Category: FYI

FYI

FYI September 26, 2020

On This Day

1688 – The city council of Amsterdam votes to support William of Orange’s invasion of England, which became the Glorious Revolution.

The Glorious Revolution (Irish: An Réabhlóid Ghlórmhar, Scottish Gaelic: Rèabhlaid Ghlòrmhor or Welsh: Chwyldro Gogoneddus), or Revolution of 1688, was the deposition and replacement of James II and VII as ruler of England, Scotland and Ireland by his Protestant daughter Mary II, and her husband, William III of Orange, which took place between November 1688 and May 1689. The outcome of events in all three kingdoms and Europe, the Revolution was quick and relatively bloodless, though establishing the new regime took much longer and led to significant casualties.[1] The term was first used by John Hampden in late 1689.[2]

Despite his Catholicism, James became king in February 1685 with widespread support since many feared his exclusion would lead to a repetition of the 1638–1651 Wars of the Three Kingdoms.[3] It was also seen as a short-term issue; James was 52, his second marriage remained childless after 11 years, and his daughter Mary was heir presumptive. This changed on 10 June 1688 with the birth of a son, James Francis Edward; under the principle of male primogeniture, he replaced Mary as heir, creating the prospect of a Catholic dynasty.[4]

This combined with instability caused when James suspended the Scottish and English Parliaments and tried to rule by personal decree.[5] The prosecution of the Seven Bishops further antagonised his English supporters, since it was seen as a direct assault on the Church of England. Public celebrations of their acquittal on 30 June 1688 turned into widespread anti-Catholic riots throughout England and Scotland, and destroyed James’s political authority. In July, a coalition of English politicians invited William to secure the English throne.

Louis XIV of France was then preparing to launch the Nine Years War, which was a direct threat to the Dutch Republic; concerned English resources might be used against him, William therefore accepted. On 5 November, he landed in Torbay with 14,000 men; as he advanced on London, the bulk of the 30,000 strong Royal Army deserted and James went into exile on 23 December.[6] A Convention Parliament met in April 1689, making William and Mary joint monarchs of England; a separate but similar Scottish settlement was made in June.[7]

The Revolution was followed by pro-Stuart revolts in Scotland and Ireland, while Jacobitism persisted into the late 18th century. However, it ended a century of political dispute by confirming the primacy of Parliament over the Crown, a principle established in the Bill of Rights 1689.[8] Restrictions on Catholics contained in the 1678 and 1681 English and Scottish Test Acts remained in force until 1828; religious prohibitions on the monarch’s choice of spouse were not removed until 2015, while restrictions on the monarch personally remain in place today.

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Born On This Day

1877 – Bertha De Vriese, Belgian physician (d. 1958)
Bertha De Vriese (26 September 1877 – 17 March 1958) was a Belgian physician. When she earned her degree as a doctor of medicine at Ghent University, where she was the first woman to conduct research and the first woman physician to graduate from the school. Although she was not allowed to pursue an academic career, De Vriese opened a private pediatric clinic and served as the director of the Children’s Ward at the Bijloke Hospital in Ghent. In 1914, she married Josef Vercouillie, also a physician.

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FYI

CBS News: Ukraine military plane crash kills 26; lone survivor praised for “heroism”
 
 
 
 
Lofty Minded in Alaska: Lost Words, Found Meaning, and an Autumn Equinox Journal Series

 
 
 
 
The Awesomer: How Not to Get Eaten by Ewoks; Chuffed (Dad Song); Firing Outside the Barrel and more ->
 
 
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: How to Make Queso at Home
 
 
A Taste of Alaska: Loss of Truck Brakes and Blackberry Cobbler Drink of the Week
 
 
By Carrie Forrest, Clean Eating: 8 Healthy Homemade Halloween Snacks
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 17 Better-For-You Takes on Comfort Food


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 25, 2020

On This Day

1237 – England and Scotland sign the Treaty of York, establishing the location of their common border.

The Treaty of York was an agreement between the kings Henry III of England and Alexander II of Scotland, signed at York on 25 September 1237, which affirmed that Northumberland (which at the time also encompassed County Durham),[1] Cumberland, and Westmorland were subject to English sovereignty. This established the Anglo-Scottish border in a form that remains almost unchanged to modern times (the only modifications have been regarding the Debatable Lands and Berwick-upon-Tweed).[2] The treaty detailed the future status of several feudal properties and addressed other issues between the two kings, and historically marked the end of the Kingdom of Scotland’s attempts to extend its frontier southward.

The treaty was one of a number of agreements made in the ongoing relationship between the two kings. The papal legate Otho (also known as Oddone di Monferrato) was already in the Kingdom of England at Henry’s request, to attend a synod in London in November 1237. Otho was informed in advance by Henry of the September meeting at York, which he attended. This meeting was recorded by the contemporary chronicler Matthew Paris, who disparaged both Alexander and Otho. Paris’ untruthful allegations towards Alexander, portraying him as boorishly uncivil and aggressive, have been repeated uncritically in several historical accounts.[not verified in body]

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Born On This Day

1908 – Jacqueline Audry, French director and screenwriter (d. 1977)
Jacqueline Audry (25 September 1908 – 22 June 1977) was a French film director who began making films in post-World War II France and specialised in literary adaptations.[1] She was the first commercially successful female director of post-war France.[2]
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FYI

Vector’s World: Going Fishing
 
 
 
 
By Hillel Italie / The Associated Press: Sir Harold Evans, crusading publisher and author, dies at 92
 
 
 
 
By Evan Gough, Universe Today: A New Mass Extinction has been Discovered, Wiping Out Life 233 Million Years Ago, and Leading to the Rise of the Dinosaurs
 
 
 
 
By Jessica Stewart, My Modern Met: Jacques Cousteau’s Grandson Is Building the World’s Largest Underwater Research Center
 
 
 
 
By AGDaily: Tips from a farmer on how to handle stress & mental health
 
 
 
 
Texas CEO Magaine: Churchill wasn’t afraid to give bad news; Pulling Together Under Pressure: An Interview with Erik Larson
 
 
 
 
Lady Gaga: Put on your superhero suit. Let’s go,’
 
 
 
 
By Eben Shapiro, Time: Lego Makes a Hundred Billion Bricks a Year. CEO Niels Christiansen on Why They’re Now More Important Than Ever
 
 
 
 
By Dina Gerdeman, Havard Business School: Are You Sabotaging Your Own Company?
 
 
 
 
STORIES OF NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Kate Rockwell–Klondike Kate
 
 
 
 
By Megan Wollerton, CNet: Amazon’s new Ring camera is actually a flying drone — for inside your house Ring announces the $250 Always Home Cam and plans for end-to-end encryption.
 
 
 
 
By Robert Gearty, Fox News: Giant rat earns animal hero award for sniffing out landmines in Cambodia
 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: See the impact of Chernobyl on Belarus; Inside Arctic Greenhouses and more->
 
 
 
 

Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Friday, September 25, 2020
 
 
 
 

Ernie at Tedium: FTP Fadeout
 
 
 
 
49 Writers, Inc.: Book Review: Nerve, Adventures in the Science of Fear by Eva Holland from 49 Writers’ Katie Bausler

 
 
 
 
Wow!

 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Beyond Basic Spaghetti Dinners
 
 
By Christine Gallary, The Kitchn: I Tried the Internet’s Most Popular Brownie Recipe (It Has Over 10,000 Reviews)
 
 
By Grace Elkus, the Kitchn: I Tried Reddit’s Wildly Popular Lemon Bars (and They’re Worth the Hype)
 
 
By Lauren Habermehl, Taste of Home: Bumpy Cake Is an Iconic Michigan Dessert You Need to Try


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 24, 2020

On This Day

1789 – The United States Congress passes the Judiciary Act, creating the office of the Attorney General and federal judiciary system and ordering the composition of the Supreme Court.
The Judiciary Act of 1789 (ch. 20, 1 Stat. 73) was a United States federal statute adopted on September 24, 1789, in the first session of the First United States Congress. It established the federal judiciary of the United States.[2][3][4][5] Article III, Section 1 of the Constitution prescribed that the “judicial power of the United States, shall be vested in one Supreme Court, and such inferior Courts” as Congress saw fit to establish. It made no provision for the composition or procedures of any of the courts, leaving this to Congress to decide.[6]

The existence of a separate federal judiciary had been controversial during the debates over the ratification of the Constitution. Anti-Federalists had denounced the judicial power as a potential instrument of national tyranny. Indeed, of the ten amendments that eventually became the Bill of Rights, five (the fourth through the eighth) dealt primarily with judicial proceedings. Even after ratification, some opponents of a strong judiciary urged that the federal court system be limited to a Supreme Court and perhaps local admiralty judges. The Congress, however, decided to establish a system of federal trial courts with broader jurisdiction, thereby creating an arm for enforcement of national laws within each state.

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Born On This Day

1898 – Charlotte Moore Sitterly, American astronomer (d. 1990)
Charlotte Emma Moore Sitterly (September 24, 1898 – March 3, 1990) was an American astronomer.[1] She is known for her extensive spectroscopic studies of the Sun and chemical elements. Her tables of data are known for their reliability and are still used regularly.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Recipes

Edible Alaska: Keynotes & kelp jerky
 
 
By In The Kitchen With Matt: Country Fried Potatoes
 
 
A Taste of Alaska: New Cabinet and Tea Set and Chocolate Dipped Peanut Butter Cookie Sandwiches


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 22, 2020

On This Day

1711 – The Tuscarora War begins in present-day North Carolina.
The Tuscarora War was fought in North Carolina from September 22, 1711 until February 11, 1715 between the Tuscarora people and their allies on one side and European American settlers, the Yamassee, and other allies on the other. This was considered the bloodiest colonial war in North Carolina.[1] The Tuscarora signed a treaty with colonial officials in 1718 and settled on a reserved tract of land in Bertie County, North Carolina. The war incited further conflict on the part of the Tuscarora and led to changes in the slave trade of North and South Carolina.

The first successful settlement of North Carolina began in 1653. The Tuscarora lived in peace with the settlers for more than 50 years, while nearly every other colony in America was involved in some conflict with Native Americans. Most of the Tuscarora migrated north to New York after the war, where they joined the Five Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy as the sixth nation.

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Born On This Day

1868 – Louise McKinney, Canadian educator and politician (d. 1931)
Louise McKinney née Crummy (22 September 1868 – 10 July 1931) was a Canadian politician and women’s rights activist from Alberta, Canada. She was the first woman sworn into the Legislative Assembly of Alberta and the first woman elected to a legislature in the British Empire. She served in the Alberta legislature from 1917 to 1921 as a member of the Non-Partisan League. Later she was one of the Famous Five who campaigned successfully for the right of Canadian women to be appointed to the Senate. A former schoolteacher and temperance organizer, she came to Alberta in 1903 as a homesteader.[1]

Political career

McKinney ran for a seat to the Alberta Legislature in the 1917 Alberta general election. She won the electoral district of Claresholm as a candidate for the Non-Partisan League by defeating Liberal incumbent William Moffat.[2] She was one of two women elected to the Legislative Assembly that year, the other being Roberta MacAdams.

McKinney spoke out in favour of temperance, education, stronger liquor control, government ownership of grain elevators and flour mills, women’s property rights and adoption of, and reform to, the Dower Act.

She ran for a second term in the 1921 Alberta general election as a member of the United Farmers. She was defeated by Independent Farmer candidate Thomas Milnes.[3]

McKinney was one of The Famous Five,[4] along with Irene Parlby, Henrietta Muir Edwards, Emily Murphy and Nellie McClung

Late life and honours
McKinney died at Claresholm, Alberta, in 1931, just two years after the Persons Case victory.[5] In 1939, she was recognized as a Person of National Historic Significance by the government of Canada. A plaque commemorating this is on display at the post office in Claresholm.[6] The Persons Case was recognized as a Historic Event in 1997.[7] In October 2009, the Senate voted to name McKinney and the other members of the Famous Five Canada’s first “honorary senators”.[8]

 
 

FYI

By Rocky Parker, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Senior Blogs, Part 2
 
 
 
 

Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Tuesday, September 22, 2020
 
 
 
 

Rasmuson Foundation: Unsung heroes: Department of Transportation
 
 
Ramuson Foundation: Unsung heroes: Department of Administration
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: The Internet Archive Will Digitize & Preserve Millions of Academic Articles with Its New Database, “Internet Archive Scholar”
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Liebregts: Dolphin
 
 
The Kitchen Garten: DIY Self-Watering Planter
 
 
By Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead: How to Make Rosemary and Lemongrass Soap

 
 

Recipes

The Food Network: Wickedly Delicious Halloween Appetizers
 
 
By WayneGBG: The Changeling Sandwich
 
 
By Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Salmon Piccata
 
 
By Stephanefalies: Churro Ice Cream Sandwich
 
 
By Jesse Szewczyk, The Kitchn: I Tried Reddit’s Popular Black Midnight Cake (It’s as Good as Promised)


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI September 21, 2020

On This Day

1435 – The Congress of Arras causes Burgundy to switch sides in the Hundred Years’ War.
The Congress of Arras was a diplomatic congregation established at Arras in the summer of 1435 during the Hundred Years’ War, between representatives of England, France, and Burgundy. Toward the close of the Hundred Years’ War, both the Congress and the subsequent Treaty of Arras represented diplomatic failures for England and major successes for France.

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Born On This Day

1552 – Barbara Longhi, Italian painter (d. 1638)
Barbara Longhi (English: /bɑːrˈbɑːrə ˈlɒŋɡi/, Italian: [ˈloŋɡi]; 21 September 1552 – 23 December 1638)[1] was an Italian painter. She was much admired in her lifetime as a portraitist, although most of her portraits are now lost or unattributed. Her work, such as her many Madonna and Child paintings, earned her a fine reputation as an artist.

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FYI

By Sabrina Imbler, The New York Times: In a Desert’s Burning Sands, Shrimp When it rains in Iran’s Dasht-e Lut desert, the ground comes alive with tiny, upside-down crustaceans.
 
 
 
 

By Joshua Benton, NiemanLab: “Politics as a chronic stressor”: News about politics bums you out and can make you feel ill — but it also makes you take action
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Favorite Opera Recordings (and Her First Appearance in an Opera)
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: The Life, Work & Philosophy of Bill Murray: Happy 70th Birthday to an American Comedy Icon
 
 
 
 

By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DXXI): Ella Slack, the Queen’s Stand-in; The Musashino waste plant in Japan has a diner where people can watch trash being processed; Charles Booth’s Victorian London Poverty Maps; The terraced gardens of Isola Bella, created in the 17th century; This McDonald’s in Roswell; An unreleased ’80s horror film featuring George Clooney, Laura Dern, and Charlie Sheen; This 1987 Fellini set; Cindy Baedman’s “Healing Grotto” and more->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Love Sheriff Grady Judd!

 
 

Recipes

By Lauren Habermehl, Taste of Home: How to Make a Stunning Melon Cake (with Tara Teaspoon)
 
 
Food Network Kitchen: Pumpkin Cheese Ball
 
 
By Shauna Havey, Taste of Home: Lentil Taco Cups
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 17 Under-an-Hour Chicken Dinners
 
 
By Amy Glander, Taste of Home: 60 Dinners That Start with a Jar of Pasta Sauce


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI September 20, 2020

On This Day

1378 – Cardinal Robert of Geneva is elected as Pope Clement VII, beginning the Papal schism.
The Western Schism, also called Papal Schism, Great Occidental Schism and Schism of 1378 (Latin: Magnum schisma occidentale, Ecclesiae occidentalis schisma), was a split within the Catholic Church lasting from 1378 to 1417[1] in which two men (by 1410 three) simultaneously claimed to be the true pope, and each excommunicated the other. Driven by authoritative politics rather than any theological disagreement, the schism was ended by the Council of Constance (1414–1418). For a time these rival claims to the papal throne damaged the reputation of the office.[2]

The affair is sometimes referred to as the Great Schism, although this term is also used for the East–West Schism of 1054 between the Western Churches answering to the See of Rome and the Greek Orthodox Churches of the East.

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Born On This Day

1876 – Carleton Ellis, American inventor and chemist (d. 1941)
Carleton Ellis (September 20, 1876 – January 13, 1941) was an American inventor and a pioneer in the field of organic chemistry. He was involved in the development of margarine, polyester, anti-knock gasoline, paint and varnish remover, and holder of 753 patents.[1] A native of Keene, New Hampshire, he was the valedictorian of his high school class, and later a graduate of MIT. He then set up the Ellis Laboratories in Montclair, New Jersey.

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FYI

AP: Robert W. Gore, the inventor of Gore-Tex fabric, dead at 83
 
 
 
 

By Michael Waters, The Hustle: How marketers convinced America to eat fish sticks
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice – No Time But the Present
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: 13-Year-Old Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Prejudice, Its Antidote, and the Five Documents That Shaped Humanity
 
 
 
 
Wow!

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

Ideas

By Kylieeleanne: Concrete Rhubarb Leaf Garden Decor
 
 
By WickedMakers: Halloween Candy Slide
 
 
By doozer_not_fraggle: Overhead Mobile Gantry Crane Build (A Tool for Lifting Heavy Things)

Recipes

By In The Kitchen With Matt: Pumpkin Waffles
 
 
By scotto: Pan Bagna – a Vegetarian Delight
 
 
By felipeaguayob: The BEST Tuna Sandwich OF ALL TIME
 
 
By Emerald04: S’mores Grilled Cheese
 
 
The Food Network: Cute and Spooky Halloween Cupcakes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI September 19, 2020

On This Day

1796 – George Washington’s Farewell Address is printed across America as an open letter to the public.
Washington’s Farewell Address is a letter written by American President George Washington as a valedictory to “friends and fellow-citizens” after 20 years of public service to the United States.[1] He wrote it near the end of his second term of presidency before retiring to his home at Mount Vernon in Virginia.

The letter was first published as The Address of Gen. Washington to the People of America on His Declining the Presidency of the United States in the American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796, about ten weeks before the presidential electors cast their votes in the 1796 election. It is a classic statement of republicanism, warning Americans of the political dangers which they must avoid if they are to remain true to their values. It was almost immediately reprinted in newspapers throughout the country, and later in pamphlet form.[2]

The first draft was originally prepared by James Madison in June 1792, as Washington contemplated retiring at the end of his first term in office.[3] However, he set it aside and ran for a second term because of heated disputes between Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson which convinced Washington that the growing tensions would rip apart the country without his leadership. This included the state of foreign affairs, and divisions between the newly formed Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties.[4]

As his second term came to a close four years later, Washington prepared a revision of the original letter with the help of Hamilton to write a new farewell address to announce his intention to decline a third term in office. He reflects on the emerging issues of the American political landscape in 1796, expresses his support for the government eight years after the adoption of the Constitution, defends his administration’s record and gives valedictory advice to the American people.[5]

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Born On This Day

1889 – Sarah Louise Delany, American physician and author (d. 1999)
Sarah Louise “Sadie” Delany (September 19, 1889 – January 25, 1999) was an American educator and civil rights pioneer who was the subject, along with her younger sister, Elizabeth “Bessie” Delany, of the New York Times bestselling oral history biography, Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years, by journalist Amy Hill Hearth. Sadie was the first African-American permitted to teach domestic science at the high-school level in the New York public schools, and became famous, with the publication of the book, at the age of 103.

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FYI

Quartz Weekly Obsession: Ruth Bader Ginsburg: The tiny giant of jurisprudence
 
 
Ruth Bader Ginsburg (/ˈbeɪdər ˈɡɪnzbɜːrɡ/; born Joan Ruth Bader; March 15, 1933 – September 18, 2020),[1] also known by her initials RBG, was an American jurist who served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1993 until her death in 2020. She was nominated by President Bill Clinton and was generally viewed as belonging to the liberal wing of the Court. Ginsburg was the second woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, after Sandra Day O’Connor. During her tenure on the Court, Ginsburg authored notable majority opinions, including United States v. Virginia (1996), Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), and Friends of the Earth, Inc. v. Laidlaw Environmental Services, Inc. (2000).

Following O’Connor’s retirement in 2006 and until Sonia Sotomayor joined the Court in 2009, she was the only female justice on the Supreme Court. During that time, Ginsburg became more forceful with her dissents, which were noted by legal observers and in popular culture.

Ginsburg was born and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She then earned her bachelor’s degree at Cornell University and became a wife to Martin D. Ginsburg and a mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class. Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated tied for first in her class. Following law school, Ginsburg entered academia. She was a professor at Rutgers Law School and Columbia Law School, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent a considerable part of her legal career as an advocate for gender equality and women’s rights, winning multiple arguments before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsels in the 1970s. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where she served until her appointment to the Supreme Court. Ginsburg received attention in American popular culture for her fiery liberal dissents and refusal to step down. She was playfully dubbed “The Notorious R.B.G.”, a reference to Brooklyn-born rapper The Notorious B.I.G.[2]

Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., on September 18, 2020, at the age of 87, from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer.[3][4]

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report:

 
 
Piper PA-22-135 Tri-Pacer, N8875C: Accident occurred September 14, 2020 near Homer Airport (PAHO), Alaska

Posted: 19 Sep 2020 08:29 AM PDT
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska Aircraft crashed on beach after takeoff. https://registry.faa.gov/N8875CDate: 14-SEP-20Time: 00:32:00ZRegis#: N8875CAircraft Make: PIPERAircraft Model: PA22Event Type: ACCIDENTHighest Injury: MINORAircraft Missing: NoDamage: SUBSTANTIALActivity: PERSONALFlight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)Operation: 91City: HOMERState:
 
 
Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N7669Y: Accident occurred September 12, 2020 at Homer Airport (PAHO), Alaska

Posted: 19 Sep 2020 08:32 AM PDT
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska Aircraft lost control on landing and veered off runway and up a bank. https://registry.faa.gov/N7669YDate: 12-SEP-20Time: 04:30:00ZRegis#: N7669YAircraft Make: PIPERAircraft Model: PA30Event Type: ACCIDENTHighest Injury: NONEAircraft Missing: NoDamage: SUBSTANTIALActivity: PERSONALFlight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
 
 
Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N416RK: Accident occurred September 12, 2020 at McCarthy Airport (PAMX), Alaska

Posted: 19 Sep 2020 08:06 AM PDT
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska Aircraft on takeoff veered off the runway and hit trees. Windyfork LLChttps://registry.faa.gov/N416RKDate: 12-SEP-20Time: 03:15:00ZRegis#: N416RKAircraft Make: PIPERAircraft Model: PA18Event Type: ACCIDENTHighest Injury: NONEAircraft Missing: NoDamage: SUBSTANTIALActivity: PERSONALFlight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
 
 
Cessna 170B, N3068A: Incident occurred September 13, 2020 in Kiana, Alaska

Posted: 19 Sep 2020 08:00 AM PDT
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska Aircraft lost power and control with wing impacting gravel bar. https://registry.faa.gov/N3068ADate: 13-SEP-20Time: 21:45:00ZRegis#: N3068AAircraft Make: CESSNAAircraft Model: 170Event Type: INCIDENTHighest Injury: NONEAircraft Missing: NoDamage: UNKNOWNActivity: PERSONALFlight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)Operation:
 
 
 
 
STORIES OF NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: The Richest Woman in the Klondike
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Gastro Obscura: America’s loneliest woman brewed root beer for the masses; The 1600’s Best Kitchen Gadget and more ->
 
 
By Meghan Splawn, The Kitchn: How to Make Homemade Taco Seasoning
 
 
myRecipeTreasures: Cinnamon Brown Sugar Apple Chips
 
 
By Kardea Brown, The Food Network: French Onion Grilled Cheese
 
 
The Food Network: Boston Cream Pie Cheesecake
 
 
myRecipeTreasures: Soft Cream Cheese Snickerdoodles


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI September 18, 2020

On This Day

1895 – The Atlanta Exposition Speech on race relations is delivered by Booker T. Washington.
The Cotton States and International Exposition Speech was an address on the topic of race relations given by Booker T. Washington on September 18, 1895. The speech laid the foundation for the Atlanta compromise, an agreement between African-American leaders and Southern white leaders in which Southern blacks would work meekly and submit to white political rule, while Southern whites guaranteed that blacks would receive basic education and due process of law.

The speech,[1] presented before a predominantly white audience at the Cotton States and International Exposition (the site of today’s Piedmont Park) in Atlanta, Georgia, has been recognized as one of the most important and influential speeches in American history.[2] The speech was preceded by the reading of a dedicatory ode written by Frank Lebby Stanton.[3]

Washington began with a call to the blacks, who composed one third of the Southern population, to join the world of work. He declared that the South was where blacks were given their chance, as opposed to the North, especially in the worlds of commerce and industry. He told the white audience that rather than relying on the immigrant population arriving at the rate of a million people a year, they should hire some of the nation’s eight million blacks. He praised blacks’ loyalty, fidelity and love in service to the white population, but warned that they could be a great burden on society if oppression continued, stating that the progress of the South was inherently tied to the treatment of blacks and protection of their liberties.

He addressed the inequality between commercial legality and social acceptance, proclaiming that “The opportunity to earn a dollar in a factory just now is worth infinitely more than the opportunity to spend a dollar in an opera house.” Washington also promoted segregation by claiming that blacks and whites could exist as separate fingers of a hand.

The title “Atlanta Compromise” was given to the speech by W. E. B. Du Bois, who believed it was insufficiently committed to the pursuit of social and political equality for blacks.

Although the speech was not recorded at its initial presentation in 1895, Washington recorded a portion of the speech during a trip to New York in 1908. This recording has been included in the United States National Recording Registry.[4]

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Born On This Day

1858 – Kate Booth, English Salvation Army officer (d. 1955)
Catherine Booth-Clibborn (Katie Booth, 18 September 1858 – 9 May 1955) was an English Salvationist and evangelist who extended the Salvation Army into France and Switzerland against local opposition. She was the oldest daughter of William and Catherine Booth. She was also known as “la Maréchale”.

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FYI

By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Let’s Talk About Stuff
 
 
 
 
I found these on Zillow. Check out the asking price versus MOA Tax assessment.

$3,800,000 16505 Southcliff Cir, Anchorage, AK 99516
 
 
$1,750,000 19665 Villages Scenic Pkwy, Anchorage, AK 99516
 
 
This one is titled “Ideal opportunity for Airbnb or family compound”
$1,290,000, 16528 Kings Way Dr, Anchorage, AK 99516

 
 
 
 

Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Friday, September 18, 202
 
 
 
 

Tribune News Service: Researchers puzzled by ‘crazy’ killer whales attacking boats near Spain
 
 
 
 
New Life On A Homestead: What’s That Lump On My Chicken’s Chest? Does It Have A Tumor?

 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Set foot in this Italian “Hell Alley” and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Don’t Do Business with Incompetents
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: A Long, Guided Tour of New York City Captured in Original Color Film (1937)
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By frazeeg: DIY Hammer-In Steel Garden Edging
 
 
By Ajaxjones: Jet Propelled Radio Controlled Duck
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Got Fish? Try This Beer Battered Fish Recipe!
 
 
By PanSobao: Margherita Pizza-Style Chicken Sandwich
 
 
By skeeeeee: Panino Alla Parmigiana – an Italian Delicious Recipe
 
 
By Molly Yeh, The Food Network: Chocolate Donuts with Coffee Glaze
 
 
The Food Network: Scary Good Halloween Snacks


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI September 15, 16 & 17, 2020

On This Day

1530 – Appearance of the miraculous portrait of Saint Dominic in Soriano in Soriano Calabro, Calabria, Italy; commemorated as a feast day by the Roman Catholic Church 1644–1912.

Saint Dominic in Soriano (Italian: San Domenico in Soriano; Spanish: Santo Domingo en Soriano) was a portrait of Saint Dominic (1170–1221) which was from 1530 an important artefact in the Dominican friary at Soriano Calabro in southern Italy. It was believed to be of miraculous origin, and to inspire miracles. It was the subject of a Roman Catholic feast day celebrated on 15 September from 1644 to 1913. Its miraculous origin was the subject of several 17th-century paintings. Several ecclesiastical buildings have been named after it. The painting may no longer exist.

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1880 – The Cornell Daily Sun prints its first issue in Ithaca, New York. The Sun is the United States’ oldest, continuously-independent college daily.
The Cornell Daily Sun is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York by students at Cornell University and hired employees.

The Sun features coverage of the university and its environs as well as stories from the Associated Press and UWIRE. It prints on weekdays when the university is open for academic instruction as a tabloid-sized daily. In addition to these regular issues, The Sun publishes a graduation issue and a freshman issue, which is mailed to incoming Cornell freshmen before their first semester. The paper is free on campus and online.

Aside from a few full-time production and business positions, The Sun is staffed by Cornell students and is fully independent of the university. It operates out of its own building in downtown Ithaca. The Sun is currently the number one college newspaper in the United States, according to The Princeton Review.[1]

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1961 – The world’s first retractable roof stadium, the Civic Arena, opens in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
The Civic Arena, formerly the Civic Auditorium and later Mellon Arena, was an arena located in Downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Civic Arena primarily served as the home to the Pittsburgh Penguins, the city’s National Hockey League (NHL) franchise, from 1967 to 2010.[5]

Constructed in 1961 for use by the Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera (CLO), it was the brainchild of department store owner Edgar J. Kaufmann. It was the first retractable roof major-sports venue in the world, covering 170,000 square feet (16,000 m2), constructed with nearly 3,000 tons of Pittsburgh steel and supported solely by a massive 260-foot (79 m) long cantilevered arm on the exterior.[2] Even though it was designed and engineered as a retractable-roof dome, the operating cost and repairs to the hydraulic jacks halted all full retractions after 1995, and the roof stayed permanently closed after 2001.[6] The first roof opening was during a July 4, 1962, Carol Burnett show to which she exclaimed “Ladies and Gentlemen…I present the sky!”[7]

The Civic Arena hosted numerous concerts, the circus, political and religious rallies, roller derbies as well as contests in hockey, basketball, fish tournament weigh-ins, pro tennis, boxing, wrestling, lacrosse, football, ice skating championships, kennel shows, and soccer. The structure was used as the backdrop for several major Hollywood films, most prominently Sudden Death in 1995. Prior to its demise, it was known as Mellon Arena, named for Mellon Financial, specifically American businessman and 49th Secretary of the Treasury Andrew W. Mellon, which purchased the naming rights in 1999. Their naming rights expired on August 1, 2010, and the arena was once again known as the Civic Arena.[8]

The Civic Arena closed on June 26, 2010. The former Mellon naming rights expired soon after, and the Penguins and all other events moved across the street to the new Consol Energy Center – now PPG Paints Arena. After various groups declined historic status for the venue, it was demolished between September 2011 – March 2012. In its place, existing public parking lots in the area were expanded over the entire site. Two of the many streets stricken from the city’s street plan when the arena was originally built were subsequently re-extended back through the site: Wylie Street and Fullerton Street.[9] The Penguins have the rights to redevelop the property and a preliminary plan exists for residential units, retail space and office space.[10]

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Born On This Day

1828 – Alexander Butlerov, Russian chemist and academic (d. 1886)
Alexander Mikhaylovich Butlerov (Алекса́ндр Миха́йлович Бу́тлеров; 15 September 1828 – 17 August 1886) was a Russian chemist, one of the principal creators of the theory of chemical structure (1857–1861), the first to incorporate double bonds into structural formulas, the discoverer of hexamine (1859), the discoverer of formaldehyde (1859) and the discoverer of the formose reaction (1861). He first proposed the idea of possible tetrahedral arrangement of valence bonds in carbon compounds in 1862.

The crater Butlerov on the Moon is named after him.

Alexander Butlerov was born in Chistopol into a landowning family.

 
 
1891 – Stephanie von Hohenlohe, Austrian-German spy (d. 1972)
Stephanie Julianne von Hohenlohe, born Stephany Julienne Richter (16 September 1891 – 13 June 1972) was an Austrian princess by her marriage to the diplomat Prince Friedrich Franz von Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingsfürst, a member of the princely Hohenlohe family. She was born a commoner, allegedly of Jewish family background.

A Hungarian national, she relocated to London after her divorce from the prince, where she is suspected of having acted as a spy for Germany during the 1930s. She developed close connections among the Nazi hierarchy, including Adolf Hitler. She also developed other influential relationships, including with Harold Sidney Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere, and promoted British support for Germany while living in London from 1932. The British, French and Americans all suspected her of being a spy for the German Government.[1] During the 1930s, she was awarded the Gold Medal of the Nazi Party for her services.[2]

Fleeing from Britain to San Francisco in 1939 after war was declared, she was put under surveillance by the US government. After the attack on Pearl Harbor she was arrested by the FBI and interned in the United States as an enemy alien. She provided information to the Office of Strategic Services which was used in a 1943 report on the personality of Adolf Hitler. In May 1945 she was released on parole and returned to Germany, where she cultivated influential connections in post-war German society.

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1867 – Vera Yevstafievna Popova, Russian chemist (d. 1896)
Vera Yevstafievna Popova, née Vera Bogdanovskaya (Вера Евстафьевна Попова; 17 September 1867 – 8 May 1896) was a Russian chemist. She was one of the first female chemists in Russia,[3] and the first Russian female author of a chemistry textbook.[4] She “probably became the first woman to die in the cause of chemistry” as a result of an explosion in her laboratory.[5]

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Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI September 14, 2020

On This Day

1180 – Genpei War: Battle of Ishibashiyama in Japan.
The Battle of Ishibashiyama (石橋山の戦い, Ishibashiyama no tatakai) was the first in which Minamoto no Yoritomo,[1] who became shōgun less than a decade later, was commander of the Minamoto forces. The battle was fought on September 14, 1180, in the southwest of present-day Odawara, Kanagawa Prefecture, near Yoritomo’s headquarters at Kamakura.[2][3][better source needed]

Background
Yoritomo was exiled by Taira no Kiyomori following the Heiji Rebellion of 1160. In the following years, the Taira clan attempted to consolidate their position, eventually forcing the Emperor Takakura to abdicate in favour of his infant son, Antoku, whose mother was a Taira. Prince Mochihito felt that the throne should have been his, and in May 1180, issued an appeal to the Minamoto clan to rise against the Taira.[4]

When Kiyomori heard that Yoritomo had left Izu Province for the Hakone Pass, he appointed Ōba Kagechika to stop him. Although there was much sympathy for Yoritomo’s call to arms, the clans were wary of openly supporting him and an army of only 300 gathered at Ishibashiyama where he had raised his standard. A force from the Miura clan was prevented from reaching Yoritomo by the Sakawa River which was in flood.[5]

The battle

Kiyomori launched a night attack on the Minamato camp with 3,000 men. A further 300 under Itō Sukechika skirted around the camp and attacked from the rear. The defenders were aided by elements of Kiyomori’s force who were secretly loyal to the Minamato and who could disrupt the battle without detection in the dark and stormy conditions. However, sheer weight of numbers soon told and the Minamato made a fighting retreat, culminating in a final stand by a hollow tree. When all was lost, Yoritomo is said to have hidden inside the tree trunk with a single companion. Here he was found by one of his secret allies and smuggled from the battlefield.[6] Yoritomo fled by sea from Cape Manazuru to Awa Province[7] in the south of present-day Chiba Prefecture on September 28, 1180.[2]

 
 

Born On This Day

1843 – Lola Rodríguez de Tió, Puerto Rican poet, abolitionist, and women’s rights activist (d. 1924)
Lola Rodríguez de Tió,[note 1] (September 14, 1843 – November 10, 1924), was the first Puerto Rican-born woman poet to establish herself a reputation as a great poet throughout all of Latin America.[1] A believer in women’s rights, she was also committed to the abolition of slavery and the independence of Puerto Rico.

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FYI

By Tom Metcalfe – Live Science Contributor: Wreck of WWII warship with Nazi symbol discovered off Norway
 
 
By Laura Geggel – Associate Editor, Live Science: New ‘eternal sleeper’ dinosaur species was entombed while still alive
 
 
 
 

By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DXX): The “Witch’s House” in its original location on a Hollywood studio lot. Moved to Beverly Hills in the 1930s, now a private home.; French kings could have an “official royal mistress”. Wikipedia has the official list.; In 1979, two families escaped East Germany in a homemade hot air balloon; Near Mount Rushmore there’s a monument, Crazy Horse, which has been under construction since 1948, to honour a well known Lakota war leader; This Trailer Park in Joshua Tree; Goldie Hawn spotted with Nancy Sinatra and Ruth Buzzi singing goodbye to the 60s and more ->
 
 
 
 
Hannah Howe: Maslow’s hierarchy for modern times ; A tearful farewell at Paddington Station c1942, by Bert Hardy.; In 1952, Dwight Eisenhower gave a speech to D-Day veterans, discussing those who‘d died under his command.; Cécile Rol-Tanguy and Henri Tanguy, the French Resistance couple who conducted clandestine operations, relayed confidential messages and participated in the liberation of Paris. More ->
 
 
 
 
By Oscar Durand, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Latin America Blogs
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Chocolate Covered Katie: Pumpkin Muffins

By Cathy Jacobs, The Spruce Eats: 51 Best Cauliflower Recipes

Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Red Chimichurri

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 400 Calorie Recipes For The Whole Family