Category: FYI

FYI

FYI July 03, 2022

On This Day

1035 – William the Conqueror becomes the Duke of Normandy, reigns until 1087.

William I[a] (c. 1028[1] – 9 September 1087), usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard,[2][b] was the first Norman king of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke of Normandy from 1035 onward. By 1060, following a long struggle to establish his throne, his hold on Normandy was secure. In 1066, following the death of Edward the Confessor, William invaded England, leading an army of Normans to victory over the Anglo-Saxon forces of Harold Godwinson at the Battle of Hastings, and suppressed subsequent English revolts in what has become known as the Norman Conquest. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands, and by difficulties with his eldest son, Robert Curthose.

William was the son of the unmarried Duke Robert I of Normandy and his mistress Herleva. His illegitimate status and his youth caused some difficulties for him after he succeeded his father, as did the anarchy which plagued the first years of his rule. During his childhood and adolescence, members of the Norman aristocracy battled each other, both for control of the child duke, and for their own ends. In 1047, William was able to quash a rebellion and begin to establish his authority over the duchy, a process that was not complete until about 1060. His marriage in the 1050s to Matilda of Flanders provided him with a powerful ally in the neighbouring county of Flanders. By the time of his marriage, William was able to arrange the appointment of his supporters as bishops and abbots in the Norman church. His consolidation of power allowed him to expand his horizons, and he secured control of the neighbouring county of Maine by 1062.

In the 1050s and early 1060s, William became a contender for the throne of England held by the childless Edward the Confessor, his first cousin once removed. There were other potential claimants, including the powerful English earl Harold Godwinson, whom Edward named as king on his deathbed in January 1066. Arguing that Edward had previously promised the throne to him and that Harold had sworn to support his claim, William built a large fleet and invaded England in September 1066. He decisively defeated and killed Harold at the Battle of Hastings on 14 October 1066. After further military efforts, William was crowned king on Christmas Day, 1066, in London. He made arrangements for the governance of England in early 1067 before returning to Normandy. Several unsuccessful rebellions followed, but William’s hold was mostly secure on England by 1075, allowing him to spend the majority of his reign in continental Europe.

William’s final years were marked by difficulties in his continental domains, troubles with his son, Robert, and threatened invasions of England by the Danes. In 1086, he ordered the compilation of the Domesday Book, a survey listing all the land-holdings in England along with their pre-Conquest and current holders. He died in September 1087 while leading a campaign in northern France, and was buried in Caen. His reign in England was marked by the construction of castles, settling a new Norman nobility on the land, and change in the composition of the English clergy. He did not try to integrate his various domains into one empire but continued to administer each part separately. His lands were divided after his death: Normandy went to Robert, and England went to his second surviving son, William Rufus.

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Born On This Day

1518 – Li Shizhen, Chinese physician and mineralogist (d. 1593)
Li Shizhen (July 3, 1518 – 1593), courtesy name Dongbi, was a Chinese acupuncturist, herbalist, naturalist, pharmacologist, physician, and writer of the Ming dynasty. He is the author of a 27-year work, found in the Compendium of Materia Medica (Bencao Gangmu (Chinese: 本草綱目). He developed several methods for classifying herb components and medications for treating diseases.[1]

The Compendium is a materia medica text with 1,892 entries, with details about more than 1,800 drugs (Chinese Medicine), including 1,100 illustrations and 11,000 prescriptions. It also described the type, form, flavor, nature and application in disease treatments of 1,094 herbs. The book has been translated into several languages.[1] The treatise included various related subjects such as botany, zoology, mineralogy, and metallurgy. Five original editions still exist.[2][1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

Maria Popova, The Marginalian (formerly Brain Pickings): Octavia Butler on the meaning of “God,” Richard Powers on how to live up to our human potential amid the otherworldly wonder of this world

 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Free: Watch Battleship Potemkin and Other Films by Sergei Eisenstein, the Revolutionary Soviet Filmmaker
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Free Online: Watch Stalker, Mirror, and Other Masterworks by Soviet Auteur Andrei Tarkovsky
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Marie Curie’s Ph.D. Thesis on Radioactivity–Which Made Her the First Woman in France to Receive a Doctoral Degree in Physics

 
 
 
 
Joan Reeves: Sunday Thoughts On Salads

 
 
 
 
CBS News The Doobie Brothers: “These are the better days”

 
 
 
 

Call Sign?


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By spacedog242: “Easy Mode” FIGJAM 5 Gallon Bucket Swamp Cooler
 
 
By zdedesigns: Card Stock Violet Dragon Glider
 
 

Recipes

By Chalet Naturalys: Summer Berry Frozen Cheesecake
 
 
By Ronna Farley: Summery Strawberry Mini Pies
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI June 30, July 01 & 02, 2022

On This Day

296 – Pope Marcellinus begins his papacy.[1]
Pope Marcellinus was the bishop of Rome from 30 June 296 to his death in 304. A historical accusation was levelled at him by some sources to the effect that he might have renounced Christianity during Emperor Diocletian’s persecution of Christians before repenting afterwards, which would explain why he is omitted from lists of martyrs. The accusation is rejected, among others, by Augustine of Hippo. He is today venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church and in the Serbian Orthodox Church.


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1643 – First meeting of the Westminster Assembly, a council of theologians (“divines”) and members of the Parliament of England appointed to restructure the Church of England, at Westminster Abbey in London.
The Westminster Assembly of Divines was a council of divines (theologians) and members of the English Parliament appointed from 1643 to 1653 to restructure the Church of England. Several Scots also attended, and the Assembly’s work was adopted by the Church of Scotland. As many as 121 ministers were called to the Assembly, with nineteen others added later to replace those who did not attend or could no longer attend. It produced a new Form of Church Government, a Confession of Faith or statement of belief, two catechisms or manuals for religious instruction (Shorter and Larger), and a liturgical manual, the Directory for Public Worship, for the Churches of England and Scotland. The Confession and catechisms were adopted as doctrinal standards in the Church of Scotland and other Presbyterian churches, where they remain normative. Amended versions of the Confession were also adopted in Congregational and Baptist churches in England and New England in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The Confession became influential throughout the English-speaking world, but especially in American Protestant theology.

The Assembly was called by the Long Parliament before and during the beginning of the First English Civil War. The Long Parliament was influenced by Puritanism, a religious movement which sought to further reform the church. They were opposed to the religious policies of King Charles I and William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury. As part of a military alliance with Scotland, Parliament agreed that the outcome of the Assembly would bring the English Church into closer conformity with the Church of Scotland. The Scottish Church was governed by a system of elected assemblies of elders called presbyterianism, rather than rule by bishops, called episcopalianism, which was used in the English church. Scottish commissioners attended and advised the Assembly as part of the agreement. Disagreements over church government caused open division in the Assembly, despite attempts to maintain unity. The party of divines who favoured presbyterianism was in the majority, but the congregationalist party, which held greater influence in the military, favoured autonomy for individual congregations rather than the subjection of congregations to regional and national assemblies entailed in presbyterianism. Parliament eventually adopted a presbyterian form of government but lacked the power to implement it. During the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, all of the documents of the Assembly were repudiated and episcopal church government was reinstated in England.

The Assembly worked in the Reformed Protestant theological tradition, also known as Calvinism. It took the Bible as the authoritative word of God, from which all theological reflection must be based. The divines were committed to the Reformed doctrine of predestination — that God chooses certain men to be saved and enjoy eternal life rather than eternal punishment. There was some disagreement at the Assembly over the doctrine of particular redemption — that Christ died only for those chosen for salvation. The Assembly also held to Reformed covenant theology, a framework for interpreting the Bible. The Assembly’s Confession is the first of the Reformed confessions to teach a doctrine called the covenant of works, which teaches that before the fall of man, God promised eternal life to Adam on condition that he perfectly obeyed God.

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1698 – Thomas Savery patents the first steam engine.
Thomas Savery (/ˈseɪvəri/; c. 1650 – 15 May 1715) was an English inventor and engineer. He invented the first commercially used steam-powered device, a steam pump[1] which is often referred to as the “Savery engine”. Savery’s steam pump was a revolutionary method of pumping water, which solved[citation needed] the problem of mine drainage and made widespread public water supply practicable.


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Born On This Day

1286 – John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey, English magnate (d. 1347)[23]
John de Warenne (June 1286 – June 1347), 7th Earl of Surrey, was the last Warenne earl of Surrey.


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1553 – Peter Street, English carpenter and builder (d. 1609)
Peter Street (baptised 1 July 1553, died in May 1609) was an English carpenter and builder in London in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. He built the Fortune Playhouse, and probably the Globe Theatre, two significant establishments in the history of the stage in London. He had a part in building King James’s Banqueting House in Whitehall Palace and he may have been responsible for the settings for the king’s royal masques.


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1575 – Elizabeth de Vere, Countess of Derby, English noblewoman and head of state of the Isle of Man (d. 1627)
Elizabeth Stanley (née de Vere), Countess of Derby, Lord of Mann (2 July 1575 – 10 March 1627), was an English noblewoman and the eldest daughter of the Elizabethan courtier and poet Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford.

She was the Lord of Mann from 1612 to 1627, and prior to holding the title, she had taken over many administrative duties appertaining to the Isle of Man’s affairs. Elizabeth was the first female to rule as the island’s head of state.

She served as a Maid of Honour to Queen Elizabeth I of England before her marriage to William Stanley, 6th Earl of Derby. Her wedding or (more likely) that of Elizabeth Carey to Thomas, son of Lord Berkeley, was the occasion for the first performance of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.[1]


Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 
Margaret D. H. Keane (born Peggy Doris Hawkins, September 15, 1927 – June 26, 2022)[1] was an American artist known for her paintings of subjects with big eyes. She mainly painted women, children, or animals in oil or mixed media. The work achieved commercial success through inexpensive reproductions on prints, plates, and cups. It has been critically acclaimed but also criticized as formulaic and cliché. The artwork was originally attributed to Keane’s ex-husband, Walter Keane. After their divorce in the 1960s, Margaret soon claimed credit, which was established after a court “paint-off” in Hawaii.[2]

A resurgence of interest in Margaret Keane’s work followed the release of Tim Burton’s 2014 biopic Big Eyes. She maintained a gallery in San Francisco which boasts “the largest collection of Margaret Keane’s art in the entire world.”[3] In light of the great gulf between her work’s popularity and its critical lampooning, she was sometimes referred to as the “Wayne Newton of the art world.”[4]

Read more ->

 
 
CBS Sunday Morning: From 2014: Margaret Keane and the story behind “Big Eyes”
 
 
 
 

zefrank1: True Facts: The Beaver
 
 
 
 

I don’t believe it works in Alaska yet…

By Michael Sheetz, CNBC: FCC authorizes SpaceX to provide mobile Starlink internet service to boats, planes and trucks
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Kuta, Smithsonian: The Man Who Invented Water Skiing One hundred years ago, Ralph Samuelson successfully skied across the waters of Lake Pepin
 
 
 
 
Jack CarrUSA: Behind the Scenes of The Terminal List: An Audiobook Preview
 
 
 
 
By Shawna Chen, Axios: Discovery of 1955 warrant in Emmett Till’s murder sparks calls for arrest
 
 
 
 
By Madlin Mekelburg, Austin American-Statesman: ‘Magical thinking’: Gov. Abbott says he will ‘eliminate all rapists,’ defends Texas abortion law
 
 
 
 
By Michele Debczak, Mental Floss: From Fries to Tots: A Delicious History of Fried Potatoes
 
 
 
 
By Margherita Cole, My Modern Met: Japanese Food Artist Makes Crystal Clear Desserts With Delicious Treats You Can See Inside
 
 
 
 
By Mike Pomranz, Food & Wine: Taco Bell’s Latest Tostada Features a Giant Cheez-It The Cheez-It base is 16-times larger than the original snack cracker.
 
 
 
 
NanoAvionics: Our first 4K satellite selfie using a deployable GoPro camera

 
 
 
 
By JIM MUSTIAN, AP News: FBI opens investigation into sexual abuse in the Roman Catholic Church in New Orleans; probe is latest in a series of scandals at archdioceses

 
 
 
 

askReddit: What improved your life so much, you wished you did sooner?
 
 
 
 
By Rupendra Brahambhatt, Interesting Engineering: In a world-first, scientists create eco-friendly cement from algae The era of sustainable construction has arrived.

 
 
 
 

The Guardian: Urban Wildlife Photography Awards 2022: in pictures
 
 
 
 

By Connie Guglielmo, CNET: Steve Jobs Knew iPhone Would Be Iconic. More Than 2 Billion Phones Later, He Was Right Commentary: Apple’s co-founder knew the iPhone would change everything, from the moment he took the stage. I was there to witness history.
 
 
 
 
James Clear: 3-2-1: The value of questions, the power of small acts, and how life rewards courage
 
 
 
 

Payette Forward: 6 Hacks To Stop iPhone Spam Calls — Scammers Hate #4!

 
 
Payette Forward: 9 Hacks To Stop iPhone Spam TEXTS — Scammers Hate #5!
 
 
 
 
Buddy Brown: JULY 4TH is KRYPTONITE to DEMOCRATS!
 
 
 
 

Best of The History Guy: Aviation Disasters
 
 
 
 
Team Never Quit: Hell is a Continuous, Everlasting Trauma
 
 
 
 
Colion Noir: Top 5 Reasons You NEED An AR-15
 
 
 
 

Mike Force Podcast: Eva zu Beck | EP. 076
Eva is a full-time adventurer, traveler, and YouTuber. She has been traveling solo for 4 years to countries like Afghanistan, Iraq, Yemen, and Mongolia. She is currently traveling through the US in her Land Rover Defender (which she lives out of) with plans of driving up towards Alaska.
 
 
 
 


Civil Terror Gridlock J. Luke Bennecke

Terrorists hack and weaponize the new self-driving car network designed by engineer Jake Bendel, forcing him to partner with a rogue FBI agent to stop a larger national attack. An intense thriller with a plausible scenario from a real-life traffic engineer about artificial intelligence and the self-driving revolution.

“Fans of smart, fast-paced thrillers, like those by Clive Cussler and Tom Clancy, will gravitate towards Civil Terror: Gridlock.” – Auto Newsblaster Free on Kindle.

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Message from Blu: “Never regret giving. Give with your whole heart. If you get burnt by the receiver, it was worth it just to find out who they really are. Move on, give again, be you. Always be you! It’s okay to wear your heart on your sleeve, the right person needs to see that it’s there.”
MARLENE MC’COHEN


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

Ideas

By pojken: Magical No Dip, One-Hand, Tri-String, Continuous Feed, Mega Bubble Wand
 
 
Soap Bubble Wiki
 
 
By JGMatt: Working 1-Watt 50mm LED
 
 

Recipes

Joan Reeves: Saturday Recipe Share: Cheesy Zucchini Casserole
 
 
By andimadethings: Frozen Strawberry Lemonade Cheesecake Pops
 
 
By Momos75: Blackberry Hand Pie Ice Cream Sandwiche
 
 
By Handy_Bear: French Chocolate Mousse (Mousse Au Chocolat)
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI June 29, 2022

On This Day

226 – Cao Rui succeeds his father as emperor of the Kingdom of Wei.
Cao Rui (pronunciation (help·info)) (204 or 206 – 22 January 239), courtesy name Yuanzhong, was the second emperor of the state of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. His parentage is in dispute: his mother, Lady Zhen, was Yuan Xi’s wife, but she later remarried Cao Pi, the first ruler of Wei. Based on conflicting accounts of his age, Pei Songzhi calculated that, in order to be Cao Pi’s son, Cao Rui could not have been 33 (by East Asian age reckoning) when he died as recorded, so the recorded age was in error; Lu Bi and Mou Guangsheng argued instead that Cao Rui was Yuan Xi’s son.

Cao Rui’s reign was viewed in many different ways throughout Chinese history. He devoted many resources into building palaces and ancestral temples, and his reign saw the stalemate between his empire, Shu Han, and Eastern Wu become more entrenched. His building projects and his desire to have many concubines (who numbered in the thousands) greatly exhausted the imperial treasury.

On his deathbed, he has no biological son. He passed the throne to his adopted son Cao Fang and entrusted him to the regency of Cao Shuang and Sima Yi. This would prove to be a fatal mistake for his clan, as Cao Shuang monopolised power and governed incompetently, eventually drawing a violent reaction from Sima Yi, who overthrew him in a coup d’état (Incident at Gaoping Tombs). Sima Yi became in control of the Wei government from AD 249, eventually allowing his grandson Sima Yan to usurp the throne in AD 266. After his death, Cao Rui was posthumously honoured as “Emperor Ming” with the temple name “Liezu”.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1136 – Petronilla of Aragon (d. 1173)
Petronilla (29 June[1]/11 August[2] 1136 – 15 October 1173), whose name is also spelled Petronila or Petronella (Aragonese: Peyronela or Payronella,[3] and Catalan: Peronella), was Queen of Aragon from the abdication of her father, Ramiro II, in 1137 until her own abdication in 1164. After her abdication she acted as regent during the minority of her son (1164–1173). She was the last ruling member of the Jiménez dynasty in Aragon, and by marriage brought the throne to the House of Barcelona.

Read more ->
 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DCIX): Tradeswomen, magazine for blue collar workingwomen in the ‘80s & ’90s; Daredevil Aerialist Betty Fox; Whimsigothic, the Witchy Aesthetic Hexing the Internet; Women that settled the American Frontier, and gave the first women’s accounts of it; “Keepers of Culture” women of the Iroquois Confederacy; The young Nazi-resistance fighter who should be a household name; The Pioneering Sculptor from Kentucky that studied with Rodin; How bicycles boosted the women’s rights movement; The Island Run By Women and more ->

 
 
 
 

Rare Historical Photos: Vintage advertising posters of Soviet cars from the past, 1970s-1980s
 
 
 
 

By Gemma Tarlach, Atlas Obscura: Inside America’s Premier Black Rodeo, A Celebration of Cowboy Culture A photographer captures perseverance and pride over a decade of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo.

 
 
 
 

By Abhaya Raj Joshi, Rest of the World: How a schoolteacher became one of Nepal’s biggest YouTube stars With his YouTube channel, Purvi Blues, Sachin Neupane hopes to help Nepalis connect with their history and culture.
 
 
 
 

By Rebecca Leber, Vox: The biggest myths about gas prices Making sense of the political theater over gas prices.

 
 
 
 
By Minda Zetlin, Inc.: This Is the Most Bizarre Grammar Rule You Probably Never Heard Of But I’ve been following it all my life, and so have you.

 
 
 
 
Craig Medred: Everyday smarties

 
 
 
 
Voices of History: GUNS DON’T KILL PEOPLE – “Eric and Dylan would not have been stopped by more gun laws.”
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI June 27 & 28, 2022

On This Day

1760 – Anglo-Cherokee War: Cherokee warriors defeat British forces at the Battle of Echoee near present-day Otto, North Carolina.
The Anglo-Cherokee War (1758–1761; in the Cherokee language: the “war with those in the red coats” or “War with the English”), was also known from the Anglo-European perspective as the Cherokee War, the Cherokee Uprising, or the Cherokee Rebellion. The war was a conflict between British forces in North America and Cherokee bands during the French and Indian War.

The British and the Cherokee had been allies at the start of the war, but each party had suspected the other of betrayals. Tensions between British-American settlers and Cherokee warriors of towns that the pioneers encroached on, increased during the 1750s, culminating in open hostilities in 1758.

Read more ->

 
 

1495 – A French force heavily defeats a much larger Neapolitan and Spanish army at the battle of Seminara, leading to the creation of the Tercios by Gonzalo de Córdoba.[2]
A tercio (pronounced [ˈteɾθjo]; Spanish for “[a] third”) was a military unit of the Spanish Army during the reign of the Spanish Habsburgs in the early modern period. The tercios were renowned for the effectiveness of their battlefield formations, forming the elite military units of the Spanish Monarchy. They were the essential pieces of the powerful land forces of the Spanish Empire, sometimes also fighting with the navy. The Spanish tercios were a crucial step in the formation of modern European armies, understood as made up of professional volunteers, instead of levies raised for a campaign or hired mercenaries typically used in other European countries of the time.[citation needed]

The tercios’ internal administrative organization, and their battlefield formations and tactics, grew out of the innovations of Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba during the Italian Wars. The tercios marked a rebirth of battlefield infantry comparable to the Macedonian phalanxes and the Roman legions.[7] From the victory in Pavia (1525), and on to a period of over a century, their position as the finest infantry in Europe was built upon their professional training and high proportion of “old soldiers” (veteranos), in conjunction with the particular elan imparted by the lower nobility who commanded them. In addition, they were among the first to effectively mix pikes and firearms (arquebuses). The tercios were replaced by regiments in the early eighteenth century.

From 1920, the name of tercio was given to the formations of the newly created Spanish Legion; professional units then created to fight colonial wars in North Africa, similar to the French Foreign Legion. These formations are actually regiments bearing the name of tercio as an honorary title.

Read more ->

Born On This Day

1717 – Louis-Guillaume Le Monnier, French botanist and physicist (d. 1799)
Louis-Guillaume Le Monnier (sometimes written as Lemonnier) (27 June 1717 – 7 September 1799) was a French natural scientist and contributor to the Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers.[1]

He was born near Vire as the son of Pierre Le Monnier (1675–1757), who was a scientist himself and a member of the French Academy of Sciences.[2] Louis-Guillaume’s older brother was the astronomer Pierre Charles Le Monnier.[3]

Louis-Guillaume Le Monnier worked in physics, geology, medicine, and botany. In 1739 he accompanied the expedition of César-François Cassini de Thury and Nicolas Louis de Lacaille to extend the Meridian of Paris and documented mines and the geology and botany along the route.[2] In the same year, he also began working at the hospital of Saint Germain en Laye as a physician. He researched electrical phenomena, sending a current from a Leyden jar through a wire 950 toises (about 1,850 m) long and concluded that electricity propagated “instantaneously” in the wire.[4] Later research of his on electrical phenomena was concerned with thunderstorms and the “fair weather condition”.[5]

Like his father and his brother before him, Louis-Guillaume became a member of the Académie des sciences on 3 July 1743,[2] and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society on 7 February 1745,[6] of which his brother also was a member. On 30 June 1746, one year after his brother, he also became a member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences.[7]

With Claude Richard he was one of the original organizers of Louis XV’s botanic collection at Petit Trianon, an undertaking quickly joined by Bernard de Jussieu. Lemonnier was appointed professor of botany at the Jardin du Roi (later the Jardin des Plantes) in 1759, filling a spot left by the death of Bernard de Jussieu’s brother Antoine in April of the previous year. In 1786 he was succeeded as professor of botany by René Louiche Desfontaines.[8]

For Diderot’s Encyclopédie he wrote several entries, among them “Electricité”, “Magnétisme”, “Aimant” (Magnet), and “Aiguille aimantée” (Compass needle).[3][9] After 1759, he stopped publishing, though.[10] In his later career, he became in 1770 “Premier médecin ordinaire”[10] and in 1788 “Premier médecin du Roi”.[2]

His lover was Marie Louise de Rohan, Madame de Marsan, future Governess of the Children of France.

His publications include:

Leçons de physique expérimentale, sur l’équilibre des liqueurs et sur la nature et les propriétés de l’air (1742).
Observations d’histoire naturelle faites dans les provinces méridionales de France, pendant l’année 1739 (1744).
Recherches sur la Communication de l’Electricité (1746).
Observations sur l’Electricité de l’Air (1752).

 
 

1503 – Giovanni della Casa, Italian author and poet (d. 1556)
Giovanni della Casa (28 June 1503 – 14 November 1556), was a Florentine poet, writer on etiquette and society, diplomat, and inquisitor. He is celebrated for his famous treatise on polite behavior, Il Galateo overo de’ costumi (1558). From the time of its publication, this courtesy book has enjoyed enormous success and influence. In the eighteenth century, influential critic Giuseppe Baretti wrote in The Italian Library (1757), “The little treatise is looked upon by many Italians as the most elegant thing, as to stile, that we have in our language.”[1]

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FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

KDLG: Authors are protesting Amazon’s e-book policy that allows users to read and return

 
 
 
 

By Maria Popova, The Marginalian (formerly Brain Pickings): Extraordinary Letters on Love, Life, Death, Courage, and Moral Purpose Without Religion From a Victorian woman who lived and died with uncommon bravery.
 
 
 
 
By Mia Sato, The Verge: The archive saving home sewing history from the trash Sewing patterns are meant to be trashed — or not
 
 
 
 
By Grace Smith-Vidaurre and Tim Wright, TED-Ed: Why can parrots talk?
 
 
By Annie Reneau , Upworthy: He rescued a baby parrot with birth defects. His reaction to its first steps is priceless. This is what pure joy looks like.
 
 

The Backyard Naturalist: Backyard Birders’ Summer Checklist
 
 
 
 
Point In History: An interactive look at the world’s historical boundaries.
 
 
 
 

By Luka Wright, TED Talks: These animals are also plants … wait, what?

 
 
 
 
By Adam Bankhurst, IGN.com: A 125 Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Fossil Has the Oldest Belly Button Known to Science

 
 
 
 

AP News: Wind farm, environmentalists agree on ways to protect whales
 
 
AP News: Dolphins in Lisbon river show benefits of protecting nature
 
 
 
 
Conner Carey: iPhone Life

 
 
 
 

By Anne Ewbank, Atlas Obscura: The Lost Glamour of the Department-Store Restaurant Pot pies and fanciful desserts made shopping delicious.
 
 
 
 
By Mark Dent, The Hustle: ‘Just stop buying lattes’: The origins of a millennial housing myth Financial gurus want young home shoppers to stop complaining and cut back on small luxuries. But there are broader affordability issues at play.

 
 
 
 
Google History

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

ToolsThatBuild: Hack for Cleaning Inside Sliding Window and Door Tracks
 
 
By Prob1e: George, the Golf Ball Ant – Recycling Fun Craft for All the Family to Get Involved With.
 
 

By Penolopy Bulnick: Holographic Rainbow Reflective 3D Prints – 3D Printing on Diffraction Grating Sheets
 
 

Recipes

Taste of Home: 100+ Fourth of July Appetizers You Have to Make This Year
 
 
I Wash You Dry: Juicy Oven Baked Chicken Breast Recipe
 
 
By nishakaralkar: Chocolate Filled Braided Bread
 
 
By Roshni Sahoo: Easiest Fruit Ice Cream (Pomegranate)
 
 
By Federica: Chocolate Tortellini Filled With Coconut and White Chocolate
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI June 24, 25 & 26, 2022

On This Day

1314 – First War of Scottish Independence: The Battle of Bannockburn concludes with a decisive victory by Scottish forces led by Robert the Bruce.[6]
The First War of Scottish Independence was the first of a series of wars between English and Scottish forces. It lasted from the English invasion of Scotland in 1296 until the de jure restoration of Scottish independence with the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton in 1328. De facto independence was established in 1314 at the Battle of Bannockburn. The wars were caused by English kings attempting to establish their authority over Scotland while Scots fought to keep English rule and authority out of Scotland.[2][3]

The term “War of Independence” did not exist at the time. The war was given that name retrospectively many centuries later, after the American War of Independence made the term popular, and after the rise of modern Scottish nationalism.[citation needed]

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1258 – War of Saint Sabas: In the Battle of Acre, the Venetians defeat a larger Genoese fleet sailing to relieve Acre.

This article is about the Battle of Acre (1258). For other battles, see Battle of Acre.
The Battle of Acre took place in 1258 off the port of Acre, between the fleets of the Republic of Genoa and the Republic of Venice. Mounting tensions between the traders of the two cities had resulted in the outbreak of open warfare between the two (“War of Saint Sabas”), with the Venetians blockading the Genoese in their quarter. Genoa sent an armada under the aged capitano del popolo, Rosso della Turca, to relieve the blockade, and asked the assistance of Philip of Montfort and the Knights Hospitaller for a combined attack from the land side. However, even though the Genoese fleet’s arrival took the Venetians by surprise, and their fleet was divided in two by weather as they exited the harbour, della Turca delayed his own attack long enough for the Venetians time to get into battle formation. The superior experience and seamanship of the latter resulted in a crushing Venetian victory, with half the Genoese fleet lost. The Genoese abandoned Acre soon after.[1][2]

 
 
1886 – Henri Moissan isolated elemental Fluorine for the first time.
Fluorine is a chemical element with the symbol F and atomic number 9. It is the lightest halogen and exists at standard conditions as a highly toxic, pale yellow diatomic gas. As the most electronegative element, it is extremely reactive, as it reacts with all other elements except for argon, neon, and helium.

Among the elements, fluorine ranks 24th in universal abundance and 13th in terrestrial abundance. Fluorite, the primary mineral source of fluorine which gave the element its name, was first described in 1529; as it was added to metal ores to lower their melting points for smelting, the Latin verb fluo meaning ‘flow’ gave the mineral its name. Proposed as an element in 1810, fluorine proved difficult and dangerous to separate from its compounds, and several early experimenters died or sustained injuries from their attempts. Only in 1886 did French chemist Henri Moissan isolate elemental fluorine using low-temperature electrolysis, a process still employed for modern production. Industrial production of fluorine gas for uranium enrichment, its largest application, began during the Manhattan Project in World War II.

Owing to the expense of refining pure fluorine, most commercial applications use fluorine compounds, with about half of mined fluorite used in steelmaking. The rest of the fluorite is converted into corrosive hydrogen fluoride en route to various organic fluorides, or into cryolite, which plays a key role in aluminium refining. Molecules containing a carbon–fluorine bond often have very high chemical and thermal stability; their major uses are as refrigerants, electrical insulation and cookware, the last as PTFE (Teflon). Pharmaceuticals such as atorvastatin and fluoxetine contain C−F bonds. The fluoride ion from dissolved fluoride salts inhibits dental cavities, and so finds use in toothpaste and water fluoridation. Global fluorochemical sales amount to more than US$69 billion a year.

Fluorocarbon gases are generally greenhouse gases with global-warming potentials 100 to 23,500 times that of carbon dioxide, and SF6 has the highest global warming potential of any known substance. Organofluorine compounds often persist in the environment due to the strength of the carbon–fluorine bond. Fluorine has no known metabolic role in mammals; a few plants and sea sponges synthesize organofluorine poisons (most often monofluoroacetates) that help deter predation.[14]


Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1485 – Johannes Bugenhagen, Polish-German priest and reformer (d. 1558)[13]
Johannes Bugenhagen (24 June 1485 – 20 April 1558), also called Doctor Pomeranus by Martin Luther, was a German theologian and Lutheran priest who introduced the Protestant Reformation in the Duchy of Pomerania and Denmark in the 16th century. Among his major accomplishments was organization of Lutheran churches in Northern Germany and Scandinavia. He has also been called the “Second Apostle of the North”.

Johannes Bugenhagen was pastor to Martin Luther at St. Mary’s church in Wittenberg. He is also commemorated in the Calendar of Saints of the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod as a pastor on 20 April.


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1799 – David Douglas, Scottish-English botanist and explorer (d. 1834)
David Douglas (25 June 1799 – 12 July 1834) was a Scottish botanist, best known as the namesake of the Douglas fir. He worked as a gardener, and explored the Scottish Highlands, North America, and Hawaii, where he died.[1] The standard author abbreviation Douglas is used to indicate this person as the author when citing a botanical name.[2]


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1903 – Big Bill Broonzy, American singer-songwriter and guitarist (d. 1958)
Big Bill Broonzy (born Lee Conley Bradley; June 26, 1903[1][2] – August 14, 1958) was an American blues singer, songwriter and guitarist. His career began in the 1920s, when he played country music to mostly African-American audiences. Through the 1930s and 1940s he successfully navigated a transition in style to a more urban blues sound popular with working-class African-American audiences. In the 1950s a return to his traditional folk-blues roots made him one of the leading figures of the emerging American folk music revival and an international star. His long and varied career marks him as one of the key figures in the development of blues music in the 20th century.

Broonzy copyrighted more than 300 songs during his lifetime, including both adaptations of traditional folk songs and original blues songs. As a blues composer, he was unique in writing songs that reflected his rural-to-urban experiences.[3]


Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 
 
 

By David Sherry, Creative Caffeine, Emily gomez: Building an “Entrepreneurs Safety Net”
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: Karl Marx & the Flaws of Capitalism: Lex Fridman Talks with Professor Richard Wolff
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Color Footage of the Liberation of Paris, Shot by Hollywood Director George Stevens (1944)
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Only Surviving Manuscript of John Milton’s Paradise Lost Gets Published in Book Form for the First Time
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Rapper Post Malone Performs a 15-Song Set of Nirvana Songs, Paying Tribute to Kurt Cobain
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: The Oldest House in New York City: Meet the Wyckoff House (1652)

 
 
 
 

By Mark Kennedy, AP News: Rick Astley revisits his career-making song with ‘gratitude’
 
 
 
 
Jack White On “Seven Nation Army” | CONAN on TBS
 
 
BBC Music: Jack White – Seven Nation Army (Glastonbury 2022)

 
 
By Joanna Moorhead, The Guardian: How to Bully-Proof Your Kids for Life Arm your kids with the right tools, and you’ll empower them against bullies—and stop them becoming one themselves

 
 
 
 

Politico: Abortion laws by state: Where abortions are illegal after Roe v. Wade overturned Not all trigger bans immediately kick in, but abortion will soon be illegal in more than a dozen states.
 
 
 
 
David Acosta Jr. | Special Guest Episode | EP. 075 | Mike Force Podcast
 
 
 
 
Parrot Uses Facemask as Hammock
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Natasha’s Kitcen: Cheesy Mashed Potato Pancakes Recipe There’s just something about that beautiful cheese pull.
 
 
By jprussack: Cheesy Goldfish Crackers XL
 
 
By half-n-half: Authentic Chocolate Pot De Crème
 
 
By Thyme of Season: HOMEMADE S’MORES ICE CREAM
 
 
By aledeg: Balsam Fir and Honey Ice Cream
 
 
By Cat_at_heart: Water Drop Splash Sculpture (Candy Glass)
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI June 23, 2022

On This Day

1757 – Battle of Plassey: Three thousand British troops under Robert Clive defeat a 50,000-strong Indian army under Siraj ud-Daulah at Plassey.

The Battle of Plassey was a decisive victory of the British East India Company over the Nawab of Bengal and his French[1] allies on 23 June 1757, under the leadership of Robert Clive. The victory was made possible by the defection of Mir Jafar, who was Nawab Siraj-ud-Daulah’s commander in chief. The battle helped the British East India Company take control of Bengal. Over the next hundred years, they seized control of most of the rest of the Indian subcontinent, Burma, and Afghanistan.

The battle took place at Palashi (Anglicised version: Plassey) on the banks of the Hooghly River, about 150 kilometres (93 mi) north of Calcutta (now Kolkata) and south of Murshidabad in West Bengal, then capital of Bengal Subah (now in Nadia district in West Bengal). The belligerents were the Nawab Siraj-ud-Daulah, the last independent Nawab of Bengal , and the British East India Company. He succeeded Alivardi Khan (his maternal grandfather). Siraj-ud-Daulah had become the Nawab of Bengal the year before, and he had ordered the English to stop the extension of their fortification. Robert Clive bribed Mir Jafar, the commander-in-chief of the Nawab’s army, and also promised to make him Nawab of Bengal. Clive defeated Siraj-ud-Daulah at Plassey in 1757 and captured Calcutta.[2]

The battle was preceded by an attack on British-controlled Calcutta by Nawab Siraj-ud-Daulah and the Black Hole massacre. The British sent reinforcements under Colonel Robert Clive and Admiral Charles Watson from Madras to Bengal and recaptured Calcutta. Clive then seized the initiative to capture the French fort of Chandannagar.[3] Tensions and suspicions between Siraj-ud-daulah and the British culminated in the Battle of Plassey. The battle was waged during the Seven Years’ War (1756–1763), and, in a mirror of their European rivalry, the French East India Company (La Compagnie des Indes Orientales)[1] sent a small contingent to fight against the British. Siraj-ud-Daulah had a vastly numerically superior force and made his stand at Plassey. The British, worried about being outnumbered, formed a conspiracy with Siraj-ud-Daulah’s demoted army chief Mir Jafar, along with others such as Yar Lutuf Khan, Jagat Seths (Mahtab Chand and Swarup Chand), Umichand and Rai Durlabh. Mir Jafar, Rai Durlabh and Yar Lutuf Khan thus assembled their troops near the battlefield but made no move to actually join the battle. Siraj-ud-Daulah’s army with about 50,000 soldiers (including defectors), 40 cannons and 10 war elephants was defeated by 3,000 soldiers of Col. Robert Clive, owing to the flight of Siraj-ud-Daulah from the battlefield and the inactivity of the conspirators. The battle ended in approximately 11 hours.

This is judged to be one of the pivotal battles in the control of Indian subcontinent by the colonial powers. The British now wielded enormous influence over the Nawab, Mir Jafar and consequently acquired significant concessions for previous losses and revenue from trade. The British further used this revenue to increase their military might and push the other European colonial powers such as the Dutch and the French out of South Asia, thus expanding the British Empire.


Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1879 – Huda Sha’arawi, Egyptian feminist and journalist (d. 1947)[13]
Huda Sha’arawi or Hoda Sha’rawi (Arabic: هدى شعراوي, ALA-LC: Hudá Sha‘rāwī; 23 June 1879 – 12 December 1947) was a pioneering Egyptian feminist leader, suffragette, nationalist, and founder of the Egyptian Feminist Union.

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FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

By Greg Evans, Deadline: James Rado Dies: ‘Hair’ Co-Creator & Star Of Broadway’s Groundbreaking Rock Musical Was 90
 
 
James Alexander Radomski (January 23, 1932 – June 21, 2022), known professionally as James Rado, was an American actor, playwright, director, and composer, best known as the co-author, along with Gerome Ragni, of the 1967 musical Hair. He and Ragni were nominated for the 1969 Tony Award for best musical, and they won for best musical at the 11th Annual Grammy Awards.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova | The Marginalian: Midweek pick-me-up: Helen Macdonald on love, loss, time, and our improbable allies in healing
 
 
By Maria Popova, The Marginalian (formerly Brain Pickings): Epictetus on Love and Loss: The Stoic Strategy for Surviving Heartbreak “Who is good if he knows not who he is? and who knows what he is, if he forgets that things which have been made are perishable, and that it is not possible for one human being to be with another always?”
 
 
 
 
By Freda Kreier, Nature.com: These cancer cells wake up when people sleep Researchers make ‘striking’ discovery that breast cancer cells are more likely to jump into the blood when people are resting.
 
 
 
 
James Clear: 3 of many 3-2-1: Mental toughness, the connection between action and satisfaction, and mistakes
 
 
 
 
By Lance Mortlock, Chief Executive: 6 Things I Learned From A Former CIA Director About Success In A Volatile Environment
“Situational awareness is everything,” says Gen. (Ret.) David Petraeus, who offers lessons for business from the front.
 
 
 
 
By Sofia Quaglia, The Guardian: Scientists unveil bionic robo-fish to remove microplastics from seas Tiny self-propelled robo-fish can swim around, latch on to free-floating microplastics and fix itself if it gets damaged
 
 
 
 

By Isabelle Qian, Muyi Xiao, Paul Mozur and Alexander Cardia, The New York Times: Four Takeaways From a Times Investigation Into China’s Expanding Surveillance State Times reporters spent over a year combing through government bidding documents that reveal the country’s technological road map to ensure the longevity of its authoritarian rule.
 
 
 
 

By Lilit Marcus and Wayne Chang, CNN Travel: Nepal may move Everest Base Camp
 
 
 
 
CBS News: Monkey in “bullet-proof” vest found dead after bloody cartel shootout in Mexico

 
 
 
 
Mel Magazine: TikTok’s Highly Anticipated Eel Pit Is Finally Revealed
 
 
 
 

By Paweł Zadrożniak: The Floppotron 3.0 – Computer Hardware Orchestra
 
 
 
 
Story & Illustrations Gwendal Uguen, Code Luc Guillemot, The Pudding: A Visual Guide to the Aztec Pantheon

 
 
 
 

By George Wright, BBC News: Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov auctions Nobel medal for $103m
Dmitry Muratov said all the money from the sale would go to help refugees from the war in Ukraine.
 
 
 
 
By Kelly Ho, HongKongFP: In Pictures: Jumbo Floating Restaurant towed out of Hong Kong after 46 years Residents gathered beneath cloudy skies on Tuesday morning to watch as the iconic floating restaurant was slowly towed away.
 
 
By Zen Soo, AP News: Hong Kong’s iconic Jumbo Floating Restaurant capsizes at sea
 
 
 
 

ByKai Kupferschmidt, Science.org: A wild hope Two decades after it disappeared in nature, the stunning blue Spix’s macaw will be reintroduced to its forest home
 
 
 
 
Colion Noir: 14 Senate Republicans Agreed To Gun Control That We Need To Stop
 
 
 
 
Gas is $5.50-$5.80gl, Diesel is $6.00 – $6.20gl

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By kellechu: Color-Changing Prom Dress With Magic Wand
 
 
By Handy_Bear: Giant Matches – That Work!
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By mcarlson9: Go Big Bacon Cheeseburger
 
 
By Jeromina: Hand-Pulled Chocolate Cotton Candy
 
 
By Sugar Hi: Modeling Chocolate Unicorn Cake Topper
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI June 22, 2022

On This Day

1807 – In the Chesapeake–Leopard affair, the British warship HMS Leopard attacks and boards the American frigate USS Chesapeake.
The Chesapeake–Leopard affair was a naval engagement off the coast of Norfolk, Virginia, on June 22, 1807, between the British fourth-rate HMS Leopard and the American frigate USS Chesapeake. The crew of Leopard pursued, attacked, and boarded the American frigate, looking for deserters from the Royal Navy.[1] Chesapeake was caught unprepared and after a short battle involving broadsides received from Leopard, the commander of Chesapeake, James Barron, surrendered his vessel to the British. Chesapeake had fired only one shot.

Four crew members were removed from the American vessel and were tried for desertion, one of whom was subsequently hanged. Chesapeake was allowed to return home, where James Barron was court martialed and relieved of command.

The Chesapeake–Leopard affair created an uproar among Americans. There were strident calls for war with Great Britain, but these quickly subsided. President Thomas Jefferson initially attempted to use this widespread bellicosity to diplomatically threaten the British government into settling the matter. The United States Congress backed away from armed conflict when British envoys showed no contrition for the Chesapeake affair, delivering proclamations reaffirming impressment. Jefferson’s political failure to coerce Great Britain led him toward economic warfare: the Embargo of 1807.[2]

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Born On This Day

1792 – James Beaumont Neilson, Scottish engineer and businessman (d. 1865)
James Beaumont Neilson (22 June 1792 – 18 January 1865) was a Scottish inventor whose hot-blast process greatly increased the efficiency of smelting iron.

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FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Hear a Neuroscientist-Curated 712-Track Playlist of Music that Causes Frisson, or Musical Chills
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: What Is the House of the Rising Sun?: An Introduction to the Origins of the Classic Song
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: George Harrison Breaks Down Abbey Road Track-By-Track on the Day of Its Release (September 26, 1969)
 
 
 
 
Jack CarrUSA: Bill Barr: One Damn Thing After Another
 
 
 
 

Black Rifle Coffee Company: Dan Bigely
 
 
 
 
By Dina Gachman, Texas Monthly: Meet the Yucca Whisperer of West Texas Near Fort Stockton, Hoven Riley has been quietly growing more than 20,000 of the prized plants, which are being illicitly uprooted from public and private lands to meet a growing demand.
 
 
 
 
By Taylor Martin, CNET: Most People Put Their Router in the Wrong Place (and Wi-Fi Speed Suffers) There’s an easy fix for better Wi-Fi. Try these five tips to find the best place for your router.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
ILSR’s Community Broadband Initiative: Recently in Community Networks… Week of 6/20
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Homemade on a weeknight: Chili Cheese Frito Salad
 
 
The Yummy bowl: Creamy Chicken And Bacon Pasta

 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

Music June 22, 2022

Ray Stevens CabaRay Nashville – Don Schlitz (Season 1, Episode 4) [Full Episode]
 
 
 
 
Creed Fisher – Earplugs and Beer
 
 
 
 
Hank Williams, Jr. – Spinning ‘Rich White Honky Blues’ Vinyl at Easy Eye Sound
nbsp;
 
 
 

FYI June 21, 2022

On This Day

1529 – French forces are driven out of northern Italy by Spain at the Battle of Landriano during the War of the League of Cognac.
The Battle of Landriano took place on 21 June 1529, between the French army under Francis de Bourbon, Comte de St. Pol and the Imperial–Spanish army commanded by Don Antonio de Leyva, Duke of Terranova[2] in the context of the War of the League of Cognac. The French army was destroyed and the battle’s strategic result was that the struggle between Francis I of France and Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor for control of northern Italy was temporarily at an end.[3]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1630 – Samuel Oppenheimer, German Jewish banker and diplomat (d. 1703)[11]
Samuel Oppenheimer (born 21 June 1630, Heidelberg – 3 May 1703, Vienna) was an Ashkenazi Jewish banker, imperial court diplomat, factor, and military supplier for the Holy Roman Emperor. He enjoyed the special favor of Emperor Leopold I, to whom he advanced considerable sums of money for the Great Turkish War. Prince Eugene of Savoy brought him a large number of valuable Hebrew manuscripts from Turkey, which became the nucleus of the famous David Oppenheim Library, now part of the Bodleian Library at Oxford.

Although the Jews had been recently expelled from Vienna in 1670, the emperor permitted Oppenheimer to settle there, together with his “Gesinde”, his followers, who included a number of Jewish families. He even received the privilege of building a mansion in the heart of Vienna. He was appointed “Oberfaktor” and court Jew at the recommendation of Margrave Ludwig of Baden, the imperial general in Hungary, to whom he had advanced 100,000 gulden for war expenses. He also enabled Prince Eugene to provide medical attendance for the army during the Turkish war. About the year 1700, a riot broke out, possibly sanctioned by the royal court, to persuade Oppenheimer to relieve the court’s debt.[1] During the riot, houses were sacked and property looted, including Oppenheimer’s. As a result, one man was hanged for sacking Oppenheimer’s house and others were imprisoned for participating in the disturbance.

Oppenheimer took steps to suppress the anti-Semitic Entdecktes Judenthum (Judaism Unmasked) treatise by spending large sums of money to win the court and the Jesuits to the side of the Jews. As a result, an imperial edict was issued forbidding circulation of the author, Eisenmenger’s, work. Oppenheimer was employed also by the emperor in political missions which were often of a delicate nature.

When Oppenheimer died, the state refused to honor its debts to his heir Emanuel and had his firm declared bankrupt. His death brought deep financial crisis to the state; it experienced great difficulty in securing the credit necessary to meet its needs. Emanuel appealed to European rulers to whom the state owed money and who intervened on his behalf. After deliberate procrastination, the state refused Emanuel’s demand for 6 million florins and instead demanded 4 million florins from him. This amount was based on a sum which (with compound interest), according to the state, Oppenheimer had allegedly obtained by fraud at the beginning of his career. Emanuel died in 1721 and the Oppenheimer estate was auctioned in 1763. Although Oppenheimer was not himself learned, he was a benefactor on a scale hitherto unknown, building many synagogues and yeshivot and supporting their scholars. He also paid ransom for the return of Jews captured during the Turkish wars and supported as well R. Judah he-Hasid’s voyage to Erez Israel in 1700. Known as Judenkaiser by his contemporaries, he was a man whose complex personality, a mixture of pride and reserve, defied historical analysis. Twenty years after his death it was estimated that more than 100 persons held residence in Vienna by virtue of their being included in Oppenheimer’s privileges.[2]

Oppenheimer was buried in the Rossauer Cemetery, the oldest Jewish cemetery in Vienna (Seegasse 9). Stones in the cemetery were buried during WWII for protection. Many were recovered and the cemetery was restored in the 1980s. One half of Samuel Oppenheimer’s tombstone as well as the lower part of the second half were recovered during excavations in the cemetery in 2008 and was restored to its original location,[3] as were the tombstones of several of his descendants. A photograph taken before the war reveals the elaborate inscriptions on his tombstone.

One of Oppenheimer’s sons, Simon Wolf Oppenheimer, established a banking house in Hanover. Simon Wolff’s son, Jakob Wolf Oppenheimer continued the family banking house. It was there, from 1757 to 1763, that Mayer Amschel Rothschild apprenticed and learned the banking business that would become synonymous with that family name. Oppenheimer’s descendants include the composer Felix Mendelssohn.

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

By Alexander Bodin Saphir, BBC News: The Tip-Off From a Nazi That Saved My Grandparents It has often been described as a “miracle” that most of Denmark’s Jews escaped the Holocaust. Now it seems that the country’s Nazi rulers deliberately sabotaged their own operation.

 
 
 
 

JEFF DUNHAM: President Biden tackles Questions From Gas Prices to Chicken Sandwiches FIRESIDE SHATS
 
 
 
 

MCHD Paramedic Podcast 360: BIKE TEAM

 
 
 
 

The Loewentheil Collection: SEIZING SHADOWS: RARE PHOTOGRAPHS BY LATE QING DYNASTY MASTERS 
 
The Loewentheil Collection is launching its first virtual exhibition of selections from the world’s largest and finest collection of early photography of China.

“Seizing Shadows: Rare Photographs by late Qing Dynasty Masters,” a virtual exhibition in English and Chinese, is the first exhibition devoted to photographs by pioneering Chinese photographers.
 
 
 
 

Periscope Film: “NORTH OF THE HIMALAYAS” 1930s EDUCATIONAL FILM N.E. CHINA MONGOLIA EASTERN RUSSIA TIBET XD47964

 
 
 
 
By Judith Herman, Mental Floss: 25 Words That Are Their Own Opposites Stumble into the looking-glass world of contronyms.

 
 
 
 

By Anja Klemp Vilgaard, Narratively: The King Who Became a Pirate When King Erik VII of Denmark was forced from the throne, he did the only thing any self-respecting descendant of Vikings could: He joined the warriors of the sea, and hit right back at his enemies.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 

Ideas

By greensiphouse: Convertible Backyard A-frame Fort From a Swing Set.
 
 
By Kelly Concepts: Making a Stock Tank Pool
 
 

Recipes

By Ross Yoder, BuzzFeed: I’m Newly-Obsessed With The Japanese-Style Method For Making Iced Coffee At Home (And Honestly, American Cold Brew Doesn’t Even Compare)
 
 
Food Network Kitchen: Bacon-Egg-And-Cheese-Stuffed Pancakes
 
 
I Wash You Dry: Slow Cooker Honey Garlic Chicken Thighs
 
 
By Diana Rattray, The Spruce Eats: Crispy Baked Chicken Thighs With Panko and Parmesan Coating
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI June 20, 2022

On This Day

1787 – Oliver Ellsworth moves at the Federal Convention to call the government the ‘United States’.

Ellsworth participated in the 1787 Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia as a delegate from Connecticut along with Roger Sherman and William Samuel Johnson. More than half of the 55 delegates were lawyers, eight of whom, including both Ellsworth and Sherman, had previous experience as judges conversant with legal discourse.

Ellsworth took an active part in the proceedings beginning on June 20, when he proposed the use of “the United States” to identify the government under the authority of the Constitution. The words “United States” had already been used in the Declaration of Independence and Articles of Confederation as well as Thomas Paine’s The American Crisis. It was Ellsworth’s proposal to retain the earlier wording to sustain the emphasis on a federation rather than a single national entity. Three weeks earlier, on May 30, 1787, Edmund Randolph of Virginia had moved to create a “national government” consisting of a supreme legislative, an executive, and a judiciary. Ellsworth accepted Randolph’s notion of a threefold division but moved to strike the phrase “national government.” Since then, the “United States” has been the official title used in the Convention to designate the government. The complete name, “the United States of America,” had already been featured by Paine, and its inclusion in the Constitution was the work of Gouverneur Morris when he made the final editorial changes in the Constitution.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1761 – Jacob Hübner, German entomologist and author (d. 1826)
Jacob Hübner (20 June 1761 – 13 September 1826, in Augsburg) was a German entomologist. He was the author of Sammlung Europäischer Schmetterlinge (1796–1805), a founding work of entomology.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 
Nothing nefarious , excellent information on the various tracking devices.
By Kashmire Hill, The New York Times: I Used Apple AirTags, Tiles and a GPS Tracker to Watch My Husband’s Every Move A vast location-tracking network is being built around us so we don’t lose our keys: One couple’s adventures in the consumer tech surveillance state.
 
 
 
 

By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DCVII): This book of colour shades depicted with feathers; Culture in Crisps: Lays Flavours from Around the World; This 32ft International bridge that connects a Canadian house to U.S. backyard; The Celebrity illustrations of Richard Bernstein; Ozette: America’s lost 2,000-year-old village; The Art of Life: A documentary about the art of living outside of conventions and more ->
 
 
MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DCVI): The Coffee Machine Museum; A Magazine for Women in Blue-Collar Work During the ’80s and ’90s; Audrey Hepburn, living in Nazi occupied Netherlands, suffering malnutrition, raised funds for the resistance by dancing in underground concerts; A 103 year-old comic about what would happen if “pocket telephones” would be invented; In-N-Out’s biblical wrapping; Remember we fell in love with this Forgotten ’70s Girl Group That Swept Bowie off His Feet? Now there’s a Documentary! And more ->
 
 
 
 

By Alice Fleerackers, Nautilus: The Simple Dutch Cure for Stress “Uitwaaien” is a popular activity around Amsterdam—one believed to have important psychological benefits.

 
 
 
 

By Kevin Koczwara, Literary Hub: Finding the One Book My Young Son Would Sit Still To Kevin Koczwara on the Genius of Maurice Sendak and Reading Where the Wild Things Are

 
 
 
 

Taking your goose for a stroll
 
 
 
 

By Kaitlyn Pacheco, Angi: The Largest Residential Home in Every U.S. State

 
 
 
 
By Matt Growcoot, PetaPixel: Film Footage Captured in 1936 Remastered in Stunning 6.5K

 
 
 
 
By Rosmary Misdary, The Gothamist: New York Harbor becomes a dining hotspot for bottlenose dolphins

 
 
 
 

ESPN News Service: FINA votes to restrict transgender women from elite swimming competition
 
 
 
 
Chris Williamson Host of the Modern Wisdom Podcast | Mike Ritland Podcast Episode 99

 
 
 
 

Jocko Podcast 338: Uvalde School Shooting Tragedy. Tactical Response Assessment
 
 
 
 
Before Kids, After Kids
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: The Best Way to Fry an Egg Once you try Spanish fried eggs, you’ll never cook them any other way.
 
 

 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?