Category: FYI

FYI

FYI December 11, 2019

On This Day

1994 – A bomb explodes on Philippine Airlines Flight 434, en route from Manila, Philippines, to Tokyo, Japan, killing one. The captain is able to safely land the plane.
Philippine Airlines Flight 434, sometimes referred to as PAL434 or PR434, was a flight on December 11, 1994 from Cebu to Tokyo on a Boeing 747-283B that was seriously damaged by a bomb, killing one passenger and damaging vital control systems. The bombing was a test run of the unsuccessful Bojinka terrorist attacks. The Boeing 747 (tail number EI-BWF) was flying the second leg of a route from Ninoy Aquino International Airport (formerly Manila International Airport), Pasay City in the Philippines, to Narita International Airport, in Tokyo, Japan, with a stop at Mactan–Cebu International Airport, Cebu, in the Philippines. After the bomb detonated, 57-year-old veteran pilot Captain Eduardo “Ed” Reyes was able to land the aircraft, saving it and the remaining passengers and crew.[1]

Authorities later discovered that Ramzi Yousef, a passenger on the aircraft’s prior flight leg, had placed the explosive.[2][3] Yousef boarded the flight under the fake Italian name “Armaldo Forlani”,[4] an incorrect spelling of the name of the Italian legislator[5] Arnaldo Forlani. Yousef was later convicted of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.[3]

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Born On This Day

1863 – Annie Jump Cannon, American astronomer and academic (d. 1941)
Annie Jump Cannon (/ˈkænən/; December 11, 1863 – April 13, 1941) was an American astronomer whose cataloging work was instrumental in the development of contemporary stellar classification. With Edward C. Pickering, she is credited with the creation of the Harvard Classification Scheme, which was the first serious attempt to organize and classify stars based on their temperatures and spectral types. She was nearly deaf throughout her career. She was a suffragist and a member of the National Women’s Party.[2]

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FYI

Jalopnik.com: Ford CEO’s Vision For Stripping Cars Sounds Depressingly Similar To What Airlines Do and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo.com: How to Give Ring and Nest the Boot and Set Up Your Own Home Security Camera; Ring’s Hidden Data Let Us Map Amazon’s Sprawling Home Surveillance Network and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: Cannabis Is Getting More Popular, Especially Among People With Depression; New NYC Law Would Require New Buildings to Have Bird-Friendly Windows; Watch the Trippy Winning Videos of Nikon’s Microscopic Film Contest and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Sifter: The Shirk Report – Volume 555
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Midweek pick-me-up: Poet and philosopher David Whyte on courage, love, and hardship as the grounds for self-expansion
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Extending Medicaid pregnancy coverage could save lives; ‘We actually abandon women after delivery,’ doctor says and more->
 
 
 
 
By Kristen Dahlgren, NBC News: NBC’s Kristen Dahlgren shares the unusual breast cancer symptom she nearly missed
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: The Hunt As History And As Game and more ->
 
 
 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 10, 2019

On This Day

1665 – The Royal Netherlands Marine Corps is founded by Michiel de Ruyter
The Korps Mariniers is the elite infantry component of the Royal Netherlands Navy. The unit is specialised in special operations, operating under highly extreme conditions and amphibious warfare. The Korps Mariniers are a rapid reaction force that can be deployed to any location in the world within maximum 48 hours. Their motto is Qua Patet Orbis (“As Far As The World Extends”).

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Born On This Day

1885 – Elizabeth Baker, American economist and academic (d. 1973)[14]
Elizabeth Faulkner Baker (10 December 1885 – 30 January 1973) was an American economist and academic who specialized in scientific management and the relationship between employment and technological change, especially the role of women.

Personal life and education
Baker was born in Abilene, Kansas, on 10 December 1885 and served as dean of women and instructor in economics at Lewiston State Normal School (1915–17) and then dean of women at Ellensburg State Normal School (1917–18) while earning her Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of California in 1918. She received her M.A. in economics from Columbia University in 1919 and her Ph.D. in economics from the same university in 1925 while teaching at Barnard College.[1]

Career
Baker remained at Barnard for the rest of her career, serving as chair of the Department of Economics from 1940 until her retirement in 1952. During World War II, she served as a hearing officer for the National War Labor Board. She joined the Taylor Society, a group dedicated to the ideas of scientific management as espoused by Frederick Winslow Taylor, in the late 1920s and Baker was director of its New York section in 1944–46.[1]

 
 

FYI

Webneel: 30 Best 2020 New Year Wallpapers for your desktop and more ->

 
 
 
 
By Graham Lee Brewer, High Country News: This Cherokee congressman is for Trump – and Indian Country Markwayne Mullin, who is hard-right and white-passing, may not seem like an Indigenous lawmaker, but he’s no anomaly.
“It has nothing to do with eliminating my cows from farting, it has to do with that farm being deemed a hazard to the public health.”

 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Rural Iowa paper columnist retires after 70 years; House Democrats announce agreement with Trump administration on revised trade pact with Canada, Mexico; Chinese telecom giant, big supplier to rural wireless outfits, challenges FCC ban on use of subsidies to buy its goods; Multimedia NYT piece examines impact of opioid epidemic on the Class of 2000 in rural town in southeast Ohio and more ->

 
 
 
 

Atlas Obscura: How a WWI battlefield became a wildlife refuge; A Soldier in Disguise and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Plants Emit High-Pitched Sounds When They Get Cut, or Stressed by Drought, a New Study Shows; 82 Vintage Cookbooks, Free to Download, Offer a Fascinating Illustrated Look at Culinary and Cultural History and more ->
 
 
 
 

Today’s email was written by Holly Ojalvo, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Theory of mind: A think piece
 
 
 
 
By Mat Nashed, Ozy: The World’s First Female Fighter Pilot Had a Dark Side
Why you should care
Because the myth of Sabiha Gökçen is central to the myth of modern Turkey.

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By In The Kitchen With Matt: Red Velvet Cake Mix Crinkle Cookies
 
 
By FOOD By Lyds: Homemade Eggnog Custard

Food Network Kitchen: Pull-Apart Deviled Egg Wreath


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 09, 2019

On This Day

1872 – In Louisiana, P. B. S. Pinchback becomes the first African-American governor of a U.S. state.
Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback (born Pinckney Benton Stewart[citation needed], May 10, 1837 – December 21, 1921) was an American publisher and politician, a Union Army officer, and the first African American to become governor of a U.S. state. A Republican, Pinchback served as the 24th Governor of Louisiana from December 9, 1872, to January 13, 1873. He was one of the most prominent African-American officeholders during the Reconstruction Era.

Pinchback was born free in Macon, Georgia to Eliza Stewart, a freed mulatto woman, and William Pinchback, a white planter. His father raised the younger Pinchback and his siblings as his own children on his large plantation in Mississippi. After the death of his father in 1848, his mother took Pinchback and siblings to the free state of Ohio to ensure their continued freedom. After the start of the American Civil War, Pinchback traveled to Union-occupied New Orleans. There he raised several companies for the 1st Louisiana Native Guard, and became one of the few African Americans commissioned as officers in the Union Army.

Pinchback remained in New Orleans after the Civil War, becoming active in Republican politics. He won election to the Louisiana State Senate in 1868 and became the president pro tempore of the state senate. He became the acting Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana upon the death of Oscar Dunn in 1871 and briefly served as Governor of Louisiana after Henry C. Warmoth was suspended from office. He was the first African American to serve as a US governor. African Americans were increasingly disenfranchised in the South at the turn of the 20th century; Pinchback was the only African American to serve as governor of a U.S. state until 1890. After the contested 1872 Louisiana gubernatorial election, Republican legislators elected Pinchback to the United States Senate. Due to the controversy over the 1872 elections in the state, which were challenged by white Democrats, Pinchback was never seated in Congress.

Pinchback served as a delegate to the 1879 Louisiana constitutional convention, where he helped gain support for the founding of Southern University. In a Republican federal appointment, he served as the surveyor of US customs of New Orleans from 1882 to 1885. Later he worked with other leading men of color to challenge the segregation of Louisiana’s public transportation system, leading to the Supreme Court case of Plessy v. Ferguson. To escape increasing racial oppression, he moved with his family to Washington, D.C. in 1892, where they were among the elite people of color. He died there in 1921.

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Born On This Day

1779 – Tabitha Babbitt, American tool maker and inventor (d. 1853)
Sarah “Tabitha” Babbitt (December 9, 1779 – December 10, 1853) was an early American Shaker purported to be a tool maker and inventor. Inventions credited to her by the Shakers include the circular saw, the spinning wheel head, and false teeth. She was a member of the Harvard Shaker community.

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FYI

By Doha Madani, NBC News: Peter Frates, inspiration for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, dies at 34 “He was a noble fighter who inspired us all to use our talents and strengths in the service of others,” the Frates family said in a statement Monday.
 
 
 
 
By Marty Steinberg, CNBC: Paul Volcker, the Carter-Reagan Fed chairman who beat inflation, dies at age 92

 
 
 
 
CBS News: Cyberattack downs Pensacola computers hours after Navy base attack
 
 
 
 

By Christine Schmidt, NiemanLab: Want to start your own local online news outlet? With a new staff and a $1 million grant, LION Publishers wants to do more to help

 
 
 
 

The Rural Blog: FCC to scrap 4G LTE rural program, create $9 billion subsidy to bring fifth-generation wireless to rural areas; Sign up for Dec. 12 webinar that will discuss USDA’s latest ‘America’s Diverse Family Farms 2019’ report and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Stephanie Donovan, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Personal Growth Blogs
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDLXXXI): Cowboy Car Hops, Dallas, Texas, 1940; Laverie Valee, also known ‘Charmion’, a Trapeze Artist & a Strongwoman, 1897; Snow country children going to a New Year’s event, covered in straw capes to protect them from the weather; The Viral Photo of Mount Everest and the Untold Accounts of the People who were there; “Beaded Bag,“ 1880s-1890s, made by a Nimiipuu artist and more ->
 
 
By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDLXXX): This massive fireplace decorated for Christmas at the Biltmore Estate; A Microdot Camera, a vintage technology used by the CIA in the Cold War; Experimental electronic musician Conrad Schnitzler with equipment at the Berlin Wall; Iggy Pop’s High School Band; Wrocław Water Tower in Poland; This Winter Train in Finland and more ->
 
 
By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDLXXVII): Juni Ludowici’s ‘Round House’ on the River Thames, 1958; Discovered: A Long Lost Mixtape Lou Reed Made for Andy Warhol (with Unreleased Songs); The 250-yr-old Rope Bridge at Carrick-a-Rede, Ireland and more ->
 
 
By MessyNessy, 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCLXXVI): A Beguiling “Secret Garden” Apartment For Sale in London; This Cabin, complete with Rooftop Lookout; Conrad Veidt in the silent film The Indian Tomb, 1921 and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Keren Blankfeld, The New York Times: Lovers in Auschwitz, Reunited 72 Years Later. He Had One Question. Was she the reason he was alive today?
 
 
 
 
GlacierHub Newsletter — Dec. 9, 2019: This week’s Video of the Week features a short clip of researchers installing an automatic weather station on Yala Glacier in Nepal. More ->

 
 
 
 

Open Culture: How to Improve Your Memory: Four TED Talks Explain the Techniques to Remember Anything and more ->
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Convair C-131B Samaritan, N145GT; fatal accident occurred February 08, 2019 in the Atlantic Ocean; Flight Control System Malfunction/Failure: Robinson R44 Raven II, N484AB; accident occurred January 08, 2019 near Garner Field Airport (KUVA), Uvalde, Texas and more ->
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Whale skeletons come to life at ‘Bonehenge’; Beavers That Give a Damn and more ->

Ideas

New Life On a Homestead: 30 Cream of Tartar Uses That Will Surprise You
 
 

Recipes

Hank Shaw, Hunter Angler Gardener Cook: Bacon Butternut Squash Soup


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 08, 2019

On This Day

1927 – The Brookings Institution, one of the United States’ oldest think tanks, is founded through the merger of three organizations that had been created by philanthropist Robert S. Brookings.
The Brookings Institution is an American research group founded in 1916 on Think Tank Row in Washington, D.C.[2] It conducts research and education in the social sciences, primarily in economics, metropolitan policy, governance, foreign policy, and global economy and economic development.[3][4] Its stated mission is to “provide innovative and practical recommendations that advance three broad goals: strengthen American democracy; foster the economic and social welfare, security and opportunity of all Americans; and secure a more open, safe, prosperous, and cooperative international system.”[2]

Brookings has five research programs at its Washington, D.C. campus (Economic Studies,[5] Foreign Policy,[6] Governance Studies,[7] Global Economy and Development,[8] and Metropolitan Policy)[9] and three international centers based in Doha, Qatar (Brookings Doha Center);[10] Beijing, China (Brookings-Tsinghua Center for Public Policy);[11] and New Delhi, India (Brookings India).[12]

The University of Pennsylvania’s Global Go To Think Tank Index Report has named Brookings “Think Tank of the Year” and “Top Think Tank in the World” every year since 2008.[13] The Economist describes Brookings as “perhaps America’s most prestigious think-tank”.[14]

Brookings states that its staff “represent diverse points of view” and describes itself as non-partisan,[2][15] and various media outlets have alternately described Brookings as “conservative”,[16] “centrist”[17] or “liberal”.[18] An academic analysis of Congressional records from 1993 to 2002 found that Brookings was referred to by conservative politicians almost as frequently as liberal politicians, earning a score of 53 on a 1–100 scale with 100 representing the most liberal score.[19] The same study found Brookings to be the most frequently cited think tank by the U.S. media and politicians.[19]

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Born On This Day

1919 – Kateryna Yushchenko, Ukrainian computer scientist and academic (d. 2001)
Kateryna Lohvynivna Yushchenko (Ukrainian: Катерина Логвинівна Ющенко, Russian: Екатерина Логвиновна Ющенко, December 8, 1919, Chigirin – died August 15, 2001) was a Ukrainian computer and information research scientist, corresponding member of USSR Academy of Sciences (1976),[1] and member of The International Academy of Computer Science.[2] She developed one of the world’s first high-level languages with indirect address in programming, called the Address programming language. Over the period of her academic career, Yushchenko supervised 45 Ph.D students. Further professional achievements include Yushchenko being awarded two USSR State Prizes, The USSR Council of Ministers Prize, The Academician Glushkov Prize, and The Order of Princess Olga. Yushchenko was the first woman in the USSR to become a Doctor of Physical and Mathematical Sciences in programming.

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FYI

By Jordan Hoffman, Vanity Fair: Caroll Spinney, Sesame Street Puppeteer, Dies at Age 85 The voice of Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch goes silent.
 
 
By Robert D. McFadden, The New York Times: Caroll Spinney, Big Bird’s Alter Ego on ‘Sesame Street,’ Is Dead at 85 Besides the sweet-natured giant yellow bird, he also played the misanthropic bellyacher Oscar the Grouch.
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life: “Owl Be Home for Christmas By Donna Andrews: Review/Giveaway/Podcast” from Kings River Life Magazine, plus 11 more
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: The Fate of Fausto: Oliver Jeffers’s Lovely Painted Fable About the Absurdity of Greed and the Existential Triumph of Enoughness, Inspired by Vonnegut
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: The Author of ‘Simple Abundance’ Has Some New Advice for You and more ->
 
 
 
 
BY Zachary Crockett, The Hustle: Why some of America’s top CEOs take a $1 salary A number of high-profile execs have reduced their paycheck to a single dollar. But the gesture isn’t as altruistic as it seems.
 
 
 
 
American Thinker: Six Months at an Amazon Fulfillment Center; Veteran Spy Novelist John Le Carré Takes On Brexit in His Latest and more ->
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass: The days of threatening your cable company with cord cutting to get a cheaper rate are over; Apple just bought the first-ever batch of carbon-free aluminum and more ->
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Aerodynamic Stall/Spin: Cessna 550 Citation II, N941JM; accident occurred November 30, 2018 at Hector International Airport (KFAR), Fargo, Cass County, North Dakota; Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Cessna 172 Skyhawk, N7207A; accident occurred November 27, 2018 in Whittier, Alaska and more ->
 
 
 
 
Steven Savage: Shhhh! Stealth launch of my book . . .
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By msjbud: Chocolate Peanut Butter Ritz Cookies
 
 
By FOOD by Lyds: Christmas Sugar Cookies Recipe
 
 
Perfectly DeStressed: Sangria Gift Jar


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 07, 2019

On This Day

1942 – World War II: British commandos conduct Operation Frankton, a raid on shipping in Bordeaux harbour.
Operation Frankton was a commando raid on ships in the Nazi German occupied French port of Bordeaux in southwest France during the Second World War. The raid was carried out by a small unit of Royal Marines known as the Royal Marines Boom Patrol Detachment (RMBPD), part of Combined Operations inserted by HMS Tuna captained by Lieutenant-Commander Dick Raikes who, earlier, had been awarded the DSO for operations while in command of the submarine HMS Seawolf (47S). (The RMBPD would later form the Special Boat Service).

The plan was for six kayaks (called “canoes” by the British) to be taken to the area of the Gironde estuary by submarine. Twelve men would then paddle by night to Bordeaux. On arrival they would attack the docked cargo ships with limpet mines and then escape overland to Spain. Men from no.1 section were selected for the raid; including the commanding officer, Herbert ‘Blondie’ Hasler, and with the reserve Marine Colley the team was thirteen in total. One canoe was damaged while being deployed from the submarine and it and its crew therefore could not take part in the mission. Only two of the 10 men who launched from the submarine survived the raid: Hasler, and his no.2 in the canoe, Bill Sparks. Of the other eight, six were executed by the Germans while two died from hypothermia.

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Born On This Day

1915 – Leigh Brackett, American author and screenwriter (d. 1978)
Leigh Douglass Brackett (December 7, 1915 – March 18, 1978) was an American writer, particularly of science fiction, and has been referred to as the Queen of Space Opera.[1] She was also a screenwriter, known for her work on such films as The Big Sleep (1946), Rio Bravo (1959) and The Long Goodbye (1973). She also worked on an abandoned draft of The Empire Strikes Back (1980). She was the first woman shortlisted for the Hugo Award.

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FYI

Huff Post: Ron Leibman, ‘Angels In America’ And ‘Friends’ Actor, Dead At 82 The actor played a huge variety of roles in movies, theater and TV in a career that spanned six decades.
 
 
Ronald Leibman (October 11, 1937 – December 6, 2019) was an American actor. He won both the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actor in a Play in 1993 for his performance as Roy Cohn in Angels in America. Leibman also won a Primetime Emmy Award for his role as Martin ‘Kaz’ Kazinsky in his short-lived crime drama series Kaz. In 1986 Leibman was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor for the role of Morris Huffner in Christmas Eve. Leibman is most widely known for providing the voice of Ron Cadillac in Archer and for playing Dr. Leonard Green, Rachel’s rich, short-tempered father, on the sitcom Friends.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
Jezebel.com: I’m a Truck Guy Now; This Week In Meghan McCain Brings More Unpopular Opinions and Joy Behar’s Funeral and more ->
 
 
 
 
Jalopnik.com: Uber’s First-Ever Safety Report Reveals 3,045 Sexual Assaults And 9 Murders In 2018; What It Takes (And Costs) To Fly Your Own Plane; Is Electric The Answer For The Mazda Miata?; TEN Publishing Kills 19 Automotive Print Publications Including Automobile [Updated] More ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: Invasive Mice Seen Attacking Adult Albatrosses on Breeding Colony for the First Time and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Four Fun Friday Kodachrome Car Photographs No. 232
 
 
 
 
By Phil Helsel, NBC News: Three fired over Nazi salute photo with West Virginia corrections employees More than 30 others have been suspended without pay as officials investigate the photo that appears to show trainees making a Nazi salute in uniform.
 
 
 
 
By Nick Fouriezos, Ozy: Where Tech Is Helping People Become Better Neighbors
Why you should care
Because the new networking could mean sharing space — and friendship — with your neighbors.

 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Loss of Visual Reference: Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N537HF; accident occurred November 30, 2017 at Kendall-Tamiami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida and more ->
 
 
 
 
A Taste of Alaska: Grandma’s Naughty Dinosaurs
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: When you own an artwork, you don’t own the copyright: Danish artist wins injunction against watchmakers planning to cut up painting; Should Barnes & Noble rethink its supply chain? More->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: How a Bach Canon Works. Brilliant.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Lldevita, Alaska Master Gardener Blog: Crop Rotation
 
 
By lldevita, Alaska Master Gardener Blog: Cover crops
 
 
By lldevita, Alaska Mater Gardener Blog: Water conservation in the garden

Recipes

By Lindsay Champion, the Kitchn: 31 Lazy Dinners to Make Every Night in December
 
 
The Food Network: 9 Pastry-Chef Hacks for Better Holiday Cookies When you make a ton of cookies for a living, you pick up some clever tricks along the way.
 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Simple English Toffee
 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Reese’s Copycat Peanut Butter Balls


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 06, 2019

On This Day

1884 – The Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., is completed.

The Washington Monument is an obelisk on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate George Washington, once commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and the first President of the United States. Located almost due east of the Reflecting Pool and the Lincoln Memorial,[2] the monument, made of marble, granite, and bluestone gneiss,[3] is both the world’s tallest predominantly stone structure and the world’s tallest obelisk,[A] standing 554 feet 7 11⁄32 inches (169.046 m) tall according to the U.S. National Geodetic Survey (measured 2013–14) or 555 feet 5 1⁄8 inches (169.294 m) tall according to the National Park Service (measured 1884).[B] It is the tallest monumental column in the world if all are measured above their pedestrian entrances.[A] Overtaking the Cologne Cathedral, it was the tallest structure in the world between 1884 and 1889, after which it was overtaken by the Eiffel Tower in Paris.

Construction of the monument began in 1848 and was halted from 1854 to 1877 due to a lack of funds, a struggle for control over the Washington National Monument Society, and the American Civil War. Although the stone structure was completed in 1884, internal ironwork, the knoll, and installation of memorial stones were not completed until 1888. A difference in shading of the marble, visible approximately 150 feet (46 m) or 27% up, shows where construction was halted and later resumed with marble from a different source. The original design was by Robert Mills, but he did not include his proposed colonnade due to a lack of funds, proceeding only with a bare obelisk. The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1848; the first stone was laid atop the unfinished stump on August 7, 1880; the capstone was set on December 6, 1884; the completed monument was dedicated on February 21, 1885;[14] and officially opened October 9, 1888.

The Washington Monument is a hollow Egyptian style stone obelisk with a 500-foot (152.4 m) tall column and a 55-foot (16.8 m) tall pyramidion. Its walls are 15 feet (4.6 m) thick at its base and 1 1⁄2 feet (0.46 m) thick at their top. The marble pyramidion has thin walls only 7 inches (18 cm) thick supported by six arches, two between opposite walls that cross at the center of the pyramidion and four smaller corner arches. The top of the pyramidion is a large marble capstone with a small aluminum pyramid at its apex with inscriptions on all four sides. The lowest 150 feet (45.7 m) of the walls, constructed during the first phase 1848–1854, are composed of a pile of bluestone gneiss rubble stones (not finished stones) held together by a large amount of mortar with a facade of semi-finished marble stones about 1 1⁄4 feet (0.4 m) thick. The upper 350 feet (106.7 m) of the walls, constructed during the second phase 1880–1884, are composed of finished marble surface stones, half of which project into the walls, partially backed by finished granite stones.[15]

The interior is occupied by iron stairs that spiral up the walls, with an elevator in the center, each supported by four iron columns, which do not support the stone structure. The stairs contain fifty sections, most on the north and south walls, with many long landings stretching between them along the east and west walls. These landings allowed many inscribed memorial stones of various materials and sizes to be easily viewed while the stairs were accessible (until 1976), plus one memorial stone between stairs that is difficult to view. The pyramidion has eight observation windows, two per side, and eight red aircraft warning lights, two per side. Two aluminum lightning rods connected via the elevator support columns to ground water protect the monument. The monument’s present foundation is 37 feet (11.3 m) thick, consisting of half of its original bluestone gneiss rubble encased in concrete. At the northeast corner of the foundation, 21 feet (6.4 m) below ground, is the marble cornerstone, including a zinc case filled with memorabilia.[15] Fifty American flags fly on a large circle of poles centered on the monument.[16] In 2001, a temporary screening facility was added to the entrance to prevent a terrorist attack.[17] An earthquake in 2011 slightly damaged the monument, and it was closed until 2014.[18] It was closed again for elevator system repairs, security upgrades, and mitigation of soil contamination from August 2016 to September 2019.

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Born On This Day

1904 – Ève Curie, French-American journalist and pianist (d. 2007)
Ève Denise Curie Labouisse (French pronunciation: ​[ɛv dəniz kyʁi labwis]; December 6, 1904 – October 22, 2007) was a French and American writer, journalist and pianist. Ève Curie was the younger daughter of Marie Skłodowska-Curie and Pierre Curie. Her sister was Irène Joliot-Curie and her brother-in-law Frédéric Joliot-Curie. Ève was the only member of her family who did not choose a career as a scientist and did not win a Nobel Prize, although her husband Henry Richardson Labouisse, Jr. did collect the Nobel Peace Prize in 1965 on behalf of UNICEF. She worked as a journalist and authored her mother’s biography Madame Curie and a book of war reportage, Journey Among Warriors.[1][2] From the 1960s she committed herself to work for UNICEF, providing help to children and mothers in developing countries.

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FYI

Leonard J. Goldberg (January 24, 1934 – December 4, 2019) was an American film and television producer.[1] He had his own production company, Mandy Films (formerly Panda Productions).[2] He served as head of programming for ABC, and was president of 20th Century Fox. Goldberg was also the executive producer of the CBS series Blue Bloods.

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By Bruce Haring, Nellie Andreeva, Deadline: ‘Blue Bloods’ Cast Reacts To Death Of Producer Leonard Goldberg
 
 
 
 
By Associated Press, NBC News: Pearl Harbor veteran’s interment to be last on sunken Arizona The last three living USS Arizona survivors plan to be laid to rest with their families.
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Dumbo octopus; Double wide and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Ryan Prior, CNN, The Good Stuff: A 5-year-old boy’s entire kindergarten class showed up for his adoption hearing
 
 
 
 
By Rob Fox, Rare: This Crazy Looking Body Armor Protects Small Dogs from Coyotes and Other Attacks
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Grundy, Va., is an example of how hard it is to revive a coal town, and perhaps other places in the industrial heartland; Appalachian writer suggests three recent books that provide a more complex treatment of the region than most; Quick hits: Lyme disease vaccine could be near; owner of small Alaskan newspaper offers to sell it for nothing and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Ryan Saavedra, The Daily Wire: Famed Host Jeremy Clarkson Unloads On Greta Thunberg: ‘Mad,’ ‘Dangerous,’ ‘Go Back To School And Shut Up’
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Annaliese Griffin, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Obsession: Amelia Earhart: Commercial aviation’s biggest booster
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: We Need Diverse Agents; US vs. Apple and more ->
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Midweek pick-me-up: The difficult art of giving space in love – Rilke on freedom, togetherness, and the secret to a good marriage
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Radical Tea Towels Offer a Graphic Crash Course in Progressive American History; Music Is Truly a Universal Language: New Research Shows That Music Worldwide Has Important Commonalities; David Sedaris Teaches Storytelling & Humor His New Masterclass
 
 
 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 05, 2019

On This Day

1082 – Ramon Berenguer II, Count of Barcelona is assassinated.
Ramon Berenguer II the Towhead[1] or Cap de estopes[2] (1053 or 1054 – December 5, 1082) was Count of Barcelona from 1076 until his death. He was the son of Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona and Almodis de La Marche.[3] The Chronicle of San Juan de la Pena called him, “. . . exceeding brave and bold, kind, pleasant, pious, joyful, generous, and of an attractive appearance”.[4] Because of the extremely thick hair he had on top of his head, he was known as Cap d’Estop.”

He succeeded his father, Ramon Berenguer I, Count of Barcelona, as co-ruler with his twin brother, Berenguer Ramon, in 1075.[5] The twins failed to agree and divided their possessions between them, against the will of their late father. Ramon Berenguer the Towhead, so called because of the thickness and colour of his hair, was killed while hunting in the woods in 1082.[6] His brother, who went on to become the sole ruler of Catalonia, was credited by popular opinion of having orchestrated this murder.[6] Berenguer Ramon II the Fratricide[6] was later succeeded by Ramon Berenguer’s son, Ramon Berenguer III.

Family and issue
Ramon Berenguer married Mahalta (or Maud) of Apulia, born ca. 1059, died 1111/1112, daughter of Duke Robert Guiscard and of Sikelgaita de Salerno.[7] Following his murder, she remarried to Aimery I of Narbonne, and was the mother of his son Aimery II.

Ramon Berenguer and Mahalta’s son, Ramon Berenguer III (before 1082–1131), was count of Barcelona and Provence.

 
 

Born On This Day

1896 – Ann Nolan Clark, American historian, author, and educator (d. 1995)
Ann Nolan Clark, born Anna Marie Nolan (December 5, 1896 – December 13, 1995), was an American writer who won the 1953 Newbery Medal.

Biography
Born in Las Vegas, New Mexico in 1896, Clark graduated from New Mexico Normal School New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas at age 21, and married Thomas Patrick Clark on August 6, 1919. She gave birth to an only son, Thomas Patrick, Jr., who later died as a pilot in World War II.[1]

She began her career teaching English at the Highlands University. However, in the early 1920s, she transferred to a job teaching Native American children how to read for the Tesuque pueblo people, which lasted for 25 years. Clark found that the underfunded Tesuque School couldn’t afford any substantial instructional material. In the process of teaching the children about literature, she incorporated their voices and stories to write In My Mother’s House, and other books for the 1st to 4th grade one-room schoolhouse. She writes about this process, and about her travels to many parts of Central and South America, in her adult nonfiction book, Journey to the People.

Between 1940 and 1951, the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs published 15 of her books, all relating to her experiences with the Native Americans. Her book In My Mother’s House, illustrated by Pueblo artist Velino Herrera, was named a Caldecott Honor book in 1942.[2]

In 1945, the Institute for Inter-American Affairs sent Clark to live and travel for five years in Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru, and Brazil.[3] Those experiences led her to write books such as Magic Money, Looking-for-Something, and Secret of the Andes, which won the 1953 Newbery Medal. In the 1940s she also wrote books for the Haskell Foundation and the Haskell Indian Nations University at Lawrence, KS; one of them ” The Slim Butte Raccoon” was illustrated by Andrew Standing Soldier.

She also won the Catholic Library Association’s 1963 Regina Medal, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ 1962 Distinguished Service Award. Clark died in 1995 in Arizona, after writing 31 books which took a glance at Native American culture, mostly through the eyes of its children.[4]

Mrs. Clark’s birth family was well known in the early 20th century in her hometown of Las Vegas, New Mexico, and their home, the Nolan House, is on the National Register of Historic Places as one of the first quarry stone houses there.
 
 

FYI

By Rachael Bale, ANIMALS Executive Editor, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: How far will coyotes go? More ->
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blogspot: Rural and Republican areas have seen the most dramatic income gains and losses in the past few years; Former agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack scrutinized for big salary from farmer-funded dairy promotion group and more ->
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: The Long Game of Creativity: If You Haven’t Created a Masterpiece at 30, You’re Not a Failure; What the Great Pyramid of Giza Would’ve Looked Like When First Built: It Was Gleaming, Reflective White and more ->
 
 
 
 

Chuck Wendig Terrible Minds: Gifts For Writers 2019
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Nicolás Rivero, edited by Annaliese Griffin, and produced by Tori Smith, Quartz Obsession: Krampus: You better watch out
 
 
 
 

National Science Foundation: A Message from the Director of the National Science Foundation; Reframing the dangers Antarctica’s meltwater ponds pose to ice shelves and sea level and more ->
 
 
 
 
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Recipes

A Taste of Alaska: Keto Cranberry Salad


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 04, 2019

On This Day

1867 – Former Minnesota farmer Oliver Hudson Kelley founds the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry (better known today as the Grange).
The Grange, officially named The National Grange of the Order of Patrons of Husbandry, is a fraternal organization in the United States that encourages families to band together to promote the economic and political well-being of the community and agriculture. The Grange, founded after the Civil War in 1867, is the oldest American agricultural advocacy group with a national scope. The Grange actively lobbied state legislatures and Congress for political goals, such as the Granger Laws to lower rates charged by railroads, and rural free mail delivery by the Post Office.

In 2005, the Grange had a membership of 160,000, with organizations in 2,100 communities in 36 states. It is headquartered in Washington, D.C., in a building built by the organization in 1960. Many rural communities in the United States still have a Grange Hall and local Granges still serve as a center of rural life for many farming communities.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1777 – Juliette Récamier, French businesswoman (d. 1849)
Jeanne Françoise Jullie Adélaïde Récamier (French pronunciation: ​[ʒan fʁɑ̃swaz ʒyli adela.id ʁekamje]; 3 December 1777 – 11 May 1849), known as Juliette (French pronunciation: ​[ʒyljɛt]), was a French socialite, whose salon drew Parisians from the leading literary and political circles of the early 19th century.[1] As an icon of neoclassicism, Récamier cultivated a public persona of herself as a great beauty and her fame quickly spread across Europe. She befriended many intellectuals, sat for the finest artists of the age, and spurned an offer of marriage from Prince Augustus of Prussia.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

MRAK CHALLENGE: GATHER THEIR STORIES
The generation that remembers Dec. 7, 1941 is slipping away from us. Some of them were children when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor 78 years ago. If they were five or older, they likely remember vividly where they were when they learned of the attack, and what happened next in their lives.

Today’s MRAK challenge: Call someone you know who is in their 80s or 90s, and ask them where they were when they heard the news of the attack. Write down the details of their account. Send the story to Suzanne@mustreadalaska.com, and I’ll compile them for Saturday’s online edition of Must Read Alaska. Thank you!

First story is in!

BEND, OREGON: Marlys was a 12-year-old child in Bend. Her father, Bob Prentice, was a minister at the Presbyterian church and he and his wife Doris were at the church for their pastoral duties on Dec. 7, 1941, a Sunday, while Marlys was sick at home. At about noon, Marlys turned on the radio, tuned to the only station they had — KBND — and heard news of the attack crackle through the tubes. “I was laying in my bed and I was horrified. I was scared. When I heard my parents’ car pulling into the driveway, I leaned over the banister looking straight down the steps and shouted: ‘The Japanese have bombed Pearl Harbor!'” That’s how my parents heard the news.

“I didn’t say Japs — we were trained not to say things like that. Then the downstairs radio went on and we never left the radio that day. The president’s voice — I won’t forget when he came on the radio and said ‘We are at war.'”

“It drained our little town of all the young dads and lads overnight to create a big Army and Air Force. One of the members of the church — my father’s best friend and hunting buddy — signed up right away, and was killed in action, and so was my piano teacher’s son. The church was packed on Dec. 14, as people came to hear what my dad, the preacher, had to say.”

Send your story here.

 
 
 
 

CBS News: “I was being penalized for having breast cancer”: Survivor fights with insurance over follow-up tests
As for Neill’s bill? After CBS News contacted Aetna to ask about her case, it reversed course, saying, “We mistakenly did not apply the appropriate policy when Ms. Neill appealed. We apologize for this mistake.”

Neill said she doesn’t believe it.

“It’s all about money. The bottom line,” Neill said.

Aetna told us it will reprocess Neill’s claim and reimburse her for any out-of-pocket costs. We asked whether any other women were affected by that mistake but were told no, that Aetna believes this is “an isolated issue.”

But if you have a story to tell us about Aetna, mammograms or other medical prices, visit CBSNews.com/healthcosts. You can also email us at healthcosts@cbsnews.com.
 
 
 
 

The Guardian: Flashy fish: electric eel powers Tennessee aquarium’s Christmas tree Special system connected to Miguel’s tank enables his naturally occurring shocks to power strands of lights on a nearby tree
 
 
 
 

By Gianluca Mezzofiore, CNN: A massive waterfall formed on Greenland’s ice sheet. Here’s why it matters
 
 
 
 
Google Fiber: All in on a Gig

 
 
 
 

By Victoria Jaggard, SCIENCE Executive Editor, National Geographic: TODAY’S BIG QUESTION: Should we sacrifice our skies for 5G service?
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Three ‘Culture of Health’ prize winners are rural and more ->
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice: Do We Have Minds of Our Own? More ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 03, 2019

On This Day

1901 – In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt delivers a 20,000-word speech to the House of Representatives asking Congress to curb the power of trusts “within reasonable limits”.
The 1901 State of the Union Address was given on Tuesday, December 3, 1901, by the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt. It was presented to both houses of the 57th United States Congress, but he was not present. He stated, “The Congress assembles this year under the shadow of a great calamity. On the sixth of September, President McKinley was shot by an anarchist while attending the Pan-American Exposition at Buffalo, and died in that city on the fourteenth of that month.” He concluded it with, “Indeed, from every quarter of the civilized world we received, at the time of the President’s death, assurances of such grief and regard as to touch the hearts of our people. In the midst of our affliction we reverently thank the Almighty that we are at peace with the nations of mankind; and we firmly intend that our policy shall be such as to continue unbroken these international relations of mutual respect and good will.” [1]

 
 

Born On This Day

1810 – Louisa Susannah Cheves McCord, American author and political essayist (d. 1879)[4]
Louisa Susannah Cheves McCord (December 3, 1810 – November 23, 1879), was an American author from South Carolina, best known as a political essayist. McCord, the daughter of Langdon Cheves, was born in 1810, in South Carolina. She was educated in Philadelphia. In 1840, she married David James McCord, becoming a widow in 1855. She mainly resided in Columbia, South Carolina.[1]

She was active as an author from the 1840s onward, and her production is regarded as an important contribution of Southern Antebellum literature. McCord’s writings consisted principally of essays and reviews, and she wrote well on the subject of political economy. Her published volumes included, My Dreams, a volume of poems, published in Philadelphia in 1848; Sophisms of the Protective Policy. A translation from the French of Bastiat, published in New York. 1848; Caius Gracchus. A five-act tragedy, published in New York, 1851. McCord was a contributor to the “Southern Quarterly Review,” and the “Southern Literary Messenger,” for a number of years from 1849. Her poetry was simple and clearly uttered.[1] Henry Timrod, Paul Hamilton Hayne, William Gilmore Simms, William Henry Trescot, Requier and James Matthews Legaré were her contemporaries; some of these were among her personal friends.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Nic Newman, NiemanLab: Inspired by The Daily, dozens of daily news podcasts are punching above their weight worldwide
 
 
 
 
By Jennifer Kutz, GIF connoisseur: Psh, think you can guess the top GIF expressions of 2019?
 
 
Sasha Blair-Goldensohn Software Engineer, Google Maps: How I’m making Maps better for wheelchair users like me
 
 
 
 

By Jon Swartz, Market Watch: How Amazon created AWS and changed technology forever
 
 
By Jon Fortt, Annie Palmer, CNBC: Amazon just partnered with Verizon to improve 5G speeds
 
 
 
 

By Mike Wehner, BGR: There it is! NASA finally spotted crash site of India’s Moon lander
 
 
 
 
Larry Page and Sergey Brin Founders: A letter from Larry and Sergey
 
 
 
 

ILSR’s Community Broadband Networks Initiative: Christopher Honored at October Broadband Communities Event and more ->
 
 
 
 

Webneel Daily Inspiration 1352: Frog widlife photography; Beautiful peacock photo by musicismylife and more ->
 
 
 
 

The Rural Blog: Webinars next week on rural suicide prevention, increasing rural household access to community solar power programs and more ->
 
 
 
 

Fast Company Compass: A holiday gift guide for people who hate plastic, Looking for the perfect holiday gift for your coworkers? We’ve got 6 and more ->
 
 
 
 

Gastro Obscura: America’s Lost Railroad Cuisine; Monastery Brewery and more ->
 
 
 
 
By George Stone, TRAVEL Executive Editor, National Geographic: Today’s Big Question: What do you learn traveling while female?

 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Clive James & Jonathan Miller (Both RIP) Talk Together About How the Brain Works; Punk Dulcimer: The Ramones’ “I Wanna Be Sedated” Played on the Dulcimer and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Paul Anthony Jones, Mental Floss: 20 Slang Terms From World War I One of the subtlest and most surprising legacies of the First World War is its effect on our language.

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Organikmechanic: Reusing a Defunct Top-Loading Washing Machine by Converting It to Pedal Power – Step-by-step
 
 
New Life On A Homestead: DIY Flannel Board and Felt Learning Activities for Kids

Recipes

By FancyNancyAnn: Sous Vide Pulled Pork Shoulder for Simple Family Meals


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI December 02, 2019

On This Day

1823 – Monroe Doctrine: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President James Monroe proclaims American neutrality in future European conflicts, and warns European powers not to interfere in the Americas.
The Monroe Doctrine was a United States policy of opposing European colonialism in the Americas beginning in 1823. It stated that further efforts by various European states to take control of any independent state in North or South America would be viewed as “the manifestation of an unfriendly disposition toward the United States.”[1] At the same time, the doctrine noted that the U.S. would recognize and not interfere with existing European colonies nor meddle in the internal concerns of European countries. The Doctrine was issued on December 2, 1823 at a time when nearly all Latin American colonies of Spain and Portugal had achieved, or were at the point of gaining, independence from the Portuguese and Spanish Empires.

President James Monroe first stated the doctrine during his seventh annual State of the Union Address to Congress. The term “Monroe Doctrine” itself was coined in 1850.[2] By the end of the 19th century, Monroe’s declaration was seen as a defining moment in the foreign policy of the United States and one of its longest-standing tenets. It would be invoked by many U.S. statesmen and several U.S. presidents, including Ulysses S. Grant, Theodore Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, and Ronald Reagan.

The intent and impact of the Monroe Doctrine persisted with only small variations for more than a century. Its stated objective was to free the newly independent colonies of Latin America from European intervention[3] and avoid situations which could make the New World a battleground for the Old World powers, so that the U.S. could exert its own influence undisturbed. The doctrine asserted that the New World and the Old World were to remain distinctly separate spheres of influence, for they were composed of entirely separate and independent states.[4]

After 1898, Latin American lawyers and intellectuals reinterpreted the Monroe doctrine in terms of multilateralism and non-intervention. In 1933, under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the U.S. went along with the new reinterpretation, especially in terms of the Organization of American States.[5]

The U.S. government feared the victorious European powers that emerged from the Congress of Vienna (1814–1815) would revive monarchical government. France had already agreed to restore the Spanish monarchy in exchange for Cuba.[6] As the revolutionary Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) ended, Prussia, Austria, and Russia formed the Holy Alliance to defend monarchism. In particular, the Holy Alliance authorized military incursions to re-establish Bourbon rule over Spain and its colonies, which were establishing their independence.[7]:153–5

Great Britain shared the general objective of the Monroe Doctrine, albeit from an opposite standpoint and ultimate aim, and even wanted to declare a joint statement to keep other European powers from further colonizing the New World. The British Foreign Secretary George Canning wanted to keep the other European powers out of the New World fearing that its trade with the New World would be harmed if the other European powers further colonized it. In fact, for many years after the Monroe Doctrine took effect, Britain, through the Royal Navy, was the sole nation enforcing it, the U.S. lacking sufficient naval capability. Allowing Spain to re-establish control of its former colonies would have cut Great Britain off from its profitable trade with the region.[3] For that reason, Canning proposed to the U.S. that they mutually declare and enforce a policy of separating the New World from the Old World. The U.S. resisted a joint statement because of the recent memory of the War of 1812, leading to the Monroe administration’s unilateral statement.

However, the immediate provocation was the Russian Ukase of 1821[8] asserting rights to the Pacific Northwest and forbidding non-Russian ships from approaching the coast.[9][10]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1898 – Indra Lal Roy, Indian lieutenant and first Indian fighter aircraft pilot (d. 1918)
ndra Lal Roy (Bengali: ইন্দ্রলাল রায়), DFC (2 December 1898 – 22 July 1918) is the sole Indian World War I flying ace.[1][2] He is designated as First Indian Fighter Aircraft Pilot. While serving in the Royal Flying Corps and its successor, the Royal Air Force, he claimed ten aerial victories; five aircraft destroyed (one shared), and five ‘down out of control’ (one shared) in just over 170 hours flying time.[3]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Vector’s World: There ought to be a law! Grocery getter and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo: Evacuation Slide Mysteriously Falls Off of a Boeing Plane in Flight and Lands in Family’s Yard; T-Mobile’s 5G Network Goes Live Today: Here’s What You Should Know and more ->
 
 
 
 
Gizmodo Science: Amazon Officially Enters the Quantum Computing Race; Toxic Coastal Fog Linked to Dangerously High Levels of Mercury in Mountain Lions; Why Did the Sloth Cross the Road? To Pose For This Year’s ‘Capturing Ecology’ Photo Contest and more ->
 
 
 
 
GlacierHub Newsletter — Dec. 2, 2019: The McMurdo dry valleys are one of the world’s most extreme deserts. The region is also home to eleven named glaciers: the Suess, Canada, and Commonwealth Glaciers. More ->
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass: Portland plans to propose the strictest facial recognition ban in the country; We can save our planet and stop behaving like ‘robots,’ says environmental artist Agnes Denes and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Helen Regan and Omar Khan, CNN: Indian Navy welcomes its first woman pilot in major milestone for armed forces
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tanbusch, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Budgeting Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Leticia Lago, Developer Marketing: Creating stargazing apps and the perfect loaf
 
 
 
 

One bullet.

By David K. Li, NBC News: Pennsylvania mom arrested, charged with murdering her young children Lisa Snyder was also booked on suspicion of endangering welfare of children, tampering with evidence and sexual intercourse with an animal.
 
 
 
 
By Joshua Benton, Nieman Lab: An old FCC rule is being used to justify shrinking the Dayton “Daily” News to three days a week
 
 
 
 
By Tyler McCarthy | Fox News: ‘Dancing with the Stars’ pro Louis van Amstel furious after teacher lectures his kid about having two dads
The boy told his dads that he understood what the substitute was saying, but said he didn’t speak up because he’s had two failed adoptions before and didn’t want his dads to rethink their decision, with his final court hearing coming up on Dec. 19.
 
 
 
 
By Amanda Wicks Contributor, Pitchfork: Lil Bub, Famous Internet Cat, Dead at 8
 
 
 
 
By Dominic Rech, CNN: Scientists used speakers to make dead coral reefs sound healthy. The fish came back
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Rural HIV infection rates rising as urban rates fall; crisis ‘can’t be ignored any longer’ writes j-school professor; Trade bailout payments predicted to account for nearly a quarter of all farm income in 2019, according to USDA report and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: You Can Sleep in an Edward Hopper Painting at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts: Is This the Next New Museum Trend? Twin Peaks Actually Explained: A Four-Hour Video Essay Demystifies It All and more ->
 
 
 
 

Recipes