Category: FYI

FYI

FYI April 25, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1849 – The Governor General of Canada, Lord Elgin, signs the Rebellion Losses Bill, outraging Montreal’s English population and triggering the Montreal Riots.

The Rebellion Losses Bill (full name: An Act to provide for the Indemnification of Parties in Lower Canada whose Property was destroyed during the Rebellion in the years 1837 and 1838[1]) was a controversial law enacted by the legislature of the Province of Canada in 1849. Its passage and subsequent assent by the Governor General, James Bruce, 8th Earl of Elgin makes the bill a landmark piece of legislation in Canadian political history.

The bill was enacted to compensate Lower Canadians who lost property during the Rebellions of 1837 with measures similar to those providing compensation in Upper Canada. Two factors made this measure controversial. Even though participants in the Rebellion could not be compensated with taxpayer’s money, the sympathies for the Rebellion were more widespread in Lower Canada so that compensation in Lower Canada was seen as “giving money to the rebels”. Secondly, the damage done by the army far exceed the damage done by the rebels so that provisions to compensate for damages done by the army was considered disloyal to the Crown. The enactment of the bill angered some of Montreal’s Tory citizens and provoked weeks of violent disturbances known as the Montreal Riots. It culminated in the burning of the Parliament building on April 25 which until then was in Montreal.

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Born On This Day

1854 – Charles Sumner Tainter, American engineer and inventor (d. 1940)
Charles Sumner Tainter (April 25, 1854 – April 20, 1940) was an American scientific instrument maker, engineer and inventor, best known for his collaborations with Alexander Graham Bell, Chichester Bell, Alexander’s father-in-law Gardiner Hubbard, and for his significant improvements to Thomas Edison’s phonograph, resulting in the Graphophone, one version of which was the first Dictaphone.[1]

Later in his career Tainter was associated with the International Graphopone Company of West Virginia,[2] and also managed his own research and development laboratory, earning him the title: ‘Father Of The Talking Machine’ (i.e.: father of the phonograph).[3]

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FYI

2018 Edelman TRUST BAROMETER
 
 
 
 
By Bobby Finger: Police Have Arrested a 72-Year-Old Man Who Might Be the Golden State Killer

By Tony Bizjak, Anita Chabria and Dale Kasler: ‘It’s terrifying.’ Neighbors react to possibility they lived next to East Area Rapist

 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: This Recently Discovered Fifth-Century Massacre in Sweden Is So Game of Thrones We Can’t Even Handle It

Sandby borg is an Iron Age ringfort, one of at least 15 on the island of Öland, Sweden.[2] It sits about 2 kilometers southeast of Södra Sandby village in Sandby parish in southeastern Öland. It is also close to the village of Gårdby.

From 2011 the fort has been subject of excavation, the results of which show that it was the scene of a massacre in the late 5th century AD. The victims of the massacre were never buried but are found lying as they fell, inside the houses and scattered on the streets of the fort. This has resulted in a unique snapshot character of the archaeology at Sandby borg, providing new insights both to violence and conflict in the Iron Age but also concerning everyday life in the ringfort.

Read more on wiki ->

 
 
 
 
By Kevin Pang: Distillery sells bourbon in glass bottles molded from World Trade Center steel
 
 
 
 

By Katie Bernot: $490 coffee-stirring machine aims to kill 0.3 cent disposable stir sticks
 
 
 
 
By Allison Shoemaker: Say “Sorry I tased you” with a “Sorry I tased you” cake
 
 
 
 
By Michael Isaac Stein: Tabasco Sauce Is in a Battle For Its Very Survival

Avery Island
 
 
 
 

A Message from the Director of the National Science Foundation
 
 
 
 
Huh, guess they never looked at the “kitchens” in old campers & trailers~
By Mark Wilson: These Japanese Micro-Kitchens Make Me Want A Tiny Home
 
 
 
 
By Cale Guthrie Weissman: Finally, A Weed Magazine For The Rest Of Us
 
 
 
 
By Matthew Izatt Product Manager, Gmail: Stay composed: here’s a quick rundown of the new Gmail
 
 
 
 
By David Murphy: Here Are the Major New Features Google Added to Gmail Today (and What It Didn’t)
 
 
 
 

By Laura Hazard Owen: Netflix is launching a weekly BuzzFeed show in July
 
 
 
 
Have protests such as these ever stopped or changed the way (more safety precautions, etc) companies do business? I’m not saying folks do not have legitimate complaints, I just question the positive outcome of their methods. Remember the clowns in Seattle who, using petroleum based products such as kayaks protested Shell drilling?
By Heather Chapman: Mother and daughter take to treehouses to fight pipeline
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Cuba’s Aging Cinemas, Photography Mystery, Star Noodle Dragon and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Strict Flapper Diet, Demon Core, Friendship in a Nevada Ghost Town and more->
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Gardening for One, Cemetery Picnics, The Caviar of Citruses and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture via Sheerly: 200+ Films by Indigenous Directors Now Free to View Online: A New Archive Launched by the National Film Board of Canada\\\\\\\
 
 
 
 
Open Culture By Josh Jones: The Science of Beer: A New Free Online Course Promises to Enhance Your Appreciation of the Timeless Beverage
 
 
 
 
Libby – Library ebooks & audiobooks
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Research Article: “False Information on Web and Social Media: A Survey”
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: UCLA Library Builds Worldwide Digital Archival Network (International Digital Ephemera Project (IDEP))
 
 
 
 
Children & Young Adult
Lee & Low Books: Writing Contests
Lee & Low Books offers two annual writing contests that encourage writers of color and Native/Indigenous writers to submit their manuscripts to a publisher that takes pride in nurturing new talent. Winners of each contest receive a cash prize of $2,000 and a standard publishing contract with Lee & Low Books. Honor Award winners receive a cash prize of $1,000.
 
 
 
 
By Merav Savir: This Jiu Jitsu Champ Can’t Hear You. But She Still Kicks Ass
 
 
 
 
Mother Daughter Projects HometalkerTallahassee, FL: Garage Floor Metallic Coating


 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: The Top 15 Quick Home Repair Tricks Every Homeowner Should Know
 
 
 
 
Shelly L Nemeth Tutorial TeamGilbert, AZ: Wire Cloche
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #84)
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI April 24, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1922 – The first segment of the Imperial Wireless Chain providing wireless telegraphy between Leafield in Oxfordshire, England, and Cairo, Egypt, comes into operation.
The Imperial Wireless Chain was a strategic international wireless telegraphy communications network, created to link the countries of the British Empire. Although the idea was conceived prior to World War I, the United Kingdom was the last of the world’s great powers to implement an operational system.[1] The first link in the chain, between Leafield in Oxfordshire and Cairo, Egypt, eventually opened on 24 April 1922,[2] with the final link, between Australia and Canada, opening on 16 June 1928.[3]

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Born On This Day

1879 – Susanna Bokoyni, Hungarian-American circus performer (d. 1984)
Susanna Bokoyni (24 April 1879 – 24 August 1984), also known as “Princess Susanna”, was a Hungarian centenarian and circus performer who was listed in Guinness World Records as the longest-lived dwarf on record. The second-longest lived is Rozika Ovitz Ovitz, a Holocaust survivor from Rozavlea, Romania, who died at age 98.[1][2][3]

Early life and career
Bokoyni was born in Hungary on 24 April 1879. Doctors told her family that she would not live past age seven. At age 16, she became a dancer at Budapest’s Orpheum Theater. She later toured with Rose’s Parisian Midget Follies and Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show where she performed a tight rope act.[4]

Later life and death

In 1972, the nonagenarian Bokoyni moved to Newton, New Jersey and settled at the Merriam House Retirement Home. On 24 August 1984, she died at age 105 at Newton Memorial Hospital. She was interred at Glenwood Cemetery in Vernon, New Jersey.[5]

 
 
 
 

FYI

By David Tracy: 13 Truckers Line Up To Save Man From Jumping Off Overpass
 
 
 
 
By Ed Cara: Scientists Create ‘Am I Stoned,’ an App That Aims to Answer the Eternal Question
 
 
 
 
By Jake Buehler: Oregon’s Cutest Predator Is on the Verge of Extinction
 
 
 
 
Colossal: Melting Memories: A Data-Driven Installation that Shows the Brain’s Inner Workings, An Aerial Tour of an Abandoned Chinese Fishing Village by Joe Nafis and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Online Research Help: All About ERIC Bibliographic Records in New Tour Video

 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Reference: U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Department of Energy Release Online Public Dataset and Viewer of U.S. Wind Turbine Locations and Characteristics
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: PEN American Foundation Releases “Online Harassment Field Manual” to Empower Writers, Journalists and Others with Practical Tools, Tactics to Defend Against Hateful Speech and Trolling
 
 
 
 
Open Culture By Josh Jones: Enter an Online Interactive Documentary on M.C. Escher’s Art & Life, Narrated By Peter Greenaway
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Apply to Become an Archivist Overseeing Prince’s Artifacts & Archival Materials: Applications Are Being Accepted Now
 
 
 
 
By Steller Watch Brian Fadely Biologist: Part II: Is that a healthy pup?
 
 
 
 
Debra Lynn Dadd: More phthalates banned, chair pads with natural fill, and more….
 
 
 
 
terribleminds: chuck wendig -> Chicken And Waffles Drizzled With Salt-And-Vinegar Maple Syrup
 
 
 
 
Water Purifying Solar Distillery
 
 
 
 
By Snow Biscuit: Star Coat
 
 
 
 
By Seamster: Build a Versatile Sewing and Craft Table
 
 
 
 
By M C Langer: Making Quality Toys From Plastic Trash: a Beginner’s Guide
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Lisa S. Hometalk HelperWilmington, DE: A Natural Method for Killing Weeds
 
 
 
 
By Clint Hometalker United Kingdom: 1/2 Recycled Greenhouse Build

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

By jessyratfink: How to Make a Basic Lasagna


 
 

 
 

FYI April 23, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

2005 – The first ever YouTube video, titled “Me at the zoo”, was published by user “jawed”.[1]

YouTube is an American video-sharing website headquartered in San Bruno, California. The service was created by three former PayPal employees—Chad Hurley, Steve Chen, and Jawed Karim—in February 2005. Google bought the site in November 2006 for US$1.65 billion; YouTube now operates as one of Google’s subsidiaries.

YouTube allows users to upload, view, rate, share, add to favorites, report, comment on videos, and subscribe to other users. It offers a wide variety of user-generated and corporate media videos. Available content includes video clips, TV show clips, music videos, short and documentary films, audio recordings, movie trailers, live streams, and other content such as video blogging, short original videos, and educational videos. Most of the content on YouTube is uploaded by individuals, but media corporations including CBS, the BBC, Vevo, and Hulu offer some of their material via YouTube as part of the YouTube partnership program. Unregistered users can only watch videos on the site, while registered users are permitted to upload an unlimited number of videos and add comments to videos. Videos deemed potentially inappropriate are available only to registered users affirming themselves to be at least 18 years old.

YouTube earns advertising revenue from Google AdSense, a program which targets ads according to site content and audience. The vast majority of its videos are free to view, but there are exceptions, including subscription-based premium channels, film rentals, as well as YouTube Red, a subscription service offering ad-free access to the website and access to exclusive content made in partnership with existing users. As of February 2017, there are more than 400 hours of content uploaded to YouTube each minute, and one billion hours of content are watched on YouTube every day. As of August 2017, the website is ranked as the second-most popular site in the world by Alexa Internet, a web traffic analysis company.[1]

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Born On This Day

1907 – Lee Miller, American model and photographer (d. 1977)
Elizabeth “Lee” Miller, Lady Penrose (April 23, 1907 – July 21, 1977), was an American photographer. She was a fashion model in New York City in the 1920s before going to Paris, where she became a fashion and fine art photographer. During the Second World War, she was a war correspondent for Vogue, covering events such as the London Blitz, the liberation of Paris, and the concentration camps at Buchenwald and Dachau.[1]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

By Adele Peters: Baby Bison Are Being Flown To Siberia To Try To Save The Permafrost
 
 
 
 
Glacier Hub Weekly News Letter 4/23/2018: Journey to Sajama, Bolivia, through photos taken by Karina Yager, a professor at Stony Brook University and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Ayun Halliday: Special David Bowie MetroCards Get Released in New York City
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Colin Marshall: Watch the Trailer for a Stunning New 70-Millimeter Print of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, Released by Christopher Nolan on the Film’s 50th Anniversary

 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Go medieval by attaching a book to your belt, Death Valley After Dark, Giant Pumpkin Regatta and more ->
 
 
 
 
Messy Nessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCLXXXIV): Wonderland Inc, Kansas City, 1968 (under investigation), Inside the world of the Parisian “Fairground King”, The World inside a Spanish Globe and more ->

 
 
 
 
Camilla Ibrahim Christmas Island Crab Advocate, Google Australia & New Zealand: Shellebrating Christmas Island’s extraordinary nature with Street View and Google Earth
 
 
 
 
Grace Kvamme Head of Americas Books Merchandising: It’s World Book Day: Find a new read with Google Play Books
 
 
 
 
By Aaron Britt: Two Creativity-Boosting Hacks To Wipe Out Bad Business Writing
 
 
 
 
By Belle Beth Cooper: 6 Pieces of Advice From Successful Writers
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, A Lawyer’s Thoughts on Authors, Self-Publishing and Traditional Publishing: Giving A Voice To Indies
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: New Interactive Data Tool: New York City Population FactFinder (NYC PFF)
 
 
 
 
Victoria Larsen Stencils Hometalker Los Lunas, NM: A Privacy Wall Doesn’t Have To Be Boring Anymore
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI April 22, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1864 – The U.S. Congress passes the Coinage Act of 1864 that mandates that the inscription In God We Trust be placed on all coins minted as United States currency.
The Coinage Act of 1864 was passed on April 22, 1864. The United States federal law changed the composition of the one-cent coin and authorized the minting of the two-cent coin. The Director of the United States Mint developed the designs for these coins for final approval of the Secretary of the Treasury. As a result of this law, the phrase “In God We Trust” first appeared, on the 1864 two-cent coin. An Act of Congress, passed on March 3, 1865, allowed the Mint Director, with the Secretary’s approval, to place the phrase on all gold and silver coins that “shall admit the inscription thereon.” In 1956, “In God We Trust” replaced “E Pluribus Unum” as the national motto. All currency was printed and minted with the new motto.[1]

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1909 – Rita Levi-Montalcini, Sephardic Jewish-Italian neurologist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 2012)

Rita Levi-Montalcini, OMRI, OMCA (Italian pronunciation: [ˈriːta ˈlɛːvi montalˈtʃiːni]; 22 April 1909 – 30 December 2012) was an Italian Nobel laureate, honored for her work in neurobiology. She was awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly with colleague Stanley Cohen for the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF).[3] From 2001 until her death, she also served in the Italian Senate as a Senator for Life.[4]

On 22 April 2009, she became the first Nobel laureate ever to reach the age of 100,[5] and the event was feted with a party at Rome’s City Hall.[6][7] At the time of her death, she was the oldest living Nobel laureate.[8]

Early life and education
Levi-Montalcini was born on 22 April 1909 in Turin,[9][10] to a Sephardic Jewish family.[11][12] She and her twin sister Paola were the youngest of four children. Her parents were Adele Montalcini, a painter, and Adamo Levi, an electrical engineer and mathematician, whose families had moved from Asti and Casale Monferrato, respectively, to Turin at the turn of the twentieth century.[9][13]

In her teenage years, she considered becoming a writer and admired Swedish writer Selma Lagerlöf,[14] but after seeing a close family friend die of stomach cancer she decided to attend the University of Turin Medical School.[15] Her father discouraged his daughters from attending college, as he feared it would disrupt their potential lives as wives and mothers, but eventually he supported Levi-Montalcini’s aspirations to become a doctor.[9] While at the University of Turin, the neurohistologist Giuseppe Levi sparked her interest in the developing nervous system.[5] After graduating summa cum laude M.D. in 1936 she remained at the university as Levi’s assistant, but her academic career was cut short by Benito Mussolini’s 1938 Manifesto of Race and the subsequent introduction of laws barring Jews from academic and professional careers.[16]

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FYI

By William Hughes: R.I.P. Austin Powers star Verne Troyer
 
 
Verne Troyer (January 1, 1969 – April 21, 2018)[1][2] was an American actor, stunt performer, and comedian. He was notable for his height of 2 ft 8 in (81 cm), the result of cartilage–hair hypoplasia,[3][4] which made him one of the shortest men in the world. He was best known for playing Mini-Me in the Austin Powers series of comedy films, and for his brief appearance as Griphook the goblin in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.

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Great comments!
By Ryan Felton: 84-Month Auto Loans Are Becoming More Common Because You People Can’t Stop Buying Trucks

Harry:
Sorry, Johnny, you can’t go to college. Daddy needs a new F350 to commute to his accounting job, get 3 bags of mulch twice a year, and trailer his $35K Harley to bike week.

Bdog:
Honestly the F350 is a better investment. Johny’s liberal arts degree (or psych or anthropology or any other “fun” program) isn’t going to get him a job any better than a barista. And if dad goes and has his fun, Johnny will have to take on an apprenticeship with the local Electrician, Pipefitter, or IronWorker union, get paid to learn, and make $100K+ after turning out..

 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Did French Taxis Actually Change The Fate Of World War I?
 
 
 
 

By Elizabeth Werth: The Valkyrie Of The Motorcar Survived The Race Of Death, A Sunken Ship, And An Assassination Attempt
 
 
 
 
By Nina Renata Aron: This daredevil fighter pilot proved that women were just as (or more) capable of conquering the skies Cecil “Teddy” Kenyon defied expectations by testing fighter planes and bombers during WWII
Female Test Pilot Ad from 1944

 
 
 
 
Spoon & Tamago: A Redesigned Hourglass Questions How We Perceive Time, A Tree Grows in Tokyo | Tree-Ness House by Akihisa Hirata and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Nebraska: Literacy Center of the Midlands to Close After Nearly 50 Years, Organization Was Founded by a Librarian
 
 
 
 
By Brigit Katz: This Medieval Man Used a Knife as a Prosthetic Limb
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: You are here: Home / News / New Web App: Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Online Logbook Developed at Purdue University Now Available, Free to Access and Use New Web App: Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Online Logbook Developed at Purdue University Now Available, Free to Access and Use
 
 
 
 

By Taylor McAvoy: Seattle preschools release thousands of ladybugs for Earth Day

 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Malfunction Junction in Front of the Mastin-Parris Motor Co.

 
 
 
 

Sweet Stretch: 1972 Volkswagen Beetle Limo


Barn Finds By Scotty Gilbertson: Sweet Stretch: 1972 Volkswagen Beetle Limo
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: The Paradox of Freedom: The Great Humanistic Philosopher and Psychologist Erich Fromm on Moral Aloneness and Our Mightiest Antidote to Terror
 
 
 
 
By Stephen Taylor Hometalker New Zealand: Combined Garden Modular Seating / Retaining Wall / Storage
 
 
 
 
By Kris Hometalker New Zealand: Pallet Wood Vertical Planting With Succulents
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 11 Beautiful Plants That Are Secretly Killing Your Garden
 
 
 
 
By jfulop10: Mosquito Killing Ovitrap
 
 
 
 
By Jon-A-Tron: DESIGN SKETCHING CLASS
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

In the Kitchen With Matt: Easy Whole Wheat Bread


 
 

 
 

FYI April 21, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1506 – The three-day Lisbon Massacre comes to an end with the slaughter of over 1,900 suspected Jews by Portuguese Catholics.

The Lisbon massacre, alternatively known as the Lisbon pogrom or the 1506 Easter Slaughter was an incident in April, 1506, in Lisbon, Portugal in which a crowd of Catholics, as well as foreign sailors who were anchored in the Tagus, persecuted, tortured, killed, and burnt at the stake hundreds of people who were accused of being Jews and, thus, guilty of deicide and heresy. This incident took place thirty years before the establishment of the Inquisition in Portugal and nine years after the Jews were forced to convert to Roman Catholicism in 1497, during the reign of King Manuel I.

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Born On This Day

1814 – Angela Burdett-Coutts, 1st Baroness Burdett-Coutts, English art collector and philanthropist (d. 1906)

Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts, 1st Baroness Burdett-Coutts (21 April 1814 – 30 December 1906), born Angela Georgina Burdett, was a nineteenth-century philanthropist, the daughter of Sir Francis Burdett, 5th Baronet and Sophia, formerly Coutts, daughter of banker Thomas Coutts. In 1837 she became one of the wealthiest women in England when she inherited her grandfather’s fortune of around £1.8 million pounds sterling (equivalent to £150,000,000 in 2016) following the death of her stepgrandmother, Harriot Mellon. She joined the surnames of her father and grandfather, by royal licence, to become Burdett-Coutts. Edward VII is reported to have described her as, “[a]fter my mother, the most remarkable woman in the kingdom.”[1]

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FYI

Atlas Obscura: The Spamettes In 1946, the Hormel Company hired an all-female, military-style band to promote products including SPAM. They were known as the Hormel Girls., Destroying a Rogue Bog Minnesota’s floating peat bog has been causing havoc recently. If this bog were in your backyard, how would you deal with it? Send us your ideas. and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: This mysterious metal mirror lets you see yourself as you truly are, Frank Hart Pedestrian Superstar in 1880, Bee art, WINKLER COUNTY, TEXAS Wink Sink and more ->
 
 
 
 
Webneel Daily Inspiration – 1124: Graphic Designs Daily Inspiration from around the world
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Kate Zwaard Appointed New Director of Digital Strategy at the Library of Congress
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Benetech Signs Agreement with EIFL to Expand Access to International Libraries Using Bookshare

 
 
 
 By Rina Raphael: Why Women Are Leading The Growing Natural Wine Movement
 
 
 
 
By Donnell Alexander: How This African-American Pot Grower Is Mastering California’s Green Rush
 
 
 
 
By Adele Peters: The Revolutionary Giant Ocean Cleanup Machine Is About To Set Sail
 
 
 
 
Barn Finds: Explorer’s Choice: 1965 Tucker Sno-Cat, $1,900 Motorhome: 1969 Travel Queen and more ->
 
 
 
 
My French Twist: recycled pop top bracelet, how to make a succulent wall garden, modern & hip wooden bead projects and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Chas Crazy Creations: Turning an Heirloom Into a Lamp
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 13 Ways to Get Backyard Privacy Without a Fence
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 10 Graphic Transfer Techniques That Blew Us Away
 
 
 
 
By Erin Manz Reed Hometalker: Rolled Felt Cacti in a Glitter Pot
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI April 20, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1535 – The sun dog phenomenon observed over Stockholm and depicted in the famous painting Vädersolstavlan.

A sun dog (or sundog) or mock sun, formally called a parhelion[1] (plural parhelia) in meteorology, is an atmospheric optical phenomenon that consists of a bright spot to the left and/or right of the Sun. Two sun dogs often flank the Sun within a 22° halo.

The sun dog is a member of the family of halos, caused by the refraction of sunlight by ice crystals in the atmosphere. Sun dogs typically appear as a pair of subtly colored patches of light, around 22° to the left and right of the Sun, and at the same altitude above the horizon as the Sun. They can be seen anywhere in the world during any season, but are not always obvious or bright. Sun dogs are best seen and most conspicuous when the Sun is near the horizon.

Read more ->

The so-called “Sun Dog Painting” (Vädersolstavlan) depicting Stockholm in 1535 and the celestial phenomenon at the time interpreted as an ominous presage


 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1896 – Wop May, Canadian captain and pilot (d. 1952)
Wilfrid Reid “Wop” May OBE DFC (March 20, 1896[1] – June 21, 1952), was a Canadian flying ace in the First World War and a leading post-war aviator. He was the final Allied pilot to be pursued by Manfred von Richthofen before the German ace was shot down on the Western Front in 1918. After the war, May returned to Canada, pioneering the role of a bush pilot while working for Canadian Airways in Northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

By Kristen V. Brown: An FDA Panel Just Recommended an Epilepsy Drug Made from Cannabis
 
 
 
 
By Yessenia Funes: This New Bird-of-Paradise Woos Mates With an Electric Slide
 
 
 
 
By Barbara Hoffert LJR: Dogs, Cats, Parrots, & Killers | Mystery Previews, October 2018
 
 
 
 
By Kevinson Libama Writing Tips Oasis: 21 Top Romance Publishers Accepting Submissions
 
 
 
 
Webneel: Promoting Your Site with Charitable Events
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Irish Senate honors rural Pulitzer and Gish Award winner after Iowa Senate, upset by his editorials, declines to do so

 
 
 
 
Open Culture by Ted Mills: Download an Archive of 16,000 Sound Effects from the BBC: A Fascinating History of the 20th Century in Sound
 
 
 
 
Open Culture By DC: The Feynman Lectures on Physics, The Most Popular Physics Book Ever Written, Is Now Completely Online
 
 
 
 
Messy Nessy: Lunch at the Forgotten Rothschild Party Palace, Paris without People, Remarkable Things Hiding in the Attic and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Spaces: 8 of the best rooftop bars in London and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Flower Patch Farmhouse Hometalker: DIY Terra Cotta Pot Fountain
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Kate Bernot and Kevin Pang: What’s the tastiest use for leftover bacon fat?


 
 

 
 

FYI April 19, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1713 – With no living male heirs, Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor, issues the Pragmatic Sanction of 1713 to ensure that Habsburg lands and the Austrian throne would be inherited by his daughter, Maria Theresa (not actually born until 1717).

The Pragmatic Sanction (Latin: Sanctio Pragmatica) was an edict issued by Charles VI, Holy Roman Emperor, on 19 April 1713 to ensure that the Habsburg hereditary possessions, which included the Archduchy of Austria, the Kingdom of Hungary, the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Duchy of Milan, the Kingdom of Naples, the Kingdom of Sicily and the Austrian Netherlands, could be inherited by a daughter.

Charles and his wife Elizabeth Christine had not to that point had children, and since 1711 Charles had been the sole surviving male member of the House of Habsburg. Charles’s elder brother Joseph I had died without male issue, leaving Joseph’s daughter Maria Josepha as the heir presumptive. This presented two problems. First, a prior agreement with his brother known as the Mutual Pact of Succession (1703) had agreed that, in the absence of male heirs, Joseph’s daughters would take precedence over Charles’s daughters in all Habsburg lands. Though at that time Charles had no children, if he were to be survived by daughters alone, they would be cut out of the inheritance. Secondly, because Salic law precluded female inheritance, Charles VI needed to take extraordinary measures to avoid a protracted succession dispute as other claimants would have surely contested a female inheritance.[1]

Charles VI was indeed ultimately succeeded by his own elder daughter Maria Theresa (born 1717). However, despite the promulgation of the Pragmatic Sanction, her accession in 1740 resulted in the outbreak of the War of the Austrian Succession as Charles-Albert of Bavaria, backed by France, contested her inheritance. Following the war, Maria Theresa’s inheritance of the Habsburg lands was confirmed by the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, while the election of her husband Francis I as Holy Roman Emperor was secured by the Treaty of Füssen.

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Born On This Day

1787 – Deaf Smith, American soldier (d. 1837)
Erastus “Deaf” Smith (April 19, 1787 – November 30, 1837) was an American frontiersman noted for his part in the Texas Revolution and the Army of the Republic of Texas. He fought in the Grass Fight and the Battle of San Jacinto. After the war, Deaf Smith led a company of Texas Rangers.

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FYI

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: The Universe in Verse Livestream: April 28
I am delighted to announce that although the laws of physics have enforced their cruel limitations on our space and The Universe in Verse sold out in a blink, Kickstarter has kindly donated a livestream. So you can tune in from anywhere in the world at 7p.m. EST on April 28:

LIVESTREAM LINK

Since we are donating all ticketing proceeds to the Natural Resources Defense Council, the hosts and peformers are all donating their time and talent, and this livestream is itself a donation, please consider joining the collective goodwill by making a donation to the NRDC yourself.
 
 
 
 
By Daria Kadovik: Van offers faster stroke diagnosis, treatment
 
 
 
 
Beyond Bylines Team: How to Create the Ultimate Style Guide for Your Blog
 
 
 
 

By Gopal Shah Product Manager, Google Earth : How we explored the whole wide world with Google Earth in the past year
 
 
 
 
By Ellen Glover: Master’s student Blom receives Kern Scholarship for interactive map about US agriculture
 
 
 
 
By LollyJane: Herringbone bookcase | Craft room makeover
 
 
 
 
By jessyratfink: Free Online Course ->HOW TO WRITE AN INSTRUCTABLE
 
 
 
 
By BleeptoBleep: Pallet Dining Table With Solar Lights
 
 
 
 
Birdz of a Feather Hometalker Canada: Add Some ‘Zen’ to Your Back Garden With a Water Feature
 
 
 
 
Hometalk Highlights: 31 Ways to Make A Gorgeous Wreath For Your Front Door
 
 
 
 
Hometalk Highlights Hometalker New York, NY: Material of the Week: Citric Acid
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: Silver Cleaning Hacks
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

Military April 19, 2018

By Katie Lange: Military: There Is Time In Your Day for DoD Education Programs
 
 
 
 
By Shannon Collins DoD News, Defense Media Activity: Gold Star Children Take on Business World Thanks to TAPS
 
 
 
 
By Air Force Tech. Sgt. Liliana Moreno 621st Contingency Response Wing: Service Dog Lends War Veteran a Helping Paw
 
 
 
 
By Shireen Bedi Office of the Air Force Surgeon General: Face of Defense: Doctor Builds Partnerships Through Global Health Engagement
 
 
 
 
By Jim Garamone DoD News, Defense Media Activity: ISIS Contained in Syria, Changing Tactics, OIR Spokesman Says
 
 
 
 
By Terri Moon Cronk DoD News, Defense Media Activity: Increasing Global Threats Call for Capabilities to Deter, Defend, Officials Say
 
 
 
 

Columbus, Georgia, circa 1960. “Judge Paige.” More specifically, Myles Anderson Paige (1898-1983), the Alabama-born lawyer whose multifaceted career included stints as WWI Army captain, Assistant New York State Attorney General, criminal courts jurist and National Guard colonel. Not to mention picnic food taster. 4×5 inch acetate negative from the Shorpy News Photo Archive.

Myles Anderson Paige, the first African American to be appointed a New York City Criminal Court Judge, was born on July 18, 1898 in Montgomery, Alabama. Paige was a star football player at Howard University, graduating from the Washington D.C. institution with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1921. While at Howard he joined Beta Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Paige served in the United States Army during the World War I as captain of the 369th regiment. Paige’s ascension to captain was swift and impressive considering he began his military career as a corporal in September of 1917 and was promoted to second lieutenant a week later. The following week he became first lieutenant and before the end of September he was captain and company commander.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
Just A Car Guy: Will Eisner the originator of the graphic novel, namesake of the Eisner Award, the comic book and cartoon industry equivalent of the Oscar, drew comics for, and about, the U.S. military to assist the maintenance mechanics in learning the dull info
 
 
 
 
Just A Car Guy: the Paul Bunyan load, September, 1952. A 1949 Peterbilt 390, 12 foot bunks, and adjustable Rossi chocks. the 40 foot logs were 7, 8 and 9 feet in diameter. 53,670 board feet. Driver, Wes Copeland, previously a WW2 bomber pilot
 
 
 
 
Just A Car Guy: Winnie Fritz was a farmhand at 6, a Army nurse unit commanding officer in Vietnam in 1970 at 22, a nurse to presidents and kings at Walter Reed at 23, a pilot, and the clinical operating officer of an international health system at 31.

FYI April 18, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1949 – The keel for the aircraft carrier USS United States is laid down at Newport News Drydock and Shipbuilding. However, construction is canceled five days later, resulting in the Revolt of the Admirals.

A Cold War incident known as the “Revolt of the Admirals” involved a number of retired and active-duty United States Navy admirals who publicly disagreed with President Harry S. Truman and Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson in their emphasis on strategic nuclear bombing executed by the United States Air Force as the primary means by which the nation and its interests were defended. The episode occurred in 1949 during a time wherein the administration was attempting to severely reduce military expenditures.

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Born On This Day

1813 – James McCune Smith, African-American physician, apothecary, abolitionist, and author (d. 1865)

James McCune Smith (April 18, 1813 – November 17, 1865) was an American physician, apothecary, abolitionist, and author. He was the first African American to hold a medical degree and graduated at the top in his class at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. After his return to the United States, he became the first African American to run a pharmacy in that nation.

In addition to practicing as a doctor for nearly 20 years at the Colored Orphan Asylum in Manhattan, Smith was a public intellectual: he contributed articles to medical journals, participated in learned societies, and wrote numerous essays and articles drawing from his medical and statistical training. He used his training in medicine and statistics to refute common misconceptions about race, intelligence, medicine, and society in general. Invited as a founding member of the New York Statistics Society in 1852, which promoted a new science, he was elected as a member in 1854 of the recently founded American Geographic Society. But he was never admitted to the American Medical Association or local medical associations.

He has been most well known for his leadership as an abolitionist: a member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, with Frederick Douglass he helped start the National Council of Colored People in 1853, the first permanent national organization for blacks. Douglass called Smith “the single most important influence on his life.”[1]

Smith was one of the Committee of Thirteen, who organized in 1850 in New York City to resist the newly passed Fugitive Slave Law by aiding refugee slaves through the Underground Railroad. Other leading abolitionist activists were among his friends and colleagues. From the 1840s, Smith lectured on race and abolitionism and wrote numerous articles to refute racist ideas about black capacities.

Both Smith and his wife were of mixed-race African and European ancestry. As he became economically successful, Smith built a house in a mostly white neighborhood; in the 1860 census he and his family were classified as white, whereas in 1850 they were classified as mulatto.

He served for nearly 20 years as the doctor at the Colored Orphan Asylum in New York. After it was burned down in July 1863 by a mob in the New York Draft Riots, in which nearly 100 blacks were killed, Smith moved his family and practice to Brooklyn for their safety. The parents stressed education for their children. In the 1870 census, his widow and children continued to be classified as white.

To escape racial discrimination, his children passed into white society: the four surviving sons married white spouses; his unmarried daughter lived with a brother. They worked as teachers, a lawyer, and business people. Smith’s unique achievements as a pioneering African-American doctor were rediscovered by 20th-century historians. They were relearned by his descendants in the twenty-first century when a three-times-great-granddaughter took a history class and found his name in her grandmother’s family bible. In 2010, several Smith descendants commissioned a new tombstone for his grave in Brooklyn. They gathered to honor him and their African-American ancestry.

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FYI

Tammi Jo Schults
Courtesy of Linda Maloney MilitaryFlyMoms

By Jeff Schogol: Hero Pilot Who Saved Southwest Flight Was One Of The Navy’s First Female Fighter Jockeys
 
 
 
 

By Justin T. Westbrook: The Pilot Who Saved That Southwest Flight Is A Badass

Shults was one of the first women fighter pilots in U.S. Navy history, as well as being one of the first to pilot the F/A 18 jet, as reported by Heavy.com. Shults is from New Mexico, and joined the Navy in 1985, where she also flew the LTV A-7 Corsair as part of VAQ-34, an electronic aggressor squadron, according to All Hands, a Navy magazine.

 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Mail From Your Heroes We asked you to send us photos of the incredible things you’ve received from your childhood heroes. Here are some of our favorites and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: An Avalanche of Novels, Films and Other Works of Art Will Soon Enter the Public Domain: Virginia Woolf, Charlie Chaplin, William Carlos William, Buster Keaton & More
 
 
 
 

How to Get Started in Hillclimbing


By Staff Writer: How to Get Started in Hillclimbing
 
 
 
 
The Public Domain Newsletter: Made in Taiwan? How a Frenchman Fooled 18th-Century London, Hans Holbein’s Dance of Death (1523–5), The Restoration’s Most Controversial Poet (and Why We Need Him) and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Lisa Peet: Remembering Bernie Margolis, NY State Librarian
 
 
 
 

By Julissa Treviño: Check Out the World’s Largest Archive Digitally Preserving At-Risk Heritage Sites
 
 
 
 
By Maya Desenbury: Doctors Told Her She Was Just Fat. She Actually Had Cancer.
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Pulitzer prize winners include Charlottesville protest photo
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #83)


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI April 17, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1907 – The Ellis Island immigration center processes 11,747 people, more than on any other day.
Ellis Island, in Upper New York Bay, was the gateway for over 12 million immigrants to the U.S. as the United States’ busiest immigrant inspection station for over 60 years[8] from 1892 until 1954. Ellis Island was opened January 1, 1892. The island was greatly expanded with land reclamation between 1892 and 1934. Before that, the much smaller original island was the site of Fort Gibson and later a naval magazine. The island was made part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument in 1965 and has hosted a museum of immigration since 1990.

It was long considered part of New York, but a 1998 United States Supreme Court decision found that most of the island is in New Jersey.[9] The south side of the island, home to the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, is closed to the general public and the object of restoration efforts spearheaded by Save Ellis Island.

Born On This Day

1896 – Señor Wences, Spanish-American ventriloquist (d. 1999)
Wenceslao Moreno (April 17, 1896 – April 20, 1999),[1] better known as Señor Wences, was a Spanish ventriloquist. His popularity grew with his frequent appearances on CBS-TV’s The Ed Sullivan Show in the 1950s and 1960s.[2]

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FYI

By Daniel Kreps: R. Lee Ermey, ‘Full Metal Jacket’ Actor, Dead at 74

Ronald Lee Ermey (March 24, 1944 – April 15, 2018) was an American actor and voice actor. He achieved fame when he played Gunnery Sergeant Hartman in the 1987 film Full Metal Jacket, which earned him a Golden Globe Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. Ermey was also a United States Marine Corps staff sergeant and an honorary gunnery sergeant. During his tenure in the U.S. Marine Corps, he served as a drill instructor.

Ermey was often typecast in authority figure roles, such as Mayor Tilman in the film Mississippi Burning, Bill Bowerman in Prefontaine, Sheriff Hoyt in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre remake, Jimmy Lee Farnsworth in Fletch Lives, a police captain in Se7en, plastic army men leader Sarge in the Toy Story films, Lt. “Tice” Ryan in Rocket Power, the warden in SpongeBob SquarePants, and John House in House.

Ermey hosted two programs on the History Channel: Mail Call, in which he answered viewers’ questions about various military issues both modern and historic; and Lock n’ Load with R. Lee Ermey, which concerned the development of different types of weapons. He also hosted GunnyTime on the Outdoor Channel.

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Harry Laverne Anderson (October 14, 1952 – April 16, 2018) was an American actor, comedian and magician. He is best known for the role of Judge Harry Stone on the 1984–1992 television series Night Court.

In addition to eight appearances on Saturday Night Live between 1981 and 1985, Anderson had a recurring guest role as con man Harry “The Hat” Gittes on Cheers, toured extensively as a magician, and did several magic/comedy shows for broadcast, including Harry Anderson’s Sideshow (1987). He was also notable for his role as Richie Tozier in the 1990 Tommy Lee Wallace miniseries It.

Read more ->

By Nardine Saad: ‘Nice guy’ Harry Anderson gets heartfelt sendoff from ‘Night Court’ costars, fellow magicians
 
 
 
 
By Matt Novak: Southwest Flight Makes Emergency Landing After Engine Explodes, Woman Almost Sucked Out Window
 
 
 
 
By Rebecca Fishbein: NYC Will Remove Statue of Doctor Who Performed Gynecological Experiments on Women Slaves
 
 
 
 
Sexual Assault issues?
By Tracy Clark Flory: New York City Will Finally House Inmates According to Their Gender Identity
 
 
 
 
By Maddie Stone: Everything About This Newly-Discovered Octopus Nursery Is Wild
 
 
 
 
By David Murphy: How to Upgrade Your Computer With a New Drive
 
 
 
 
By David Obuchowski: The Magic Of Learning To Drive A Manual Transmission
 
 
 
 
Distracted Driving laws?
By Andrew P. Collins: Behold Delicious Instant Karma For A Badly Behaving Kia
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The Nazi History of One-Pot Meals, I’ll Have a Pruneburger With Fries, Please and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Overlooked Soviet-Era Industrial Design, Independent Bookstore Day is on April 28 so tell us what makes your favorite local bookstore special, YEMEN Hababah Water Cistern and more ->
 
 
 
 
Debra Lynn Dadd Live Toxic Free: Happy Earth Day!
 
 
 
 
By Ellen Glover: Hoosiers, IU students can share experiences in Stories from Home mobile studio
 
 
 
 
By Meena Lee and Sarah Guinee: The New York Times has signed up a lot of subscribers. Here’s how it plans to keep them.
 
 
 
 
By Ian Frazier: The Maraschino Mogul’s Secret Life
 
 
 
 
Beyond Bylines Blog Profiles: Millennial Workplace Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Aron Pilhofer (James B. Steele Chair in Journalism Innovation at @TempleSMC. Proud @Guardian and @nytimes alum. Co-founder of @documentcloud & @HacksHackers. Yachtsman.) A growing list of tools, practices, and platforms you can use to improve reader trust in your journalism →
 
 
 
 

By Gary Price: New Resource: Google and CyArk Launch “Open Heritage”, Open Access to the World’s Largest 3D Heritage Collection
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Now Available Online: Library of Congress Digitizes Unique Japanese Censorship Collection
 
 
 
 
By Germania Rodriguez For Dailymail.com: White woman, 72, is arrested for attacking a PREGNANT soldier in a restaurant during a row over a parking spot and calling her a ‘gay black b***h’
 
 
 
 
By Jennifer Calfas: Desiree Linden Just Became the First American Woman to Win the Boston Marathon in Three Decades
 
 
 
 
By Devin Coldewey: Conserve the Sound is an archive of noises from old tape players, projectors and other dying tech

 
 
 
 
By Katherine Schwab: This Is What A World Without Smartphones Looks Like
 
 
The National Radio Quiet Zone (NRQZ) is a large area of land in the United States designated as a radio quiet zone, in which radio transmissions are heavily restricted by law to facilitate scientific research and military intelligence. It is located in the states of West Virginia, Virginia, and a small part of Maryland.

Read more on wiki ->
 
 
 
 
By DJ Pangburn: This Site Tracks How Wikipedia Is Being Edited in Real-Time
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 25 Memorial Day Flag Ideas That Will Fill You With Pride
 
 
 
 
Stabilizing the blocks?? Stencils are a neat decorating idea.
By Charissa Tutorial Team Newark CA: Need a Bar for a Party in a Hurry (and Inexpensively)?!
 
 
 
 
By Melissa Woods Hometalker Saint Joseph, MN: Make LARGE Canvas Wall Art for $14
 
 
 
 
Chas Crazy Creations: Fireflies and Cattails
 
 
 
 
Video: Fireflies and Cattails
 
 
 
 
By jessyratfink: Free Online Cooking Class
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Molecular gastronomy – Fruit Caviar