Category: FYI

FYI

FYI April 19, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1839 – The Treaty of London establishes Belgium as a kingdom and guarantees its neutrality.
The Treaty of London of 1839, also called the First Treaty of London, the Convention of 1839, the Treaty of Separation, the Quintuple Treaty of 1839, or the Treaty of the XXIV articles, was a treaty signed on 19 April 1839 between the Concert of Europe, the United Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Kingdom of Belgium. It was a direct follow-up to the 1831 Treaty of the XVIII Articles which the Netherlands had refused to sign, and the result of negotiations at the London Conference of 1838–1839.[1]

Under the treaty, the European powers recognized and guaranteed the independence and neutrality of Belgium and established the full independence of the German-speaking part of Luxembourg. Article VII required Belgium to remain perpetually neutral, and by implication committed the signatory powers to guard that neutrality in the event of invasion.[2]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1894 – Elizabeth Dilling, American author and activist (d. 1966)
Elizabeth Eloise Kirkpatrick Dilling (April 19, 1894 – May 26, 1966) was an American writer and political activist.[2] In 1934, she published The Red Network—A Who’s Who and Handbook of Radicalism for Patriots, which catalogs over 1,300 suspected communists and their sympathizers. Her books and lecture tours established her as the pre-eminent female right-wing activist of the 1930s, and one of the most outspoken critics of the New Deal.[3][4]

Dilling was the best-known leader of the World War II women’s isolationist movement, a grass-roots campaign that pressured Congress to refrain from helping the Allies.[5][6] She was among 28 anti-war campaigners charged with sedition in 1942; the charges were dropped in 1946. While academic studies have customarily ignored both the anti-war “Mothers’ movement” and right-wing activist women in general, Dilling’s writings secured her a lasting influence among right-wing groups.[7][8][9]

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FYI

By Meghan Bartels: Jerrie Cobb, Record-Breaking Pilot and Advocate for Female Spaceflight, Has Died
Cobb, who was born in 1931, became a pilot when she was 16. She purchased her first plane with money earned as a semiprofessional softball player for the Oklahoma City Queens, according to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. She set three separate world aviation records and was the first woman to fly at the prestigious Paris Air Show.

Geraldyn M. Cobb (March 5, 1931 – March 18, 2019) was an American aviator. She was also part of the “Mercury 13,” a group of women selected to undergo physiological screening tests at the same time as the original Mercury Seven astronauts, as part of a private, non-NASA program.

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By Tom McParland: How Much Value Did My New Car Lose Now That I Had an Accident?
 
 
Great comments!
By Patrick George: The Compact Truck Wars Are Coming
 
 
 
 
By Brendan Hesse: Delete These Sketchy Android Apps That Are Tracking You Without Permission
 
 
 
 
By Adam Clark Estes: A ‘Concreteberg’ as Long as a Football Field Has Clogged London’s Sewers
 
 
 
 
By Billie Haisley: Amateur MMA Fighter Beats Up Man Jerking Off In Front Of Her During Beach Photoshoot
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: Hubble Telescope Turns 29, Shares Incredible Photo of Southern Crab Nebula to Celebrate; Rare Recordings of Elusive River Dolphins Show They Are Surprisingly Chatty; A Generic Version of Opioid Overdose Antidote Naloxone Just Landed FDA Approval and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Christopher Brennan: Paris firefighters formed a ‘human chain’ to save Notre Dame’s treasures First responders were honored at two ceremonies Thursday, with French President Emmanuel Macron saying they’d receive a medal of honor for their heroic work.
 
 
 
 
By Kristin Appenbrink Editorial Lead, Google Earth: Visit the U.S. National Parks in Google Earth
 
 
 
 

Megan Friedman Features Editor, The Keyword: From kids’ music to the tech world, without missing a beat
 
 
 
 
BBC News: Lil Dicky’s all-star environmental music video goes viral
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Rijksstudio; Email Settings; On the Road to a Modern Copyright System and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Street Art for Book Lovers: Dutch Artists Paint Massive Bookcase Mural on the Side of a Building; Art Installation Dramatically Sheds Light on the Catastrophic Impact of Rising Sea-Levels and more ->
 
 
 
 
Week In Weird: The Conjuring of Bigfoot: The Forgotten Tale of the Time Lorraine Warren Met Sasquatch in Tennessee
 
 

Webneel: 30 Mesmerising Play with Nature Double Exposure Photography Effect by Vladimir Sazonov
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Farmworker shortage has led to higher wages, more foreign workers; could lead farmers to switch crops or automate; Analysis: NAFTA replacement would produce slight net positive for U.S. economy; several ag sectors would benefit and more ->
 
 

I see Spring!


 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

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FYI April 18, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1857 – “The Spirits Book” by Allan Kardec is published, marking the birth of Spiritualism in France.
The Spirits Book (Le Livre des Esprits in original French) is part of the Spiritist Codification, and is regarded as one of the five fundamental works of Spiritism. It was published by the French educator Allan Kardec on April 18, 1857. It was the first and remains the most important spiritist book, because it addresses in first hand all questions developed subsequently by Allan Kardec.

The book is structured as a collection of questions regarding the origin of the spirits, the purpose of the life, the order of the universe, evil and good and the afterlife. Its answers, according to Kardec, were given to him by a group of spirits who identified themselves as “The Spirit of Truth”, with whom he communicated in several Spiritist sessions during the 1850s. Kardec, who considered himself an “organizer” rather than an author, grouped the questions and their answers by theme, occasionally including lengthier digressions the spirits had dictated to him on specific subjects, some signed by philosophers such as Augustine of Hippo and Thomas Aquinas and writers including Voltaire.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1893 – Violette Morris, French shot putter and discus thrower (d. 1944)
Violette Morris (18 April 1893 – 26 April 1944) was a French athlete who won two gold and one silver medals at the Women’s World Games in 1921–1922. in 1936, she became a spy for Nazi Germany, which continued during World War II. She was killed in 1944 in a Resistance-led ambush as a traitor to France.

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FYI

Vector’s World: Personalized vehicle; Bail out; Free range Ducati; Push me pull you
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Amazon’s E-Commerce Adventure in China Proved Too Much of a Jungle; When Fair Use Threatens the Derivative Works Right and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Kelly Tyko: Carl’s Jr. will have a special $4.20 CBD burger for 4/20. Here’s where to get it.
 
 
 
 
By Li Zhou: Native American activists: The fire at Notre Dame is devastating. So is the destruction of our sacred lands. It’s an ongoing abuse that’s garnered far less outcry.
 
 
 
 
John Ristevski Chairman and CEO of CyArk: On World Heritage Day, explore historic sites in 3D
 
 
 
 
By Greg Myre: ‘A Woman Of No Importance’ Finally Gets Her Due
 
 
 
 

By Christine Cube: Earth Day is around the corner. Here’s our Best Of list for environmental news.
 
 
 
 
By Lauren Hirsch: Sears sues former CEO Eddie Lampert, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin and others for alleged ‘thefts’ of billions from retailer
 
 
 
 
The Rual Blog: Rural Texas newspaper publisher deletes reference to same-sex partner in obituary, citing religious reasons; Arkansas legislature repeals ban on cities and towns building broadband; N.C., other states may follow; EU threatens tariffs on $20 billion in U.S. goods in latest salvo of 15-year airplane manufacturer subsidy dispute and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: How the Vietnam War Shaped Classic Rock–And How Classic Rock Shaped the War; How Venice Works: 124 Islands, 183 Canals & 438 Bridges and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Ideas

By Best of Hometalk: 16 Furniture Paint Ideas to Transform Existing Accessories
 
 
Melanie Hometalk Helper Canada: Garden Makeover
 
 
Debbie / Dragonfly Treasure: Easy and Quick Last Minute Easter Favors
 
 
Birdz of a Feather Hometalker Canada: Install a Water Garden in Your Small Yard
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 30 Garden Art Ideas To Fall In Love With These art pieces for your garden are lovely, try them out now!
 
 
Brittany @by Brittany Goldwyn: My Finished Tiny Backyard Space
 
 
By Lolly Jane: DIY Abstract Art With A Golden Touch
 
 
By Menashalibrary: Inexpensive Eco-Friendly Way to Make a Garden Bed Weed Proof


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
FOOD by Lyds: Sweet Vanilla Soufflé
By KitchenMason: How to Make the BEST Butter Cookies!
 
 
By In the Kitchen With Matt: Chocolate Mint Cookies
 
 
By Tye Rannosaurus: Black Light Reactive Key (S)lime Pie With Tentacles!
 
 
By Fizzy123: Best Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits: No Food Processor
 
 
By ElisesEats: Individual Beef Wellington Pies


 
 

 
 

FYI April 17, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1895 – The Treaty of Shimonoseki between China and Japan is signed. This marks the end of the First Sino-Japanese War, and the defeated Qing Empire is forced to renounce its claims on Korea and to concede the southern portion of the Fengtien province, Taiwan and the Pescadores Islands to Japan.
The Treaty of Shimonoseki (Japanese: 下関条約 Hepburn: Shimonoseki Jōyaku) was a treaty signed at the Shunpanrō hotel, Shimonoseki, Japan on 17 April 1895, between the Empire of Japan and the Qing dynasty, ending the First Sino-Japanese War. The peace conference took place from March 20 to 17 April 1895. This treaty followed and superseded the Sino-Japanese Friendship and Trade Treaty of 1871.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1620 – Marguerite Bourgeoys, French-Canadian nun and saint, founded the Congregation of Notre Dame of Montreal (d. 1700)
Marguerite Bourgeoys, C.N.D. (17 April 1620–12 January 1700), was a French nun and founder of the Congregation of Notre Dame of Montreal in the colony of New France, now part of Québec, Canada. Born in Troyes, she traveled to Fort Ville-Marie (now Montreal) by 1653. There she developed the convent and educated young girls, the poor, and children of First Nations until shortly before her death at the turn of the 18th century. She is also significant for developing one of the first uncloistered religious communities in the Catholic Church.[3] Declared “venerable” by the pope in 1878, she was canonized in 1982 and declared a saint by the Catholic Church.

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FYI

 
 
By Jennifer Flynn: Product with a Purpose: A Look at Product Management in the Newsroom
 
 
 
 
By Bradford Betz: Laguna Beach votes to keep American flag on police cars
 
 
 
 
By Ashley May: Girl molested by Catholic school teacher paid $8 million from Los Angeles archdiocese
 
 
 
 
By Ellie Bate: Shawn Mendes Wrote An Adorable Tribute To Taylor Swift For TIME’s “Most Influential People” Issue
 
 
 
 

By Elizabeth Cohen: Israeli flight attendant in coma after getting measles
 
 
 
 
By Christine Fisher: Christina Koch will set a record for longest spaceflight by a woman
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Hemp industry booms on CBD’s reputed health benefits, supported by users but not very much by science; Dee Davis: Rural residents, largely abandoned by major papers, vulnerable to partisan influence and ‘fake news’; What the Ag Census tells us about rural connectivity and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Laura Hazard Owen: With corgis, chickens, and kitchen reveals, the NYT Cooking Community Facebook group is a “happy corner of the internet”
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: How Digital Scans of Notre Dame Can Help Architects Rebuild the Burned Cathedral; A 16th Century “Database” of Every Book in the World Gets Unearthed: Discover the Libro de los Epítomes Assembled by Christopher Columbus’ Son; Animations Visualize the Evolution of London and New York: From Their Creation to the Present Day

 
 
 
 
By Tariq Tahir, Jon Rogers and Peter Allen: PRECIOUS SECONDS Notre Dame firefighters saved cathedral half an hour before collapse – after staff took 23 MINS to find blaze when alarm went off The rampaging inferno which destroyed the 850-year-old church’s Gothic roof and iconic spire was only found after the second fire alarm was sounded
 
 


 
 

 
 

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FYI April 16, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1457 BC – Likely date of the Battle of Megiddo between Thutmose III and a large Canaanite coalition under the King of Kadesh, the first battle to have been recorded in what is accepted as relatively reliable detail.
The Battle of Megiddo (15th century BC) was fought between Egyptian forces under the command of Pharaoh Thutmose III and a large rebellious coalition of Canaanite vassal states led by the king of Kadesh.[2] It is the first battle to have been recorded in what is accepted as relatively reliable detail. Megiddo is also the first recorded use of the composite bow and the first body count.[3] All details of the battle come from Egyptian sources—primarily the hieroglyphic writings on the Hall of Annals in the Temple of Amun-Re at Karnak, Thebes (now Luxor), by the military scribe Tjaneni.

The ancient Egyptian account gives the date of the battle as the 21st day of the first month of the third season, of Year 23 of the reign of Thutmose III. It has been claimed that this was April 16, 1457 BC according to the Middle Chronology, although other publications place the battle in 1482 BC or 1479 BC. The Battle of Megiddo was an Egyptian victory and resulted in a rout of the Canaanite forces, which fled to safety in the city of Megiddo. Their action resulted in the subsequent lengthy Siege of Megiddo.

By reestablishing Egyptian dominance in the Levant, Thutmose III began a reign in which the Egyptian Empire reached its greatest expanse.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1864 – Rose Talbot Bullard, American medical doctor and professor (d. 1915)
Rose Talbot Bullard (April 16, 1864 – December 22, 1915) was an American physician and medical school professor, who was elected president of the Los Angeles County Medical Association in 1902.

Early life

Rose Talbot (the surname is sometimes seen as “Talbott”) was born in Birmingham, Iowa in 1864. Her father was a physician. She earned her medical degree at the Women’s Hospital Medical College in Chicago, where she graduated at the top of her class in 1886. Her sister Lula Talbot Ellis was also a physician, and the first woman to graduate from the medical school at the University of Southern California in 1888.[1]

Career
Bullard moved to California in 1886 and soon was helping with a smallpox epidemic in Los Angeles. She shared a practice with Elizabeth Follansbee. She taught gynecology at the University of Southern California. She was one of the first officers of the YWCA of Los Angeles, when it formed in 1893.[2] She was elected president of the Los Angeles County Medical Association in 1902, the first woman to serve in that post (and the only woman to serve in that post until 1992).[3] She was also a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, one of only eight women elected to that status when the organization was founded in 1912. In her obstetric practice, she was among the first in Southern California to use spinal anesthesia.[4] When the American Medical Association established a Public Health Education Committee in 1909, Bullard was one of the ten physicians appointed to the committee, and the only one from Los Angeles.[5]

In her work with women patients, she advocated outdoor activity, especially bicycling, which she believed came with other benefits for women. “The bicycle has done more for the cause of legitimate dress reform than any other single agent,” she declared in 1895.[6]

“Men may talk and argue about women physicians, as such,” commented a medical journal editorial in 1903, “but no person ever comments unfavorably upon Dr. Bullard, either as a physician or a lady.”[7]

Personal life and legacy
Bullard married a fellow physician, ophthalmologist and anesthesiologist Frank Dearborn Bullard, in 1888. They had a daughter, Helen Talbot Bullard, who also became a physician. Bullard died suddenly in 1915, aged 51 years, from complications after a surgery to treat a dental infection.[8]

The Women Physicians Action Committee of the Los Angeles County Medical Association gives an annual Rose Talbot Bullard Award for a woman physician who is a “champion and trailblazer”.[9]

 
 

FYI

 
 
By David Crary: Jonathan Wolman, former Denver Post editorial page editor, dies at 68
 
 

By Christina Maxouris, CNN: Georgia Engel, who played Georgette on ‘The Mary Tyler Moore Show,’ has died

Georgia Bright Engel (July 28, 1948 – April 12, 2019) was an American actress. She is best known for having played Georgette Franklin Baxter in the successful sitcom The Mary Tyler Moore Show from 1972 to 1977 and Pat MacDougal on Everybody Loves Raymond from 2003 to 2005.[1][2] During her career, Engel received five Primetime Emmy Award nominations.

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By Janelle Griffith: Man sues parents for ‘destroying’ his valuable porn collection
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: A 3,600-year-old disc is considered to be the oldest representation of the cosmos; Monarch Migration and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The global diversity of french fry dips is a window into the way we eat today; Sabr vs. Sabra; Doodle Soup; Doughnut Sausages and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: Liquid Blood Extracted From 42,000-Year-Old Foal Found Frozen in Siberia; The Quest for the Most Elusive Material in Physics; Winters Are Only Going to Get Worse, So Researchers Invented a Way to Generate Electricity from Snowfall and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Sam Barsanti: Aretha Franklin wins posthumous Pulitzer
 
 
 
 
By Joey Garrison: DC synagogue accused in lawsuit of enabling ‘systemic and regular’ sexual abuse at preschool
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: A Virtual Time-Lapse Recreation of the Building of Notre Dame (1160) and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Merrit Kennedy: Dog Saved By Workers On Oil Rig, 135 Miles Off Thai Coast
 
 
The Rural Blog: USDA to start taking applications for $600 million rural broadband loan/grant pilot program on April 23; Rural Americans more likely to die prematurely (before 75); rural blacks and Native Americans’ lives are the shortest; Pulitzers announced; here are some with rural resonance and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: On Creating Bookshelves for an All-Digital Public Library; Librarians; What’s in a Name? Authors on Choosing Names for Their Characters; Mondegreens,Malapropisms and Eggcorns; Little Red Riding Hood Too Sexist for School; Notre Dame
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Michael’s Test Kitchen: Peanut Butter Filled Chocolate Cupcakes


 
 

 
 

FYI April 15, 2019

On This Day

 
 

1632 – Battle of Rain: Swedes under Gustavus Adolphus defeat the Holy Roman Empire during the Thirty Years’ War.
The Battle of Rain (also called the Battle of the River Lech or Battle of Lech) was fought on 15 April 1632 as part of the Thirty Years’ War.

The forces involved in this conflict were 40,000 Swedish troops under Gustavus Adolphus and 25,000 Catholic League troops under Johan Tserclaes, Count of Tilly. It was the second meeting between the two legendary generals (see First Breitenfeld when Tilly received the first setback of his long and storied career) and like at Breitenfeld, Tilly lost when Gustavus forced the river Lech under the cover of his superb artillery.

Battle
Gustavus had a bridge of boats constructed across the Lech near the city of Rain through the night prior to the battle, and in the morning sent three hundred Finnish Hackapelite troops across the river under fire. The Hackapelites dug earthworks for batteries which then protected the rest of Gustavus’ army as they crossed the river.

As soon as his army had crossed the river, Gustavus immediately and successfully stormed the hill. Tilly was shot in the leg early in the battle and was moved to the rear; his second in command, Johann von Aldringen, was knocked unconscious with a skull fracture minutes later. Maximilian I, Elector of Bavaria, ordered an immediate retreat to save the now leaderless army, leaving most of the Catholic League’s baggage and artillery in the field. The army itself may only have escaped destruction due to a storm and high winds blocking roads in the night that followed.[1]

Aftermath
The immediate result of the battle was that Bavaria lay open for occupation by the Swedish army, enabling Gustavus Adolphus to temporarily threaten the Austrian heartland.

The death of Tilly also led to the recall of Albrecht von Wallenstein into Imperial service. He would raise a new army and challenge the Swedes at Nürnberg in August.

Tactics
The battle is, however, more interesting from a tactical point of view rather than from its outcome, as the elaborate plan of Gustavus Adolphus to catch the entire Imperial army by complex maneuvering was prevented when Tilly was mortally wounded in the battle, resulting in the early retreat of the Imperial army. The Swedish battle plan consisted of two major elements:

1. A strong feint attack by a portion of the Swedish infantry with heavy artillery support against Tilly’s strongly fortified center behind the Lech. The intended effect was to attract the full attention of the Imperial army and its reserve. The Swedish force succeeded in establishing and fortifying its position on a small island or peninsula close to the Imperial side of the river. From this position, it was able to repel a series of fierce Imperial counterattacks despite being outnumbered.

2. As the Imperial army got tied up in desperate attempts to eliminate the Swedish bridgehead, the Swedish cavalry with no opposition or attention from the enemy was able to cross the river 10 km south of the Imperial left wing. From this position they intended to outflank the entire Imperial army and thus catch it in a position with the river and the Swedish infantry at its front and the Swedish cavalry in its rear and on its flanks.

With Tilly mortally wounded, the morale of the Imperial army quickly dissolved and the army withdrew before the arrival of the Swedish cavalry. Thus, Tilly’s death possibly saved his army from annihilation. Nonetheless, both armies suffered considerable losses (3,000 on the Imperial side, 2,000 on the Swedish), mostly due to frontal attacks and counterattacks against fortified positions with strong natural defenses.

The battle of Lech proves more than the Battle of Breitenfeld the innovation of Gustavus Adolphus’ tactical imagination. His daring frontal attack in combination with the deployment of a large part of his army for the flanking movement has similarities with the tactics of John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough at the Blenheim battlefield, (situated in the very neighborhood of Rain) or of Frederick the Great at Leuthen. The disciple of Gustavus Adolphus, Johan Banér, also employed a similar battle plan four years later in the battle of Wittstock.

See also
Rain order of battle

 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1892 – Corrie ten Boom, Dutch-American clocksmith, Nazi resister, and author (d. 1983)
Cornelia Arnolda Johanna “Corrie” ten Boom (15 April 1892 – 15 April 1983) was a Dutch watchmaker and later a writer who worked with her father Casper ten Boom, her sister Betsie ten Boom and other family members to help many Jews escape the Nazi Holocaust during World War II by hiding them in her home. They were caught and she was arrested and sent to Ravensbrück concentration camp. Her most famous book, The Hiding Place, is a biography that recounts the story of her family’s efforts and how ten Boom found hope while imprisoned at the concentration camp.

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FYI

 
 

By Variety Staff: Bibi Andersson, ‘Persona,’ ‘The Seventh Seal’ Actress, Dies at 83

Berit Elisabeth Andersson (11 November 1935 – 14 April 2019),[1] known professionally as Bibi Andersson (Swedish: [²bɪbːɪ ²anːdɛˌʂɔn]), was a Swedish actress who was best known for her frequent collaborations with the filmmaker Ingmar Bergman.

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Gizmodo Science: Utility Workers in England Stumble Upon Grisly Graves of 26 Iron Age Skeletons and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Brendan Hesse: How to Run Diagnostics Tests on Your Smartphone
 
 
 
 
By C. Brandon Ogbunu and Ben Odell: After Jackie Robinson Bent Baseball’s Color Barrier, Two Journeymen Broke It For Good
 
 
 
 
BBC News: China turtle death: One of last four known Yangtze giant softshells dies
 
 
 
 
Jane Onyanga-Omara, USA TODAY: New Zealand mosque shootings: Six in court on charges they sent attack images
 
 
 
 
Rocky Parker Blog Profiles: Esports Blogs
 
 
 
 
Dan Harbeke Head of External Affairs, Google Iowa: How we’re supporting economic opportunity in Iowa
 
 
 
 
Aude Gandon Global Brand Director, Google Play: Want to Change the Game? Design your own with Google Play
 
 
 
 
By Rhitu Chatterjee: Teen Dating Violence Can Lead To Homicide — And Girls Are The Most Common Victims
And there are hotlines specifically for teens facing intimate partner violence, such as the National Teen Dating Abuse helpline, adds Bair-Merritt. Teenagers can call 1-866-331-9474 or text LOVEIS to 22522 and be connected with a professional trained to gauge whether they are in immediate danger, how scared they are feeling, whether they or their partner have access to firearms and to help individuals get out of unsafe situations. Teenagers can also chat with someone for help at loveisrespect.org.
 
 
 
 
Glacier Hub Newsletter 04-15-19: For nearly 10 years, Jón Stefánsson’s grade-seven students have used GPS devices to track the disappearance of their local glacier in Iceland. More ->
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Asian-carp processing industry booms in Western Ky., which will get nation’s first industrial park for that purpose; Syphilis spreading in rural U.S. because of intravenous drug use, stigma, lack of funding, and other factors; Trump announces airwave auction to speed 5G network rollout and program to increase rural broadband access and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Should Literature Be Political? A Glimpse into Sartre by The Partially Examined Life; Salvador Dalí’s Illustrations for The Bible (1963); The Charlie Chaplin Archive Opens, Putting Online 30,000 Photos & Documents from the Life of the Iconic Film Star; How to Take a Picture of a Black Hole: Watch the 2017 Ted Talk by Katie Bouman, the MIT Grad Student Who Helped Take the Groundbreaking Photo and more ->
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCCXLVIII): Unearthing the 1929 Julian Price House; A Real-life Rapunzel Tower; A whole Subreddit forum Dedicated to Castle P0rn; The Lilliput Pocket Omnibus, 1937; The bacteria on the typical hand and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: Four “Killer” Ideas to Get Rid of Weeds Forever
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 12 Container Garden Ideas to Kick Off Spring Great way to start the Gardening Season
 
 
Laura Kennedy Hometalker Canada: Cement Pots for a Windowsill Herb Garden
 
 
Holly Lengner – Lost Mom Tutorial Team Longmont, CO: Flower Wall Hanging
 
 


 
 

 
 

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FYI April 14, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1900 – The Exposition Universelle begins.
The Exposition Universelle of 1900, better known in English as the 1900 Paris Exposition, was a world’s fair held in Paris, France, from 14 April to 12 November 1900, to celebrate the achievements of the past century and to accelerate development into the next. The style that was universally present in the Exposition was Art Nouveau. The fair, visited by nearly 50 million, displayed many machines, inventions, and architecture that are now nearly universally known, including the Grande Roue de Paris Ferris wheel, Russian nesting dolls, diesel engines, talking films, escalators, and the telegraphone (the first magnetic audio recorder).

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Born On This Day

 
 
1678 – Abraham Darby I, English iron master (d. 1717)
Abraham Darby, in his later life called Abraham Darby the Elder, now sometimes known for convenience as Abraham Darby I (14 April 1678 – 8 March 1717) was the first and best known of several men of that name. Born into an English Quaker family that played an important role in the Industrial Revolution, Darby developed a method of producing pig iron in a blast furnace fuelled by coke rather than charcoal. This was a major step forward in the production of iron as a raw material for the Industrial Revolution.

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FYI

 
 
Gary Price Info Docket: Reference: Backgrounder: “Hate Speech on Social Media: Global Comparisons”; National Library of Spain (BNE) Releases Digital Collection of Circus Photographs; Digital Privacy: “Google’s Sensorvault is a Boon for Law Enforcement. This Is How It Works” and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Fortunato Salazar: Spanish Bullfighting Finds a New Home in South Texas
Why you should care
As restrictions on bullfighting emerge around the world, Southern Texas is becoming a magnet for international fighters.

It was the first time in 75 years that the popular 11-day Rio Grande Valley Livestock Show had booked a bullfight. That milestone and the event’s scale — a festival bullfight attended by several thousand fans, and featuring four international bullfighters — exemplify the recent rise in popularity, in deep South Texas, of traditional Mexican bullfighting adapted to north-of-the-border norms by omitting the usual finale in which the bull is killed.
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: The Golden Age of Youtube Is Over
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Nobel-Winning Physicist Wolfgang Pauli on Science, Spirit, and Our Search for Meaning; How Eleanor Roosevelt Revolutionized Politics
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The scrapbooking lawman who documented 19th-century Colorado; Boy Scout Catfish and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Before the Easy-Bake Oven, toy stoves were beautiful and deadly; Curry History and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Associated Press: Large bird attacks and kills its fallen owner in Florida The San Diego Zoo calls cassowaries the world’s most dangerous bird with a four-inch, dagger-like claw on each foot.
 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

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FYI April 13, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1919 – Eugene V. Debs is imprisoned at the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary in Atlanta, Georgia, for speaking out against the draft during World War I.
Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American socialist, political activist, trade unionist, one of the founding members of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and five times the candidate of the Socialist Party of America for President of the United States.[1] Through his presidential candidacies as well as his work with labor movements, Debs eventually became one of the best-known socialists living in the United States.

Early in his political career, Debs was a member of the Democratic Party. He was elected as a Democrat to the Indiana General Assembly in 1884. After working with several smaller unions, including the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, Debs was instrumental in the founding of the American Railway Union (ARU), one of the nation’s first industrial unions. After workers at the Pullman Palace Car Company organized a wildcat strike over pay cuts in the summer of 1894, Debs signed many into the ARU. He called a boycott of the ARU against handling trains with Pullman cars in what became the nationwide Pullman Strike, affecting most lines west of Detroit and more than 250,000 workers in 27 states. Purportedly to keep the mail running, President Grover Cleveland used the United States Army to break the strike. As a leader of the ARU, Debs was convicted of federal charges for defying a court injunction against the strike and served six months in prison.

In prison, Debs read various works of socialist theory and emerged six months later as a committed adherent of the international socialist movement. Debs was a founding member of the Social Democracy of America (1897), the Social Democratic Party of America (1898) and the Socialist Party of America (1901). Debs ran as a Socialist candidate for President of the United States five times, including 1900 (earning 0.6% of the popular vote), 1904 (3.0%), 1908 (2.8%), 1912 (6.0%) and 1920 (3.4%), the last time from a prison cell. He was also a candidate for United States Congress from his native state Indiana in 1916.

Debs was noted for his oratory and his speech denouncing American participation in World War I led to his second arrest in 1918. He was convicted under the Sedition Act of 1918 and sentenced to a term of 10 years. President Warren G. Harding commuted his sentence in December 1921. Debs died in 1926, not long after being admitted to a sanatorium due to cardiovascular problems that developed during his time in prison. He has since been cited as the inspiration for numerous politicians.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1854 – Lucy Craft Laney, Founder of the Haines Normal and Industrial School, Augusta, Georgia (d. 1933)[1]
Lucy Craft Laney (April 13, 1854 – October 24, 1933)[1] was an early African-American educator who in 1883 founded the first school for black children in Augusta, Georgia. She was principal of the Haines Institute for Industrial and Normal Education for 50 years. Laney was selected by Governor Jimmy Carter in 1974 to be one of the first African Americans to have their portraits hung in the Georgia State Capitol.

Early life
Lucy Craft Laney was born on April 13, 1854, in Macon, Georgia, 11 years before the end of slavery, which was outlawed at the end of the Civil War. She was the seventh of 10 children born to Louisa and David Laney, who were both former slaves; her father had saved enough money to buy his freedom and that of his wife about 20 years before Lucy’s birth.[1] Both her parents were strong believers in education and were very giving to strangers; this upbringing would strongly influence Laney in her life. At the time of her birth it was illegal for blacks to read; however with the assistance of Ms. Campbell, the slave owner’s sister, Lucy learned to read at the age of four. She attended Lewis (later Ballard) High School in Macon, Georgia, a mission school run by the American Missionary Association. In 1869 she entered the first class of Atlanta University (later Clark Atlanta University), where she prepared to be a teacher.[2] She graduated from the school’s teacher training program (the Normal Department) in 1873.[1]

Teaching career
Laney worked as a teacher in Macon, Milledgeville and Savannah, Georgia for ten years before deciding to open a school of her own.[3] Due to health reasons, she settled in Augusta, Georgia, and founded the first school for black children. Her first class in 1883 was six children but Laney attracted interest in the community and by the end of the second year the school had 234 students.

With the increase in students, she needed more funding for her operation. She attended the northern Presbyterian Church Convention in 1886 in Minneapolis and pleaded her case there, but was turned down initially. One of the attendees, Francine E. H. Haines, later declared an interest in and donated $10,000 to Laney for the school. With this money, Laney expanded her offerings. She changed the school’s name to The Haines Normal and Industrial Institute in honor of her benefactor and to indicate its goals of industrial and teacher training.

The school eventually grew to encompass an entire city block of buildings. By 1928, the school’s enrollment was more than 800 students.[3]

Laney also opened the first black kindergarten and the first black nursing school in Augusta.
NAACP and other organizations

While living in Augusta, Laney helped to found the local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1918. She was also active in other organizations to promote the welfare of blacks and black women: the Interracial Commission, the National Association of Colored Women, and the Niagara Movement. She also helped to integrate the community work that the YMCA and YWCA were engaged in.[1]

Recognition
In 1974 then Governor Jimmy Carter hung the first portraits of African Americans in the Georgia state capitol: Lucy Craft Laney, the Reverend Henry McNeal Turner, and the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. In 1992 she was inducted into “Georgia Women of Achievement.”[1]

Death and legacy
Laney died on October 24, 1933, and is buried at the corner of Laney Walker Boulevard and Phillips Street, where she first founded the Haines Normal and Industrial Institute. Now, Lucy Craft Laney Comprehensive High School occupies the space, though her grave and memorial remain undisturbed.[3][4][5]

Lucy Laney Elementary School in Harris County was named for her.[6] Lucy Craft Laney High School is also named for her. Additionally, Lucy Craft Laney Community School is a Minneapolis Public School serving PK-5th grade students in North Minneapolis named for her.

 
 

FYI

 
 

Romus Valton Burgin (August 13, 1922 – April 6, 2019)[1] was an American author and United States Marine.

Early life and family
Burgin was born to Joseph Harmon Burgin and Beulah May (née Perry) Burgin in Jewett, Texas.[1][2] Burgin’s younger brother, Joseph (“Joe” or “J.D.”) Delton (March 24, 1926 – February 17, 1945) joined the United States Army, after changing his year of birth from 1926 to 1925, and was sent to Europe,[3][4] as a member of Company “C”, 274th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division (“Trailblazers”).[5][6] Joseph died in Alsace-Lorraine on February 17, 1945 when he was killed by artillery fire near the river Saar and the town of Forbach, as they moved east toward Saarbrücken on the other side of the river, as part of a push against the Siegfried Line.[3][7][8] He is buried at the Sardis Cemetery next to his parents.[9]

Military career
Burgin joined the United States Marine Corps on November 13, 1942, during World War II and was assigned to the 9th Replacement Battalion. He soon became a mortarman in K-Company, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division (K-3-5),[1] and fought in the Pacific War at Cape Gloucester,[1] then alongside his friend, Eugene Sledge,[1] on Peleliu,[1] and Okinawa.[10][11] Burgin was promoted to the rank of sergeant upon reaching Okinawa.[3][12]

Burgin was the author of the memoir Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific (with William Marvel).[1][13] He was awarded a Bronze Star for his actions in the Battle of Okinawa on 2 May 1945, when he destroyed a Japanese machine gun emplacement that had his company pinned down.[10] He also was going to be awarded a Silver Star by Captain Andrew “Ack-Ack” Haldane for taking out a pillbox on Peleliu, but Haldane was killed by sniper fire before he could submit it.[1]

Personal life
After the war he went to work for the United States Post Office.[3] While in Melbourne, Burgin met an Australian woman, named Florence Risely. They married in Dallas on January 29, 1947.[3][14] The couple had four daughters.[15][12] Burgin is portrayed in the HBO miniseries The Pacific by Martin McCann.[10][11] Burgin himself appears in documentary footage during the miniseries.[15] He died on April 6, 2019 at the age of 96 in Lancaster, Texas.[16]

Bibliography
Burgin, R.V. & Marvel, William “Bill” (2010). Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific. Penguin. ISBN 978-0-451-22990-8.

The official website of WWII Marine R.V. Burgin

 
 
 
 
By Tercius: Buy Committee: Should I Buy a Wi-Fi Security Camera or Video Doorbell?
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Meet the Wild Creatures That Roamed Ancient Texas
 
 
 
 
Just A Car Guy: few things are as admirable as innovation overcoming a problem, and using whats available, in the most simple way, to get the job done…. like when a bridge washes out, but people have NO other way to get across except helicopter (time to install a zip line, people!!!)
 
 
Just A Car Guy: Update! The news released this moments after the next post after this… Incredible local volunteer threatened with jail if he continues to use a dump truck to help people cross the Waiho River! Fucking govt can’t take it!
 
 
Just A Car Guy: Lucius D Copeland of Phoenix, Arizona, US was issued with a United States patent for his steam-powered bicycle and is sometimes classed as an early motorcycle.
 
 
Just A Car Guy: Back in 1973, Rex and Kay Hatton were newlyweds, with a 69 Stingray 4 spd Corvette when someone stole it. Great news, it’s been found, and returned to them in time to restore it for their 50th anniversary
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: The Alton Transportation Company Mega Bus
 
 
 
 
By Yaron Steinbuch: Buzz Aldrin offers condolences after Israel’s failed moon landing
 
 
 
 
By Harry Mccracken: These are Amazon’s 38 rules for success
 
 
By JR Raphael: 26 incredibly useful things you didn’t know Google Calendar could do
 
 
By Katherine Schwab: See 11 dogs rocking fabulous cones of shame
 
 
 
 
By Thom Patterson: The world’s largest plane just flew for the first time
 
 
 
 
Limecello: 10 Tenacious Questions with Lorelei James (In Which Lorelei Interviews Herself)
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Mty Recipe Treasures: Gooey Cinnamon Biscuits; Tasty Meat Pie; Easter Treats see below ->

Cupcakes

Caramel Corn

Fudge Ribbon Cake

Easy Energy Bites


 
 

 
 

FYI April 12, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1955 – The polio vaccine, developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, is declared safe and effective.
Polio vaccines are vaccines used to prevent poliomyelitis (polio).[1] Two types are used: an inactivated poliovirus given by injection (IPV) and a weakened poliovirus given by mouth (OPV).[1] The World Health Organization recommends all children be fully vaccinated against polio.[1] The two vaccines have eliminated polio from most of the world,[2][3] and reduced the number of cases reported each year from an estimated 350,000 in 1988 to 33 in 2018.[4][5]

The inactivated polio vaccines are very safe.[1] Mild redness or pain may occur at the site of injection.[1] Oral polio vaccines cause about three cases of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis per million doses given.[1] This compares with 5,000 cases per million who are paralysed following a polio infection.[6] Both are generally safe to give during pregnancy and in those who have HIV/AIDS but are otherwise well.[1]

The first polio vaccine was the inactivated polio vaccine.[1] It was developed by Jonas Salk and came into use in 1955.[1][7] The oral polio vaccine was developed by Albert Sabin and came into commercial use in 1961.[1][8] They are on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[9] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$0.25 per dose for the oral form as of 2014.[10] In the United States, it costs between $25 and $50 for the inactivated form.[11]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1883 – Imogen Cunningham, American photographer and educator (d. 1976)
Imogen Cunningham (/ˈkʌnɪŋəm/; April 12, 1883 – June 23, 1976) was an American photographer known for her botanical photography, nudes, and industrial landscapes. Cunningham was a member of the California-based Group f/64, known for its dedication to the sharp-focus rendition of simple subjects.[1]

Read more ->
 
 

FYI

 
 
Vector’s World: Aloha Friday and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Emily Alford: Ashley Judd On Georgia’s Abortion Ban: ‘I Would’ve Had to Co-Parent With My Rapist’
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Blackstock: Here’s a Video That Explains The Difference Between a Dual Clutch and a Sequential Manual Gearbox
 
 
 
 
By Dell Cameron: Lawmakers Demand Social Network Execs Reveal What They Spend to Fight Terrorism
 
 
 
 
By Andrew Liszewski: Skype’s Latest Feature Will Help You Show Your Parents How to Use Their New Phone
 
 
 
 
By David Murphy: How Do I Leech My Neighbor’s Wifi Connection?
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: 400-Year-Old Sacrificed Guinea Pigs Wearing Colorful Earrings and Necklaces Discovered in Peru; Gravitational Wave Detectors Spot Two Potential Black Hole Collisions in a Weekand and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Joe Palca: A Math Teacher’s Life Summed Up By The Gifted Students He Mentored
 
 
 
 
Library Journal: Page To Screen, Apr. 12, 2019 | Book Pulse

 
 
 
 
Webneel: Lost in Thought – Beautiful Paper Sculpture and artworks by Eiko Ojala
 
 
 
 

By Harry McCracken: Meet the woman behind Amazon’s explosive growth
 
 
 
 
Gary Price Info Docket: Louisiana State University (LSU) to Launch New Online-Only Digital Studies Minor; Germany: Bonn Library Recovers 600 Books Missing Since the Second World War and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Jon Brodkin: Ajit Pai proposes $20 billion for “up to” gigabit-speed rural broadband
At $2 billion a year over ten years, the fund will provide more money each year over a longer period of time than the CAF program it would replace. It will also fund higher-speed services. The CAF funding only required carriers, including AT&T and CenturyLink, to deploy broadband with speeds of at least 10Mbps downstream and 1Mbps upstream.

In November 2018, Pai said he’s proposing to raise the standard for subsidized deployments from 10Mbps/1Mbps to 25Mbps/3Mbps. But the program announced today will also try to go beyond the 25Mbps/3Mbps minimum. In an email to reporters, Pai’s office said the Rural Digital Opportunity Fund will “provide up to gigabit-speed broadband in the parts of the country most in need of connectivity.”
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Congress leaves for break without approving disaster aid; Ag Census shows shows farms consolidating and farmers getting older and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

FRESHCUTKY Hometalker Hueysville, KY: Easy to Grow NO DIG Potatoes in the Vegetable Garden!
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

A Taste of Alaska: Brownie Bark for the Road
 
 
By Creative Mom CZ: Cottage Cheese and Black Currant Pie
 
 
Little Big House Alaska: Ciabatta Bread


 
 

 
 

FYI April 11, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1881 – Spelman College is founded in Atlanta, Georgia as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary, an institute of higher education for African-American women.
Spelman College is a private, liberal arts, women’s college in Atlanta, Georgia. The college is part of the Atlanta University Center academic consortium in Atlanta.[2] Founded in 1881 as the Atlanta Baptist Female Seminary, Spelman was the fourth historically black female institution of higher education to receive its collegiate charter in 1924. (Two schools were strictly seminaries and one was originally coeducational.) Therefore, Spelman College is America’s oldest private historically black liberal arts college for women.[2]

Spelman is ranked among the nation’s top liberal arts colleges and #1 among historically black colleges in the United States by U.S. News & World Report. The college is also ranked among the top 50 four-year colleges and universities for producing Fulbright and Truman Scholars, and was ranked the second largest producer of African-American college graduates who attend medical school. Spelman ranks #1 among baccalaureate origin institutions of African-American women who earned science, engineering, and mathematics doctoral degrees.[7][8] Forbes ranks Spelman among the nation’s top ten women’s colleges. The Princeton Review ranks Spelman among the Best 373 Colleges and Universities in America.[9][10]

Spelman is the alma mater of thousands of notable African descendant women including the first African-American COO of Starbucks and CEO of Sam’s Club Rosalind Brewer, Pulitzer Prize winner Alice Walker, former Dean of Harvard College Evelynn M. Hammonds, activist and Children’s Defense Fund founder Marian Wright Edelman, musician, activist & historian Bernice Johnson Reagon (who also founded Sweet Honey in the Rock), political activist Stacy Abrams, writer Pearl Cleage, TV personality Rolanda Watts, Opera star Mattiwilda Dobbs, actresses Cassi Davis, LaTanya Richardson, Adrienne-Joi Johnson, and Keshia Knight Pulliam, and many other luminaries in the arts, education, sciences, business, and the armed forces.

In 2013, Spelman College decided to drop varsity athletics and leave the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Using money originally budgeted to the sports programs, they created wellness programs available for all students.[11]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1864 – Johanna Elberskirchen, German author and activist (d. 1943)
Johanna Elberskirchen (11 April 1864 in Bonn – 17 May 1943 in Rüdersdorf) was a feminist writer and activist for the rights of women, gays and lesbians as well as blue-collar workers. She published books on women’s sexuality and health among other topics.[1] Her last known public appearance was in 1930 in Vienna, where she gave a talk at a conference organised by the World League for Sexual Reform. She was open about her own homosexuality which made her a somewhat exceptional figure in the feminist movement of her time. Her career as an activist was ended in 1933, when the Nazi Party rose to power. There is no public record of a funeral but witnesses report that Elberskirchen’s urn was secretly put into Hildegard Moniac’s grave, who had been her life partner.[2]

Quotes
Based on the assumption that women’s libido only exists in order to secure the creation of offspring and is therefore fundamentally different from men’s libido, Elberskirchen argued that: “If it was the yearning for a child, there would be no abortion, no infanticide, no suicide. In that case the awful punitive articles wouldn’t exist. And first and foremost the outrageous, immoral contempt of an unmarried mother and her child wouldn’t exist – there would be no ‘fallen’ women, no ‘bastards’.[3]

Read more ->
 
 

FYI

 
 
Times Union: Writer, musician Greg Haymes dies
 
 
 
 
She gave him the wrong medication and he died. What is the question?
By Mara Gordon: When A Nurse Is Prosecuted For A Fatal Medical Mistake, Does It Make Medicine Safer?
The report details how Vaught mistakenly took the wrong medicine out of a dispensing cabinet.

She was trying to give the patient, Charlene Murphey, a dose of an anti-anxiety medication, midazolam (brand name Versed), before an imaging scan during a December 2017 hospital stay, the report states. Vaught instead gave Murphey vecuronium, a paralytic drug used during anesthesia that had the same first two letters, according to the report. Murphey died in an intensive care unit the following day.

The Nashville District Attorney’s office told the Tennessean it made the decision to bring criminal charges against Vaught specifically because she administered the fatal medication after overriding the safety mechanism in the dispensing machine.

Medical errors are common. Some researchers estimate they’re the third leading cause of death in the United States. And many in the patient safety community say they don’t understand what prompted the DA’s office to prosecute this case in particular.
 
 
 
 
By Megan Henney: The National Enquirer is up for sale after Jeff Bezos scandal
 
 
 
 
By Dan Charles NPR: As weeds outsmart the latest weedkillers, farmers are running out of options
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: As Old as Adam; Spotify Ad Draws Criticism over How It (Under)Pays Musicians; I Don’t Want to Really Scare You; Books Heard ‘Round the World: a New Survey of International Audiobook Markets; Library Extension Turns Amazon.Com into a Branch of Your Local Library; A Reader’s Guide to Planes, Trains, & Automobiles; When Their Trademarks Are Used, the Hells Angels Resort Not to Violence but to High-Profile Lawsuits
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Trump executive orders increase presidential power, target states’ power to stop oil and gas pipeline projects; Medicare expands telehealth coverage for seniors and more ->
 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: For Sale: Story, Indiana; Wool Dog Blanket; Hot Pink ‘Pagodas’ and more ->
 
 

Atlas Obscura: You can buy an abandoned, decaying fort on a private island; Car Sausages; Clifton Cliff Jail and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Economics 101: Hedge Fund Investor Ray Dalio Explains How the Economy Works in a 30-Minute Animated Video; See the Oldest Printed Advertisement in English: An Ad for a Book from 1476; The Devilish History of the 1980s Parental Advisory Sticker: When Heavy Metal & Satanic Lyrics Collided with the Religious Right and more ->
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI April 10, 2019

On This Day

 
 
1500 – Ludovico Sforza is captured by Swiss troops at Novara and is handed over to the French.
Ludovico Maria Sforza (also known as Ludovico il Moro;[1] 27 July 1452 – 27 May 1508), was Duke of Milan from 1494, following the death of his nephew Gian Galeazzo Sforza, until 1499. A member of the Sforza family, he was the fourth son of Francesco I Sforza. He was famed as a patron of Leonardo da Vinci and other artists, and presided over the final and most productive stage of the Milanese Renaissance. He is probably best known as the man who commissioned The Last Supper.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1903 – Clare Turlay Newberry, American author and illustrator (d. 1970)
Clare Turlay Newberry (April 10, 1903 – February 12, 1970)[1] was an American author and illustrator of 17 published children’s books, who achieved fame for her drawings of cats, the subject of all but three of her books.[1] Four of her works were named Caldecott Honor Books.

Born in Enterprise, Oregon, she began drawing cats at the age of two and sold her first illustrations, a series of paper dolls, to the children’s magazine John Martin’s Book at age 16.[2] She spent a year at the University of Oregon (1921–1922), then studied art at the School of the Portland Art Museum (1922–23) and the California School of Fine Arts (1923–24), but never finished her academic art training.[2][3]

In 1930 she went to Paris to study at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière. The next year, in order to earn enough for passage to return to the US, she illustrated a story she had written before leaving for Paris, about a little girl named Sally who got a lion for her birthday. It was published as her first book, Herbert the Lion, to acclaim.[3] The New York Times praised it as “refreshingly imaginative” and “full of high spirited nonsense”.[4]

She had hoped to become a portrait painter, but she abandoned this in 1934 for cat illustration. Her next book, Mittens, was the story of a six-year-old boy who posts an ad for his lost kitten. It became a bestseller and was named one of the Fifty Books of the Year by the American Institute of Graphic Arts.[3] Her four Caldecott Honor Books were Barkis, about a sister jealous of a brother’s new puppy, Marshmallow, about the relationship between a cat and a baby rabbit, April’s Kittens, about a family with an extra kitten in an apartment that permits only one cat, and T-Bone the Babysitter, about a cat with spring fever.[3] Her book Smudge was also one of the AIGA Fifty Books of the Year.[1]

With the exception of Herbert the Lion and Lambert’s Bargain, about the birthday gift of a hyena, Newberry’s subjects were all drawn from life.[2][3] In 1946, she purchased a month-old ocelot named Joseph for $500 from a sailor who brought it from Venezuela. The New York Times reported the news with the headline “Still A Lot For Ocelot”.[5] After using the ocelot, now dubbed Rufus, as a live drawing model, Newberry offered to give the ocelot away to a good home, but unfortunately Rufus died, possibly from a disease acquired from one of his many visitors or prospective owners.[6][

 
 

FYI

 
 

By Reuters: Boeing shareholders file class-action lawsuit over 737 Max plane crashes The Chicago-based company faces many other lawsuits over the crashes, including from victims’ families and participants in its employee retirement plans.
 
 
 
 
Carol at Make a Living Writing, Evan Jensen: Monster List of Markets: 135 Places to Find Freelance Writing Jobs
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Extraordinary 500-Year-Old Library Catalogue Reveals Books Lost to Time; Cats Recognize Their Own Names—Even if They Choose to Ignore Them and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Erik Ortiz: Residents in Vallejo, California, demand change after fatal police shootings A fatal shooting in February was the 16th death involving police in the Bay Area city since 2011. Residents and activists say there’s a pattern of questionable police conduct.
 
 
 
 
Sundar Pichai CEO: With Goodwill, we’re helping more Americans learn digital skills
 
 
 
 
By Todd Haselton: A toddler locked his father’s iPad for 48 years, here’s what to do if that happens to you
 
 
 
 
By Minyvonne Burke: Wrongful death lawsuit against Michelle Carter who encouraged boyfriend’s suicide is dismissed Lynn Roy filed a $4.2 million wrongful death lawsuit against Carter, who was convicted of involuntary manslaughter for encouraging Conrad H. Roy III to kill himself.
An attorney for Carter, 22, had asked Moniz to keep her free as they attempted to have the case heard by the U.S. Supreme Court. The state’s high court, however, upheld the conviction during a February ruling and ordered her to start her sentence immediately.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, text TALK to 741741 or visit SpeakingOfSuicide.com/resources for additional resources.
 
 
 
 
By Marshall Honorof: Amazon Kindle (2019) Review: A Good Budget E-Reader with One Big Problem
 
 
By Richard Lawler: The Morning After: Amazon’s illuminated new Kindle
 
 
 
 
By David Smith: The Nation: oldest weekly magazine in the US names new editor
 
 
 
 
By John Dixon: Lee’s Summit man finally charged in laser pointer incident during Chiefs-Patriots game 45 comments The identity of the person banned from Arrowhead for life last February is finally known
 
 
 
 
By Elisha Fieldstadt: Oregon deputies with ‘guns drawn’ respond to report of intruder to find … a Roomba vacuum
 
 
 
 
Update the law?
Marina Pitofsky, USA TODAY: North Carolina man will not be prosecuted for abandoning his pet fish
 
 
 
 
By Henrik Edberg: 21 Small Ways to Make Life Simpler
 
 
 
 
OZY PRESIDENTIAL BRIEF: Facebook Will Allow Dead People’s Accounts to Live On; The Rise of ‘Purpose Education’: A Recipe for Fulfillment … or Snowflakes? More ->
 
 
 
 

News Science: For the first time, you can see what a black hole looks like; New species of ancient human unearthed in the Philippines; First Cherokee cave inscriptions commemorate ancient lacrosselike game and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Claire Atkinson: Former CBS News correspondent Lara Logan adds to Sinclair Broadcasting’s national ambitions
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Thousands of U.S. bridges need repair; look up local data; Penn. town tries rare lawsuit to oust supervisor who hasn’t been to a town meeting in over a year; 2017 Census of Agriculture to be released April 11 and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Arkansas Black apples seem straight out of a dark fairy tale; 21 Rare Skills; Basque Hotels and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The Egyptian egg ovens considered more wondrous than the pyramids; Bigwala Instruments and more ->
 
 
Open Culture: A Brief History of IDEO: A Short Documentary Takes You Inside the Design Firm That Changed the Way We Think about Design; New Augmented Reality App Celebrates Stories of Women Typically Omitted from U.S. History Textbooks and Nick Cave Creates a List of His Top 10 Love Songs

Ideas

Cari at Everything Pretty: DIY Hanging Air Freshener With Essential Oils
 
 
By Brooklyntonia: Faux Stained Glass Mickey Ears
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

For National Cake Day, try this ‘Matilda’-inspired chocolate cake
 
 
By In the Kitchen With Matt: Homemade Twinkies
 
 
By Auroris: Homemade Flavoured Butters