Aris Folley: Company to ship Ruth Bader Ginsburg action figures in October
 
 
 
 
By Jen Harper: 6 Ridiculous Goodnight Moon Parodies
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The Hidden History of U.S. Civil War Tattoos, Washington’s Fence of Doors and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: First year after childbirth deadly for opioid-addicted women
 
 
 
 
Raja Ayyagari Product Manager, Google Photos: Upgrading your paid storage with Google One
 
 
 
 

By Ernie Smith: Retail’s Tech Champion Sears and Roebuck—a firm that has seen better days—helped sell the public on computers, video games, and online services. (They made great catalogs, too.)
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: What English Would Sound Like If It Was Pronounced Phonetically
 

 

 
 
 
 
By Ainsley Harris: This angel network wants to mobilize 100,000 women investors
 
 
 
 
By Jonathan Ringen: The inside story of how McDonald’s innovated the Quarter Pounder
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Emy Flint | Semigloss Design Hometalker Frederick, MD: Anthropologie Inspired Ombre Curtains With Fringe
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: Sleep Better at Night With These 9 Cleaning Bed Hacks The best tips on cleaning everything from your pillows to your mattress
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #100)
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI August 14, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1457 – Publication of the Mainz Psalter, the first book to feature a printed date of publication and printed colophon.
The Mainz Psalter was the second major book printed with movable type in the West;[1] the first was the Gutenberg Bible. It is a psalter commissioned by the Mainz archbishop in 1457. The Psalter introduced several innovations: it was the first book to feature a printed date of publication, a printed colophon, two sizes of type, printed decorative initials, and the first to be printed in three colours.[1] The colophon also contains the first example of a printer’s mark.[2] It was the first important publication issued by Johann Fust and Peter Schoeffer following their split from Johannes Gutenberg.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1848 – Margaret Lindsay Huggins, Anglo-Irish astronomer and author (d. 1915)
Margaret Lindsay, Lady Huggins (14 August 1848 in Dublin – 24 March 1915 in London),[1] born Margaret Lindsay Murray, was an Irish-English scientific investigator and astronomer.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8] With her husband William Huggins she was a pioneer in the field of spectroscopy and co-authored the Atlas of Representative Stellar Spectra (1899).[9][10]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

By Josh Jones: Aretha Franklin’s Most Powerful Early Performances: “Respect,” “Chain of Fools,” “Say a Little Prayer” & More
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday: Watch 13 Comedians Take “The Bob Ross Challenge” & Help Raise Money for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
 
 
 
 
Prabhu Balasubramanian Group Product Manager, Google Home: Pump up the jams: New music streaming services now available on Google Home
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Large ISPs blame consumer protections for their disregard of rural America, columnist writes
 
 
 
 
By Laura Hazard Owen: I want bad news and I want it fast: That’s the business model for Factal, a business-focused company from the founders of Breaking News
 
 
 
 
Mike Copper: Alaska yields rush of golden memories
 
 
 
 
By Katie Van Syckle: Meet The Times’s ‘Mini Detective Agency’
 
 
 
 
By Melissa Locker: Retail apocalypse watch: Office Depot is now moonlighting as a coworking space
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Check Out All The Weird Jeeps At This Huge Jeep Party
 
 
 
 
Effects of pressurization?
By Ashley Reese: Thankfully, You Can Still Bring Your Miniature Horse on a Southwest Flight
 
 
 
 
By Todd Bishop: Next week! Join us for a GeekWire podcast event and ‘Thirsty Thursday’ rooftop meetup in Seattle
 
 
 
 
By Abbey Perreault: How England Got Its Curvy Cucumbers Straightened Out
 
 
 
 
Should Police Turn to Crowdsourced Online Sleuthing?
 
 
 
 
By Matt Blitz: From Death Traps to Disneyland: The 600-Year History of the Roller Coaster Rides may be faster and taller over the centuries, but the rules of physics still apply.
 
 
 
 
Creating a better world for pets: VCA Animal Hospital’s – From 3 founders to 27,000 employees
 
 
 
 
By Mike Hoss: The Magic Yarn Project – Locals make dozens of wigs, caps for children with cancer
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Wildcat Man and Robin: Building a Wood-Framed Panelized Yurt
 
 
 
 
Chas’ crazy Creations: Making Magnets to Your Style! Great Gift Ideas!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 16 Ways To Totally Transform Your Kitchen Cabinets Today Instantly increase your home’s value — NO Renovations Required!
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Tom Harkins: 11 Ground Beef Recipes You’re Going to Love


 
 

 
 

FYI August 13, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1918 – Women enlist in the United States Marine Corps for the first time. Opha May Johnson is the first woman to enlist.
Military service
Johnson became the first known woman to enlist in the Marine Corps on 13 August 1918, when she joined the Marine Corps Reserve during World War I.[7] Johnson, due to being first in line that day,[10] was the first of over 300 women to enlist in the Marine Corps Reserve during World War I.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1914 – Grace Bates, American mathematician and academic (d. 1996)
Grace Elizabeth Bates (13 August 1914 – 19 November 1996) was an American mathematician and one of few women in the United States to be granted a Ph.D. in mathematics in the 1940s. She became an emeritus professor at Mount Holyoke College. As well as teaching, she wrote papers on algebra and probability theory and two books: The Real Number System and Modern Algebra, Second Course.[1] Throughout her own education, Bates overcame obstructions to her pursuit of knowledge, opening the way for future women learners.[2]

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FYI

 
 
By Melanie Ehrenkranz: The Vigilantes on Facebook Who Stream To Catch a Predator-Style Ambushes of Alleged Pedophiles
 
 
 
 
By Dan Neilan: A mathematician has solved a 50-year-old Beatles mystery
 
 

 
 
By Nate Hoffelder: The New Gmail: 12 Gmail Hacks Every Writer Can Use
 
 
 
 
By Lorraine Berry: The Language of Grief: How Writers Write About Loss
 
 
 
 

By Keith Rice: Weekend Rec: John Green’s Now-Classic Debut, Looking for Alaska
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The Appeal of Gas Stations, Scotland’s Modern Maze, Pacific Grove Butterfly House and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Eden Ashley: The Honest Truth About Being A Full-Time Blogger
 
 
 
 
By Stephanie Donovan: Blog Profiles: Yoga Blogs
 
 
 
 

By David S. Wallens: Full Review and Driving Impressions: 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata ND2
 
 
 
 

By Erik Shilling: The 2019 Mazda Miata’s Extra Power Makes a Great Car Better


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI August 12, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1865 – Joseph Lister, British surgeon and scientist, performs 1st antiseptic surgery.
Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister, OM PC PRS FRS (5 April 1827 – 10 February 1912[1]), known between 1883 and 1897 as Sir Joseph Lister, Bt., was a British surgeon and a pioneer of antiseptic surgery.

He promoted the idea of sterile surgery while working at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Lister successfully introduced carbolic acid (now known as phenol) to sterilise surgical instruments and to clean wounds.

Applying Louis Pasteur’s advances in microbiology, Lister championed the use of carbolic acid as an antiseptic, so that it became the first widely used antiseptic in surgery. He first suspected it would prove an adequate disinfectant because it was used to ease the stench from fields irrigated with sewage waste. He presumed it was safe because fields treated with carbolic acid produced no apparent ill-effects on the livestock that later grazed upon them.

Lister’s work led to a reduction in post-operative infections and made surgery safer for patients, distinguishing him as the “father of modern surgery”.[2]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1831 – Helena Blavatsky, Russian theosophist and scholar (d. 1891)
Helena Petrovna Blavatsky (Russian: Еле́на Петро́вна Блава́тская, Yelena Petrovna Blavatskaya; 12 August [O.S. 31 July] 1831 – 8 May 1891) was a Russian occultist, philosopher, and author who co-founded the Theosophical Society in 1875. She gained an international following as the leading theoretician of Theosophy, the esoteric religion that the society promoted.

Born into an aristocratic Russian-German family in Yekaterinoslav, Ukraine, Blavatsky traveled widely around the Russian Empire as a child. Largely self-educated, she developed an interest in Western esotericism during her teenage years. According to her later claims, in 1849 she embarked on a series of world travels, visiting Europe, the Americas, and India, claiming that during this period she encountered a group of spiritual adepts, the “Masters of the Ancient Wisdom”, who sent her to Shigatse, Tibet, where they trained her to develop a deeper understanding of the synthesis of religion, philosophy and science. Both contemporary critics and later biographers have argued that some or all of these foreign visits were fictitious, and that she spent this period in Europe. By the early 1870s, Blavatsky was involved in the Spiritualist movement; although defending the genuine existence of Spiritualist phenomena, she argued against the mainstream Spiritualist idea that the entities contacted were the spirits of the dead. Relocating to the United States in 1873, she befriended Henry Steel Olcott and rose to public attention as a spirit medium, attention that included public accusations of fraudulence.

In New York City, Blavatsky co-founded the Theosophical Society with Olcott and William Quan Judge in 1875. In 1877 she published Isis Unveiled, a book outlining her Theosophical world-view. Associating it closely with the esoteric doctrines of Hermeticism and Neoplatonism, Blavatsky described Theosophy as “the synthesis of science, religion and philosophy”, proclaiming that it was reviving an “Ancient Wisdom” which underlay all the world’s religions. In 1880 she and Olcott moved to India, where the Society was allied to the Arya Samaj, a Hindu reform movement. That same year, while in Ceylon she and Olcott became, supposedly, the first people from the United States to formally convert to Buddhism. Although opposed by the British administration, Theosophy spread rapidly in India but experienced internal problems after Blavatsky was accused of producing fraudulent paranormal phenomena. Amid ailing health, in 1885 she returned to Europe, there establishing the Blavatsky Lodge in London. Here she published The Secret Doctrine, a commentary on what she claimed were ancient Tibetan manuscripts, as well as two further books, The Key to Theosophy and The Voice of the Silence. She died of influenza.

Blavatsky was a controversial figure during her lifetime, championed by supporters as an enlightened guru and derided as a fraudulent charlatan and plagiarist by critics. Her Theosophical doctrines influenced the spread of Hindu and Buddhist ideas in the West as well as the development of Western esoteric currents like Ariosophy, Anthroposophy, and the New Age Movement.

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FYI

 
 
By Jordan Ritter Conn: Waiting for a Modern Music City Miracle As Nashville’s population explodes and the music industry continues to evolve in the digital age, what does the dream of making it big as a country artist in the 10-year town even look like in 2018?
 
 
 
 
By Laura Robeson: Surviving Myself
We need to ask questions, we need to talk about stories like this.
There is no shame in it. Depression is a health issue like anything else. A brain malfunction. A sometimes treatable and sometimes fatal health issue. Please ask questions, please talk about this stuff. Say how you’re feeling, ask how to get help. Those who love you won’t know you need help unless you tell them. The mental health care system is a terribly complicated and imperfect system, but those of us who have navigated it a bit can help others through the hoops and mazes.

It can be really, REALLY hard to ask for help, trust me I know. But I promise it’s better to do it sooner rather than later, because not everybody survives themselves.
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: New Resource: Anti-Defamation League Launches ADL H.E.A.T. (Hate, Extremism, Anti-Semitism, Terrorism) Map
 
 
H.E.A.T. Map
 
 
 
 
Shane Parrish (Farnam Street): Thinking in Algorithms: My Conversation with Ali Almossawi [The Knowledge Project Ep. #38]
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls – Breakfast Links: Week of August 6, 2018
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Polish Poet and Nobel Laureate Wisława Szymborska on Great Love, Bluets: Maggie Nelson on the Color Blue as a Lens on Memory, Loneliness, and the Paradoxes of Love and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Harley-Davidson Servi-Car: Forest Cadillac Service Rig
 
 
 
 

By Jeff Laverly: Most Looked At in America: 1982 Excalibur Series IV
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By JenFoxBot: A Beginner’s Guide to Microcontrollers
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: Top Cleaning Tips You Need To Know For “2017” Clean home, peaceful mind.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Adina Mayo: Sweet Potato and Cranberry ‘Muffins’
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI August 11, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
3114 BC – The Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, used by several pre-Columbian Mesoamerican civilizations, notably the Maya, begins.
The Mesoamerican Long Count calendar is a non-repeating, vigesimal (base-20) and base-18 calendar used by several pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures, most notably the Maya. For this reason, it is often known as the Maya (or Mayan) Long Count calendar. Using a modified vigesimal tally, the Long Count calendar identifies a day by counting the number of days passed since a mythical creation date that corresponds to August 11, 3114 BCE in the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.[n 1] The Long Count calendar was widely used on monuments.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1897 – Enid Blyton, English author, poet, and educator (d. 1968)
Enid Mary Blyton (11 August 1897 – 28 November 1968) was an English children’s writer whose books have been among the world’s best-sellers since the 1930s, selling more than 600 million copies. Blyton’s books are still enormously popular, and have been translated into 90 languages; her first book, Child Whispers, a 24-page collection of poems, was published in 1922. She wrote on a wide range of topics including education, natural history, fantasy, mystery, and biblical narratives and is best remembered today for her Noddy, Famous Five, and Secret Seven series.

Following the commercial success of her early novels such as Adventures of the Wishing-Chair (1937) and The Enchanted Wood (1939), Blyton went on to build a literary empire, sometimes producing fifty books a year in addition to her prolific magazine and newspaper contributions. Her writing was unplanned and sprang largely from her unconscious mind; she typed her stories as events unfolded before her. The sheer volume of her work and the speed with which it was produced led to rumours that Blyton employed an army of ghost writers, a charge she vigorously denied.

Blyton’s work became increasingly controversial among literary critics, teachers and parents from the 1950s onwards, because of the alleged unchallenging nature of her writing and the themes of her books, particularly the Noddy series. Some libraries and schools banned her works, which the BBC had refused to broadcast from the 1930s until the 1950s because they were perceived to lack literary merit. Her books have been criticised as being elitist, sexist, racist, xenophobic and at odds with the more liberal environment emerging in post-war Britain, but they have continued to be best-sellers since her death in 1968.

Blyton felt she had a responsibility to provide her readers with a strong moral framework, so she encouraged them to support worthy causes. In particular, through the clubs she set up or supported, she encouraged and organised them to raise funds for animal and paediatric charities. The story of Blyton’s life was dramatised in a BBC film entitled Enid, featuring Helena Bonham Carter in the title role and first broadcast in the United Kingdom on BBC Four in 2009. There have also been several adaptations of her books for stage, screen and television.


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FYI

 
 
By Whitney Kimball: Arvonne Fraser, Who Tirelessly Battled Sexism in Government, Has Died at 92
 
 
Arvonne Skelton Fraser (September 1, 1925 – August 7, 2018) was an American women’s rights advocate and political campaigner.[1][2] She held the position of Senior Fellow Emerita at the Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota, and from 1993–1994 was the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.[1][2] She also managed the political campaigns of her husband Donald M. Fraser during his career, from 1954 to 1979.[1]

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Great comments!
By Elizabeth Werth: There’s a Model T Race With Pigs as Co-Drivers, Because of Course There Is
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Fighter Pilot, Racing Driver, Prisoner of War, Transgender Pioneer: The Incredible Story of Roberta Cowell
 
 
Roberta Elizabeth Marshall Cowell (8 April 1918[1] – 11 October 2011) was a racing driver and Second World War fighter pilot. She was the first known British trans woman to undergo sex reassignment surgery.[2]

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By Gary Price: Toronto Public Library Invites the City to Write its Story
 
 
 
 
By Timothy Inklebarger: A Patron Wants to Print a Gun: Now What? ALA provides resources for drafting policies on 3D printer use
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: New Resource: Indiana University and Uffizi Gallery Unveil Website Featuring First Set Of 3D, Digitized Artifacts
 
 
 
 

By Emily Siner: What Vanderbilt Archivists Have Learned From 50 Years Of Watching The Evening News
 
 
 
 
I do believe some people should be given a second chance but one must take into account the severity of their “criminal” actions. Surprised Tyson Foods does not do background checks. Tyson Foods does not care about a person’s history with crime or mental concerns? What about the safety of their workers and families? Murderers, rapists, pedophiles, thieves, pyromaniacs, driving under the influence, addicts/bingers – Tyson welcomes all?
By Carly Stern: Why You Should Hire Someone Who Went to Prison
 
 
 
 
By Christina Grant – VIDEO: Behind the Bylines with Katie Berning – Steamboat Pilot and Today
 
 
 
 
By Paul Bradshaw: 7 ideas for things to do over the summer while preparing to start a journalism course
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Man who won Pulitzer with photo on his last day with Charlottesville paper says he thinks about it every day
 
 
 
 
By Harry McCracken: Samsung’s Galaxy Note 9 and the triumph of the phablet How a class of device that initially seemed silly–and had a silly name–came to own the smartphone market.
 
 
 
 
By Joe Berkowitz: No, troll, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez does not owe you a debate
 
 
 
 
By Eillie Anzilotti: How the Weather Channel is documenting the damage of climate change A new series on The Weather Channel delves into the places around the world where droughts and floods are forcing people to uproot.
 
 
 
 
By Kat Boogard: 3 Better Ways to Say “It’s Actually Not My Fault”
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smith: Pens for Pennies
How cheap ballpoint pens, which are easy to lose and easy to make, changed the world due to their sheer disposability. They’re really freaking cheap.
 
 
 
 
Once again – just ’cause I love the history and the dressing! Thechive: “If you’re wearing cowboy clothes, you’re ranch dressing.” (bawwwwah!)
By Ernie Smith: Let’s Get Sauced
Yes, this is an article about ranch dressing. And yes, ranch dressing was invented at Hidden Valley Ranch. Here’s some stuff you didn’t know about ranch.

It started in the Alaskan bush, where businessman Steve Henson—who played cook on top of his main gig as a plumber—came up with an idea to help calm down the workers annoyed that they had to eat salad.

“It’s tough to feed men up in those bush jobs,” the Nebraska native told Los Angeles Times food reporter Sergio Ortiz in 1999. “If they don’t like something, they’re as likely to throw it at the cook as they are to walk out cursing. I had to come up with something to keep them happy.”
 
 
 
 
The California Weather Blog: July 2018 warmest month in California history; unprecedented early-season wildfire activity continues
 
 
 
 
By Jill Griffin: The Value Of A Well-Written Thank-You Note
 
 
 
 
By Muna Danish: The California Report – PHOTOS: The ‘Top Dogs’ at the World Dog Surfing Championships
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 17 DIY Projects You Can Start And Finish Tonight Great activity after work or school
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 30 Great Jar Ideas You Have To Try The ingenious mason jar projects you never even thought of!
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI August 10, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1813 – Instituto Nacional, is founded by the Chilean patriot José Miguel Carrera. It is Chile’s oldest and most prestigious school. Its motto is Labor Omnia Vincit, which means “Work conquers all things”.
Instituto Nacional General José Miguel Carrera, often shortened to Instituto Nacional (National Institute), founded on August 10, 1813 by the Chilean patriot José Miguel Carrera, officially Liceo Ex A-0 – Instituto Nacional General José Miguel Carrera, is Chile’s oldest learning institution and its most prestigious school. Its motto is ‘Labor Omnia Vincit’, which means “Hard work kongquers all”.

It is an all-male public school teaching 7th and 8th grade of the basic level (Educación Básica) and 1st through 4th grade of the intermediate level (Educación Media). It is located in downtown Santiago, Chile, neighboring the University of Chile’s main campus. The exact location is Arturo Prat #33, Santiago, Chile.

Instituto Nacional is considered by many to be one of the best schools in Chile, and the most prestigious one.[1]

Many Chilean presidents and other notable personalities have studied at this all-male school.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1908 – Rica Erickson, Australian botanist, historian, and author (d. 2009)
Frederica Lucy “Rica” Erickson AM, née Sandilands, (10 August 1908 – 8 September 2009) was an Australian naturalist, botanical artist, historian, author and teacher. Without any formal scientific training, she wrote extensively on botany and birds, as well as genealogy and general history. Erickson authored ten books, co-authored four, was editor of twelve, and author or co-author of numerous papers and articles that have been printed in popular, scientific and encyclopaedic publications.[1]

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FYI

 
 

By Yessenia Funes: NOAA’s First All-Female Hurricane Hunter Crew Flew Fearlessly Into Hurricane Hector
 
 
 
 
By Kate Bernot: 5 foods that I, a sane person, cook in my Instant Pot regularly
 
 
 
 
By Bianca Bosker: The Nastiest Feud in Science A Princeton geologist has endured decades of ridicule for arguing that the fifth extinction was caused not by an asteroid but by a series of colossal volcanic eruptions. But she’s reopened that debate.
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Federal appeals court tells EPA to ban pesticide chlorpyrifos
 
 
Chlorpyrifos (CPS), sold under many brand names, is an organophosphate pesticide used to kill a number of pests including insects and worms. It is used on crops, animals, and buildings. It was introduced in 1965 by Dow Chemical Company. It acts on the nervous system of insects by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase.

Chlorpyrifos is considered moderately hazardous to humans by the World Health Organization.[6] Exposure surpassing recommended levels has been linked to neurological effects, persistent developmental disorders and autoimmune disorders. Exposure during pregnancy may harm the mental development of children, and most home use was banned in 2001 in the U.S.[7] In agriculture, it is “one of the most widely used organophosphate insecticides” in the United States, and before being phased out for residential use was one of the most used residential insecticides.[8] On March 29, 2017, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt denied a petition to ban chlorpyrifos.[9] On August 9, 2018, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the EPA to ban the sale of chlorpyrifos in the United States within 60 days.[10]

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By Al Cross: Head of online publishers’ group says his members ‘fill the gaps’ in local news coverage of California wildfires
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: Roller Skating in a Corset and Bustle
 

 
 
 
 

Zebra finches fire up brain regions and vibrate their vocal cords in ways that mimic singing, even while asleep. (Flickr/Michael Lawton)


By Katherine J. Wu: Zebra Finches Dream a Little Dream of Melody
 
 
 
 
By Jesus Diaz: How the #VanLife movement is influencing car design
 
 
 
 
By Lydia Dishman: Move over LinkedIn, Facebook wants to be the place to find a mentor
 
 
By Lydia Dishman: Ten Thousand Coffees – This Startup Wants To Help You Use Facebook To Find A Mentor
 
 
 
 
By Lydia Dishman: The bus tours tackling the workplace gender gap one city at a time
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 31 Coastal Decor Ideas Perfect For Your Home Love the beach? Try these coastal decor ideas now!

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI August 09, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

 
 
1944 – Continuation War: The Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive, the largest offensive launched by Soviet Union against Finland during the Second World War, ends to a strategic stalemate. Both Finnish and Soviet troops at the Finnish front dug to defensive positions, and the front remains stable until the end of the war.
The Vyborg–Petrozavodsk Offensive or Karelian offensive[Notes 3] was a strategic operation by the Soviet Leningrad and Karelian Fronts against Finland on the Karelian Isthmus and East Karelia fronts of the Continuation War, on the Eastern Front of World War II. The Soviet forces captured East Karelia and Viborg. After that, however, the fighting reached a stalemate.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1915 – Mareta West, American astronomer and geologist (d. 1998)
Mareta N. West (August 9, 1915 – November 2, 1998[1]) was an American astrogeologist who in the 1960s chose the site of the first manned lunar landing, Apollo 11. She was the first female astrogeologist. Her cremated remains were launched into space.

Early life
West was born August 9, 1915. She received her bachelor’s degree in geology from the University of Oklahoma where she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority.[2]

West was a third-generation Oklahoman, her grandparents having moved to Indian Territory in 1889.[2]

Career
In the 1940s, West worked as a petroleum geologist in the oil and gas industry before becoming the first woman geologist hired by the United States Geological Survey in Arizona.[2] She was the first woman astrogeologist.[2]

West chose the site of the Apollo 11 first manned lunar landing.[2]

Publications
Nuclear Power Reactor Sites in the Southeastern United States, 1978.
West Side of the Moon

Cremated remains launched into space
Her cremated remains were launched into space aboard a SpaceLoft-XL rocket on April 28, 2007 as part of the first commercial attempt to launch human remains for lunar “burial”.[3] This was a sub-orbital launch, and the cremains were recovered afterwards. They were launched again on August 2, 2008, aboard a Falcon 1 rocket. The intended destination of this flight was low Earth orbit, however the rocket failed two minutes after launch.[4]

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
Beautiful!
By cody Cepeda: 2-year-old defies the odds, learns to walk despite spine condition
 
 
 
 
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Call 1-800-273-8255
CBS: “Superman” actress Margot Kidder’s death ruled a suicide
 
 
 
 

By Jason Torchinsky: Tell Us What The Hell These Two Planes Think Is So Damn Funny
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: The World’s Fastest Creature Is Not What You Think
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Radio Report: “In Rural Texas, Libraries Anchor Small Towns But Struggle to Stay Afloat”
 
 
 
 
By Katisha Smith: The 10 Children’s Books You Need to Create Lifelong Book Lovers
 
 
Gretchen Rubin Interview: Vivek Wadhwa and Alex Salkever – “Reading Is the Best Habit for Lifelong Learning, and It Helps with Other Skills like Concentration and Meditation.”
 
 
 
 
By Aris Folley: Brock Turner loses appeal to overturn sexual assault conviction
 
 
 
 
By Brett Simon: Convert Your Broadcast Voice to Print: 5 Tips From a Former TV Reporter
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Rural telcos say Verizon lied about rural 4G LTE coverage
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: How To Clean Your Toilet From Top To Bottom
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: See What 14 Highly Organized People Do Not Put On The Kitchen Counter If you hate clutter, here’s what you have to keep off your countertops!
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes