Category: FYI

FYI

FYI July 06, 2020

On This Day

371 BC – The Battle of Leuctra shatters Sparta’s reputation of military invincibility
The Battle of Leuctra (Greek: Λεῦκτρα, Leûktra) was a battle fought on 6 July 371 BC between the Boeotians led by the Thebans, and the Spartans along with their allies[2] amidst the post-Corinthian War conflict. The battle took place in the neighbourhood of Leuctra, a village in Boeotia in the territory of Thespiae.[2] The Theban victory shattered Sparta’s immense influence over the Greek peninsula, which Sparta had gained long before its victory in the Peloponnesian War a generation earlier.

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Born On This Day

1912 – Molly Yard, American feminist (d. 2005)
Mary Alexander “Molly” Yard (July 6, 1912 – September 21, 2005) was an American feminist of the late 20th century who was an assistant to First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and later a U.S. administrator, social activist and feminist, who served as National Organization for Women (NOW)’s eighth president from 1987 to 1991 and was a link between first and second-wave feminism.

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FYI

Charles Edward Daniels (October 28, 1936 – July 6, 2020)[5] was an American singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist[6] known for his contributions to Southern rock, country, and bluegrass music. He was best known for his number-one country hit “The Devil Went Down to Georgia”. Daniels was active as a singer and musician since the 1950s. He was inducted into the Cheyenne Frontier Days Hall of Fame in 2002,[7] the Grand Ole Opry in 2008,[8] the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum in 2009,[9] and the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2016.[10]

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Ennio Morricone, OMRI[1] (Italian: [ˈɛnnjo morriˈkoːne]; 10 November 1928 – 6 July 2020) was an Italian composer, orchestrator, conductor, and trumpet player who wrote music in a wide range of styles. Morricone composed over 400 scores for cinema and television, as well as over 100 classical works. His score to The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) is considered one of the most influential soundtracks in history[2] and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.[3] His filmography includes over 70 award-winning films, all Sergio Leone’s films since A Fistful of Dollars, all Giuseppe Tornatore’s films since Cinema Paradiso, The Battle of Algiers, Dario Argento’s Animal Trilogy, 1900, Exorcist II, Days of Heaven, several major films in French cinema, in particular the comedy trilogy La Cage aux Folles I, II, III and Le Professionnel, as well as The Thing, Once Upon A Time In America, The Mission, The Untouchables, Mission to Mars, Bugsy, Disclosure, In the Line of Fire, Bulworth, Ripley’s Game and The Hateful Eight.[4]

After playing the trumpet in jazz bands in the 1940s, he became a studio arranger for RCA Victor and in 1955 started ghost writing for film and theatre. Throughout his career, he composed music for artists such as Paul Anka, Mina, Milva, Zucchero and Andrea Bocelli. From 1960 to 1975, Morricone gained international fame for composing music for Westerns and—with an estimated 10 million copies sold—Once Upon a Time in the West is one of the best-selling scores worldwide.[5] From 1966 to 1980, he was a main member of Il Gruppo, one of the first experimental composers collectives, and in 1969 he co-founded Forum Music Village, a prestigious recording studio. From the 1970s, Morricone excelled in Hollywood, composing for prolific American directors such as Don Siegel, Mike Nichols, Brian De Palma, Barry Levinson, Oliver Stone, Warren Beatty, John Carpenter and Quentin Tarantino. In 1977, he composed the official theme for the 1978 FIFA World Cup. He continued to compose music for European productions, such as Marco Polo, La piovra, Nostromo, Fateless, Karol and En mai, fais ce qu’il te plait. Morricone’s music has been reused in television series, including The Simpsons and The Sopranos, and in many films, including Inglourious Basterds and Django Unchained. He also scored seven Westerns for Sergio Corbucci, Duccio Tessari’s Ringo duology and Sergio Sollima’s The Big Gundown and Face to Face. Morricone worked extensively for other film genres with directors such as Bernardo Bertolucci, Mauro Bolognini, Giuliano Montaldo, Roland Joffé, Roman Polanski and Henri Verneuil. His acclaimed soundtrack for The Mission (1986)[6] was certified gold in the United States. The album Yo-Yo Ma Plays Ennio Morricone stayed 105 weeks on the Billboard Top Classical Albums.[7]

Morricone’s best-known compositions include “The Ecstasy of Gold”, “Se Telefonando”, “Man with a Harmonica”, “Here’s to You”, the UK No. 2 single “Chi Mai”, “Gabriel’s Oboe” and “E Più Ti Penso”. In 1971, he received a “Targa d’Oro” for worldwide sales of 22 million,[8] and by 2016 Morricone had sold over 70 million records worldwide.[9] In 2007, he received the Academy Honorary Award “for his magnificent and multifaceted contributions to the art of film music.” He was nominated for a further six Oscars. In 2016, Morricone received his first competitive Academy Award for his score to Quentin Tarantino’s film The Hateful Eight, at the time becoming the oldest person ever to win a competitive Oscar. His other achievements include three Grammy Awards, three Golden Globes, six BAFTAs, ten David di Donatello, eleven Nastro d’Argento, two European Film Awards, the Golden Lion Honorary Award and the Polar Music Prize in 2010. Morricone has influenced many artists from film scoring to other styles and genres, including Hans Zimmer,[10] Danger Mouse,[11] Dire Straits,[12] Muse,[13] Metallica,[14] and Radiohead.[15]

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By Caroline Linton, CBS News: Nick Cordero, Broadway actor who battled COVID-19, has died at age 41, wife says
 
 
Nicholas Eduardo Alberto Cordero (September 17, 1978 – July 5, 2020)[1] was a Canadian Broadway actor. He was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical for his role as Cheech in the 2014 Broadway musical Bullets Over Broadway and was twice nominated for the Drama Desk Awards. His career also included television roles and film roles. He died at the age of 41 from COVID-19 complications.

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By Meghan Bartels, Space.com: Comet NEOWISE shines in stunning photos from the International Space Station
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tanbusch, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Moth Blogs
 
 
 
 

By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Did the CIA Write the Scorpions’ “Wind of Change,” One of the Bestselling Songs of All Time?
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Watch Vintage Footage of Tokyo, Circa 1910, Get Brought to Life with Artificial Intelligence
 
 
 
 
MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDXCXX): Pictures of loved ones on WWII pistols. These were called “Sweetheart Grips”; Crotalaria cunninghamii “Green Bird ” plant; One of the distinctive houses in a Lebanese Village and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By CutterLight: Super Sourdough Soft Pretzels
 
 
Chocolate Covered Katie: Keto Protein Bars
 
 
Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Salmon Jerky


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI July 05, 2020

On This Day

1687 – Isaac Newton publishes Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica.
Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Latin for Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy),[1] often referred to as simply the Principia (/prɪnˈsɪpiə, prɪnˈkɪpiə/), is a work in three books by Isaac Newton, in Latin, first published 5 July 1687.[2][3] After annotating and correcting his personal copy of the first edition,[4] Newton published two further editions, in 1713 and 1726.[5] The Principia states Newton’s laws of motion, forming the foundation of classical mechanics; Newton’s law of universal gravitation; and a derivation of Kepler’s laws of planetary motion (which Kepler first obtained empirically).

The Principia is considered one of the most important works in the history of science.[6] The French mathematical physicist Alexis Clairaut assessed it in 1747: “The famous book of Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy marked the epoch of a great revolution in physics. The method followed by its illustrious author Sir Newton … spread the light of mathematics on a science which up to then had remained in the darkness of conjectures and hypotheses.”[7]

A more recent assessment has been that while acceptance of Newton’s theories was not immediate, by the end of the century after publication in 1687, “no one could deny that” (out of the Principia) “a science had emerged that, at least in certain respects, so far exceeded anything that had ever gone before that it stood alone as the ultimate exemplar of science generally”.[8]

In formulating his physical theories, Newton developed and used mathematical methods now included in the field of calculus. But the language of calculus as we know it was largely absent from the Principia; Newton gave many of his proofs in a geometric form of infinitesimal calculus, based on limits of ratios of vanishing small geometric quantities.[9] In a revised conclusion to the Principia (see General Scholium), Newton used his expression that became famous, Hypotheses non fingo (“I feign no hypotheses”).[10]

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1937 – Spam, the luncheon meat, is introduced into the market by the Hormel Foods Corporation.
Spam (stylized as SPAM) is a brand of canned cooked pork made by Hormel Foods Corporation. It was introduced by Hormel in 1937 and gained popularity worldwide after its use during World War II.[1] By 2003, Spam was sold in 41 countries on six continents and trademarked in over 100 countries (excluding Middle East and North Africa due to it being haram).[2] Spam’s basic ingredients are pork with ham added, salt, water, modified potato starch (as a binder), sugar, and sodium nitrite (as a preservative). Natural gelatin is formed during cooking in its tins on the production line.[3] Many have raised concerns over Spam’s nutritional attributes, in large part due to its high content of fat, sodium, and preservatives.[4]

It has become the subject of a number of appearances in pop culture, notably a Monty Python sketch which repeated the name many times, which led to its name being borrowed for unsolicited electronic messages, especially email.[5]

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Born On This Day

1857 – Clara Zetkin, German theorist and activist (d. 1933)
Clara Zetkin (/ˈzɛtkɪn/; German: [ˈtsɛtkiːn]; née Eißner [ˈaɪsnɐ]; 5 July 1857 – 20 June 1933) was a German Marxist theorist, activist, and advocate for women’s rights.[1]

Until 1917, she was active in the Social Democratic Party of Germany,[2] then she joined the Independent Social Democratic Party of Germany (USPD) and its far-left wing, the Spartacist League; this later became the Communist Party of Germany (KPD), which she represented in the Reichstag during the Weimar Republic from 1920 to 1933.[3]

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FYI

By Marshall Honoroff, Tom’s Guide: I ditched Android for iPhone SE for a month — here’s the pros and cons
 
 
 
 

The Awesomer: Endless LEGO Marble Machine; Murphy Ladder Commercial and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: The Stuff of Stars: A Stunning Marbled Serenade to the Native Poetry of Science and the Cosmic Interleaving of Life
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Cathy Jacobs, The Spruce Eats: 45 Delicious Rice Recipes
 
 
By Makerneer: Caveperson Steak!
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: New Slow-Cooker Recipes You Can Count On
 
 
By momos75: Chimney Cake


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI July 03 & 04, 2020

On This Day

987 – Hugh Capet is crowned King of France, the first of the Capetian dynasty that would rule France until the French Revolution in 1792.
The Capetian dynasty (/kəˈpiːʃən/), also known as the House of France, is a dynasty of Frankish origin, and a branch of the Robertians. It is among the largest and oldest royal houses in Europe and the world, and consists of Hugh Capet, the founder of the dynasty, and his male-line descendants, who ruled in France without interruption from 987 to 1792, and again from 1814 to 1848. The senior line ruled in France as the House of Capet from the election of Hugh Capet in 987 until the death of Charles IV in 1328. That line was succeeded by cadet branches, the Houses of Valois and then Bourbon, which ruled without interruption until the French Revolution abolished the monarchy in 1792. The Bourbons were restored in 1814 in the aftermath of Napoleon’s defeat, but had to vacate the throne again in 1830 in favor of the last Capetian monarch of France, Louis Philippe I, who belonged to the House of Orléans.

The dynasty had a crucial role in the formation of the French state. Initially obeyed only in their own demesne, the Île-de-France, the Capetian kings slowly but steadily increased their power and influence until it grew to cover the entirety of their realm. For a detailed narration on the growth of French royal power, see Crown lands of France.

Members of the dynasty were traditionally Catholic, and the early Capetians had an alliance with the Church. The French were also the most active participants in the Crusades, culminating in a series of five Crusader Kings – Louis VII, Philip Augustus, Louis VIII, Saint Louis, and Philip III. The Capetian alliance with the papacy suffered a severe blow after the disaster of the Aragonese Crusade. Philip III’s son and successor, Philip IV, humiliated Pope Boniface VIII and brought the papacy under French control. The later Valois, starting with Francis I, ignored religious differences and allied with the Ottoman Sultan to counter the growing power of the Holy Roman Empire. Henry IV was a Protestant at the time of his accession, but realized the necessity of conversion after four years of religious warfare.

The Capetians generally enjoyed a harmonious family relationship. By tradition, younger sons and brothers of the King of France are given appanages for them to maintain their rank and to dissuade them from claiming the French crown itself. When Capetian cadets did aspire for kingship, their ambitions were directed not at the French throne, but at foreign thrones. As a result, the Capetians have reigned at different times in the kingdoms of Spain, Poland, Aragon, Portugal, Navarre, and as Emperors of the Latin Empire and Brazil.

In modern times, King Felipe VI of Spain is a member of this family, while Grand Duke Henri of Luxembourg is of relation to the family by agnatic kinship; both through the Bourbon branch of the dynasty. Along with the House of Habsburg, it was one of the two most powerful continental European royal families, dominating European politics for nearly five centuries.

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1054 – A supernova, called SN 1054, is seen by Chinese Song dynasty, Arab, and possibly Amerindian observers near the star Zeta Tauri. For several months it remains bright enough to be seen during the day. Its remnants form the Crab Nebula.

SN 1054 is a supernova that was first observed on c. 4 July 1054[clarification needed], and remained visible for around two years. The event was recorded in contemporary Chinese astronomy, and references to it are also found in a later (13th-century) Japanese document, and in a document from the Arab world. Furthermore, there are a number of proposed, but doubtful, references from European sources recorded in the 15th century, and perhaps a pictograph associated with the Ancestral Puebloan culture found near the Peñasco Blanco site in New Mexico, United States.

The remnant of SN 1054, which consists of debris ejected during the explosion, is known as the Crab Nebula. It is located in the sky near the star Zeta Tauri (ζ Tauri). The core of the exploding star formed a pulsar, called the Crab Pulsar (or PSR B0531+21). The nebula and the pulsar that it contains are some of the most studied astronomical objects outside the Solar System. It is one of the few Galactic supernovae where the date of the explosion is well known. The two objects are the most luminous in their respective categories. For these reasons, and because of the important role it has repeatedly played in the modern era, SN 1054 is one of the best known supernovae in the history of astronomy.

The Crab Nebula is easily observed by amateur astronomers thanks to its brightness, and was also catalogued early on by professional astronomers, long before its true nature was understood and identified. When the French astronomer Charles Messier watched for the return of Halley’s Comet in 1758, he confused the nebula for the comet, as he was unaware of the former’s existence. Motivated by this error, he created his catalogue of non-cometary nebulous objects, the Messier Catalogue, to avoid such mistakes in the future. The nebula is catalogued as the first Messier object, or M1.

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Born On This Day

1860 – Charlotte Perkins Gilman, American sociologist and author (d. 1935)
Charlotte Perkins Gilman (/ˈɡɪlmən/; née Perkins; July 3, 1860 – August 17, 1935), also known as Charlotte Perkins Stetson, her first married name, was a prominent American humanist, novelist, writer of short stories, poetry and nonfiction, and a lecturer for social reform.[1] She was a utopian feminist and served as a role model for future generations of feminists because of her unorthodox concepts and lifestyle. She has been inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame.[2] Her best remembered work today is her semi-autobiographical short story “The Yellow Wallpaper”, which she wrote after a severe bout of postpartum psychosis.

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1918 – Pauline Phillips, American journalist and radio host, created Dear Abby (d. 2013)
Pauline Esther “Popo” Phillips (née Friedman; July 4, 1918 – January 16, 2013), also known as Abigail Van Buren, was an American advice columnist and radio show host who began the Dear Abby column in 1956. It became the most widely syndicated newspaper column in the world, syndicated in 1,400 newspapers with 110 million readers.[1]

From 1963 to 1975, Phillips also hosted a daily Dear Abby program on CBS Radio. TV anchorwoman Diane Sawyer calls her the “pioneering queen of salty advice”.[2]

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FYI

 
 
 
 
CBS News: Divers find evidence of America’s first mines — and skeletons — in underwater caves
 
 
 
 

By Chelsea Gohd, Space.com: Astronauts celebrate Fourth of July from space station
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Bored Panda: 40 Surprising Movie Details You Probably Never Noticed (New Pics); Man Designs An Off-Road “Wheelchair” So That His Wife Can Go Places She Never Imagined, It’s Now Up For Mass-Production and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Bug-Eyed Portraits; The Lion of Chaeronea; How to smoke food on your stove and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: A Cherry By Any Other Name; The Oysters That Helped Women Rule; No Scum Allowed and more ->
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Diana Rattray, The Spruce Eats: 28 Family-Friendly Pasta Casseroles
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Homemade Parmesan Crackers
 
 
Coleen’s Recipes: SUGAR COOKIE PERFECTION


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI July 02, 2020

On This Day

1494 – The Treaty of Tordesillas is ratified by Spain.
The Treaty of Tordesillas (Portuguese: Tratado de Tordesilhas [tɾɐˈtaðu ðɨ tuɾðeˈziʎɐʃ];[note 1] Spanish: Tratado de Tordesillas [tɾaˈtaðo ðe toɾðeˈsiʎas]), signed at Tordesillas in Spain on June 7, 1494, and authenticated at Setúbal, Portugal, divided the newly discovered lands outside Europe between the Portuguese Empire and the Spanish Empire (Crown of Castile), along a meridian 370 leagues[note 2] west of the Cape Verde islands, off the west coast of Africa. This line of demarcation was about halfway between the Cape Verde islands (already Portuguese) and the islands entered by Christopher Columbus on his first voyage (claimed for Castile and León), named in the treaty as Cipangu and Antilia (Cuba and Hispaniola).

The lands to the east would belong to Portugal and the lands to the west to Castile. The treaty was signed by Spain, 2 July 1494, and by Portugal, 5 September 1494. The other side of the world was divided a few decades later by the Treaty of Zaragoza, signed on 22 April 1529, which specified the antimeridian to the line of demarcation specified in the Treaty of Tordesillas. Originals of both treaties are kept at the General Archive of the Indies in Spain and at the Torre do Tombo National Archive in Portugal.[8]

This treaty would be observed fairly well by Spain and Portugal, despite considerable ignorance as to the geography of the New World; however, it omitted all of the other European powers. Those countries generally ignored the treaty, particularly those that became Protestant after the Protestant Reformation.

The treaty was included by UNESCO in 2007 in its Memory of the World Programme.

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Born On This Day

1876 – Harriet Brooks, Canadian physicist and academic (d. 1933)
Harriet Brooks (July 2, 1876 – April 17, 1933[1]) was the first Canadian female nuclear physicist. She is most famous for her research on nuclear transmutations and radioactivity. Ernest Rutherford, who guided her graduate work, regarded her as being next to Marie Curie in the calibre of her aptitude.[2] She was among the first persons to discover radon and to try to determine its atomic mass.[2]

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FYI

By Josh Jones, Open Culture: John Prine’s Last Song Was Also His First to Go No. 1: Watch Him Perform “I Remember Everything”
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: An Animated Introduction to the Pioneering Anthropologist Margaret Mead
 
 
 
 

By James Clear: 3-2-1: On choosing the right goal, focus, and perseverance
 
 
 
 

ILSR’s Community Broadband Networks Initiative: Say goodbye to AT&T and its monopolist pals
 
 
 
 
This episode was produced by Brit Hanson, fact-checked by Yowei Shaw and edited by Deborah Goerge NPR: Backyard Birding 101
 
 
 
 

By James Rogers, Fox News: Get set for July 4 buck moon, partial lunar eclipse: NASA’s top tips for July skywatchers The July 4 full moon is known as the buck moon or thunder moon

 
 
 
 
By Craig Stevens – National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Christina Hulbe – University of Otago Live Science: How a hidden ocean circulates beneath the Antarctic ice

 
 
 
 

The Rural Blog: Federal report looks at Appalachia’s petrochemical potential; New memoir recounts how Appalachian author broke a generational cycle of abuse and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Awesomer: Frosted Flakes x Froot Loops; Black Ice and more ->
 
 
 
 
NSFW

Recipes

By Elizabethinmn: Grilled Tex Mex Romaine Salad
 
 
By Jadem52: Perfect Cast Iron Campfire Pizza


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI July 01, 2020

On This Day

1569 – Union of Lublin: The Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania confirm a real union; the united country is called the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth or the Republic of Both Nations.
The Union of Lublin (Polish: Unia lubelska; Lithuanian: Liublino unija) was signed on 1 July 1569, in Lublin, Poland, and created a single state, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, one of the largest countries in Europe at the time. It replaced the personal union of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania with a real union and an elective monarchy, since Sigismund II Augustus, the last of the Jagiellons, remained childless after three marriages. In addition, the autonomy of Royal Prussia was largely abandoned. The Duchy of Livonia, tied to Lithuania in real union since the Union of Grodno (1566), became a Polish–Lithuanian condominium.[1]

The Commonwealth was ruled by a single elected monarch who carried out the duties of King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, and governed with a common Senate and parliament (the Sejm). The Union was an evolutionary stage in the Polish–Lithuanian alliance and personal union, necessitated also by Lithuania’s dangerous position in wars with Russia.[2][3][4]

Constituting a crucial event in the history of several nations, the Union of Lublin has been viewed quite differently by many historians. Sometimes identified as the moment at which the szlachta (including Lithuanians/Ruthenians) rose to the height of their power, establishing a democracy of noblemen as opposed to absolute monarchy. Some historians concentrate on its positive aspects, emphasizing its peaceful, voluntary creation, inclusive character and its role in spreading of economical welfare and good laws; others see there a possible cause of social and political instability that led to the Partitions of Poland about 200 years later. Some Lithuanian historians are more critical of the Union, concluding it was an effect of domination by Polish nobles.

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Born On This Day

1873 – Alice Guy-Blaché, French-American film director, producer and screenwriter (d. 1968)[18]
Alice Ida Antoinette Guy-Blaché (née Guy; July 1, 1873 – March 24, 1968) was a French pioneer filmmaker, active from the late 19th century, and one of the very first to make a narrative fiction film.[2] She was the first woman to direct a film. From 1896 to 1906, she was probably the only female filmmaker in the world.[3] She experimented with Gaumont’s Chronophone sync-sound system, and with color-tinting, interracial casting, and special effects.[4]

She was artistic director and a co-founder of Solax Studios in Flushing, New York. In 1912, Solax invested $100,000 for a new studio in Fort Lee, New Jersey, the center of American filmmaking prior to the establishment of Hollywood. That year, she made the film A Fool and His Money, probably the first to have an all-African-American cast. The film is now at the National Center for Film and Video Preservation at the American Film Institute.[5]

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FYI

By Leonardo Castañeda, The Mercury News: San Jose lowriders bring coronavirus relief to Gilroy farmworkers The brightly colored caravan carried diapers, sanitizer, food and more
 
 
Just A Car Guy: I never heard about this before, Mack trucks has a you tube channel for videos about how people all over use Mack trucks on the job
 
 
 
 

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: FROM THE ARCHIVE (2016) | Kindness Over Fear: Naomi Shihab Nye Tells the Remarkable Real-Life Story That Inspired Her Beloved Poem “Kindness”
 
 
 
 

Since I began writing a book about resilience, I have been researching stoicism, as this way of thinking lends to remarkable resilience. One of the great stoic philosophers was Epictetus, who was around in 100 AD. Ancient wisdom is impressive because unlike most things, it can survive thousands of years.

Epictetus’s book, Discourses, is a written account of his (verbal) teachings by one of his pupils named Arrian. I’ve been reading through it as I research the topic of resilience. Here are a few of my favorite quotes from Discourses so far.

With regard to practical matters they maintain that popular ideas of good and bad are wrong: many people who appear to be in dire circumstances are actually happy provided they deal with their situation bravely; others, regardless of how many possessions they have, are miserable, because they do not know how to use the gifts of fortune wisely.

Perspective is everything. You could have two people with the same exact lives, one miserable and the other happy. I try to remind myself of this whenever I get into a “woe is me” mood.

I must die. But must I die bawling? I must be put in chains – but moaning and groaning too? I must be exiled; but is there anything to keep me from going with a smile, calm and self-composed?

This is stoicism in a nutshell! No matter what happens, you control your response.

Even if I lack the talent, I will not abandon the effort on that account. Epictetus will not be better than Socrates. But if I am no worse, I am satisfied. I mean, I will never be Milo either; nevertheless, I don’t neglect my body. Nor will I be another Croesus – and still, I don’t neglect my property. In short, we do not abandon any discipline for despair of ever being the best in it.

This quote is SO important. If you can’t be the very best, does that mean you shouldn’t try at all? Of course not. You don’t have to exercise to look like a bodybuilder. The benefits of positive pursuits are a spectrum of goodness. Look beyond looking like peak Arnold Schwarzenegger, and you’ll find many other reasons to exercise!

On a personal level, it’s better to be slightly out of shape than completely out of shape. Don’t think all or nothing, think something or nothing!

Cheers,
Stephen Guise
 
 
 
 

Chuck Wendig: Terribleminds: Author Pet Show!
 
 
 
 
Twisted Sifter: The Cadbury Gorilla Drummer is Still the Best Ad Ever
 
 
Twisted Sifter: The Shirk Report – Volume 584
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open culture; A 1947 French Film Accurately Predicted Our 21st-Century Addiction to Smartphones
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: How Ornette Coleman Shaped the Jazz World: An Introduction to His Irreverent Sound
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Amelia Rampe, The Kitchn: Carla Hall’s Potato Salad Is a Pickle-Lover’s Dream Come True
 
 
Betty Crocker Kitchens: 5-Ingredient Sanity-Saving Dinners

 
 
By Cathy Jacobs, The Spruce Eats: 15 Delicious Meals With Canned Salmon Turn a can of salmon into a tasty meal
 
 
By Rachel Hanna: The Real Southern Poundcake Recipe from The Inn At Seagrove
 
 
Taste of Home: How to Make Soda Cake


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI June 30, 2020

On This Day

 
 

Born On This Day

 
 

FYI

 
 
Personal life
Benny Mardones was born Ruben Armand Mardones on November 9, 1946, in Cleveland, Ohio. His father, Ruben Sr., was from Santiago, Chile. Benny only saw his father a few times in his life. His father left Benny and his sister, Louise, when Benny was a baby and eventually returned to Chile. In addition to Louise, Benny had two half-brothers and two half-sisters who live in Chile.

Benny grew up in Savage, Maryland, and graduated from Howard High School in Ellicott City, Maryland, in 1964. He joined the U.S. Navy after high school and served during the Vietnam War. He was briefly married when he was 21 years old, and again in the mid-1980s. After his discharge from the Navy he moved to New York City to pursue his singing and songwriting career. While living in New York, he composed several songs with writing partner Alan Miles. He later wrote songs with fellow singer-songwriter Bobby Tepper, including the song “Into the Night.”

The multi-platinum success of “Into the Night” in 1980 catapulted Benny into the limelight, and he soon spiraled into cocaine addiction and alcoholism. He stopped performing concerts and making public appearances and his label, Polydor Records, dropped him. Over the next few years, he lapsed into obscurity.[3] The birth of his son Michael in April 1985 inspired Benny to get his life in order. The following month, he moved to Syracuse, New York, and by the end of the summer he had kicked his drug and alcohol habit. The renewed popularity of “Into the Night” in 1989 reignited his career, but he wasn’t able to duplicate his earlier success, and he never had another Billboard Top 100 hit.

Benny is the subject of a documentary titled Into the Night: The Benny Mardones Story that was set to be released on DVD in the fall of 2008. However, it has not been released, and no release date is scheduled.[4]

Benny was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2000. Despite his illness, he continued to perform to sold-out audiences in central New York, where he retained a notable fan following. On December 16, 2017 Mardones performed “Into the Night” publicly for the last time at the Turning Stone Casino in Verona, NY.[5]

On October 4, 2011, he married his third wife, Jane Braemer, originally from Denmark. He and Jane resided in Menifee, California.

In July 2018 Benny underwent DBS (Deep Brain Stimulation) which minimized the tremors, but complications from the extensive surgeries created numerous other balance, stability, confusion, and pain issues. After surgery, Benny suffered multiple falls including one that dislocated his hip and shattered his pelvic bone. Continued dislocations and several surgeries later, Benny spent a long time fighting various infections. His hip replacement surgery was completed in January 2019, but he dislocated his hip again and had another surgery to fix that.

In December 2018 a GoFundMe campaign was started to help with ongoing medical costs.

Mardones died on June 29, 2020 at his home in Menifee, California, at age 73. [6]

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FYI June 30, 2020

On This Day

1422 – Battle of Arbedo between the duke of Milan and the Swiss cantons.[3]
The Battle of Arbedo was fought on June 30, 1422, between the Duchy of Milan and the Swiss Confederation.

In 1419, Uri and Unterwalden bought the Bellinzona stronghold from the Sacco barons, but were unable to defend it adequately. When, in 1422, they rejected the Milanese proposal to buy back the fortified town, their troops stationed in Bellinzona were put to rout by the Visconti army under the command of Francesco Bussone, Count of Carmagnola. An attempt to reconquer the fortified area with the support of other confederates led to the battle at Arbedo, a village 3 km (1.9 mi) north of Bellinzona. The Count of Carmagnola led the forces of the Duchy of Milan against the Swiss and was victorious.
The shooting thaler of the 1867 federal Schützenfest depicts Hans Landwing saving the cantonal banner.

The Swiss were mainly equipped with halberds and had an initial success against the cavalry charge. Then Carmagnola brought his crossbowmen forward, while dismounting his cavalry. The dismounted men-at-arms used pikes which outreached the halberds. The Swiss were further under pressure by the crossbow fire on the flanks.

The Milanese force began to push back the Swiss, who were only saved from total disaster by the appearance of a band of foragers, whom the Milanese were convinced represented a major new force. When the Milanese force pulled back to reform, the Swiss fled the battlefield, having taken heavy casualties.

In a historiographical tradition of Zug, the bearer of the cantonal banner, Peter Kälin, was slain, and the banner was taken up by his son, who was slain in his turn. The banner was saved by one Hans Landwing, and was later lost against the French.[8]

The victory secured Bellinzona and the Leventina to the Duchy. In addition the Duchy gained the Val d’Ossola, thus the Swiss lost all the territorial gains they had made. The defeat discouraged the Swiss expansionist intentions towards Lake Maggiore for a long time. It was the defeat at Arbedo that made the Swiss increase the number of pikemen.

 
 

Born On This Day

1912 – María Luisa Dehesa Gómez Farías, Mexican architect (d. 2009)
María Luisa Dehesa Gómez Farías (30 June 1912 – 11 March 2009) was a Mexican architect who worked for close to 50 years in the Federal District of Mexico City, primarily designing single-family homes and apartment buildings.[1] She was the first Mexican woman to graduate with a degree in architecture.
Biography

María Luisa Dehesa Gómez Farías was born on 30 June 1912[2] in Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico to Ramón Dehesa[3] and María Luisa Gómez Farías y Canedo, daughter of the Mexican Minister in London, Benito Gómez Farías [es]. She was the granddaughter of Teodoro A. Dehesa Méndez on her paternal side and great-granddaughter of Valentín Gómez Farías on her maternal side.[2]

In 1933 she enrolled at the Academia de San Carlos (the National School of Architecture) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico.[3] In her class of 113 students, only five were women[1] and they were required to study in a separate workshop from the men.[3] She graduated in 1937, the first Mexican woman to graduate with a degree in architecture. Her thesis, which won honorable mention from the jurors,[3] was entitled Artillery Barracks Type. It was accepted in 1939 and she attained her professional designation.[4]

After she finished school, Dehesa married Manuel Millán and they subsequently had four children.[2] She joined the Public Works Department in Mexico City and served for nearly 50 years in various divisions,[1] primarily designing single-family homes and apartment buildings.[2] In 1974, she was announced as a joint winner of the Ruth Rivera Prize, together with the first Mexican female civil engineer, Concepción Mendizábal Mendoza.[5] In 2006, the College of Architects of Mexico City, honored her for her contributions.[3]

Notimex published Dehesa’s memoirs, entitled Los Años Valientes, with illustrations by her daughter Elizabeth Millán de Guerra, a graphic designer.[2] Dehesa died in Mexico City in 2009.[6]

 
 

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NICEST PLACES IN AMERICA 2020 FINALIST
“Housing Alaska’s Homeless”

Nominated by Molly Cornish and Sandy Cannon

A city known for its cold warms hearts by ensuring its homeless are safe during the pandemic.

Anchorage has always been a welcoming place. It has to be. “It’s made up mostly of transplants of the lower-48, and when you move here people are so excited to show you their city and introduce you to others,” says Moly Cornish, community engagement director at the local Catholic Social Services. “It’s great.”
 
 
 
 
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FYI June 29, 2020

On This Day

1888 – George Edward Gouraud records Handel’s Israel in Egypt onto a phonograph cylinder, thought for many years to be the oldest known recording of music.
George Edward Gouraud (30 June 1842 – 20 February 1912)[1] was an American Civil War recipient of the Medal of Honor who later became famous for introducing the new Edison Phonograph cylinder audio recording technology to England in 1888.

Civil war
He was the son of the French engineer François Fauvel Gouraud (1808–1847) who came to the US in 1839 to introduce the daguerrotype technology for photography. Both parents died in the summer of 1847. Gouraud fought for the United States Army during the Civil War 1861–1865, and received the Medal of Honor for bravery as a captain with the 3rd New York Volunteer Cavalry on November 30, 1864. He was later brevetted lieutenant colonel.[2]

Working for Edison
He moved to London at the behest of American Railway magnate William Jackson Palmer to promote the Edison telegraph system. Gouraud did not meet Edison himself until 1874 when the latter was sent to demonstrate new equipment that he had invented to the British Post Office. As an enthusiast of new electric inventions, in the late 1880s and early 1890s he had many gadgets installed in his house at Beulah Hill, Upper Norwood in South London, which he renamed “Little Menlo” after Menlo Park, New Jersey where Edison’s research facility was situated.

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Born On This Day

1858 – Julia Lathrop, American activist and politician (d. 1932)
Julia Clifford Lathrop (June 29, 1858 – April 15, 1932) was an American social reformer in the area of education, social policy, and children’s welfare. As director of the United States Children’s Bureau from 1912 to 1922, she was the first woman ever to head a United States federal bureau.[1]

Biography

Julia Clifford Lathrop was born in Rockford, Illinois. Julia’s father, a lawyer and personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, helped establish the Republican Party and served in the state legislature (1856–57) and Congress (1877–79). Her mother was a suffragist active in women’s rights activities in Rockford and a graduate of the first class of Rockford Female Seminary.

Lathrop attended Rockford Female Seminary where she met Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. After one year, she transferred to Vassar College, developing her own multidisciplinary studies in statistics, institutional history, sociology, and community organization and graduated in 1880.[2] Afterwards, she worked in her father’s law office first as a secretary and then studying the law for herself.

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FYI June 28, 2020

On This Day

1635 – Guadeloupe becomes a French colony.
Guadeloupe (/ˌɡwɑːdəˈluːp/, French: [ɡwad(ə)lup] (About this soundlisten); Antillean Creole: Gwadloup) is an archipelago forming an overseas region of France in the Caribbean.[2] It consists of six inhabited islands, Basse-Terre, Grande-Terre, Marie-Galante, La Désirade, and the Îles des Saintes, as well as many uninhabited islands and outcroppings.[3] It lies south of Antigua and Barbuda and Montserrat, and north of Dominica. Its capital is Basse-Terre on the southern west coast; however, the largest city is Les Abymes and the main city is Pointe-à-Pitre.[2]

Like the other overseas departments, it is an integral part of France. As a constituent territory of the European Union and the Eurozone, the euro is its official currency and any European Union citizen is free to settle and work there indefinitely. As an overseas department, however, it is not part of the Schengen Area. The region formerly included Saint Barthélemy and Saint Martin, which were detached from Guadeloupe in 2007 following a 2003 referendum.

The official language is French; Antillean Creole is also spoken.[2][4]

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Born On This Day

1891 – Esther Forbes, American historian and author (d. 1968)
Esther Louise Forbes (/fɔːrbz/; June 28, 1891 – August 12, 1967) was an American novelist, historian and children’s writer who received the Pulitzer Prize and the Newbery Medal. She was the first woman elected to membership in the American Antiquarian Society.

Early life and education
Esther Forbes was born to William and Harriette Merrifield Forbes on June 28, 1891, in Westborough, Massachusetts. She moved with her family to Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1898. She attended Bancroft School in Worcester, and, from 1909 to 1912, she attended Bradford Academy,[1] a junior college in Bradford, Massachusetts.

In 1916, she joined her older sisters Cornelia and Katherine in Madison, Wisconsin, where Cornelia was in graduate school and Katharine was teaching. During this time she attended the classes at the University of Wisconsin.

Career
While in Wisconsin, she joined the editorial board of the Wisconsin Literary Magazine, along with another future Pulitzer Prizewinner, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. In 1919, she returned to Worcester and in late December began working for the editorial department of Houghton Mifflin Company in Boston. From 1924 to 1926, she wrote feature articles for the Boston Evening Transcript.

She married Albert L. Hoskins, Jr., an attorney, on January 14, 1926, and left Houghton Mifflin. The couple moved to New York City. Her first novel, O Genteel Lady! was published in 1926 and was selected as the second book for the Book of the Month Club. In 1928 A Mirror for Witches was published. In 1933, she and Albert Hoskins divorced. Although she retained her married name, she wrote under her maiden name, Esther Forbes.

Forbes returned to Worcester in 1933, where she lived with her mother and unmarried siblings. At this time, her mother, Harriette M. Forbes, began working closely with Forbes on the research for her novels, often at the local research library, the American Antiquarian Society.

In 1935, Miss Marvel, in 1937 Paradise and in 1938, The General’s Lady were published. Each of these were historical novels set in New England from colonial times through the early years of the Republic.

In a break from her fiction, Forbes wrote a definitive biography of Paul Revere, Paul Revere and the World He Lived In (1942), for which she received the 1943 Pulitzer Prize for History. Also in 1943, she received an honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Clark University.

In 1943, her best-known work Johnny Tremain was published, for which she received the Newbery Award in 1944. In 1946, America’s Paul Revere was published and in 1947, The Boston Book was published.

In 1947, she received the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer novel award of $150,000 for her then forthcoming book, The Running of the Tide, published in 1948. In 1949, she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.[2] Rainbow on the Road was published in 1954. In 1960, Esther Forbes became the first woman elected to membership in the American Antiquarian Society.

Death
Forbes died on August 12, 1967 in Worcester, of rheumatic heart disease. Her manuscripts were donated to Clark University in Worcester. The royalties for her works were donated to the American Antiquarian Society, which also has the research notes on her unfinished work on witchcraft in early New England.

Quotations
Most American heroes of the Revolutionary period are by now two men, the actual man and the romantic image. Some are even three men — the actual man, the image, and the de-bunked remains.
— Paul Revere and the World He Lived In, note 54.

Works
Oh Genteel Lady! (1926)
A Mirror for Witches (1928)
Miss Marvel (1935 historical about a Worcester family)
Paradise (1937)
The General’s Lady (1938 historical novel about Bathsheba Spooner)
Paul Revere and the World He Lived In (1942 biography)
Johnny Tremain (1943 YA novel)
The Boston Book (1947 pictorial essay)
America’s Paul Revere (1948 pictorial essay)
The Running of the Tide (1948)
Rainbow on the Road (1954)
 
 

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FYI June 27, 2020

On This Day

1358 – The Republic of Ragusa is founded.
The Republic of Ragusa (Croatian: Dubrovačka Republika) was an aristocratic maritime republic centered on the city of Dubrovnik (Ragusa in Italian, German and Latin) in Dalmatia (today in southernmost Croatia) that carried that name from 1358 until 1808. It reached its commercial peak in the 15th and the 16th centuries, before being conquered by Napoleon’s French Empire and formally annexed by the Napoleonic Kingdom of Italy in 1808. It had a population of about 30,000 people, of whom 5,000 lived within the city walls.[2] Its Latin motto was “Non bene pro toto libertas venditur auro”, which means “Liberty is not sold for all the gold in the world”.[3]

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Born On This Day

1869 – Kate Carew, American illustrator and journalist (d. 1961)
Mary Williams (June 27, 1869 – February 11, 1961), who wrote pseudonymously as Kate Carew, was an American caricaturist self-styled as “The Only Woman Caricaturist”. She worked at the New York World, providing illustrated celebrity interviews.

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