Category: FYI

FYI

FYI December 15, 2018


On This Day

1851 – The Monster Meeting, Australia was an organised protest by approximately 10,000 to 15,000 diggers at the Shepherd’s Hut, Forest Creek.  The Forest Creek Monster Meeting was an organised protest at Forest Creek in Victoria, Australia against the increase in Miner’s Licence fee planned by the colonial government of Victoria. Although it was one of several similar protests held around the colony, it is notable as the largest known mass rally held during the Australian gold rushesRead more ->

Born On This Day

1909 – Eliza Atkins Gleason, African American librarian (d. 2009)[1]
Eliza Atkins Gleason (December 15, 1909 – December 15, 2009)[1] was the first African American to receive a doctorate in Library Science. In 1941,she established and became the first Dean of the School of Library Service at Atlanta University and created a library education program that trained 90 percent of all African-American librarians by 1986.[2]  Read more ->

FYI

Celebrating A Velocity of Being: Maria Popova and Guests | NYPL Author Talks On December 15, several of the contributors will join me to read their letters (and play some music) alongside art from the book in a special evening at The New York Public Library — our only live event for the book, at the most fitting venue for this many-peopled endeavor of goodwill, for we are donating 100% of proceeds from the book to our local public library system in New York.

By Emily Petersen: Our favorite Science photos of 2018

By Steven Melendez: Amazon and Walmart add more robots, but insist they won’t terminate jobs
Companies like Amazon and Walmart say their automation efforts will lead to new jobs, but critics worry about the humans who could be phased out.

By Michael Grothaus: 7 digital privacy tools you need to be using now
Everyone wants your data. Here’s how to protect it.

The Passive Voice:
Meet the Safecracker of Last Resort
I’ve always envied people
Can a sleepless night awaken creativity?
Six Years With a Distraction-Free iPhone
Planes And Vans Could Deliver Billions In Cost Savings For Amazon

By Martin J. Smith: This former Deutsche Bank exec gave it all up to run a Brooklyn music school
Chad Cooper left a fast-track career at Deutsche Bank when the struggling Brooklyn Conservatory of Music called his name. Here’s why he did it.

ITRC: The mission of the Identity Theft Resource Center, or ITRC, is to provide free help and information to consumers. 
They want to be a voice for identity theft crime victims who don’t know what to do about the situation. Visit their website or call them at 888-400-5530.
The ITRC website also gives information about scams and fraud and categorizes ID theft crime: child, criminal, elderly, financial, government, medical, and military. Sign up for their newsletter while you’re there.

By Christina Maxouris, CNN: California commission finds PG&E falsified records for years

Thomas Biesheuvel and Danielle Bochove, Bloomberg: Chicken-Egg Sized Diamond Found in Canada’s Frozen North

By Louis Casiano | Fox News: Parents say priest told mourners that son may be kept out of heaven over suicide: report
The Hullibargers said an apology isn’t enough.
“Really, the only way for that to happen is for this priest to be removed. We’re afraid that, like the Catholic Church does, they’ll send him off and he’ll do it to somebody else,” Jeff Hullibarger said.

By Al Cross: Ky. appeals court OKs release of records showing how Purdue Pharma promoted OxyContin, opioid epidemic

Santa Claus has the right idea. Visit people only once a year.”
Victor Borge

“Once again, we come to the Holiday Season, a deeply religious time that each of us observes, in his own way, by going to the mall of his choice.”
Dave Barry

“I love Christmas. I receive a lot of wonderful presents I can’t wait to exchange.”
Henny Youngman

“The principal advantage of the non-parental lifestyle is that on Christmas Eve you need not be struck dumb by the three most terrifying words that the government allows to be printed on any product: “Some assembly required.””
John Leo

“Let me see if I’ve got this Santa business straight. You say he wears a beard, has no discernible source of income and flies to cities all over the world under cover of darkness? You sure this guy isn’t laundering illegal drug money?”
Tom Armstrong

“Mail your packages early so the post office can lose them in time for Christmas.”
Johnny Carson

Recipes

My Recipe Treasures: White Chocolate Corn Pops, Best Ever Egg Nog and Amazing Versatile Brownie Mix

FYI December 14, 2018

On This Day

 
 
835 – Sweet Dew Incident: Emperor Wenzong of the Tang dynasty conspires to kill the powerful eunuchs of the Tang court, but the plot is foiled.
The Sweet Dew incident (Ganlu incident, Chinese: 甘露事變 or 甘露之變) was an incident on December 14, 835,[1][2] in which Emperor Wenzong of the Chinese Tang dynasty, angry about the power that the eunuchs had, conspired with the chancellor Li Xun and the general Zheng Zhu to slaughter the eunuchs. The plot failed, however, when the eunuchs realized what was happening and counterattacked with soldiers under their command. Li Xun, Zheng, as well as many of their associates and other officials were slaughtered, and thereafter, the eunuchs had an even firmer control over Emperor Wenzong and his government than before.[2][3]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1631 – Anne Conway, English philosopher and author (d. 1679)
Anne Conway (also known as Viscountess Conway; née Finch; 14 December 1631 – 23 February 1679[1]) was an English philosopher whose work, in the tradition of the Cambridge Platonists, was an influence on Gottfried Leibniz. Conway’s thought is original as it is rationalist philosophy, with hallmarks of gynocentric concerns and patterns, and in that sense it was unique among seventeenth-century systems.[2]

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FYI

 
 

By Andrew Dalton and Hillel Italie: Grammy-Winning ‘Song Stylist’ Nancy Wilson Dead At 81

Nancy Sue Wilson[2][1] (February 20, 1937 – December 13, 2018)[1] was an American singer whose career spanned over five decades, from the mid–1950s until her retirement in the early–2010s. She was notable for her single “(You Don’t Know) How Glad I Am” and her version of the standard “Guess Who I Saw Today”.

Wilson recorded more than 70 albums and won three Grammy Awards for her work. During her performing career Wilson was labeled a singer of blues, jazz, R&B, pop, and soul, a “consummate actress”, and “the complete entertainer”. The title she preferred, however, was “song stylist”.[3] She received many nicknames including “Sweet Nancy”, “The Baby”, “Fancy Miss Nancy” and “The Girl With the Honey-Coated Voice”.[4]

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By Andrew Dalton: Sondra Locke, frequent co-star in Clint Eastwood films, dead at 74

Sandra Louise Anderson (née Smith; May 28, 1944[1][2] – November 3, 2018), professionally known as Sondra Locke, was an American actress and director. She made her film debut in 1968 in The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She went on to star in such films as Willard, The Outlaw Josey Wales, The Gauntlet, Every Which Way But Loose, Bronco Billy, Any Which Way You Can and Sudden Impact. She had worked with Clint Eastwood, who was her companion for over 13 years. Her autobiography, The Good, the Bad, and the Very Ugly – A Hollywood Journey, was published in 1997.

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By Pratchi Gupta: Feds Charge 19 in Connection to New York Sex Trafficking Ring
Federal prosecutors have charged 19 people in connection with a sex-trafficking ring that exploited teenage victims in New York.

The New York Times reports that the United States attorney’s office in Manhattan, the F.B.I. and the police department announced charges on Thursday against defendants who preyed on at least 15 teens in the child welfare system. Nine of them were residents at the Hawthorne Cedar Knolls Residential Treatment Center, a center for children with emotional and behavioral problems in Mount Pleasant, New York. “Many of the girls in the rehabilitation center had been placed there in the first place to rescue them from the sex trade,” the Times reported.

In recent months, the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Service, which manages Hawthorne, announced the shuttering of the facility after receiving sanctions from New York’s child welfare office. In December 2017, the New York Times reported that a teen goes missing from Hawthorne “nearly every day.”
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Farm Bill includes help for rural hospitals, rural broadband
At 807 pages, the new Farm Bill takes a bit to read through. We’ve mentioned the SNAP debate and industrial hemp legalization, but here are a few more provisions of interest to rural Americans:
 
 
Blessing? The animal had no fear of him, he can strut around saying he killed a trophy animal, he has x amount of meat to feed his family? What is he saying is a blessing, and is it from God? I am not anti hunting, I am anti bragging, trophy, etc.
By Heather Chapman: Illinois hunter may have shot largest buck ever killed in U.S.
“I was just sitting there, and I heard the deer behind me,” Szablewski told WSIL Radio of Harrisburg. “When I walked up to him, I looked at it and thought, ‘What a blessing.'”
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Quick hits: more people want to live in the country than actually live there; two rural states top online sales
 
 
 
 
CBS News: Sandy Hook school evacuated over bomb threat on shooting anniversary
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: How the CIA Helped Shape the Creative Writing Scene in America, A Beautiful Short Documentary Takes You Inside New York City’s Last Great Chess Store, How the Astonishing Sushi Scene in Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs Was Animated: A Time-Lapse of the Month-Long Shoot and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Dear Hometalk: How Can I Decorate With White Twin Sheets?
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI December 13, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1294 – Saint Celestine V resigns the papacy after only five months to return to his previous life as an ascetic hermit.
Pope Celestine V (Latin: Caelestinus V; 1215 – 19 May 1296), born Pietro Angelerio (according to some sources Angelario, Angelieri, Angelliero, or Angeleri), also known as Pietro da Morrone, Peter of Morrone, and Peter Celestine, was pope for five months from 5 July to 13 December 1294, when he resigned. He was also a monk and hermit who founded the order of the Celestines as a branch of the Benedictine order.

He was elected pope in the Catholic Church’s last non-conclave papal election, ending a two-year impasse. Among the few edicts of his to remain in force was the confirmation of the right of the pope to abdicate; nearly all of his other official acts were annulled by his successor, Boniface VIII.[1] On 13 December 1294, a week after issuing the decree, Celestine resigned, stating his desire to return to his humble, pre-papal life. He was subsequently imprisoned by Boniface in the castle of Fumone in the Campagna region, in order to prevent his potential installation as antipope. He died in prison on 19 May 1296 at the age of 81.[1]

Celestine was canonized on 5 May 1313 by Pope Clement V. No subsequent pope has taken the name Celestine.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1476 – Lucy Brocadelli, Dominican tertiary and stigmatic (d. 1544)
The Blessed Lucy Brocadelli, O.S.D. (also known as the Blessed Lucy of Narni), (13 December 1476 in Narni – 15 November 1544 in Ferrara) was a Dominican tertiary who was famed as a mystic and a stigmatic. She has been venerated by the Roman Catholic Church since 1710. She is known for being the counselor of the Duke of Ferrara, for founding convents in two different and hostile city-states and for her remains being solemnly returned to her home city of Narni on 26 May 1935, 391 years after her death.

Read more->
 
 
1780 – Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner, German chemist, invented the Döbereiner’s lamp (d. 1849)
Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner (13 December 1780 – 24 March 1849) was a German chemist who is best known for work that foreshadowed the periodic law for the chemical elements and inventing the first lighter, which was known as the Döbereiner’s lamp.[1] He became a professor of chemistry and pharmacy at the University of Jena.

Life and work
As a coachman’s son, Döbereiner had little opportunity for formal schooling. So he was apprenticed to an apothecary, reading widely and attending science lectures. He eventually became a professor at the University of Jena in 1810; he also studied chemistry at Strasbourg. In work published in 1829,[2] Döbereiner reported trends in certain properties of selected groups of elements. For example, the average atomic mass of lithium and potassium was close to the atomic mass of sodium. A similar pattern was found with calcium, strontium, and barium, with sulfur, selenium, and tellurium, and also with chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Moreover, the densities for some of these triads followed a similar pattern. These sets of elements became known as “Döbereiner’s triads”.[3][4]

Döbereiner also is known for his discovery of furfural,[5] for his work on the use of platinum as a catalyst, and for a lighter, known as Döbereiner’s lamp. By 1828 hundreds of thousands of these lighters had been mass produced by the German manufacturer Gottfried Piegler in Schleiz.[6]

The German writer Goethe was a friend of Döbereiner, attended his lectures weekly, and used his theories of chemical affinities as a basis for his famous 1809 novella Elective Affinities.

 
 

FYI

 
 
By Esther Wang: Members of Congress Will No Longer Be Able to Use Public Money to Pay for Sexual Harassment Settlements
 
 
 
 
By Ester Wang: Former Baylor Frat President Accused of Rape Now Banned from Current School, Will Still Receive His Degree
 
 
 
 
By Kelly Faircloth: How the Blacklist Shut Progressive Women Out of TV and Created a Leave It to Beaver Lie
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Germans Discover Military Jeep Hoods Used to Repair a Ceiling after World War II
 
 
 
 
By Catie Keck: Man Found in Greasy Restaurant Duct Was Stuck for 2 Days Before Being Rescued
 
 
 
 
By Catie Keck: Sting Operations Are Yet Another Reason You Shouldn’t Steal People’s Amazon Packages
 
 
 
 

By Dell Cameron: Democrats Want Internet Companies to Be Liable for Data Loss Like Banks and Hospitals
 
 
 
 
By Erik Adams: Paul Williams on the enduring magic and no-longer-lost music of Emmet Otter’s Jug Band Christmas
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Two Stalagmites Found in Chinese Cave Are a ‘Holy Grail’ for Accurate Radiocarbon Dating
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: 2018’s Brightest Comet, For Sale: Monster Map, FORT PIERRE, SOUTH DAKOTA Forgotten Explorers and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Rebecca at Soap Deli News: Ready to try out your gift making skills? Creative gift wrap ideas & gifts in 30-minutes or less. Curious about alcohol ink ornaments?
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 13 Storage Ideas That Will Instantly Declutter Your Kitchen Drawers
 
 
Jeanette @SnazzyLittleThings.com Hometalker Akron, OH: DIY Fireplace Mantel: Creating Usable Corner Space
 
 
By Natalina: Holiday Glow Skirt
 
 
By miairajennings: DIY Talking Santa Ugly Christmas Sweater (Insert Smartphone!)
 
 
By jsetla: Orchid Greenhouse Table With Lights
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI December 12, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1098 – First Crusade: Siege of Ma’arrat al-Numan: Crusaders breach the town’s walls and massacre about 20,000 inhabitants. After finding themselves with insufficient food, they reportedly resort to cannibalism.
The Siege of Maarat, or Ma’arra, occurred in late 1098 in the city of Ma’arrat al-Numan, in what is modern-day Syria, during the First Crusade. It is infamous for the claims of widespread cannibalism displayed by the Crusaders.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1806 – Stand Watie, American general (d. 1871)
Stand Watie (Cherokee: ᏕᎦᏔᎦ, translit. Degataga, lit. ‘Stand firm’) (December 12, 1806 – September 9, 1871) — also known as Standhope Uwatie, Tawkertawker, and Isaac S. Watie — was a leader of the Cherokee Nation, and the only Native American to attain a general’s rank in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He commanded the Confederate Indian cavalry of the Army of the Trans-Mississippi, made up mostly of Cherokee, Muskogee and Seminole, and was the final Confederate general in the field to cease hostilities at war’s end.

Prior to removal of the Cherokee to Indian Territory in the late 1830s, Watie and his older brother Elias Boudinot were among leaders who signed the Treaty of New Echota in 1835. The majority of the tribe opposed their action. In 1839 the brothers were attacked in an assassination attempt, as were other relatives active in the Treaty Party. All but Stand Watie were killed. Watie in 1842 killed one of his uncle’s attackers, and in 1845 his brother Thomas Watie was killed in retaliation, in the continuing cycle of violence. Watie was acquitted at trial in the 1850s on the grounds of self-defense.

During the Civil War and soon after, Watie served as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation (1862–1866). By the end of the war, the majority of the tribe supported the Confederacy. A minority supported the Union and refused to ratify his election. The former chief John Ross, a Union supporter, was captured in 1862 by Union forces. Watie led the Southern Cherokee delegation to Washington after the war to sue for peace, hoping to have tribal divisions recognized. The US government negotiated only with the leaders who had sided with the Union, and named John Ross as principal chief in 1866 under a new treaty. Watie stayed out of politics for his last years, and tried to rebuild his plantation.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Kristen Lee: I Am a Mustang Woman Now
 
 
 
 
By Ryan Felton: Goodyear Shuts Down Venezuela Factory and Gives Workers 10 Tires Each as Part of Their Severance
 
 
 
 
By Martyn Williams: Ring vs Nest: Choosing a DIY home security system is a bigger decision than you might think
 
 
 
 
By Colin Dwyer: Quake-Up Call: Magnitude 4.4 Temblor Rattles People Out Of Bed Across Southeast U.S.
 
 
 
 
By Jennings Brown: These Are the States With the Fastest and Slowest Internet
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: New Census study has county-level data on poverty, income, broadband subscriptions and more from 2013-2017
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Buried FCC report shows many internet service providers aren’t providing advertised speeds to customers
 
 
 
 
By Nadia Kounang: Fentanyl is the deadliest drug in America, CDC confirms
 
 
 
 
By Gerard O’Connell: Cardinal Pell, top advisor to Pope Francis, found guilty of ‘historical sexual offenses’
 
 
 
 
Tedium Zap Actionsdower: When a Chain Breaks What a blogger learned from a year of traveling to restaurants that used to be part of much larger chains before being forced to fend for themselves.
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Josh Jones: Take Animated Virtual Reality Tours of Ancient Rome at Its Architectural Peak (Circa 320 AD)
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice
Let us remember: One book, one pen, one child, and one teacher can change the world.
Malala Yousafzai
 
 
 
 
Drive Tribe James King Quiz: Can you name the film from the car?
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Chas’ Craazy Creations: To Grandma’s House We Go Link Party 117
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By closmanson: Wild tundra blueberry jam.
 
 
By sshammond2: Raspberry Muffins – A Battle for Berries
 
 
By mlmilius: A Family Tradition in the Kitchen


 
 

 
 

FYI December 11, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1934 – Bill Wilson, co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, takes his last drink and enters treatment for the final time.
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an international mutual aid fellowship[1] whose stated purpose is to enable its members to “stay sober and help other alcoholics achieve sobriety.”[1][2][3] It was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. With other early members, Bill Wilson and Bob Smith developed AA’s Twelve Step program of spiritual and character development. AA’s initial Twelve Traditions were introduced in 1946 to help the fellowship be stable and unified while disengaged from “outside issues” and influences.

The Traditions recommend that members remain anonymous in public media, altruistically help other alcoholics, and that AA groups avoid official affiliations with other organizations. They also advise against dogma and coercive hierarchies. Subsequent fellowships such as Narcotics Anonymous have adopted and adapted the Twelve Steps and the Twelve Traditions to their respective primary purposes.[4][5]

The first female member, Florence Rankin, joined AA in March 1937,[6][7] and the first non-Protestant member, a Roman Catholic, joined in 1939.[8] The first Black AA group was established in 1945 in Washington DC by Jim S., an African-American physician from Virginia.[9][10] AA membership has since spread internationally “across diverse cultures holding different beliefs and values”, including geopolitical areas resistant to grassroots movements.[11] Close to 2 million people worldwide are members of AA as of 2016.[12]

AA’s name is derived from its first book, informally called “The Big Book”, originally titled Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered From Alcoholism.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1863 – Annie Jump Cannon, American astronomer and academic (d. 1941)
Annie Jump Cannon (/ˈkænən/; December 11, 1863 – April 13, 1941) was an American astronomer whose cataloging work was instrumental in the development of contemporary stellar classification. With Edward C. Pickering, she is credited with the creation of the Harvard Classification Scheme, which was the first serious attempt to organize and classify stars based on their temperatures and spectral types. She was nearly deaf throughout her career. She was a suffragist and a member of the National Women’s Party.[2]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Andrew P. Collins: Why Some Trucks Have Five Little Lights On The Roof
 
 
 
 
By Andrew P. Collins: The Vanity Plates of Maine are Delightfully Awful
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Young Warrior in Gruesome Iron Age Grave Was ‘Killed’ Again After Death
 
 
 
 
Colossal: Traditional and Contemporary Japanese Culture Collides in Striking Photographs by RK, Geometric Animals Come to Life in DIY Lamp Kits by OWL, Abstract Aerial Photographs Reveal the Beauty of Meandering Waterways and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture DC: John Lennon’s Report Card at Age 15: “He Has Too Many Wrong Ambitions and His Energy Is Too Often Misplaced”
In September 1956, a young John Lennon took home a dismal report card–the kind that many smart, wayward kids can probably relate to.
 
 
 
 
Steller Watch Burlyn Birkemeier Biologist: My maiden voyage to Alaska
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By ESSOMAR: Cardboard Cat House With Scratcher
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By canida: How to Cut a Pomegranate
 
 
By Michaels Test Kitchen: Foolproof Biscuits
 
 
By ModernFarmhouseKitchen: Indian Garlic Naan


 
 

 
 

FYI December 10, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1317 – The “Nyköping Banquet” – King Birger of Sweden treacherously seizes his two brothers Valdemar, Duke of Finland and Eric, Duke of Södermanland, who were subsequently starved to death in the dungeon of Nyköping Castle.

The Nyköping Banquet (Swedish: Nyköpings gästabud) was King Birger of Sweden’s Christmas celebration 11 December 1317 at Nyköping Castle in Sweden. Among the guests were his two brothers Duke Valdemar and Duke Eric, who later that night were imprisoned and subsequently starved to death in the dungeon of Nyköping Castle.

Prelude
The dukes Valdemar and Eric, brothers of king Birger, had earlier staged a coup against the king (Håtuna games). After the intervention of the Danish and Norwegian kings, a settlement was reached in 1310 and Sweden was divided among the brothers into three sovereign states.

Treacherous arrests
Seven years later, the dukes Valdemar and Eric were invited as a sign of reconciliation to celebrate Christmas with King Birger and Queen Märta at Nyköping Castle. The banquet that was to go down in history was held on the night between 10 and 11 December 1317. The dukes’ retinues were lodged not in the castle, but in the town of Nyköping, the pretext being lack of space. After both dukes had retired to bed, the king’s drost Brunke (Johan von Brunkow) arrived with a company of crossbowmen and manacled them. The following morning, the dukes’ retinue was also apprehended.

According to the Eric Chronicles, king Birger himself was present, reminding the dukes of the Håtuna Games:[1]

Mynnes jder nakot aff hatwna leek? Fulgörla mynnes han mik
(Remember ye aught of the Håtuna Games? I remember them clearly)

Imprisonment
The dukes were imprisoned in the castle’s dungeon. They knew that no mercy would be forthcoming from Birger so they had their wills drawn up after five weeks. These documents, dated 18 January 1318, survive today. One of the executors was Birger Persson. Soon thereafter, both dukes died in the dungeon, according to tradition by drawn-out starvation. According to legend, king Birger threw the keys to the dungeon into the Nyköping river. A large medieval key was indeed found during the 19th century near the castle.

King Birger, however, had misjudged the political situation in the country. A rebellion broke out in 1318 against his rule, and he was forced to flee to Gotland, whence he soon had to continue his flight to Denmark.

Aftermath
The three-year-old son of Duke Eric, Magnus, was elected King in 1319 by the Stone of Mora in Uppland. King Birger’s son Magnus resisted forces that tried to take the Castle of Nyköping, but Magnus was defeated and fled with the drost Brunke. They lost a sea action and were captured and executed in 1320. The drost Brunke was executed in Stockholm on the sandy ridge that has since been known as Brunkeberg. The deposed king Birger died in 1321 in exile in Denmark.

Thus, of the royal family, there remained only the old queen mother Helvig of Holstein, (spouse of Magnus Ladulås), the exiled Queen Märta, and the young king Magnus Eriksson, son of the dead Duke Eric.
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1811 – Caroline Mehitable Fisher Sawyer, American poet, biographer, and editor (d. 1894)[6]
Caroline Mehitable Fisher Sawyer (December 10, 1812 – May 19, 1894) was an American poet, biographer, and editor.[1] Her writings ranged through a wide variety of themes.

Born in 1812, in Massachusetts, she began composing verse at an early age, but published little till after her marriage. Thereafter, she wrote much for various reviews and other miscellanies, besides several volumes of tales, sketches, and essays. She also made numerous translations from German literature, in prose and verse, in which she evinced an appreciation of the original. Sawyer’s poems were numerous, sufficient for several volumes, though they were not published as a collection.[2]

Read more->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
Great comments!
By Kristen Lee: This Is the Stuff Movies Constantly Get Wrong About Cars
ubba Fett, Seymour-Baus,Inc: Manual shifters have 400 gears.
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Watch a Jeep CJ-7 Beast-Mode This Alaska Road Destroyed By an Earthquake
The best part of the clip is the beginning, when which a child can be heard yelling “Don’t do it!” as the Jeep drives down a steep slope, and then drops off a fairly tall ledge:
 
 
 
 
By Stephanie Donovan: Blog Profiles: Decluttering Blogs
 
 
 
 
By David Keyton and Jim Heintz, Associated Press: Nobel Peace winner: international action on sex abuse needed
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Akshat Rathi and Whet Moser, edited by Adam Pasick and Jessanne Collins, and produced by Luiz Romero. Quartz Obsession Motor scooters: The future on two wheels

Commuter vehicle?
By Mike Hanlon: Vespa’s lethal 150 TAP: A scooter with serious attitude
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls Breakfast Links: Week of December 3, 2018: Isabella Banks, “Orator” Hunt, and the Peterloo Massacre. A 1660s recipe for hot “chacolet” from Rebeckah Winche’s receipt book. The secrets of newspaper names. The “detestable crime” in Regency Britain. Red silk tango boots from the 1920s. More ->
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: How Music Can Awaken Patients with Alzheimer’s and Dementia
 
 
By Vijay Pandey: The Magical Horse Dancing of Uttar Pradesh
 
 
By Michelle Bruton: The Chicago Coffeehouse That Offers a Shot of Psychology
Why you should care
The Windy City is known for its independent coffee shops, but this Logan Square café with a purpose stands out.

The sign says it all: Sip of Hope is the first café in the world to donate 100 percent of its proceeds toward suicide prevention and mental health education.
 
 
 
 
By David A. Bray: #OurDigitalFuture 70 Years Since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
This is why today, 10 December 2018, several original pioneers of the Internet — Vint Cerf, Sir Tim Berners-Lee, Dame Wendy Hall, and many more — as well as contemporaries working towards a better future gather both in-person and online for “Our People-Centered Digital Future” to discuss the unfinished work when it comes to digital technologies such as the Internet, Artificial Intelligence, and automation to ensure a more people-centered and community-centered future?
 
 
By Jacklyn Peiser: Podcasts Are Getting Newsier. Here Are 8 New Ones Worth a Listen.
 
 
By Christine Perez: Meet the Guy Leading Frito-Lay Into the Future
 
 
By Joel Shannon: University gets bacon vending machine just in time for finals
 
 
 
 
GlacierHub Weekly Newsletter 12-10-18: New research about Katla, a subglacial volcano in Iceland, revealed Katla emits CO2 at a globally significant level. More ->
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCCXXXI): Secrets of the Holland Island Bar Light, 360 Views & selfies from NASA’s Curiosity Rover on Mars, A 1911 obituary of an American millionaire ranting against the arranged marriages of American heiresses to British noblemen for dowry., The ‘shoe-shine boy’ who left America in the 1930s under the invitation of Emperor Haile Selassie to become the Commander of the Ethiopian Air Force and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Shawna Bailey Hometalker West Orange, NJ: Turn Empty Jars Into Stylish Christmas Candy Jars
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By srenard: Tofu and Kale Scramble: Part of a Simple Life
 
 
By MarahG: Red Cabbage Kraut Brightens a Winter Plate


 
 

 
 

FYI December 09, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1872 – In Louisiana, P. B. S. Pinchback becomes the first African-American governor of a U.S. state.
Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback (born Pinckney Benton Stewart May 10, 1837 – December 21, 1921) was an American publisher and politician, a Union Army officer, and the first African American to become governor of a U.S. state. A Republican, Pinchback served as the 24th Governor of Louisiana from December 9, 1872, to January 13, 1873. He was one of the most prominent African-American officeholders during the Reconstruction Era.

Pinchback was born free in Macon, Georgia to a mulatto woman and a white planter. His father, William Pinchback, raised the younger Pinchback as his own son on his plantation in Mississippi. After the death of his father in 1848, Pinchback and his mother fled to the free state of Ohio. After the start of the American Civil War, Pinchback traveled to Union-occupied New Orleans and raised several companies for the 1st Louisiana Native Guard, becoming one of few African American commissioned officers in the Union Army.

Pinchback remained in New Orleans after the Civil War, becoming active in Republican politics. He won election to the Louisiana State Senate in 1868 and became the president pro tempore of the state senate. He became the acting Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana upon the death of Oscar Dunn in 1871 and briefly served as Governor of Louisiana after Henry C. Warmoth was suspended from office. African Americans were increasingly disenfranchised after the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and Pinchback would be the only African American to serve as governor of a U.S. state until 1990. After the contested 1872 Louisiana gubernatorial election, Republican legislators elected Pinchback to the United States Senate. Due to the controversy over the 1872 elections, Pinchback was never seated in Congress.

Pinchback served as a delegate to the 1879 Louisiana constitutional convention, where he helped gain support for the founding of Southern University. He served as the surveyor of customs of New Orleans from 1882 to 1885 and later helped challenge the segregation of Louisiana’s public transportation system, leading to the Supreme Court case of Plessy v. Ferguson. He moved to Washington, D.C. in 1892 and died in that city in 1921.

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1968 – Douglas Engelbart gave what became known as “The Mother of All Demos”, publicly debuting the computer mouse, hypertext, and the bit-mapped graphical user interface using the oN-Line System (NLS).
Douglas Carl Engelbart (January 30, 1925 – July 2, 2013) was an American engineer and inventor, and an early computer and Internet pioneer. He is best known for his work on founding the field of human–computer interaction, particularly while at his Augmentation Research Center Lab in SRI International, which resulted in creation of the computer mouse, and the development of hypertext, networked computers, and precursors to graphical user interfaces. These were demonstrated at The Mother of All Demos in 1968. Engelbart’s law, the observation that the intrinsic rate of human performance is exponential, is named after him.

In the early 1950s, he decided that instead of “having a steady job” – such as his position at Ames Research Center – he would focus on making the world a better place. He reasoned that because the complexity of the world’s problems was increasing, and that any effort to improve the world would require the coordination of groups of people, the most effective way to solve problems was to augment human intelligence and develop ways of building collective intelligence.[6] He believed that the computer, which was at the time thought of only as a tool for automation, would be an essential tool for future knowledge workers to solve such problems. He was a committed, vocal proponent of the development and use of computers and computer networks to help cope with the world’s increasingly urgent and complex problems. Engelbart embedded a set of organizing principles in his lab, which he termed “bootstrapping”. His belief was that when human systems and tool systems were aligned, such that workers spent time “improving their tools for improving their tools” it would lead to an accelerating rate of progress.

Under Engelbart’s guidance, the Augmentation Research Center developed, with funding primarily from DARPA, the NLS to demonstrate numerous technologies, most of which are now in widespread use; this included the computer mouse, bitmapped screens, hypertext; all of which were displayed at “The Mother of All Demos” in 1968. The lab was transferred from SRI to Tymshare in the late 1970s, which was acquired by McDonnell Douglas in 1984, and NLS was renamed Augment (now the Doug Engelbart Institute).[7] At both Tymshare and McDonnell Douglas, Engelbart was limited by a lack of interest in his ideas and funding to pursue them, and retired in 1986.

In 1988, Engelbart and his daughter Christina launched the Bootstrap Institute – later known as The Doug Engelbart Institute – to promote his vision, especially at Stanford University; this effort did result in some DARPA funding to modernize the user interface of Augment. In December 2000, United States President Bill Clinton awarded Engelbart the National Medal of Technology, the U.S.’s highest technology award. In December 2008, Engelbart was honored by SRI at the 40th anniversary of the “Mother of All Demos”.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1508 – Gemma Frisius, Dutch mathematician and cartographer (d. 1555)
Gemma Frisius (/ˈfrɪziəs/; born Jemme Reinerszoon;[1] December 9, 1508 – May 25, 1555), was a Dutch physician, mathematician, cartographer, philosopher, and instrument maker. He created important globes, improved the mathematical instruments of his day and applied mathematics in new ways to surveying and navigation. Gemma’s rings are named after him. Along with Gerardus Mercator and Abraham Ortelius, Frisius is often considered one of the founders of the Netherlandish school of cartography and significantly helped lay the foundations for the school’s golden age (approximately 1570s–1670s).

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FYI

 
 
Jalopnik: An Illinois Company is Building Brand New Ford-Licensed First-Gen Broncos, Suzuki Ends Production Of The Legendary Hayabusa After 20 Years Of High Speed Dominance, Ken Block Slays Tires In Four Cars And A Truck To Make Gymkhana 10 As Awesome As Ever, It’s Time For Cabover Trucks To Make A Comeback and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Tom McKay: Egyptian Officials Are Pissed About an Alleged Nude Photoshoot on the Great Pyramid
While some Egyptian officials denounced the nudity in particular, others are simply displeased that the video may have been taken in disregard of laws prohibiting most people from climbing on ancient monuments without a valid reason for doing so.
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Against Self-Righteousness: Anne Lamott on Forgiveness, Self-Forgiveness, and the Relationship Between Brokenness and Joy, Illustrators Celebrate the Joy of Books: 10 Art Prints from “A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader”, Against Common Sense: Vladimir Nabokov on the Wellspring of Wonder and Why the Belief in Goodness Is a Moral Obligation
 
 
 
 
By Natasha Anderson: ‘Merry Christmas from your neighbor!’: Kid Rock pays off $81K worth of layaways at Nashville Walmart
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Inspired by Tyler Perry’s recent act of kindness, Kid Rock got into the spirit of giving Friday.

On Thursday Tyler Perry paid off $432,635 worth of layaway items at two Walmart stores in the Atlanta metro area, and his generousity apparently inspired Kid Rock.
 
 
 
 
By Sean Williams: 3 Shockingly “Cheap” Marijuana Stocks
 
 
 
 
By Lindsey Bever: The touching gesture by George H.W. Bush that his Secret Service ‘family’ will never forget
 
 
 
 
By ZHOU XIN | SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST and KEEGAN ELMER | SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST: Beijing threatens Canada with ‘grave consequences for hurting feelings of Chinese people’
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: Cut a Piece of Washi Tape for These 25 Creative Ideas
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Christmas Decor Ideas You Won’t Have to Take Down
 
 
By ReadsInTrees: How to Make 6-Pointed Paper Snowflakes
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By jcooperc: Alaskan Carrot Cake… Dogs Love It!

In the Kitchen With Matt: Amazing Pizza Sauce


 
 

 
 

FYI December 08, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1953 – U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower delivers his “Atoms for Peace” speech, which leads to an American program to supply equipment and information on nuclear power to schools, hospitals, and research institutions around the world.
“Atoms for Peace” was the title of a speech delivered by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower to the UN General Assembly in New York City on December 8, 1953.

I feel impelled to speak today in a language that in a sense is new – one which I, who have spent so much of my life in the military profession, would have preferred never to use.

That new language is the language of atomic warfare.[1]

The United States then launched an “Atoms for Peace” program that supplied equipment and information to schools, hospitals, and research institutions within the U.S. and throughout the world. The first nuclear reactors in Iran, Israel[2] and Pakistan were built under the program by American Machine and Foundry, a company more commonly known as a major manufacturer of bowling equipment.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1864 – Camille Claudel, French illustrator and sculptor (d. 1943)
Camille Claudel (French pronunciation: [kamij klɔdɛl] (About this soundlisten); 8 December 1864 – 19 October 1943) was a French sculptor. Although she died in relative obscurity, Claudel has gained recognition for the originality of her work.[1][2] She was the elder sister of the poet and diplomat Paul Claudel and the co-worker and lover of sculptor Auguste Rodin.

The national Camille Claudel Museum in Nogent-sur-Seine opened in 2017, and the Musée Rodin in Paris has a room dedicated to Claudel’s works.

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FYI

 
 
By Thomas Tracy: 100-year-old Tuskegee Airman found dead in Harlem home
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Sara Christian Competed in the First Ever NASCAR Race and Is the Only Woman To Score a Top Five Finish
 
 
 
 
By Emily Alford: High Rolling Nuns Gambled $500k of Embezzled Funds
 
 
 
 
By Emily Alford: Virginia Teacher Fired After Refusing to Call a Trans Student ‘Him’
On December 7, the day after the hearing, 100 West Point middle and high school students staged a walkout in support of Vlaming, according to the Virginia Gazette.
 
 
 
 
By Catie Keck: FCC Launches Investigation Into Whether Carriers Lied About Their Coverage
 
 
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: These Birders Flock to Google Street View to Spot Birds Around the World
 
 
 
 
By Rhett Jones: The Totally Free Streaming Service You Didn’t Know You Have
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Illusions, Firewall, Bialong elevator and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Chris Forrester: On 50-year anniversary, Oral History Archive turns attention from past to future
 
 
 
 
Google Student Blog: Celebrating Google’s heroes at the Army-Navy game
 
 
 
 
BBC News: Listen to the wind whistle on Mars
 
 
 
 
NBC News: ‘It’s not a date rape song’: ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside’ composer’s daughter speaks out
 
 
 
 
One bullet.
By Denise Lavoie: Charlottesville hopes to heal after man’s murder conviction

“This was a dynamic, chaotic event that led to a very brief but furious gun battle between the killer and the lawmen,” Ayub said. “This news is extremely difficult for all of us to process and understand.”

The officer who fired the rifle round is “devastated,” CHP Coastal Division Chief L.D. Maples said.

Maples said authorities learned of the ballistics finding on Wednesday.

“He’s currently not on duty,” Maples said of the officer. “He’s taking some time off.”

He described the officer as a nine-year veteran of the Highway Patrol.

“The mere thought of something like this happening is devastating to all of us who are sworn to protect,” Maples said.

He said his officer and Helus entered the bar together to save lives, and Helus “died a hero” in the fierce firefight.

“This tragedy underscores the difficult and dangerous circumstances law enforcement faces every day, often with only mere seconds to react,” he said. “The blame for this tragedy lies with one person, the suspect that entered the Borderline that night with the intent on taking innocent lives.”
 
 
 
 
By Nancy Dillon: Sheriff’s Sgt. Ron Helus was killed by friendly fire in Borderline shooting, officials reveal

“This was a dynamic, chaotic event that led to a very brief but furious gun battle between the killer and the lawmen,” Ayub said. “This news is extremely difficult for all of us to process and understand.”

The officer who fired the rifle round is “devastated,” CHP Coastal Division Chief L.D. Maples said.

Maples said authorities learned of the ballistics finding on Wednesday.

“He’s currently not on duty,” Maples said of the officer. “He’s taking some time off.”

He described the officer as a nine-year veteran of the Highway Patrol.

“The mere thought of something like this happening is devastating to all of us who are sworn to protect,” Maples said.

He said his officer and Helus entered the bar together to save lives, and Helus “died a hero” in the fierce firefight.

“This tragedy underscores the difficult and dangerous circumstances law enforcement faces every day, often with only mere seconds to react,” he said. “The blame for this tragedy lies with one person, the suspect that entered the Borderline that night with the intent on taking innocent lives.”
 
 
 
 
By Michael Cavna: How this emotional George H.W. Bush cartoon went viral — touching even his family
 
 
 
 
By Amy B. Wang: An earthquake created a highway hellscape in Alaska. Days later, the road reopened — good as new.
 
 
 
 
Bill Bernat: How to connect with depressed friends.
 
 
 
 
Carol Tice: Freelance Writers Den learning & support community!
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: How J.R.R. Tolkien Influenced Classic Rock & Metal: A Video Introduction. The Strange History of Smooth Jazz: The Music We All Know and Love … to Hate
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The humble brilliance of Italy’s moka coffee pot, Christmas Eve Carp Keep your holiday fish fresh by letting it live in your bathtub. More ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The Definitive Database for the World’s Most Wondrous Foods, Making It Rain, Presidential Food Fight and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Four Fun Friday Kodachrome Car Photographs Edition 183
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 11 Gorgeous Suncatchers to Brighten Your Windows
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: Raise Your Home’s Curb Appeal With These 15 Ornament Wreaths
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 25 Adorable Ornament Ideas to Get You SUPER Excited for Christmas
 
 
Maura White Hometalker Conesus, NY: DIY Snowflake Bath Confetti – Easy DIY Gift Idea!
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI December 07, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1922 – The Parliament of Northern Ireland votes to remain a part of the United Kingdom and not unify with Southern Ireland.
The Parliament of Northern Ireland was the Home Rule legislature of Northern Ireland, created under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, which sat from 7 June 1921[1] to 30 March 1972, when it was suspended with the introduction of Direct Rule. It was abolished under the Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973.

The Parliament of Northern Ireland was bicameral, consisting of a House of Commons with 52 seats, and an indirectly elected Senate with 26 seats. The Sovereign was represented by the Governor (initially by the Lord Lieutenant), who granted royal assent to Acts of Parliament in Northern Ireland, but executive power rested with the Prime Minister, the leader of the largest party in the House of Commons.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1878 – Akiko Yosano, Japanese author, poet, pioneering feminist, pacifist, and social reformer (d. 1942)
Yosano Akiko (与謝野 晶子 Seiji: 與謝野 晶子) (7 December 1878 – 29 May 1942) was the pen-name of a Japanese author, poet, pioneering feminist, pacifist, and social reformer, active in the late Meiji period as well as the Taishō and early Shōwa periods of Japan.[1] Her name at birth was Shō Hō (鳳 志やう Hō Shō).[2] She is one of the most noted, and most controversial, post-classical woman poets of Japan.[3]

Early life
Yosano was born into a prosperous merchant family in Sakai, near Osaka. From the age of 11, she was the family member most responsible for running the family business, which produced and sold youkan, a type of confection. From early childhood, she was fond of reading literary works, and read widely in her father’s extensive library. As a high school student, she began to subscribe to the poetry magazine Myōjō (Bright Star), of which she became a prominent contributor. Myōjō’s editor, Tekkan Yosano, taught her tanka poetry, having met her on visits to Osaka and Sakai to deliver lectures and teach in workshops.[4]

Although Tekkan had a common-law wife, he eventually separated from her after he fell in love with Akiko. The two poets started a new life together in the suburb of Tokyo and were married in 1901. The couple had two sons, Hikaru and Shigeru. Despite separating from his first wife, Tekkan remained actively involved with her.

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FYI

 
 
The Passive Voice – One of five living Pearl Harbor survivors, Provo resident, remembers ‘Day of Infamy’ Publisher Revenue for eBooks Increased in October Quality digital content can’t break through sea of online garbage and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture DC: 2,000 MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) Getting Started in December: Enroll Today
Here’s one tip to keep in mind: If you want to take a course for free, select the “Full Course, No Certificate” or “Audit” option when you enroll. If you would like an official certificate documenting that you have successfully completed the course, you will need to pay a fee.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: How does a seal get an eel up its nose? 52 Bizarre Food Myths, JIUQUAN SHI CHINA Caves of Wonder and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Ellie Anzilotti: This course helps former prisoners learn the tech they missed in jail
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Quick hits: Loneliness, boredom blamed for addiction; will big new philanthropies help rural America?
 
 
 
 
What does the “Marijuana Marlboro Man” look like?~~
By Gerry Broome: Marlboro maker places $2.4 billion bet on marijuana
 
 
 
 
By Alex Furuya: 1940s ‘Safe Spaces’: The Man Who Tried to Save His Students From Internment
Why you should care
Because not everyone follows cruel rules quietly.
 
 
By Olivia Miltner: New Wave Varieties Upset the Apple Cart
Why you should care
An explosion in new apple varieties is giving Americans more choice. But that could come with drawbacks.
 
 
By Michelle Bruton: This Midwestern Beer Lover Is Behind Some of the Year’s Darkest Fiction
Why you should care
With his new novel, Stephen Markley cements himself as one of the brightest new American voices.
 
 
 
 
David Sherry Creative Caffeine In 2019 I…
I want to hear about your goals in 2019.

Reply and write whatever comes to mind.

This can just be a thread between us, which you can use to clarify your thinking or just get them out on paper.

Or, for a few of you, with your permission, I’d be happy to share them with the group as well. It’s a chance to share with others here, and even rep or promote something of your own.

Up to you.

Here are some questions to spark your thinking:

What needs to change?

What do you know deep down you should do, but haven’t yet committed to?

What are you scared to get serious about?

What open questions do you hope to answer?

What would you like to finish?

——–

Answer all or none k thanks bye.

xx David
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Little Brags: A BOHO HO HO HO Christmas Porch
 
 
 
 
Little Sprouts Learning Hometalker Tonkawa, OK: Loofah Bar Soap With Soap Base
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Julia O’Malley: How Alaska eats: Pasta la vista to earthquake stress + chocolate


 
 

 
 

FYI December 06, 2018

On This Day

 
 
963 – Pope Leo VIII is appointed to the office of Protonotary and begins his papacy as antipope of Rome.
An antipope (Latin: antipapa) is a person who, in opposition to the one who is generally seen as the legitimately elected Pope, makes a significantly accepted competing claim to be the Pope,[1] the Bishop of Rome and leader of the Catholic Church. At times between the 3rd and mid-15th centuries, antipopes were supported by a fairly significant faction of religious cardinals and secular or anti-religious monarchs and kingdoms. Persons who claim to be pope, but have few followers, such as the modern sedevacantist antipopes, are not classified with the historical antipopes.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1478 – Baldassare Castiglione, Italian courtier, diplomat, and author (d. 1529)
Baldassare Castiglione (Italian: [baldasˈsaːre kastiʎˈʎoːne]; December 6, 1478 – February 2, 1529),[1] count of Casatico, was an Italian courtier, diplomat, soldier and a prominent Renaissance author,[2] who is probably most famous for his authorship of Il Cortegiano or The Book of the Courtier. The work was an example of a courtesy book, dealing with questions of the etiquette and morality of the courtier, and was very influential in 16th-century European court circles.[3]

Read more->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Karma Allen: Prosecutor wants death penalty for border agent accused of killing 4 women
 
 
 
 
By Rocky Parker: Get Your Daily Dose of News From These 10 Trusted Healthcare Sites
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: New federal rules could ease shortage of foster parents
The proposed regulations underwent a public comment period this summer and fall. States and 12 Native American tribes now have until April to explain how they are working to align their foster care standards with the new regulations, Wirtz reports.
 
 
 
 
Surprise, baby: It’s YouTube Rewind 2018!
 
 
 
 

By Robert Sanders: Acrobatic geckos can even race on water’s surface
 
 
 
 
By NBC4 Staff: Ohio dad makes daughter walk to school after she’s caught bullying on the bus
 
 
 
 
By Andrew Griffin: SpaceX rocket spectacularly smashes down to Earth in video
Falcon 9 rocket managed to survive disastrous crash, says Elon Musk
 
 
 
 
By Andrei Suhenco: How a 105-Year-Old Ukrainian Called Life’s Bluff
At 105 years old, Chibalo had far exceeded the average, but his work gave his life meaning and so he worked. Until one day, after walking home from work, he had his charka of vodka, just like he had done every day since the end of the War, and sat down to rest under a tree in his yard. He fell asleep and never woke up. It was February 23, 1969. And he had died like he always knew he would. At peace.
 
 
 
 
National Association to Protect Children
On the Web: protect.org/safetytool
On Twitter: @thesafetytool
On Instagram: @CommunitySafetyTool
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Annaliese Griffin, edited by Jessanne Collins, and produced by Luiz Romero. Quartz Obsession Vinegar: The original energy drink
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
irene: Homely Potato Soup