Category: FYI

FYI

FYI September 19, 2021

On This Day

1410 – End of the Siege of Marienburg: The State of the Teutonic Order repulses the joint Polish—Lithuanian forces.[1][2]
The Siege of Marienburg was an unsuccessful two-month siege of the castle in Marienburg (Malbork), the capital of the monastic state of the Teutonic Knights. The joint Polish and Lithuanian forces, under command of King Władysław II Jagiełło and Grand Duke Vytautas, besieged the castle between 26 July and 19 September 1410 in a bid of complete conquest of Prussia after the great victory in the Battle of Grunwald (Tannenberg). However, the castle withstood the siege and the Knights conceded only to minor territorial losses in the Peace of Thorn (1411). Marienburg defender Heinrich von Plauen is credited as the savior of the Knights from complete annihilation.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1889 – Sarah Louise Delany, American physician and author (d. 1999)
Sarah Louise “Sadie” Delany (September 19, 1889 – January 25, 1999) was an American educator and civil rights pioneer who was the subject, along with her younger sister, Elizabeth “Bessie” Delany, of the New York Times bestselling oral history biography, Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years, by journalist Amy Hill Hearth. Sadie was the first African-American permitted to teach domestic science at the high-school level in the New York public schools, and became famous, with the publication of the book, at the age of 103.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

The Passive Voice, From Publisher’s Weekly: How the AP Stylebook Considers Language on Disability
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Substack: How I Became the Honest Broker
 
 
The Pasive Voice, From Kristine Kathryn Rusch: Supply Chain Woes…Traditional, Indie, And More
 
 
 
 
Brain Pickings by Maria Popova: The Unfinished Story of the World: Richard Powers’s Advice on Life and the Antidote to Cynicism
 
 
 
 
The Awesomer: The Art of Weird Internet Videos; Making a Guitar in the Forest and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Ken M. Middleton, Medium: What We Can Learn From Pharrell Williams NOT Drinking Alcohol His life is living proof of what is possible.
 
 
 
 
By Nick, Majestic Animals: Goat and rooster rush to save chicken pal from hawk in dramatic footage
 
 
 
 
By Luke Smillie and Anna Antinori, The Conversation: People With Creative Personalities Really Do See the World Differently Not only do open people bring a different perspective, but they genuinely see things differently than most.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

A man went to his lawyer and stated, “I would like to make a will but I don’t know exactly how to go about it.”

The lawyer said, “No problem, leave it all to me.”

The man looked somewhat upset as he said, “Well, I knew you were going to take the biggest slice, but I’d like to leave a little to my children, too!”
Merk
 
 
The judge warned the witness, “Do you understand that you have sworn to tell the truth?”

“I do.”

“Do you understand what will happen if you are not truthful?”

“Sure,” said the witness. “My side will win.”
Anonymous
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By malijai: The Timber Lumber Mover
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Momos75: Mediterranean Chicken Ragout
 
 
By yellowcone: Oxtail Stew Served in Edible Bowls With Edible Spoons
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: One-Pot Cheesy Chili-Mac
 
 
By dany doddoli: Oreo Macarons in 10 Steps
 
 
By LuAnn Heikkila, Floodwood, Minnesota, Taste of Home: Marble Chiffon Cake
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 18, 2021

On This Day

1759 – French and Indian War: The Articles of Capitulation of Quebec are signed.
The Articles of Capitulation of Quebec were agreed upon between Jean-Baptiste Nicolas Roch de Ramezay, King’s Lieutenant, Admiral Sir Charles Saunders, and General George Townshend on behalf of the French and British crowns during the Seven Years’ War. They were signed on 18 September 1759, shortly after the Battle of the Plains of Abraham.[1]

All 11 demands of De Ramsay were granted by the British Army: the honors of war, the protection of the civilians and their properties, the free exercise of the Roman Catholic religion, etc. Several months later, on 28 April 1760, the French Royal Army attempted to retake Quebec City, at the Battle of Sainte-Foy. Although victorious in battle, the French were unable to retake the city due to a lack of naval support. He was prompted to lift the siege after the French Navy was defeated at the Battle of Neuville.

Nearly a year after the Articles of Capitulation for Quebec was signed, the government of New France capitulated in Montreal after a two month British campaign on 8 September 1760.

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Born On This Day

1948 – Lynn Abbey, American computer programmer and author
Marilyn Lorraine “Lynn” Abbey (born September 18, 1948) is an American fantasy author.

Background
Born in Peekskill, New York,[1] Abbey was daughter of Ronald Lionel (an insurance manager) and Doris Lorraine (a homemaker; maiden name, De Wees).[citation needed] She attended the University of Rochester, where she began as an astrophysics major.[1] She earned a A.B. (1969) and an M.A. (1971) in European history,[2] but shifted to computer programming as a profession “when my advisor pointed out that, given the natural rise and fall of demographic curves, tenured university faculty positions were going to be as scarce as hen’s teeth for the next twenty-five years and my education was turning into an expensive hobby. (He was right, too.)”[3] She had married Ralph Dressler July 14, 1969; they were divorced October 31, 1972.[4] During this period she also became a member of science fiction fandom.
Move to Michigan; accident and aftermath

In 1976, after a stint as a programmer for insurance companies, and work on the state task force involved in documenting the New York City bankruptcy crisis, she moved to Ann Arbor, Michigan.[1] In January 1977, she was injured in an automobile accident while going to pick up Gordon R. Dickson, who was to be a Guest of Honor at that year’s ConFusion.[1] The guilt-ridden Dickson volunteered to assist her by reading and critiquing her work (she’d been writing since childhood).[1] The manuscript he helped her with became Daughter of the Bright Moon.[1]

Publication and marriage
Abbey began publishing in 1979 with Daughter of the Bright Moon and the short story “The Face of Chaos,” in Thieves’ World, the first part of the Thieves World shared world anthology.

On August 28, 1982 she married Robert Asprin, editor of the Thieves World books, and became his co-editor. She also contributed to other shared world series during the 1980s, including Heroes in Hell and Merovingen Nights.

She began writing for TSR, Inc. around 1994 while continuing to write novels and editing anthologies. Her works for TSR include stories set in the Forgotten Realms and the Dark Sun settings. Lynn Abbey wrote for TSR’s Dark Sun series starting with The Brazen Gambit. Further novels in the series include The Rise and Fall of a Dragon King, a novel exploring the topic of genocide, a central theme in the ancient history of Athas, the world on which the Dark Sun setting takes place. Along with Cinnabar Shadows, all three of Abbey’s books written for the Athasian setting take place in and around the City-state of Urik.[5]

Divorce and moves

Abbey and Asprin divorced in 1993 and Abbey moved to Oklahoma City.[1] She continued to write novels during this period, including original works as well as tie-ins to role playing games for TSR.[1] In 2002, she returned to Thieves World with the novel Sanctuary and also began editing new anthologies, beginning with Turning Points. In 2006, she was a writer on Green Ronin’s version of Thieves World.[6][7] She has lived in Leesburg, Florida since 1997.[8]

 
 

FYI

Sir Clive Marles Sinclair (30 July 1940 – 16 September 2021) was an English entrepreneur and inventor, most commonly known for his work in consumer electronics in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

After spending several years as assistant editor of Instrument Practice, Sinclair founded Sinclair Radionics in 1961, where he produced the first slimline electronic pocket calculator in 1972 (the Sinclair Executive). Sinclair later moved into the production of home computers and produced the Sinclair ZX80, the UK’s first mass-market home computer for less than £100, and later, with Sinclair Research, the ZX81 and ZX Spectrum. The latter is widely recognised by consumers and programmers for its importance in the early days of the British and wider European home computer industry, as well as helping to give birth to the British video game industry. Among other honours, Sinclair was knighted in 1983 for his contributions to the personal computer industry in the UK.

Sinclair was also recognized for several commercial failures, including the Sinclair Radionics Black Watch wristwatch, the Sinclair Vehicles C5 battery electric vehicle, and the Sinclair Research TV80 flatscreen CRT handheld television set. The failure of the C5 along with a weakened computer market forced Sinclair to sell most of his companies by 1986. Through 2010, Sinclair concentrated on personal transport, including the A-bike, a folding bicycle for commuters, and the Sinclair X-1, a revised version of the C5 electric vehicle but which never made it to market.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows
 
 
 
 
By Bridget Reed Morawski, DCist: Meet Maryland’s ‘Boat Whisperer’ Who Carves Old Kayaks Into Hand Paddles For Charity
 
 
 
 
When is the Harvest Moon in 2021?

The exact time of the full Harvest Moon is September 20 at 23:54 Universal Time. At U.S. time zones, that translates to 8:54 p.m. ADT, 7:54 p.m. EDT, 6:54 p.m. CDT, 5:54 p.m. MDT, 4:54 p.m. PDT, 3:54 p.m Alaskan Time and 1:54 p.m. Hawaiian Time.
 
 
 
 
By April White, Atlas Obscura: A Stunning Archive of the Work of Early Black Photographers A new collection acquired by the Smithsonian is a window into Black history.
 
 
 
 
By Mike Walker, CTV News: Iconic landmark near Toronto lands spot in the Guinness World Record books
 
 
 
 
By Annie Ewbank, Gastro Obscura: Last week, I pulled up Facebook Marketplace to order dinner.
Last week, I pulled up Facebook Marketplace to order dinner. I picked out a sushi bake: a rice-and-seafood casserole that exploded in popularity during the pandemic. Within minutes, I reached the seller and paid over Venmo. At 6 p.m. sharp, I opened my door and found the sushi bake on my front porch, elegantly packaged and emblazoned with a sticker with social media info.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Glacier Route to the Yukon
 
 
 
 
By Francesca Vega, Noteably: 25+ Times Strangers Left Hilarious Notes for Others to Find
 
 
 
 
The Blonde Abroad: 10 Places to Visit in Ireland (That Aren’t Dublin)
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Karin Engelbrecht, The Spruce Eats: Nasi Goreng Recipe – Dutch-Indonesian Fried Rice
 
 
Taste of Home: 60 Recipes for Your 9×9 Pan, 32 Creamy Midwestern Casseroles We Crave and more ->
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Ooey-Gooey Cheeseburger Dinners You’ll Want to Make Right Now
 
 
By Damaris Phillips: Salted Peanut Butter Pie

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 16 & 17, 2021

On This Day

1810 – With the Grito de Dolores, Father Miguel Hidalgo begins Mexico’s fight for independence from Spain.
The Cry of Dolores[n 1] (Spanish: Grito de Dolores) occurred in Dolores, Mexico, on 16 September 1810, when Roman Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla rang his church bell and gave the call to arms that triggered the Mexican War of Independence.

Every year on the eve of Independence Day, the President of Mexico re-enacts the cry from the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City, while ringing the same bell Hidalgo used in 1810.

Read more ->

 
 
1809 – Peace between Sweden and Russia in the Finnish War; the territory that will become Finland is ceded to Russia by the Treaty of Fredrikshamn.
The Treaty of Fredrikshamn or the Treaty of Hamina (Finnish: Haminan rauha, Swedish: Freden i Fredrikshamn, Russian: Фридрихсгамский мирный договор) was a peace treaty concluded between Sweden and Russia on 17 September 1809. The treaty concluded the Finnish War and was signed in the Finnish town of Hamina (Swedish: Fredrikshamn). Russia was represented by Nikolai Rumyantsev and David Alopaeus (Russian ambassador to Stockholm), while Sweden by Infantry General Kurt von Stedingk (former Swedish ambassador to Petersburg) and Colonel Anders Fredrik Skjöldebrand.[1]

Terms
According to the treaty Sweden ceded parts of the provinces Lappland and Västerbotten (east of Tornio River and Muonio River), Åland, and all provinces east thereof. The ceded territories came to constitute the Grand Duchy of Finland, to which also the Russian 18th century conquests of Karelia, including small parts of Nyland and Savonia (later to be called Old Finland), were joined in 1812 as Viborg County. Together with the Diet of Porvoo (1809), and the Oath of the Sovereign,[2] the Treaty of Fredrikshamn constitutes the cornerstone for the autonomous Grand Duchy, its own administration and institutions, and thereby a start of the development which would lead to the revival of Finnish culture, to equal position of the Finnish language, and ultimately in 1917 to Finland’s independence.

A reference to Emperor Alexander’s promise to retain old laws and privileges in Finland was included, but the treaty overstepped any formal guarantees of the legal position of Finland’s inhabitants. The Russians refused, and the Swedes were not in a position to insist. Similar clauses had been common in peace treaties, but they were also regularly circumvented. At the period of Russification of Finland, 90 years later, the Russian government argued that the treaty was not violated and hence no outside party had any right to intervene, the question being solely a matter of the Emperor who had granted the original promise.

During the negotiations, Swedish representatives had namely endeavoured to escape the loss of the Åland islands, “the fore-posts of Stockholm,” as Napoleon rightly described them. The Åland islands were culturally, ethnically and linguistically purely Swedish, but such facts were of no significance at that time. In the course of the 19th century, it would also turn out that the Åland islands were a British interest, which, after the Crimean War, led to the demilitarization of the islands according to the Åland Convention included in the Treaty of Paris (1856). During the Second War against Napoleon, Russia and Sweden concluded an alliance directed against France (5 April 1812). They planned to effect a landing in Swedish Pomerania, which had been overrun by the French. Russia promised to press Denmark into ceding Norway to Sweden. It was understood that Great Britain would join the treaty too, but that never came to pass. Other plans failed to materialise due to Napoleon’s invasion of Russia.

 
 

Born On This Day

1861 – Miriam Benjamin, African-American educator and inventor (d. 1947)
Miriam E. Benjamin (September 16, 1861 – 1947) was an American school teacher and inventor. On July 17,[1] 1888 she obtained a patent for her invention, the Gong and Signal Chair for Hotels. As its name suggests, the chair had both a gong and signal connected to it.[2] The chair would “reduce the expenses of hotels by decreasing the number of waiters and attendants, to add to the convenience and comfort of guests and to obviate the necessity of hand clapping or calling aloud to obtain the services of pages.” The chair worked when the person sitting would press a small button on the back of the chair which would then send a signal to a waiting attendant. A light would illuminate as well, allowing the attendant to see which guest needed help. The system was eventually adopted by the United States House of Representatives and was a precursor to the signaling system used on airplanes for passengers to seek assistance from flight attendants.[3]

Read more ->

 
 
1867 – Vera Yevstafievna Popova, Russian chemist (d. 1896)
Vera Yevstafievna Popova, née Vera Bogdanovskaya (Вера Евстафьевна Попова; 17 September 1867 – 8 May 1896) was a Russian chemist. She was one of the first female chemists in Russia,[3] and the first Russian female author of a chemistry textbook.[4] She “probably became the first woman to die in the cause of chemistry” as a result of an explosion in her laboratory.[5]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

V Todd Williams:

The donkey told the tiger, “The grass is blue.”
The tiger replied, “No, the grass is green​.”
The discussion became heated, and the two decided to submit the issue to arbitration, so they approached the lion.
As they approached the lion on his throne, the donkey started screaming: ′′Your Highness, isn’t it true that the grass is blue?”​
The lion replied: “If you believe it is true, the grass is blue.”​
The donkey rushed forward and continued: ′′The tiger disagrees with me, contradicts me and annoys me. Please punish him.”
The king then declared: ′′The tiger will be punished with 3 days of silence.”​
The donkey jumped with joy and went on his way, content and repeating ′′The grass is blue, the grass is blue…”​
The tiger asked the lion, “Your Majesty, why have you punished me, after all, the grass is green?”​
The lion replied, ′′You’ve known and seen the grass is green.”
The tiger asked, ′′So why do you punish me?”​
The lion replied, “That has nothing to do with the question of whether the grass is blue or green. The punishment is because it is degrading for a brave, intelligent creature like you to waste time arguing with an ass, and on top of that, you came and bothered me with that question just to validate something you already knew was true!”
The biggest waste of time is arguing with the fool and fanatic who doesn’t care about truth or reality, but only the victory of his beliefs and illusions. Never waste time on discussions that make no sense. There are people who, for all the evidence presented to them, do not have the ability to understand. Others who are blinded by ego, hatred and resentment, and the only thing that they want is to be right even if they aren’t.
When IGNORANCE SCREAMS, intelligence moves on.
 
 
 
 
Live Science: Kids discover giant penguin’s fossil skeleton in New Zealand and more ->
 
 
 
 
September at Storyknife: Applications for 2022 residencies will open on August 1 and close on September 30, 2021.
 
 
 
 
By Open Culture: DIY Air Purifiers for Teachers: Free Designs & Step-by-Step Instructions Online
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Elvis Presley Gets the Polio Vaccine on The Ed Sullivan Show, Persuading Millions to Get Vaccinated (1956)
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: The Very First Webcam Was Invented to Keep an Eye on a Coffee Pot at Cambridge University
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By aseev: Grow Pumpkins Along Fences in Hammocks
 
 
By Matt Makes: Bubbling Pipe Lamp
 
 

Recipes

Sally’s Baking Addiction: 40+ Kid-Friendly Baking Recipes
 
 
By Chocolate Covered Katie: Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce
 
 
By Kiera Wright-Ruiz, The Kitchn: After Years of Failure, I Finally Found the Perfect Biscuit Recipe
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Easy Air Fryer Turkey Breast
 
 
By Will Coleman, The Kitchn: I Tried the Fried Pizza from TikTok and It Blew My Mind
 
 
By alessandraanguiano: Best Ever Pho Keto Version
 
 
By Roshni Sahoo: Sizzling Hot and Sour Soup
 
 
By Sheela Prakash, The Kitchn: Carbonara-Inspired Corn Skillet
 
 
I Wash You Dry: Quick and Easy Spaghetti Sauce Recipe
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Impossibly Easy Salted Caramel Apple Mini Pies
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 15, 2021

On This Day

1975 – The French department of “Corse” (the entire island of Corsica) is divided into two: Haute-Corse (Upper Corsica) and Corse-du-Sud (Southern Corsica).

Corsica (/ˈkɔːrsɪkə/, Upper Corsican: [ˈkorsiɡa], Southern Corsican: [ˈkɔrsika], Italian: [ˈkɔrsika]; French: Corse [kɔʁs] (About this soundlisten); Ligurian: Còrsega) is an island in the Mediterranean Sea and one of the 18 regions of France. It is the fourth-largest island in the Mediterranean and lies southeast of the French mainland, west of the Italian Peninsula and immediately north of the Italian island of Sardinia, which is the land mass nearest to it. A single chain of mountains makes up two-thirds of the island. In 2018, it had a population of 338,550.

The island is a territorial collectivity of France. The regional capital is Ajaccio. Although the region is divided into two administrative departments, Haute-Corse and Corse-du-Sud, their respective regional and departmental territorial collectivities were merged on 1 January 2018 to form the single territorial collectivity of Corsica. As such, Corsica enjoys a greater degree of autonomy than other French regional collectivities; for example, the Corsican Assembly is permitted to exercise limited executive powers. Corsica’s second-largest town is Bastia, the prefecture of Haute-Corse.

Corsica was ruled by the Republic of Genoa from 1284 to 1755, when it seceded to become a self-proclaimed, Italian-speaking Republic. In 1768, Genoa officially ceded it to Louis XV of France as part of a pledge for the debts it had incurred by enlisting France’s military help in suppressing the Corsican revolt, and as a result France went on to annex it in 1769. The future Emperor of the French, Napoleon Bonaparte, was a native Corsican, born that same year in Ajaccio: his ancestral home, Maison Bonaparte, is today a visitor attraction and museum. Because of Corsica’s historical ties to Tuscany, the island has retained many Italian cultural elements and many Corsican surnames are rooted in the Italian peninsula. Corsican, the native tongue, is recognised as one of France’s regional languages.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1857 – Anna Winlock, American astronomer and academic (d. 1904)[20]
Anna Winlock (1857–1904) was an American astronomer and human computer, one of the first members of female computer group known as “the Harvard Computers.” She made the most complete catalog of stars near the north and south poles of her era. She is also remembered for her calculations and studies of asteroids. In particular, she did calculations on 433 Eros and 475 Ocllo.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Upside down boat houses
 
 
 
 
Just A Car Guy: Hmmm, some problems with going electric are quickly coming up
 
 
Just A Car Guy: the ad agency that figured out the way for a Wrangler to max the potential of the COEX digital billboard in Seoul should be awarded!
 
 
Just A Car Guy: Things I did not know, but just learned category, Max Balchowsky had served in WW2 as a B-24 belly turret gunner (thanks Kim! )

 
 
 
 

Ernie Smith, Tedium, by Michael Bentley: Intellectual Pinball Q: Following the great video game crash of 1983, where did arcade operators and bar owners go next? A: Trivia games!

 
 
 
 

Eat Your Words from Edible Alaska: #14: Of Silvers 🐟 and Gold 🍂
 
 
 
 

The Awesomer: Making Movie Natural Disasters; Spiroglyphics; The Supercut and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Sally’s Baking Addiction: Soft Pretzel Knots (With Various Toppings)

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 14, 2021

On This Day

1682 – Bishop Gore School, one of the oldest schools in Wales, is founded.
The Bishop Gore School (Welsh: Ysgol Esgob Gore) is a secondary school in Swansea in Wales, founded on 14 September 1682 by Hugh Gore (1613–1691), Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. It is situated in Sketty, close to Singleton Park and Swansea University. In December 2013 the school was ranked in the second highest of five bands by the Welsh Government, based on performance in exams, value added performance, disadvantaged pupils’ performance, and attendance.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1857 – Julia Platt, American embryologist and politician (d. 1935)
Julia Barlow Platt (14 September 1857, in San Francisco – 1935) was an American embryologist, politician and mayor.

Life
Julia Platt received her undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont before moving to Cambridge to perform research at the Harvard Annex in 1887. During her time at Harvard, she challenged the anti-coeducational policies in place. In 1889, she left Harvard to take courses and do research at Woods Hole, Clark University, the University of Chicago, Bryn Mawr, the University of Freiberg, the Naples Zoological Station, and the University of Munich. She obtained her doctorate at Freiburg in 1898. She investigated embryogenesis, in particular the head development, from studying sharks and salamanders. Her most notable contribution to the field was her demonstration that neural crest cells formed the jaw cartilage and tooth dentine in Necturus maculosus (mudpuppy embryos), but her work was not believed by her contemporaries. Her claim went counter to the belief that only mesoderm could form bones and cartilage. Her hypothesis of the neural crest origin of the cranial skeleton gained acceptance only some 50 years later when confirmed by Sven Hörstadius and Sven Sellman.[1]

Unable to obtain a doctoral degree from Radcliffe or secure a university position, she said “if I cannot obtain the work I wish, then I must take up with the next best” and then became active in politics, including tearing down a fence to give the public access to the beach at Lover’s Point in Pacific Grove, California. In 1931, at the age of 74, she became mayor of Pacific Grove, California.[2] According to Steve Palumbi and Carolyn Sotka, her prescient pioneering setting up of a marine protected area was crucial to the recovery of the sea otter.[3]

Publications

Platt, J. B. (1890): “The Anterior Head-Cavities of Acanthias (Preliminary Notice)”, Zool. Anz. 13: 239
Platt, J. B. (1892): “Fibres connecting the Central Nervous System and Chorda in Amphioxus”, Anat. Anz. 7: 282-284
Platt, J. B. (1893): “Ectodermic Origin of the Cartilages of the Head”, Anat. Anz. 8: 506-509
Platt, J. B. (1894): “Ontogenetische Differenzirung des Ektoderms in Necturus”, Archiv mikr. Anat. 43: 911-966
Platt, J. B. (1894): “Ontogenetic Differentiations of the Ectoderm in Necturus” Anat. Anz. 9: 51-56
Platt, J. B. (1898): “The development of the cartilaginous skull and of the branchial and hypoglossal musculature in Necturus”, Morphol. Jahrb. 25: 377-464

 
 

FYI

STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Doctor Stotts, Deep Woods Surgeon
 
 
 
 
By Cory Max Montoya, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Women’s Rights Blogs
 
 

By Rocky Parker Beyond Bylines: AP Style Rules to Remember for Your Writing
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DLXVIII): The Last Glimpses of California’s Vanishing Hippie Utopias; Hobbies of Yore; Fox Tossing; Recently colourised footage of the last surviving Tasmanian Tiger, 1933 at Hobart’s Beaumaris Zoo; The largest uninhabited island in the world and more ->
 
 
 
 
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Ideas

By Cadhrien: Pretty Realistic Cardboard Antlers
 
 
 
 

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By Frau Martina: Carrot and Potato Soup Two Ways – Yellow and Purple
 
 
By Ronna Farley: Mom’s Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo
 
 
By Regan_Jane: White Asparagus Cream Soup
 
 
By cookwewill: Simple Coleslaw With Apples And Bacon
 
 
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Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 12 & 13, 2021

On This Day

1847 – Mexican–American War: the Battle of Chapultepec begins.
The Battle of Chapultepec was a battle between American forces and Mexican forces holding the strategically located Chapultepec Castle just outside Mexico City, fought 13 September 1847 during the Mexican–American War. The building, sitting atop a 200-foot (61 m) hill, was an important position for the defense of the city.

The battle was part of the campaign to take Mexico City, for which General Winfield Scott’s U.S. Army totaled 7,200 men. General Antonio López de Santa Anna, known for vicious attacks against Native Mexican American tribes, had formed an army of approximately 25,000 men. Mexican forces, including military cadets of the Military Academy, defended the position at Chapultepec against 2,000 U.S. forces. The Mexicans’ loss opened the way for the Americans to take the center of Mexico City.

In Mexican history, the battle is cast as the story of the brave deaths of six cadets, the Niños Héroes, who leapt to their deaths rather than be taken captive, with one wrapping himself in the Mexican flag. American sources also feature many depictions of the battle from the American point of view.[3] Although it lasted only about 60–90 minutes, the battle has great importance in the histories of both countries.

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 1906 – The Santos-Dumont 14-bis makes a short hop, the first flight of a fixed-wing aircraft in Europe.
The 14-bis (Quatorze-bis), also known as Oiseau de proie (“bird of prey” in French),[2] was a pioneer era, canard-style biplane designed and built by Brazilian aviation pioneer Alberto Santos-Dumont. In 1906, near Paris, the 14-bis made a manned powered flight that was the first to be publicly witnessed by a crowd. It was also the first powered flight made anywhere outside of the United States, as well as the first powered flight by a non-Wright airplane.[3]

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Born On This Day

1739 – Mary Bosanquet Fletcher, Methodist preacher and philanthropist (d. 1815)
Mary Bosanquet Fletcher (/ˈboʊzənˌkɛt/; 12 September 1739 – 8 December 1815) was an English preacher credited with persuading John Wesley, a founder of Methodism, to allow women to preach in public. She was born into an affluent family, but after converting to Methodism, rejected its luxurious life. She was involved in charity work throughout her life, operating a school and orphanage until her marriage to John Fletcher. She and a friend, Sarah Crosby, began preaching and leading meetings at her orphanage and became the most popular female preachers of their time.[1] Bosanquet was known as a “Mother in Israel”, a Methodist term of honour, for her work in spreading the denomination across England.[2]

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1818 – Lucy Goode Brooks, Former American slave and a founder of Friends’ Asylum for Colored Orphans (d. 1900)[9]
Lucy Goode Brooks (September 13, 1818 – October 7, 1900) was an American slave who was instrumental in the founding of the Friends’ Asylum for Colored Orphans in Richmond, Virginia.

Early life and education
Goode was born on September 13, 1818,[1] in Virginia to the slave Judith Goode and a white man. She met another slave, Albert Royal Brooks, and taught him to read and write so that they could write passes to see each other. When her master died in 1838, she became the property of a man named Sublett. That same year, she joined the First Baptist Church of Richmond. Shortly after Goode became Sublett’s property, he allowed her to marry Brooks on February 2, 1839 and allowed them to live together. Albert’s owner allowed him to operate a livery stable, for which he collected rent, but also permitted Albert to keep his additional earnings and use them to buy his freedom. In 1841 when the Baptist church divided, she was one of the group that joined in forming the First African Baptist Church.[2]

Career
When Sublett died in 1858, his heirs threatened to sell Lucy and her children to different masters. She was able to negotiate with merchants who purchased her children and allowed them to live with her as long as they showed up for work daily. The sole exception was a daughter who was sold to owners in Tennessee.[3] The knowledge that they could be separated made the Brookses work hard to try to buy the freedom of Lucy and the children. Her new master, Daniel Von Groning, who also owned her three youngest boys, allowed Albert to pay for their freedom in installments. It took four years, but on October 21, 1862, their deed of manumission was signed. The older three boys were not freed until the Civil War was ended.[2]

The loss of her daughter and a previous son—who had been sold away as an infant—motivated Brooks to try to help children who were separated from their parents, after the war had ended.[3] The Freedmen’s Bureau initially offered temporary rations and care for abandoned children, but by the fall of 1865 increasingly tried to shift the burden to local relief efforts and benevolent societies.[4] Brooks, who was a leader of the Ladies Sewing Circle for Charitable Work, convinced the other ladies to help organize an orphanage.[2] She then gained the support of several churches, including the local Quaker congregation to help found the Friends’ Asylum for Colored Orphans.[3] The plan was approved and building’s location was authorized by the city council in 1867, with the orphanage opening two years later.[5] The organization is still operational and functions as the Friends Association for Children,[6] though its current focus is to provide childcare and family support services to low- and moderate-income families.[7]

Brooks died on October 7, 1900 in Richmond, Virginia,[8] and she was buried in the Mechanic’s Cemetery of Richmond.[1] She was honored in 2008 by a Virginia Historical Marker being erected at the corner of Charity and Saint Paul Streets.[9] A book about her life was published in 1989.[10]

Friends’ Asylum for Colored Orphans (later the Friends Association for Colored Children and currently Friends’ Association for Children) was an African American orphanage at 112 West Charity Street in Richmond, Virginia. It began as a program to provide care and education to African American children and later evolved into a foster care center, an unwed mothers and pre-adoption boarding home and a community day care facility. It is currently operating as a family services organization.
History

The building’s location was authorized by the city council in 1867, and the orphanage opened two years later.[1] Lucy Goode Brooks was instrumental in its establishment.[2][3] It was incorporated in 1872 by the Society of Friends who had raised US$6,250 to erect a building on the corner of St. Paul and Charity streets. Its purpose was to provide care and education to orphaned African American children. The initial trustees were John B. Crenshaw, Jeremiah Willets, William H. Pleasants, Richard A. Ricks and Walter A. Ricks, members of the society of Friends; Rev. James H. Holmes, Nelson Vandervall, members of the First Baptist church; Joseph E. Farrar, John Adams, members of Ebenezer Baptist church; William Boyd, member of the Fifth Baptist church; Frederick Smith, -— Cooper, members of Mount Zion Baptist church; P. H. Woolfork, member of Third-street Methodist church; and Thomas M. Hewlett, member of Manchester Baptist church.[4]

By virtue of the bylaws, parents were required to yield all rights to their children and the board had discretion to bond children into indenture until their age of majority–21 years for boys and 18 years for girls.[5] Until 1889 only white trustees served on the board; thereafter, only members of black Baptist churches from Richmond could serve as trustees. The number varied according to the financial contribution of the involved churches.[6] In 1902, there were 22 children in attendance, seven of whom were newly admitted; one had run away, and three had died.[7] Seventeen children were in attendance in 1914, and the officers were Rev. W. T. Johnson (president), W. P. Epps (secretary), and Alice Hughes (matron).[8] A study conducted in 1924 in conjunction with the Child Welfare League of America determined that the orphanage was “vital to the city”, yet five years later, a second study found that foster care was a more pressing need. In light of this, in 1931, the orphanage was closed and the facility was transformed into foster care agency overseen by Richmond’s branch of the Children’s Aid Society.[6]

In 1932 the name was changed to the Friends’ Association for Colored Children and in 1938, the organization expanded to include adoption services. By 1940, in-home counseling services for children were included and in 1947 day nursery services were offered to the community. Other changes in the mid-1950s included suspension of foster care services, addition of assistance to unwed mothers, and the evolution of the center to a pre-adoption boarding home.[6] Still later, the name was changed again to the Friends’ Association for Children. It currently operates as a service organization for low to moderate-income families providing childcare and family support.[9]
 
 

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Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 10 & 11, 2021

On This Day

1937 – Nine nations attend the Nyon Conference to address international piracy in the Mediterranean Sea.
The Nyon Conference was a diplomatic conference held in Nyon, Switzerland, in September 1937 to address attacks on international shipping in the Mediterranean Sea during the Spanish Civil War. The conference was convened in part because Italy had been carrying out unrestricted submarine warfare, although the final conference agreement did not accuse Italy directly; instead, the attacks were referred to as “piracy” by an unidentified body. Italy was not officially at war, nor did any submarine identify itself. The conference was designed to strengthen non-intervention in the Spanish Civil War. The United Kingdom and France led the conference, which was also attended by Bulgaria, Egypt, Greece, Romania, Turkey, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.

The first agreement, signed on 14 September 1937, included plans to counterattack aggressive submarines. Naval patrols were established; the United Kingdom and France were to patrol most of the western Mediterranean and parts of the east, and the other signatories were to patrol their own waters. Italy was to be allowed to join the agreement and patrol the Tyrrhenian Sea if it wished. A second agreement followed three days later, applying similar provisions to surface ships. Italy and Germany did not attend, although the former took up naval patrols in November. In marked contrast to the actions of the Non-Intervention Committee and the League of Nations, this conference succeeded in preventing attacks by submarines.

Nyon has been characterised as ‘an appeasers paradise. The fiction that attacks on merchant shipping in the Mediterranean was the fault of ‘pirates unknown’ was fully indulged. [It] preserved the naval status quo in the Mediterranean until the end of the Spanish Civil War: the Francoists received whatever they wanted, the Republicans got very little.'[1]

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1776 – British–American peace conference on Staten Island fails to stop nascent American Revolutionary War.
The Staten Island Peace Conference was a brief informal diplomatic conference held between representatives of the British Crown and its rebellious North American colonies in the hope of bringing a rapid end to the nascent American Revolution. The conference took place on September 11, 1776, a few days after the British had captured Long Island and less than three months after the formal American Declaration of Independence. The conference was held at Billop Manor, the residence of loyalist Colonel Christopher Billop, on Staten Island, New York. The participants were the British Admiral Lord Richard Howe, and members of the Second Continental Congress John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Edward Rutledge.

Upon being placed in command of British land forces in the Colonies, Lord Howe had sought authority to resolve the conflict peacefully. However, his power to negotiate was by design extremely limited, which left the Congressional delegation pessimistic over a summary resolution. The Americans insisted on recognition of their recently-declared independence, which Howe was unable to grant. After just three hours, the delegates retired, and the British resumed their military campaign to control New York City.


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Born On This Day

1852 – Alice Brown Davis, American tribal chief (d. 1935)[7]
Alice Brown Davis (September 10, 1852 – June 21, 1935) was the first female Principal Chief of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, and served from 1922–1935, appointed by President Warren G. Harding.[1] She was of Seminole (Tiger Clan) and Scots descent. Her older brother John Frippo Brown had served as chief of the tribe and their brother Andrew Jackson Brown as treasurer.

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1917 – Jessica Mitford, English-American journalist and author (d. 1996)
Jessica Lucy “Decca” Freeman-Mitford (11 September 1917 – 23 July 1996) was an English author, one of the six aristocratic Mitford sisters noted for their sharply conflicting politics.

Jessica married her second cousin Esmond Romilly, who was killed in World War II, and then American civil rights lawyer Robert Treuhaft, with whom she joined the American Communist Party and worked closely in the Civil Rights Congress. Both refused to testify in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee, and later resigned from the party out of disillusion with Stalinism.

Her memoir Hons and Rebels and her book of social commentary The American Way of Death both became classics.

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FYI


I always found the boat lift fascinating. The more I learn, the more incredible and humbling it is.

NJ.com True Jersey: The great boat lift of 9/11 The unsung story of how hundreds of thousands were rescued that tragic day
 
 
 
 
Just A Car Guy: I’ve never heard of the John Deere Gators at the twin towers until now
 
 
Just A Car Guy: The cyclist who saved Jews in wartime Italy, Gino Bartali, the most renowned Italian cyclist before the Second World War, having won the Giro d’Italia twice, in 1936 and 1937, and the Tour de France in 1938 and 1948
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: RIP Jean-Paul Belmondo: The Actor Who Went from the French New Wave to Action Superstardom
 
 
Jean-Paul Charles Belmondo (French pronunciation: ​[ʒɑ̃pɔl ʃaʁl bɛlmɔ̃do]; 9 April 1933 – 6 September 2021) was a French actor, initially associated with the New Wave of the 1960s and a major French film star for several decades from the 1960s. His best known credits include Breathless (1960), That Man from Rio (1964), and Pierrot le Fou (1965). He was most notable for portraying police officers in action thriller films and became known for his unwillingness to appear in English-language films, despite being heavily courted by Hollywood.[1][2]

During his career, he was called the French counterpart of actors such as James Dean, Marlon Brando, and Humphrey Bogart.[3] Described as an icon and national treasure of France, Belmondo was seen as an influential actor of French cinema and an important figure in shaping European cinema.[4][3][5] As Guardian columnist Kim Willsher stated, “The French actor Jean-Paul Belmondo spent almost an entire film – the 1960s classic À Bout du Souffle (Breathless) – with a Gauloise dangling from his lips.”[6]

In 1989, Belmondo won the César Award for Best Actor for his performance in Itinéraire d’un enfant gâté. He was nominated for two BAFTA Awards throughout his career. In 2017, he received a lifetime achievement honor at the 42nd César Awards.[7]

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By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Watch Prince Appear on the Muppets Tonight Show & Reveal His Humble, Down-to-Earth Side (1997)
 
 
One of my favorites!
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: The Life & Music of the Godmother of Rock and Roll, Sister Rosetta Tharpe
 
 
 
 
David Camarillo’s research focuses on understanding and preventing traumatic brain injury.
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

Some positivity for the battles you or loved ones may be fighting:

 
 

 
 

Recipes

The Spruce Eats: Bang Bang Cauliflower
 
 
By Becca: Cheesy Vegetable Pie
 
 
Our Crafty Mom: 25 Best Chicken Wings Recipes Perfect For Tailgating
 
 
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Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 09, 2021

On This Day

1000 – Battle of Svolder, Viking Age.
The Battle of Svolder (Svold or Swold)[2] was the largest naval battle of the Viking age, fought in September 999 or 1000 in the western Baltic Sea between King Olaf of Norway and an alliance of the Kings of Denmark and Sweden and Olaf’s enemies in Norway. The backdrop of the battle was the unification of Norway into a single independent state after longstanding Danish efforts to control the country, combined with the spread of Christianity in Scandinavia.

King Olaf Tryggvason was sailing to, or home from, an expedition in Wendland (Pomerania), when he was ambushed by an alliance of Svein Forkbeard, King of Denmark, Olof Skötkonung (also known as Olaf Eiríksson or Olaf the Swede), King of Sweden, and Eirik Hákonarson, Jarl of Lade. King Olaf of Norway had only 11 warships in the battle against a fleet of at least 70.[3] His ships were captured one by one, last of all the Ormen Lange, which Jarl Eirik captured as Olaf threw himself into the sea. After the battle, Norway was ruled by the Jarls of Lade as a fief of Denmark and Sweden.

The exact location of the battle is disputed, and depends on which group of sources is preferred: Adam of Bremen places it in Øresund, while Icelandic sources place the battle near an island called Svolder, which is otherwise unknown.

The most detailed sources on the battle, the kings’ sagas, were written approximately two centuries after it took place. Historically unreliable, they offer an extended literary account describing the battle and the events leading up to it in vivid detail. The sagas ascribe the causes of the battle to Olaf Tryggvason’s ill-fated marriage proposal to Sigrid the Haughty and his problematic marriage to Thyri, sister of Svein Forkbeard. As the battle starts Olaf is shown dismissing the Danish and Swedish fleets with ethnic insults and bravado while admitting that Eirik Hákonarson and his men are dangerous because “they are Norwegians like us”. The best known episode in the battle is the breaking of Einarr Þambarskelfir’s bow, which heralds Olaf’s defeat.

In later centuries, the saga descriptions of the battle, especially that in Snorri Sturluson’s Heimskringla, have inspired a number of ballads and other works of literature.

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Born On This Day

1927 – Tatyana Zaslavskaya, Russian sociologist and economist (d. 2013)
Tatyana Zaslavskaya (Russian: Татьяна Ивановна Заславская, September 9, 1927 – August 23, 2013) was a Russian economic sociologist and a theoretician of perestroika. She was the prime author of the Novosibirsk Report and several books on the economy of the Soviet Union (specializing in agriculture) and in sociology of the countryside. She was a member of the Consulting Committee to the President of Russia from 1991 to 1992 and also a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Zaslavskaya was the founder of VCIOM and also its director in the years from 1987 to 1992. In 2000 she was the Laureate of the Demidov Prize and the honorary president of the Levada Center.

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FYI

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


1 month ago
Update: Statler has sadly passed away at the age of 34. RIP.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Noam Cohen, Back Channel, Wired: One Woman’s Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia Ksenia Coffman’s fellow editors have called her a vandal and a McCarthyist. She just wants them to stop glorifying fascists—and start citing better sources.
 
 
 
 

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By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Irresistible Cheesy Chicken Dinners

 
 
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Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 08, 2021

On This Day

1831 – November uprising: The Battle of Warsaw effectively ends the Polish insurrection.
The Battle of Warsaw was fought in September 1831 between Imperial Russia and Poland. After a two-day assault on the city’s western fortifications, the Polish defences collapsed and the city was evacuated. It was the largest battle and the final episode of the Polish–Russian War of 1830–31, a conflict that became better known as the November Uprising.

After almost a year of heavy fighting, a large Russian force crossed the Vistula and besieged the capital of Poland on 20 August. Although the siege was partially lifted soon afterwards and a successful sortie allowed a communication route between the city and the rest of Poland, a large Russian force remained on the left bank of the Vistula and continued to threaten the city. Russian commander Ivan Paskevich counted on Polish surrender as his Polish counterpart, Jan Krukowiecki, was known to be a member of the moderate political forces, willing to negotiate with Russian tsar Nicholas I, who had been deposed from the Polish throne in January 1831 by the Sejm (Polish parliament). When a less conciliatory faction gained power in Warsaw and the Russian offer of surrender was refused, Paskevich ordered his forces to launch an assault against Warsaw’s western defences.

The assault started on 6 September 1831. Russian forces surprised the Poles by attacking the strongest Polish position in the suburb of Wola. Despite staunch defence of some of the ramparts, especially Fort 54 and Fort 56, after the first day the outer line of Polish defences had been breached by Russian infantry and artillery. The following day fights resumed, but this time Russian artillery was close enough to shell the western boroughs of the city itself. Although losses were similar on both sides, Polish authorities decided not to risk another Massacre of Praga and ordered the evacuation of the city. On 8 September 1831 Warsaw lay in Russian hands, and the remainder of the Polish Army retreated to Modlin. The November Uprising ended soon afterwards, with the remnants of the Polish Army crossing the borders of Prussia and Austria, to avoid being captured by the Russians.

In the 19th century the fight for Warsaw became one of the icons of Polish culture, described by, among others, Polish romantic poets Adam Mickiewicz and Juliusz Słowacki. It was also the main inspiration behind Chopin’s Revolutionary Étude, initially called the Étude on the Bombardment of Warsaw.[1] The fall of Warsaw also garnered sympathy for the Poles and their quest for independence.

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Born On This Day

1927 – Marguerite Frank, American-French mathematician
Marguerite Straus Frank (born September 8, 1927) is a French-American mathematician who is a pioneer in convex optimization theory and mathematical programming.

Education
After attending secondary schooling in Paris and Toronto,[1] Frank contributed largely to the fields of transportation theory and Lie algebras, which later became the topic of her PhD thesis, New Simple Lie Algebras.[2] She was one of the first female PhD students in mathematics at Harvard University,[3] completing her dissertation in 1956, with Abraham Adrian Albert as her advisor.[2]

Contributions

Together with Philip Wolfe in 1956 at Princeton, she invented the Frank–Wolfe algorithm,[4] an iterative optimization method for general constrained non-linear problems. While linear programming was popular at that time, the paper marked an important change of paradigm to more general non-linear convex optimization.

This algorithm is used widely in traffic models to assign routes to strategic models such as those using Saturn (software).

Career
Frank was part of the Princeton logistics project led by Harold W. Kuhn and Albert W. Tucker.

In 1977, she became an adjunct associate professor at Columbia University, before moving to Rider University. Marguerite Frank was a visiting professor to Stanford (1985–1990), and ESSEC Business School in Paris (1991).

Recognition
She was elected a member of the New York Academy of Sciences in 1981.

Personal life
Marguerite Frank was born in France and migrated to U.S. during the war in 1939.[1] She was married to Joseph Frank from 1953 until his death in 2013. He was a Professor of literature at Stanford and an author of widely acclaimed critical biography of Dostoevsky.[5]
 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 
Interesting.
By Tommy Orange, Esquire: Escape Velocity: The Astonishing Life of 17-Year-Old Jeffrey Martinez Tommy Orange on the setbacks and successes of one Urban Indian—a member of the Lakota tribe, born and raised in Oakland, California.

Jeffrey was wearing a faded black hoodie with an incomprehensible (to me) mathematical equation and the phrase escape velocity. I asked what it means. “The speed at which you have to shoot something directly up, or at least perpendicular to the surface, in
order to get it to escape the gravitational field of an object,” he said. Like an orbit? “No, because orbit is described as you’re falling towards an object, but you’re going so fast that you always miss it.” He helps me understand. “Say I was talking about you. If I shot you up at escape velocity, you’d escape Earth’s gravitational field, which means you wouldn’t fall back down.” While he explained, I inadvertently looked up to the sky and imagined moving beyond the blue and into the black, getting very cold very fast and then dead.

There’s more to the hoodie than a space joke. He wants to be an astrophysicist, but it’s not just that, either. “My mom always talks about her father, and how he sort of spiraled down after they came from South Dakota to Oakland,” he said. “It’s happened to all the men in the family. My dad and all his brothers have passed away. There’s this theme of the men falling out, mainly because of the historical trauma that has trickled down. Being able to overcome that mentally is very important. My mom always talks about breaking the chain, breaking that cycle, that downward trend.” He understands the gravity of his situation, and he’s still figuring out the speed he’ll need to escape the field. He knows that to succeed will be the exception.
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Desiree Horton: Citing Sex Discrimination, First Female Orange County Fire Authority Pilot Sues to Get Job Back
 
 
 
 
Excellent!
Just A Car Guy: After graduating high school, Rick Corman rented a backhoe and dump truck, developed a revolutionary method of unloading ties, thereby saving time and reducing injury to railroad employees. Then he built his backhoe business into a multimillion-dollar railroad and construction company

 
 
Richard Jay Corman (July 22, 1955 – August 23, 2013)[1] was the founder and owner of R. J. Corman Railroad Group, a Nicholasville, Kentucky-based railroad services and short line operating company.

Early life
Corman was born and died in Nicholasville, Kentucky. The son of a state highway worker, he grew up in a home not far from his company’s future headquarters in Nicholasville.[1] He first went into business at age 11, when his paternal grandfather made him a 25% partner in a business hauling cattle, goods, and junk.[1] According to a 2011 profile in Fortune, “high school utterly bored him”; he missed 105 of 173 possible school days during his senior year but still graduated in 1973.[2]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Funny!
Vector’s World: Butt Drugs
Corydon, Indiana is about a half hour’s drive west of Louisville, Kentucky. Corydon was the capital of the Indiana Territory from 1813 until 1816. It is the proud home of Butt Drugs.
 
 
 
 

By Mike McGroarty: How to Control Creeping Charlie in Your Lawn.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Barbara Rolek, The Spruce Eats: Hungarian Cabbage With Noodles (Káposztás Tészta)
 
 
By Mary Barker, Knoxville, Tennessee, Taste of Home: Loaded Mexican Pizza
 
 
By James Schend, Taste of Home: 45 Fall Cookie Recipes That’ll Make Your House Smell Amazing
 
 
By Natasha Kravchuk, Natasha’s Kitchen: Soft Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI September 07, 2021

On This Day

70 – A Roman army under Titus occupies and plunders Jerusalem.
The siege of Jerusalem in the year 70 CE was the decisive event of the First Jewish–Roman War, in which the Roman army captured the city of Jerusalem and destroyed both the city and its Temple. The Roman army, led by the future Emperor Titus, with Tiberius Julius Alexander as his second-in-command, besieged and conquered the city of Jerusalem, which had been controlled by Judean rebel factions since 66 CE, following the Jerusalem riots of 66, when the Judean provisional government was formed in Jerusalem.

The siege of the city began on 14 April 70 CE, three days before the beginning of Passover that year.[4][5] The Jews enjoyed some minor victories, one highpoint being when sappers from Adiabene managed to tunnel under the city and set bitumen fires in the tunnels, which collapsed with the Roman siege engines falling into the crevices.[6]

The siege lasted for about five months; it ended in August 70 CE on Tisha B’Av with the burning and destruction of the Second Temple.[7] The Romans then entered and sacked the Lower City. The Arch of Titus, celebrating the Roman sack of Jerusalem and the Temple, still stands in Rome. The conquest of the city was complete on approximately 8 September 70 CE.

Josephus places the siege in the second year of Vespasian,[8] which corresponds to year 70 of the Common Era.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1885 – Elinor Wylie, American author and poet (d. 1928)
Elinor Morton Wylie (September 7, 1885 – December 16, 1928) was an American poet and novelist popular in the 1920s and 1930s. “She was famous during her life almost as much for her ethereal beauty and personality as for her melodious, sensuous poetry.”[1]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Michael Kenneth Williams (November 22, 1966 – September 6, 2021) was an American actor. He played Omar Little on the HBO drama series The Wire[1][2][3] and Albert “Chalky” White on the HBO series Boardwalk Empire. He was also acclaimed for his role as Jack Gee, husband of Bessie Smith, in the HBO telefilm biopic Bessie. He acted in supporting roles in a number of films and television series, including The Road, Inherent Vice, The Night Of, Gone Baby Gone, 12 Years a Slave, When We Rise, When They See Us, and Hap and Leonard.

Williams received five Primetime Emmy Award nominations: three for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie, one for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (pending), and one for Outstanding Informational Series or Special.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: 2/3rds of rural counties lost population since 2010; Wed. Sept. 8 webinar to interview Sec. Tom Vilsack on federal funding for rural prosperity…and more ->
 
 
 
 
ILSR’s Community Broadband Initiative: Recently in Community Networks… Week of 9/06
 
 
 
 
The Oatmeal: What a mobile website is supposed to do
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The court case that forever changed restaurant menus; The Blue Ridge honey made ‘by bees and angels’; Late-night pastries in Martha’s Vineyard’s most beloved speakeasy; That cookie in your Chinese takeout is actually Japanese and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: An only-in-Canada ice cream flavor with die-hard fans; Young Victorian ladies relished illicit, late-night fudge parties and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura The messy history of Emily Dickinson’s black cake recipe; A Missouri drive-in brought local acclaim to ‘Guberburgers’ and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The mysterious street snack that baffles botanists; How the sweet, creamy ‘Boston Cooler’ became a classic Detroit drink; The biophysicist transforming asparagus into medical implants; A brief history of the cheese curl, junk food’s happiest accident and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: For centuries, a sheep bone was the standard utensil for apple-eating; A deep dive into Hydrox, the second banana of the cookie aisle; A tragedy led Charles Sledge, police detective, to tamale-making and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Pink lemonade blueberries are real-life fairytale fruit; New Jersey’s ‘meadow doctor’ wants you to eat your weeds; The best-kept secret of a Phoenix neighborhood is this delicious date and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

I Wash You Dry: Chicken Pot Pie Biscuit Skillet
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Slow-Cooker Recipes

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?