Category: FYI

FYI

FYI January 26, 2020

On This Day

1564 – The Council of Trent establishes an official distinction between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism.
The Council of Trent (Latin: Concilium Tridentinum), held between 1545 and 1563 in Trent (or Trento, in northern Italy), was the 19th ecumenical council of the Catholic Church.[1] Prompted by the Protestant Reformation, it has been described as the embodiment of the Counter-Reformation.[2][3]

The Council issued condemnations of what it defined to be heresies committed by proponents of Protestantism, and also issued key statements and clarifications of the Church’s doctrine and teachings, including scripture, the Biblical canon, sacred tradition, original sin, justification, salvation, the sacraments, the Mass, and the veneration of saints.[4] The Council met for twenty-five sessions between 13 December 1545 and 4 December 1563.[5] Pope Paul III, who convoked the Council, oversaw the first eight sessions (1545–47), while the twelfth to sixteenth sessions (1551–52) were overseen by Pope Julius III and the seventeenth to twenty-fifth sessions (1562–63) by Pope Pius IV.

The consequences of the Council were also significant with regard to the Church’s liturgy and practices. During its deliberations, the Council made the Vulgate the official example of the Biblical canon and commissioned the creation of a standard version, although this was not achieved until the 1590s.[2] In 1565, a year after the Council finished its work, Pius IV issued the Tridentine Creed (after Tridentum, Trent’s Latin name) and his successor Pius V then issued the Roman Catechism and revisions of the Breviary and Missal in, respectively, 1566, 1568 and 1570. These, in turn, led to the codification of the Tridentine Mass, which remained the Church’s primary form of the Mass for the next four hundred years.

More than three hundred years passed until the next ecumenical council, the First Vatican Council, was convened in 1869.

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Born On This Day

1891 – Wilder Penfield, American-Canadian neurosurgeon and academic (d. 1976)
ilder Graves Penfield OM CC CMG FRS[1] (January 26, 1891 – April 5, 1976) was an American-Canadian neurosurgeon.[2] He expanded brain surgery’s methods and techniques, including mapping the functions of various regions of the brain such as the cortical homunculus. His scientific contributions on neural stimulation expand across a variety of topics including hallucinations, illusions, and déjà vu. Penfield devoted much of his thinking to mental processes, including contemplation of whether there was any scientific basis for the existence of the human soul.[2]

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FYI

By Zachary Cohen, CNN: Pentagon’s vow to protect Vindman against retaliation tested after Blackburn attacks decorated veteran
“That a member of the Senate — at a moment when the Senate is undertaking its most solemn responsibility — would choose to take to Twitter to spread slander about a member of the military is a testament to cowardice,” he continued. “While Senator Blackburn fires off defamatory tweets, Lieutenant Colonel Vindman will continue to do what he has always done: serve our country dutifully and with honor.”

 
 
 
 
By Ned Rozell, Anchorage Daily News: NASA prepares to launch rocket from Alaska’s Poker Flat range
 
 
 
 
By Rashika Jaipuriar, NBC News: Truckers fighting human trafficking are trained to be alert to late-night knocks Because traffickers often exploit the transportation system to move their victims, truckers are at an advantage to spot signs and make reports.
 
 
 
 
Sunday Morning: Calendar: Week of January 27
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: A soulful animated short film about loss and the unbreakable bonds of love; Thoreau on the true value of a tree; the stunning photomicroscopy of snow
 
 
 
 
By Tom Waterman, Towards Data Science: Google just published 25 million free datasets
Here’s what you need to know about the largest data repository in the world

 
 
 
 
By Jessica Wildfire, Medium: Use This Ancient Technique to Shut Down B.S. Artists It cuts right through the noise.
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Fire (Non-Impact): Wittman Tailwind, N625JS; fatal accident occurred April 15, 2018 in San Antonio, Texas; Loss of Visual Reference: Grumman G-164B, N3629E; fatal accident occurred March 27, 2018 in Stockton, San Joaquin County, California; Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N4511Y; fatal accident occurred March 11, 2018 near Daybreak Airport (WA46), La Center, Clark County, Washington and more ->
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life: Cat House on the Kings: Senior House/Special Needs/Kittens; Important Things to Know for Caregivers to Help Someone with Dementia; Great Food Search—Best of 2019 and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Random_Canadian: Winter Knight
 
 
By Cheryl Phan, ArtzyFartzy Creations: Build a Custom Office Desk to Suit Your Individual Style
 
 

Recipes

By In The kitchen With Matt: Easy Hummus
 
 
By Faith Durand, The Kitchn: 25 Recipes You *Actually* Want to Eat During the Super Bowl


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 25, 2020

On This Day

1704 – The Battle of Ayubale results in the destruction of most of the Spanish missions in Florida.
The Apalachee massacre was a series of raids by English colonists from the Province of Carolina and their Indian allies against a largely peaceful population of Apalachee Indians in northern Spanish Florida that took place in 1704, during Queen Anne’s War. Against limited Spanish and Indian resistance, a network of missions was destroyed; most of the population either was killed or captured, fled to larger Spanish and French outposts, or voluntarily joined the English.

The only major event of former Carolina Governor James Moore’s expedition was the Battle of Ayubale, which marked the only large-scale resistance to the English raids. Significant numbers of the Apalachee, unhappy with the conditions they lived in under the Spanish, simply abandoned their towns and joined Moore’s expedition. They were resettled near the Savannah and Ocmulgee Rivers, where conditions were only slightly better.

Moore’s raiding expedition was preceded and followed by other raiding activity that was principally conducted by English-allied Creeks. The cumulative effect of these raids, conducted between 1702 and 1709, was to depopulate Spanish Florida beyond the immediate confines of Saint Augustine and Pensacola.

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Born On This Day

1895 – Florence Mills, American singer, dancer, and actress (d. 1927)
Florence Mills (born Florence Winfrey; January 25, 1896 – November 1, 1927),[1] billed as the “Queen of Happiness”, was an African-American cabaret singer, dancer, and comedian known for her effervescent stage presence, delicate voice, and winsome, wide-eyed beauty.

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FYI

By Eyewitness News: Papyrus to close all 260 stores, company says
 
 
 
 

By Danny Crichton, TechCrunch: Samasource CEO Leila Janah passes away at 37
 
 
 
 

By Charlie Ridgely, Comic Book: MoonPie Rips Apart Mr. Peanut’s Death With Hilarious “Definitely Alive” Press Release
 
 
 
 
By Brian Barrett, Wired: The Sneaky Simple Malware That Hits Millions of Macs How the Shlayer Trojan topped the macOS malware charts—despite its “rather ordinary” methods.
The best ways to protect yourself from Shlayer and other malware are similarly universal. Don’t click suspicious links, especially not surprise pop-up windows. Don’t install Flash in the year of our lord 2020, especially not from a site that’s promising a pirated livestream.

 
 
 
 

By Leslie Josephs, CNBC: Boeing’s 777X, the world’s largest twin-engine jet, takes off in maiden flight
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Lucky Fish Salad; Roadside Roast Duck and Momos; Charcuterie and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Happy ever after: why writers are falling out of love with marriage and more ->

 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: He pointed a laser at airplanes landing at Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport (KSRQ) – they were not his only target
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Cari @ Everything Pretty: Valentine’s Day DIYS

Recipes

Betty Crocker: Betty’s Five Slow-Cooker Commandments
 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Best Ever French Toast
 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Disneyland Copycat Churro Toffee
 
 
By Melissa Harrison Jameson, The Kitchn: Our 12 Easiest Slow Cooker Dinner Recipes (Ever)
 
 
By Geraldine Campbell, The Kitchn: The Super-Simple Biscuit Recipe I’ve Made Every Week This Month
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 12 Desserts You Won’t Believe Are Under 300-Calories
 
 
Food Network Kitchen: Best Macaroni and Cheese Recipes Make delicious macaroni and cheese on the stovetop or baked to gooey perfection in the oven.
 
 
By Meghan Splawn, The Kitchn: 10 Comforting Dinners That Start with Cauliflower
 
 
By Meghan Splawn, The Kitchn: Here’s How to Make Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Popcorn at Home


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 24, 2020

On This Day

1933 – The 20th Amendment to the United States Constitution is ratified, changing the beginning and end of terms for all elected federal offices.
The Twentieth Amendment (Amendment XX) to the United States Constitution moved the beginning and ending of the terms of the president and vice president from March 4 to January 20, and of members of Congress from March 4 to January 3. It also has provisions that determine what is to be done when there is no president-elect. The Twentieth Amendment was adopted on January 23, 1933.[1]

The amendment was designed largely to limit the “lame duck” period, the period served by Congress and the president after an election but before the end of the terms of those who were not re-elected. Because under the amendment Congressional terms begin before presidential terms, it is now the incoming Congress, rather than the outgoing one, that would hold a contingent election in the event that no candidate wins a majority of the electoral vote in a presidential election. The amendment also establishes procedures in the case that a president-elect dies, is not chosen, or otherwise fails to qualify prior to the start of a new presidential term.

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Born On This Day

1858 – Constance Naden, English poet and philosopher (d. 1889)
Constance Caroline Woodhill Naden (24 January 1858 – 23 December 1889) was an English writer, poet and philosopher. She studied, wrote and lectured on philosophy and science, alongside publishing two volumes of poetry. Several collected works were published following her death at the young age of 31. In her honour, Robert Lewins established the Constance Naden Medal and had a bust of her installed at Mason Science College (now the University of Birmingham). William Ewart Gladstone considered her one of the 19th century’s foremost female poets.

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FYI

John Karlen (born John Adam Karlewicz; May 28, 1933 – January 22, 2020) was an American character actor who played multiple roles (Willie Loomis, Carl Collins, William H. Loomis, Desmond Collins, Alex Jenkins and Kendrick Young) on the ABC serial Dark Shadows, in various episodes between 206 and 1245, which aired from 1966 to 1971.

In 1971, Karlen starred as the male lead in Daughters of Darkness. He played Harvey Lacey, husband of Mary Beth Lacey (played by Tyne Daly), on the CBS crime series Cagney & Lacey (1982–88). Karlen recently reprised the role of “Willie Loomis” for a new series of Dark Shadows audio dramas, produced by Big Finish Productions.

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One bullet each.
By Lorena Mongelli and Natalie Musumeci, The New York Post: Thomas Valva, son of NYPD cop Michael, died of hypothermia in garage: police
 
 
 
 
By Whitney Johnson, Director of Visual and Immersive Experiences, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: HOW DO PHOTOGRAPHERS COVER THE WORLD’S DEADLY VIRUSES?
 
 
By Rachael Bale, ANIMALS Executive Editor, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: WHAT’S THE PRICE FOR MISTREATING CAPTIVE TIGERS?
 
 
 
 
Tin Eye: Reverse Image Search Search by image and find where that image appears online
 
 
 
 
By Mark Frauenfelder: Boing Boing is 20 (or 33) years old today
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: New documentary by Institute for Rural Journalism recounts 20-year fight to honor WWII soldier with Medal of Honor; Some law enforcement argue that rural homeless services worsen the problem; advocate incarceration instead and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: How Time-Travel Works in Fiction: A Concise Breakdown of How Time Travel Functions in Popular Movies, Books & TV Shows; The Lost Neighborhood Buried Under New York City’s Central Park; Monty Python’s Terry Jones (RIP) Was a Comedian, But Also a Medieval Historian: Get to Know His Other Side and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Little House Big Alaska: DIY Valentine’s Day Dishtowels
 
 
 
 

Recipes

A Taste of Alaska: Baby Back Ribs in the Instant Pot
 
 
A Taste of Alaska: Lemon Bars


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 23, 2020

On This Day

1556 – The deadliest earthquake in history, the Shaanxi earthquake, hits Shaanxi province, China. The death toll may have been as high as 830,000.
The 1556 Shaanxi earthquake, or Huaxian earthquake (simplified Chinese: 华县大地震; traditional Chinese: 華縣大地震; pinyin: Huáxiàn Dàdìzhèn), or Jiajing earthquake (Chinese: 嘉靖大地震; pinyin: Jiājìng Dàdìzhèn), is the deadliest earthquake in recorded history: according to imperial records approximately 830,000 people lost their lives.[4]

It occurred on the morning of 23 January 1556 in Shaanxi, during the Ming dynasty. More than 97 counties in the provinces of Shaanxi, Shanxi, Henan, Gansu, Hebei, Shandong, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu and Anhui were affected. Buildings were damaged slightly in the cities of Beijing, Chengdu and Shanghai.[5] An 840-kilometre-wide (520 mi) area was destroyed,[6] and in some counties as much as 60% of the population was killed.[7] Most of the population in the area at the time lived in yaodongs, artificial caves in loess cliffs; these collapsed in great numbers, causing many casualties.

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Born On This Day

1813 – Camilla Collett, Norwegian novelist and activist (d. 1895)
Jacobine Camilla Collett (born Wergeland) (23 January 1813 – 6 March 1895) was a Norwegian writer, often referred to as the first Norwegian feminist. She was also the younger sister of Norwegian poet Henrik Wergeland, and is recognized as being one of the first contributors to realism in Norwegian literature. Her younger brother was Major General Joseph Frantz Oscar Wergeland.

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FYI

James Charles Lehrer (/ˈlɛərə/; May 19, 1934 – January 23, 2020)[1] was an American journalist and novelist.

Lehrer was the executive editor and a news anchor for the PBS NewsHour on PBS, known for his role as a debate moderator during U.S. presidential election campaigns. He authored numerous fiction and non-fiction books that drew upon his experience as a newsman, along with his interests in history and politics.[2]

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The Rural Blog: Staffing issues put one-third of rural ambulance services in jeopardy, National Rural Health Association says; N.C. papers collaborate on watchdog function, fill gaps in rural areas that have lost papers or attention of metro media; Small daily in western Massachusetts hopes newsroom changes will ‘help dispel the rumors of the death of print’ and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Rayne, SYFYWire: Walking sharks are creeping around, and it’s weirder than a Sharknado plot twist
 
 
 
 
By Clarissa-Jan Lim, BuzzFeed News: Tinder Users Can Soon Trigger A Panic Alarm If They Feel Unsafe On A Date Tinder users will be able to input details about their dates, share location services so the app tracks them during a date, and hit a panic button if they need to alert emergency services.
 
 
 
 
By Bill Chappell, NPR: Trump Administration Targets ‘Birth Tourism’ With New Visa Rule
The State Department plans to deny tourist visas to pregnant women if officials believe they are traveling here to secure American citizenship for their child by giving birth on U.S. soil.

The Trump administration says it is targeting the practice known as “birth tourism.” The State Department says that traveling to deliver a child in the U.S. is not “a legitimate activity for pleasure or of a recreational nature.”
 
 
 
 

David at Raptitude: When In Doubt, Make Soup
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-28R-200 Arrow, N2702R; accident occurred February 18, 2017 near Centennial Airport (KAPA), Englewood, Arapahoe County, Colorado and more ->

 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Amrita Khalid, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Caesar salad: A culinary chameleon

 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Conspiracy Theories; The Silurian Hypothesis and more ->
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: Optical Poems by Oskar Fischinger, the Avant-Garde Animator Despised by Hitler, Dissed by Disney; The Flute of Shame: Discover the Instrument/Device Used to Publicly Humiliate Bad Musicians During the Medieval Period; Actor Margaret Colin (VEEP, Independence Day) Joins Pretty Much Pop #28 to Take On the Trope of the Alpha Female
 
 
 
 
By Audra D. S. Burch, The New York Times: How 17 Outsize Portraits Rattled a Small Southern Town Newnan, Ga., decided to use art to help the community celebrate diversity and embrace change. Not everyone was ready for what they saw.

 
 
 
 
By Daniel M. Russell and Mario Callegaro, Scientific American: How to Be a Better Web Searcher Researchers who study how we use search engines share common mistakes, misperceptions, and advice.
 
 
 
 
Matthew Carberry, a blog, Windage and Elucidation: How a Card Carrying Liberal Professor Became a Card Carrying Liberal Armed American
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By inkybreadcrumbs: Recycled Coffee As Flocking Powder
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Kelli Foster, The Kitchn: 5 Family-Friendly Sheet Pan Dinners from Andrea Mathis of Beautiful Eats & Things
 
 
By curryandvanilla: NANKHATAI/NARAYAN KATAAR (INDIAN SHORTBREAD)
 
 
Recipe courtesy of Food Network Kitchen: Fudgy Keto Brownies
 
 
By Marianholdings: Dark Chocolate Mocha Truffles
 
 
Little House Big Alaska: Reese’s Peanut Butter Heart Cookies


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 22, 2020

On This Day

1889 – Columbia Phonograph is formed in Washington, D.C.
Columbia Records is an American record label owned by Sony Music Entertainment, a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, the North American division of Japanese conglomerate Sony. It was founded in 1887, evolving from the American Graphophone Company, the successor to the Volta Graphophone Company.[1] Columbia is the oldest surviving brand name in the recorded sound business,[2][3][4] and the second major company to produce records.[5] From 1961 to 1990, Columbia recordings were released outside North America under the name CBS Records to avoid confusion with EMI’s Columbia Graphophone Company. Columbia is one of Sony Music’s four flagship record labels, alongside former longtime rival RCA Records, as well as Arista Records and Epic Records.

Artists who have recorded for Columbia include AC/DC, Adele, Aerosmith, Louis Armstrong, Gene Autry, Count Basie, Nora Bayes, Bix Beiderbecke, Tony Bennett, Leonard Bernstein, Beyoncé, Blue Öyster Cult, Dave Brubeck, The Byrds, Mariah Carey, Pablo Casals, Johnny Cash, The Clash, The Cleveland Orchestra, Rosemary Clooney, Leonard Cohen, Ornette Coleman, Elvis Costello, Miles Davis, Neil Diamond, Celine Dion, Bob Dylan, Earth, Wind & Fire, Duke Ellington, 50 Cent, Flatt and Scruggs, Erroll Garner, Benny Goodman, Glenn Gould, Adelaide Hall, Herbie Hancock, Lauryn Hill, Billie Holiday, Vladimir Horowitz, Billy Joel, Blind Willie Johnson, Robert Johnson, Al Jolson, Janis Joplin, Andre Kostelanetz, Yo-Yo Ma, Johnny Mathis, John Mayer, George Michael, Mitch Miller, Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk, Billy Murray, Willie Nelson, The New York Philharmonic, The Philadelphia Orchestra, Pink Floyd, Santana, Frank Sinatra, Simon and Garfunkel, Bessie Smith, John Philip Sousa, Bruce Springsteen, Igor Stravinsky, Barbra Streisand, System of a Down, James Taylor, Bonnie Tyler, Ethel Waters, Weather Report, Paul Whiteman, Andy Williams, Bert Williams, Pharrell Williams, Bob Wills, and Bill Withers.

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Born On This Day

1867 – Gisela Januszewska, Jewish-Austrian physician (d. 1943)
Gisela Januszewska (also known by surnames Kuhn, Rosenfeld and Roda; 22 January 1867 – 2 March 1943) was an Austrian physician. Having earned her degree in Switzerland, she briefly worked in Germany before becoming the first female physician in the Bosnian town of Banja Luka. She received highest decorations for her service during the First World War and social activism in Austria afterwards, but was deported to a Nazi concentration camp, where she died, during the Second World War.

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FYI

By Morgan Phillips, Fox News: UK woman believed to be oldest female World War II veteran dead at 108
 
 
 
 
By Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian: Monty Python film director Terry Jones: full of fun and innocence – and a very naughty boy
 
 
 
 
By Mona Vajolahi Product Manager, Search, Google: A fresh way to revisit your online finds in Google Search
 
 
 
 

By Amanda Green, Mental Floss: 19 Things You Might Not Know Were Invented by Women Some that save time, some that save lives, and a few that make each day a whole lot easier.
 
 
 
 

By Joshua Benton, NiemanLab: Public infrastructure isn’t just bridges and water mains: Here’s an argument for extending the concept to digital spaces
 
 
 
 

By Carly Stern, Ozy: Harriet Tubman’s Last Great Humanitarian Act
Why you should care
After her Underground Railroad days, Tubman never stopped trying to help people.

 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Natasha Frost, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Mona Lisa: The invention of an icon
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: How the Female Scientist Who Discovered the Greenhouse Gas Effect Was Forgotten by History and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Blair, NPR: A History Of ‘Pettifogging’ For The Pettifoggers Among You
 
 
By Jason Sheehan, NPR: In ‘Agency,’ William Gibson Builds A Bomb That Doesn’t Boom (And That’s OK)
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Is Jane Austen the Antidote to Social Media Overload? More ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

A Taste of Alaska: Instant Pot Chicken and Chicken Stock


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 21, 2020

On This Day

1525 – The Swiss Anabaptist Movement is founded when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptize each other in the home of Manz’s mother in Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union.
Anabaptism (from Neo-Latin anabaptista,[1] from the Greek ἀναβαπτισμός: ἀνά- “re-” and βαπτισμός “baptism”,[2] German: Täufer, earlier also Wiedertäufer[a]) is a Christian movement which traces its origins to the Radical Reformation. The movement is generally seen as an offshoot of Protestantism, although this view has been challenged by some Anabaptists.[3][4][5]

Approximately 4 million Anabaptists live in the world today with adherents scattered across all inhabited continents. In addition to a number of minor Anabaptist groups, the most numerous include the Mennonites at 2.1 million, the German Baptists at 1.5 million, the Amish at 300,000 and the Hutterites at 50,000.[not verified in body]

In the 21st century there are large cultural differences between assimilated Anabaptists, who do not differ much from evangelicals or mainline Protestants, and traditional groups like the Amish, the Old Colony Mennonites, the Old Order Mennonites, the Hutterites and the Old German Baptist Brethren.

The early Anabaptists formulated their beliefs in the Schleitheim Confession, in 1527.[6][7] Anabaptists believe that baptism is valid only when candidates confess their faith in Christ and want to be baptized. This believer’s baptism is opposed to baptism of infants, who are not able to make a conscious decision to be baptized. Anabaptists are those who are in a traditional line with the early Anabaptists of the 16th century. Other Christian groups with different roots also practice believer’s baptism, such as Baptists, but these groups are not seen as Anabaptist. The Amish, Hutterites, and Mennonites are direct descendants of the early Anabaptist movement. Schwarzenau Brethren, Bruderhof, and the Apostolic Christian Church are considered later developments among the Anabaptists.

The name Anabaptist means “one who baptizes again”. Their persecutors named them this, referring to the practice of baptizing persons when they converted or declared their faith in Christ, even if they had been baptized as infants.[8] Anabaptists required that baptismal candidates be able to make a confession of faith that is freely chosen and so rejected baptism of infants. The early members of this movement did not accept the name Anabaptist, claiming that infant baptism was not part of scripture and was therefore null and void. They said that baptizing self-confessed believers was their first true baptism:

I have never taught Anabaptism…. But the right baptism of Christ, which is preceded by teaching and oral confession of faith, I teach, and say that infant baptism is a robbery of the right baptism of Christ.
— Hubmaier, Balthasar (1526), Short apology.[9]:204

Anabaptists were heavily and long persecuted starting in the 16th century by both Magisterial Protestants and Roman Catholics, largely because of their interpretation of scripture which put them at odds with official state church interpretations and with government. Anabaptism was never established by any state and therefore never enjoyed any associated privileges. Most Anabaptists adhered to a literal interpretation of the Sermon on the Mount which precluded taking oaths, participating in military actions, and participating in civil government. Some groups who practiced rebaptism, now extinct, believed otherwise and complied with these requirements of civil society.[b] They were thus technically Anabaptists, even though conservative Amish, Mennonites, Hutterites, and some historians consider them outside true Anabaptism. Conrad Grebel wrote in a letter to Thomas Müntzer in 1524:

True Christian believers are sheep among wolves, sheep for the slaughter… Neither do they use worldly sword or war, since all killing has ceased with them.[10]

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Born On This Day

1714 – Anna Morandi Manzolini, Spanish anatomist (d. 1774)
Anna Morandi Manzolini (21 January 1714 – 9 July 1774) was an internationally known anatomist and anatomical wax modeler, as lecturer of anatomical design at the University of Bologna.[1]

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FYI

Jalopnik.com: All Of GM’s LS Engines, Explained; Always Travel With Beer Koozies and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo: NASA Wants You to Pick One of These 9 Names for Its New Mars Rover and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: New Virus Kills Sixth Person After Human-to-Human Transmission Confirmed; Why the Latest FDA Sunscreen-in-the-Blood Study Shouldn’t Scare You; World’s Oldest Known Impact Crater Confirmed in Australia and more ->
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: The 9 Best Apps to Create Fast Graphic Designs; ‘Collapsologie’: Constructing an Idea of How Things Fall Apart and more ->
 
 
 
 

ILSR’s Community Broadband Networks Initiative: Satellite Subsidies Will Widen Digital Divide in Rural America; Community Broadband Media Roundup – January 21 and more ->
 
 
 
 

Gastro Obscura: The 1930s artichoke ban that took on the mafia; Peanut Butter Hamburger; Preserving History With Food and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Staff Writer, Classic Motor Sports: 10 Lessons All Racers Wish They’d Learned Earlier in Their Careers
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: Can You Spot Liars Through Their Body Language? A Former FBI Agent Breaks Down the Clues in Non-Verbal Communication; The Neuroscience of Drumming: Researchers Discover the Secrets of Drumming & The Human Brain and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Kristin Toussaint, Fast Company Compass: These salad vending machines are going to be a lot easier to find in New York Fresh Bowl aims to have 50 vending machines operating by the end of this year, and a total of 100 in 18 months.
 
 
 
 
By TCR Staff, The Crime Report: CNN, Anchorage Daily News Win 2020 John Jay/H.F. Guggenheim Justice Reporting Prizes
 
 
 
 

The Rural Blog: USDA proposes looser standards for school meals, pleasing food processors; a related proposal could help rural schools; Trump tells farmers more trade aid coming soon; Perdue says they hope and expect that will be the end of it; Paper’s investigation nails rural S.C. sheriff on corruption and more ->
 
 
 
 

The Havok Journal The Voice of the Veteran Community
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By TikiCrafter: Dark Chocolate Raspberry Medallions
 
 
By YuesFoodStory: NO BAKE Coffee Panna Cotta
 
 
By TOBY: How to Make Quinoa Burgers
 
 
By Jesse Szewczyk, The Kitchn: 10 Slow Cooker Dump Dinners Made with 5 Ingredients or Fewer
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 20, 2020

On This Day

1785 – Invading Siamese forces attempt to exploit the political chaos in Vietnam, but are ambushed and annihilated at the Mekong river by the Tây Sơn in the Battle of Rạch Gầm-Xoài Mút.
The Battle of Rạch Gầm-Xoài Mút (Vietnamese: Trận Rạch Gầm – Xoài Mút, Thai: การรบที่ซากเกิ่ม-สว่ายมุต) was fought between the Vietnamese Tây Sơn forces and an army of Siam in present-day Tiền Giang Province on January 20, 1785. It is considered one of the greatest victories in Vietnamese history.

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Born On This Day

1775 – André-Marie Ampère, French physicist and mathematician (d. 1836)
André-Marie Ampère (/ˈæmpɪər/;[1] French: [ɑ̃pɛʁ]; 20 January 1775 – 10 June 1836)[2] was a French physicist and mathematician who was one of the founders of the science of classical electromagnetism, which he referred to as “electrodynamics”. He is also the inventor of numerous applications, such as the solenoid (a term coined by him) and the electrical telegraph. An autodidact, Ampère was a member of the French Academy of Sciences and professor at the École polytechnique and the Collège de France.

The SI unit of measurement of electric current, the ampere, is named after him. His name is also one of the 72 names inscribed on the Eiffel Tower.

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FYI

By Nate Day, Fox News: Singer David Olney, 71, dead after suffering heart attack while performing
 
 
David Charles Olney (March 23, 1948 – January 18, 2020) was an American folk singer-songwriter.[1]
 
 

 
 
 
 
By John Blake, CNN: The one thing about Martin Luther King Jr.’s greatness everyone keeps missing
 
 
 
 
By Kaitlin Sullivan, NBC News: Marijuana is risky for people taking common heart medications How people ingest marijuana, along with the drug’s purity, are the biggest risk factors, doctors say.
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Kodachrome Images of Minneapolis Salvage Yards; Fast Winter Fun in Days Gone by on Otsego Lake and more ->
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass: 20 years ago, the dot-coms took over the Super Bowl and more ->
 
 
 
 
Webneel.com Daily Inspiration – 1400: Rain photography by eduard gordeev and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: A walrus obsession caused the downfall of Greenland Vikings; War of the Wasps; Madam C.J. Walker Museum & WERD Radio and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Decoding moos to know cow moods; Everything’s Coming Up Grouper; Naturally Dyed Sheets and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Why scientists fall for precariously balanced rocks; Crop-Growing Monoliths; Glacial Castle and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: 19 mistakes worth marveling at; Mistaken Murals and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Around the world in rare and beautiful apples; Route 66’s Elite Sake Brewer; White Mana Diner and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tanbusch, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Gardening Blogs
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Aerodynamic Stall/Spin: Zenair CH 601 XL Zodiac, N601PH; fatal accident occurred July 19, 2017 near Bradford County Airport (N27), Towanda, Pennsylvania; Eurocopter EC 130B4, N155GC: Fatal accident occurred February 10, 2018 in Peach Springs, Arizona and more ->
 
 
 
 
MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDLXXXVI): John Holliday Perry’s Private Underwater Habitat; Herbert Ponting’s Portraits from Captain Scott’s Antarctic Expedition; I Flew the Same Route as the 1920s Airmail Pilots, and Lived to Tell the Tale; “The Copper King Lounge” Union Pacific Streamliner, 1938.; Wuppertal, Germay, home to the world’s oldest operating monorail system; Casa de Retiro Espiritual; Lotte Reiniger, Early filmmaker and master of Shadow Puppets and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Trisha Yearwood: Cheese Boat
 
 
By Jesse Szewczyk, The Kitchn: 5 Quick Dinners That Start with a Pound of Ground Turkey
 
 
By Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Venison Carne Guisada
 
 
Food Network Kitchen: Peanut Butter-Chocolate No-Bake Cookies


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 19, 2020

On This Day

1764 – Bolle Willum Luxdorph records in his diary that a mail bomb, possibly the world’s first, has severely injured the Danish Colonel Poulsen, residing at Børglum Abbey.[7]
A letter bomb, also called parcel bomb, mail bomb, package bomb, note bomb, message bomb, gift bomb, present bomb, delivery bomb, surprise bomb, postal bomb, or post bomb, is an explosive device sent via the postal service, and designed with the intention to injure or kill the recipient when opened. They have been used in Israeli assassinations and in terrorist attacks such as those of the Unabomber. Some countries have agencies whose duties include the interdiction of letter bombs and the investigation of letter bombings.[1] The letter bomb may have been in use for nearly as long as the common postal service has been in existence, as far back as 1764 (see Examples).

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1813 – Henry Bessemer, English engineer and businessman (d. 1898)
Sir Henry Bessemer FRS (19 January 1813 – 15 March 1898) was an English inventor, whose steel-making process would become the most important technique for making steel in the nineteenth century for almost one hundred years from 1856 to 1950.[2][3] He also played a significant role in establishing the town of Sheffield as a major industrial centre.[4]

Bessemer had been trying to reduce the cost of steel-making for military ordnance, and developed his system for blowing air through molten pig iron to remove the impurities. This made steel easier, quicker and cheaper to manufacture, and revolutionized structural engineering. One of the most significant innovators of the Second Industrial Revolution, Bessemer also made over 100 other inventions in the fields of iron, steel and glass. Unlike most inventors, he managed to bring his own projects to fruition and profited financially from their success.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Gizmodo Science: The Most and Least Physically Active U.S. States; 436-Million-Year-Old Scorpion Was Among the Planet’s First Air Breathers and more ->
 
 
 
 
Carol Tice, Make A Living Writing: Writing Headlines: 16 Wicked-Smart Ways to Attract More Readers
 
 
 
 
By Brian Gallagher, Nautilus: The Case for Professors of Stupidity Why aren’t there more people studying the science behind stupidity?
On this past International Holocaust Remembrance Day, I reread a bit of Bertrand Russell. In 1933, dismayed at the Nazification of Germany, the philosopher wrote “The Triumph of Stupidity,” attributing the rise of Adolf Hitler to the organized fervor of stupid and brutal people—two qualities, he noted, that “usually go together.” He went on to make one of his most famous observations, that the “fundamental cause of the trouble is that in the modern world the stupid are cocksure while the intelligent are full of doubt.”
 
 
 
 
By Doug Horner, The Guardian: Bring up the bodies: the retired couple who find drowning victims Gene and Sandy Ralston are a married couple in their 70s, who also happen to be among North America’s leading experts at searching for the dead.
 
 
 
 

By Cassandra Jones, Scary Mommy: All Hail This Mom Of Twins Who Turns Off WiFi When Her Husband Is Pooping
 
 
 
 

By Zachary Crockett, The Hustle: Why it only costs $10k to ‘own’ a Chick-fil-A franchise The chicken chain is known for having the lowest entry cost of any major fast-food franchise — but there’s a catch.
 
 
 
 

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: What to do when the world gets you down; Mary Shelley’s father on parenting and how an early love of reading paves the path to happiness; and more
 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: Missing Grave; Witch Hunt Memorial and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: The chef restoring Appalachia’s world-class cuisine and more ->
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Beech B200 Super King Air, N547LM: Accident occurred January 16, 2020 near Unalaska Airport (PADU), Alaska
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Elderhood; Why Book Reviewing Isn’t Going Anywhere and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Ideas

By Penolopy Bulnick: Rainbow Ends Crochet Scarf
 
 
Perfectly DeStressed: Bread Box Charging Station
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Easy Grissini Breadstick Recipe
 
 
By agarkovahelena: Best Ever Coffee Beans Cookies
 
 
By Italianwikiblog: Make an Italian Coffee and Chocolate Extravaganza!
 
 
By YukonJulie: The Best Chocolate Shortbread Cookies Ever


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 18, 2020

On This Day

1886 – Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England.
Field hockey is a widely played team sport of the hockey family. The game can be played on grass, watered turf, artificial turf or synthetic field, as well as an indoor boarded surface. Each team plays with ten field players and a goalkeeper. Players commonly use sticks made out of wood, carbon fibre, fibre glass or a combination of carbon fibre and fibre glass in different quantities (with the higher carbon fibre stick being more expensive and less likely to break) to hit a round, hard, plastic hockey ball. The length of the hockey stick is based on the player’s individual height, the top of the stick usually comes to the players hip, taller players typically have taller sticks.[1] The sticks have a round side and a flat side only the flat face of the stick is allowed to be used, if the other side is used it results in a foul. Goalies often have a different kind of stick, however they can also use an ordinary field hockey stick. The specific goal-keeping sticks have another curve at the end of the stick, this is to give them more surface area to save the ball. The uniform consists of shin guards, shoes, shorts or a skirt, a mouthguard and a jersey.

Today, the game is played globally, mainly in parts of Western Europe, South Asia, Southern Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, and parts of the United States (primarily New England and the Mid-Atlantic states).[2][3]

Known simply as “hockey” in many territories, the term “field hockey” is used primarily in Canada and the United States where ice hockey is more popular. In Sweden, the term landhockey is used and to some degree also in Norway where it is governed by Norway’s Bandy Association.[4]

During play, goal keepers are the only players who are allowed to touch the ball with any part of their body (the player’s hand is considered part of the stick if on the stick), while field players play the ball with the flat side of their stick. If the ball is touched with the rounded part of the stick, it will result in a penalty. Goal keepers also cannot play the ball with the back of their stick.

Whoever scores the most goals by the end of the match wins. If the score is tied at the end of the game, either a draw is declared or the game goes into extra time or a penalty shootout, depending on the competition’s format. There are many variations to overtime play that depend on the league and tournament play. In college play, a seven-aside overtime period consists of a 10-minute golden goal period with seven players for each team. If a tie still remains, the game enters a one-on-one competition where each team chooses 5 players to dribble from the 25-yard line down to the circle against the opposing goalie. The player has 8 seconds to score on the goalie keeping it in bounds. The play ends after a goal is scored, the ball goes out of bounds, a foul is committed (ending in either a penalty stroke or flick or the end of the one on one) or time expires. If the tie still persists more rounds are played until one team has scored.

The governing body of field hockey is the International Hockey Federation (FIH), which is called the Fédération Internationale de Hockey in French, with men and women being represented internationally in competitions including the Olympic Games, World Cup, World League, Champions Trophy and Junior World Cup, with many countries running extensive junior, senior, and masters club competitions. The FIH is also responsible for organizing the Hockey Rules Board and developing the rules for the game.

A popular variant of field hockey is indoor field hockey, which differs in a number of respects while embodying the primary principles of hockey. Indoor hockey is a 5-a-side variant, with a field which is reduced to approximately 40 m × 20 m (131 ft × 66 ft). With many of the rules remaining the same, including obstruction and feet, there are several key variations: Players may not raise the ball unless shooting on goal, players may not hit the ball (instead using pushes to transfer the ball), and the sidelines are replaced with solid barriers which the ball will rebound off.[5] In addition, the regulation guidelines for the indoor field hockey stick require a slightly thinner, lighter stick than an outdoor stick.[6]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1853 – Marthinus Nikolaas Ras, South African farmer, soldier, and gun-maker (d. 1900)
Marthinus Nikolaas Ras (18 January 1853 – 21 February 1900)[1] was a South African farmer, soldier, and gun-maker who is considered the father of South African Artillery.[2]

Military service

He served in the First Boer War in the Potchefstroom commando under General Piet Cronjé. After witnessing the siege on the British fort at Potchefstroom by the Boers, he realized the need for artillery by the Boer forces to be able to successfully mount an assault the British blockhouses and forts. In the early stages of the conflict, the Boers seriously lacked cannons to enable them to assault the six British army forts in the Transvaal. In December 1880, he requested and obtained permission to return home to his farm Bokfontein, near Brits, to build a cannon for the Boer forces.[3]

Cannon building
He built two cannons (named the Ras cannons), the first being a 3 inch caliber, 4½ feet barrel cannon, named “Martienie” and the second a 2 inch caliber, 5½ barrel cannon, named “Ras”. The “Martienie” cannon was used to great effect on a British fort near Rustenburg, firing 93 shots and resulting in the subsequent surrender of the fort.[4]

Death
On 21 February 1900 during the Second Boer War, whilst on the way back to his farm at Bokfontein, he was ambushed and killed at Kaya’s Put by an impi (African war party) of the Kgatla tribal chief Linchwe, an African tribe fighting on the side of the British.[5][6]

 
 

FYI

By Deena Prichip, NPR: Meals On Wheels Serves Up Breakfast, Lunch And Community At Local Diner
 
 
 
 

American Songwriter: Letter From the Editor: An Opportunity To Be Great
 
 
 
 

Steven Paul Judd, The NTVS: FIRST DROP OF 2020! 👀 It’s Pretty Awesome.
 
 
 
 
By David S. Wallens, Classic Motorsports: Video: Mud-Throwing, Tail-Wagging, V8-Growling Ford Rally Racers
 
 
 
 

By Carly Stern, Ozy: Why You Might Want to Get Back to Working on the Railroad
Why you should care
Sometimes the benefits are what make the job a dream.

 
 

By Jeffery Mcgee, Ozy: Goat Farming: A Love Story How does an Aussie soldier go from serving in the military to goat farming in the U.S.?
Why you should care
Because love, and livestock, could save your life.

 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: Uncover 10 hidden secrets of the New York City Subway and more ->
 
 
Gastro Obscura: Okay, so you’re a rocket scientist and a whole hog pitmaster? Haven Brothers Diner; Pocari Sweat; America’s Forgotten Fruit and more ->
 
 
 
 

James Breakwell: The Bear’s New Home
The bear made it home. I should have given you this breaking news last week, but between the car crash, the never ending dinner-turned-twisted-sociology-experiment, and the pig fecal symphony that nearly made my house uninhabitable, it sort of slipped my mind.
 
 
 
 

bluebird of bitterness: Senior moments
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Sci-Fi Set in the 2020’s Predicted a Dim Decade for Humanity and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Hank Berrien, The Daily Wire: Kathy Bates: In My Day, Actresses Knew Why They Went To Men’s Hotel Rooms
 
 
 
 
Bluebird of Bitterness: Happy [cheery, merry, joyful, jocular, gleeful] birthday, Peter
 
 
 
 

By Oliver Smith, Outside: My Journey to Scotland’s Most Remote Pub
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

The Food Network: Eggs Benedict Casserole 
 
 
By Meghan Splawn: 10 Super-Nourishing Soups to Help You Feel Better Fast


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI January 17, 2020

On This Day

1648 – England’s Long Parliament passes the “Vote of No Addresses”, breaking off negotiations with King Charles I and thereby setting the scene for the second phase of the English Civil War.[5]
The Vote of No Addresses was a measure passed on 17 January 1648 by the English Long Parliament when it broke off negotiations with King Charles I. The vote was in response to the news that Charles I was entering into an engagement with the Scots. Cromwell in particular urged that no new negotiations be opened with Charles and the vote was carried by 141 to 91.[1] This led to the support of the general council on 8 January and a hitherto reluctant House of Lords convening a committee to approve it on 13 January.

By September 1648 the Second Civil War had been fought and the Royalists, the English Presbyterians, and their Scottish allies had been defeated by the New Model Army at Preston. The Army, now in the ascendancy, wished to resume negotiations with the king so Parliament repealed the measure in September 1648.[2][3]

The Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, after many addresses to His Majesty for the preventing and ending of this unnatural war raised by him against his Parliament and kingdom, having lately sent Four Bills to His Majesty which did contain only matter of safety and security to the Parliament and kingdom, referring the composure of all other differences to a personal treaty with His Majesty; and having received an absolute negative, do hold themselves obliged to use their utmost endeavours speedily to settle the present government in such a way as may bring the greatest security to this kingdom in the enjoyment of the laws and liberties thereof; and in order thereunto, and that the House may receive no delays nor interruptions in so great and necessary a work, they have taken these resolutions, and passed these votes, viz.:

That the Lords and Commons do declare that they will make no further addresses or applications to the King.
That no application or addresses be made to the King by any person whatsoever, without the leave of both Houses.
That the person or persons that shall make breach of this order shall incur the penalties of high treason.
That the two Houses declare they will receive no more any message from the King; and do enjoin that no person whatsoever do presume to receive or bring any message from the King to both or either of the Houses of Parliament, or to any other person.
— January 17, 1647/8. Old Parliamentary History, xvi. 489. See Great Civil War, iv. 50-53.[4]

 
 

Born On This Day

1877 – Marie Zdeňka Baborová-Čiháková, Czech botanist and zoologist (d. 1937)[9]
Dr. Marie Zdeňka Baborová-Čiháková (17 January 1877, Prague – 29 September 1937, Čelákovice) was the first female Czech botanist and zoologist.[1][2][3][4]

Works
Klapálek, František; Šulc, Karel; Babor, Josef Florián; Baborová-Čiháková, Marie Zdeňka; Janda, Jiří (1914). Velký illustrovaný přírodopis všech tří říší. II II (in Czech). Rašín : Ústř. naklad. a knihkup. učit. čsl. Retrieved 31 August 2018.

 
 

FYI

Vector’s World: Horsepower; Scrunched and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Mary Otto, Association of Health Care Journalists: Reporter uncovers ‘painful mistakes’ in one state’s handling of dentist errors
In this new Q&A for AHCJ, Kane describes how he tackled the reporting for the series and worked with newsroom colleagues to bring the story to life. He also offers advice to journalists who may want to take a closer look at a professional board in their state.
 
 
 
 
By Amanda Watts and Jason Hanna, CNN: Families of Canadians killed in Iran crash to receive $25,000 to help with first expenses, Trudeau says

 
 
 
 

Grassroots Motor Sports: Project Endurance Miata: Trading a Turbo for a V6, but Do We Install a Honda J35 or a GM LFX?
 
 
 
 

By Whitney Johnson, Director of Visual and Immersive Experiences, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: WHEN IS A PHOTOGRAPH ACCURATE?
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Site tracks how often each Congress member votes with Trump; could be helpful in covering this year’s elections; Retired rural reporter criticizes Facebook for allowing fake news; his op-ed is easily adaptable by all news media; Quick hits: Washington community tries a creative solution for its shortage of mental-health-care providers and more ->
 
 
 
 

News from Science: Scientists find way to make diphtheria treatment without injecting horses with toxin; Deciphering a cancer treatment’s dark side and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Sean Braswell, Ozy: The Unspeakable Childhood Trauma That Made a Golf Legend
Why you should care
For Ben Hogan, succeeding at golf was not just about competition but about survival.

 
 
 
 

Maura, Happy Deal Happy Day: 47 NEW Hard To Find 40-70% off Amazon Promo Code
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: The Anti-Conformist, Libertarian Philosophy That Shaped Rush’s Classic Albums; Hear Christopher Tolkien (RIP) Read the Work of His Father J.R.R. Tolkien, Which He Tirelessly Worked to Preserve and more ->
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Downtown Seattle Barnes & Noble store to close Saturday and more ->
 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Liz Webber, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Prohibition: A frosty glass of unintended consequences
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 

Ideas

Cari, Everything Pretty: 26 Home Remedies for Cold and Cough

Recipes