Category: FYI

FYI

FYI January 17, 2022

On This Day

1562 – France grants religious toleration to the Huguenots in the Edict of Saint-Germain.[5]
The Edict of Saint-Germain, also known as the Edict of January, was a landmark decree of tolerance promulgated by the regent of France, Catherine de’ Medici, in January 1562. The act represented the culmination of several years of slowly liberalising edicts which had begun with the 1560 Edict of Amboise. The edict provided limited tolerance to the Protestant Huguenots in the Roman Catholic realm, though with counterweighing restrictions on their behaviour. After two months the Paris Parlement would be compelled to register it by the rapidly deteriorating situation in the capital. The direct enforced impact of the edict would be highly limited by the subsequent outbreak of the first French Wars of Religion but it would form the foundation for subsequent toleration edicts as first in the Edict of Amboise and then more famously with the Edict of Nantes of 1598.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1898 – Lela Mevorah, Serbian librarian (d. 1972)[20]
Lela A. Mevorah (17 January 1898 – 13 November 1972)[1] was a Serbian librarian and head of the Central Medical Library at the University of Belgrade Faculty of Medicine.

Mevorah was born in Belgrade to a Jewish family, the youngest of the four children and only daughter of Avram Mevorah, who worked in the Royal Currency Exchange with his father, and Esther (Koen) Mevorah, who formerly ran a wholesale store with her sister. In World War I, Lela Mevorah volunteered as a nurse at the age of sixteen. Her brothers served in the Royal Serbian Army. She completed high school in Nice, France. Her father did not permit her to study medicine, but she did study philosophy in Paris.[1]

In World War II, Mevorah’s father and two of her brothers were killed by Nazis in the Holocaust. Her brother Moše, then a lieutenant colonel in the Royal Yugoslav Army, was captured in 1941 and interred in a German POV camp, where he painted portraits of over 600 fellow prisoners. Lela Mevorah was herself captured in 1941 and interred in camps in Albania and Italy. In 1943, following Mussolini’s death, the prisoners at Ferramonti di Tarsia were released, and Mevorah spent the rest of the war in Asti before returning to Serbia.[1]

In 1946 the Central Medical Library was founded by Dr. Matija Ambrozić, who ran the library alone until Mevorah joined him there in 1947. Soon, she was appointed head of the Library, a post she held until her death in 1972.[1]

The books of the University of Belgrade Faculty of Medicine were destroyed in the April 1941 Nazi bombing of the city. Materials for the new Library initially came from books liberated from the Germans by the National Liberation Army and donors including the United Jugoslav Fund from America, the World Health Organization, the British Council, the American Library in Belgrade, the embassy of France, and French scientists.[2] By 1959 the Library had built a collection of 15,000 books and 850 journals.[2]

Mevorah was cognizant of the need and the difficulties of accumulating current medical materials in a country with limited resources. In 1962 she wrote, “Diseases do not know borders; furthermore, progress and new methods of treatment should not know them either. Innovation should be accessible at the same time to a scientist as well as a physician lost in some remote area.” She created a library bulletin about future publications in order to assist libraries with purchasing current materials with limited budgets. With her language skills she was able to assist doctors and students with foreign language materials.[1]

 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
By Sam Kelly, MIT Press Reader: How the FBI Destroyed the Careers of 41 Women in TV and Radio At the dawn of the Cold War era, dozens of progressive women working in radio and television were placed on a media blacklist and forced from their industry. Carol Stabile explores this shameful period in American history.
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: Charles and Ray Eames’ Powers of Ten Updated to Reflect Our Modern Understanding of the Universe
 
 
By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: Hear Debussy Play Debussy’s Most Famous Piece, “Clair de lune” (1913)
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DLXXXVI): Martin Luther King, Jr., arrested for “loitering,” Montgomery, Alabama, 1958; Sixty Years Ago, NASA Scientists Found That Women Would Be Better Astronauts. Their Work Was Never Published.; The Original GOAT; The creation of a Georgian billionaire’s pleasure garden; Villa Majorelle; The Mechanism used to cryo-freeze the first cryopreserved human in history (born in 1893); The Boys Who Ran Away from Home on a 747 and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Rocky Parker, Beyond Bylines: 6 Bad Writing Habits to Ditch in 2022
 
 
By Rocky Parker, Beyond Bylines: Our Favorite Theater Blogs, Act 2
 
 
By Cory Max Montoya, Beyond Bylines: Lifestyle Vlogs to Follow for a Healthy, Productive 2022
 
 
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Some Notes on DEIJ and Conservation
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Garage Avenger: Lazy Susan 2.0 (Sushi Train)
 
 
TheMachineMan: 3D Printable Fully Function Automatic Chicken Door
 
 
By Minimal Pocket Generator: Warp Knitting on a Round Knitting Loom
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Cookwewill: Breaded Chicken Wings | Pan Fried
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Skillet Spinach Alfredo Chicken Pot Pie
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 10 Bite-Sized Sweets
 
 
By The Crazy Diva: Eggnog Quick Bread with an Eggnog Glaze Recipe
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 16, 2022

On This Day

1707 – The Scottish Parliament ratifies the Act of Union, paving the way for the creation of Great Britain.[11]
The Acts of Union (Scottish Gaelic: Achd an Aonaidh) were two Acts of Parliament: the Union with Scotland Act 1706 passed by the Parliament of England, and the Union with England Act passed in 1707 by the Parliament of Scotland. They put into effect the terms of the Treaty of Union that had been agreed on 22 July 1706, following negotiation between commissioners representing the parliaments of the two countries. By the two Acts, the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland—which at the time were separate states with separate legislatures, but with the same monarch—were, in the words of the Treaty, “United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain”.[2]

The two countries had shared a monarch since the Union of the Crowns in 1603, when King James VI of Scotland inherited the English throne from his double first cousin twice removed, Queen Elizabeth I. Although described as a Union of Crowns, and in spite of James’s acknowledgement of his accession to a single Crown,[3] England and Scotland were officially separate Kingdoms until 1707 (as opposed to the implied creation of a single unified Kingdom, exemplified by the later Kingdom of Great Britain). Prior to the Acts of Union there had been three previous attempts (in 1606, 1667, and 1689) to unite the two countries by Acts of Parliament, but it was not until the early 18th century that both political establishments came to support the idea, albeit for different reasons.

The Acts took effect on 1 May 1707. On this date, the Scottish Parliament and the English Parliament united to form the Parliament of Great Britain, based in the Palace of Westminster in London, the home of the English Parliament.[4] Hence, the Acts are referred to as the Union of the Parliaments.

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Born On This Day

1882 – Margaret Wilson, American author (d. 1973)
Margaret Wilhelmina Wilson (January 16, 1882 – October 6, 1973) was an American novelist. She was awarded the 1924 Pulitzer Prize for The Able McLaughlins.

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FYI

By Bobby Finger, Eater: Who’s Really Behind Joanna Gaines’s Perfect Peanut Butter Brownies? The New York Times credits the “Fixer Upper” star for this transcendent peanut butter and chocolate combination, but both the comment section and Gaines herself say otherwise
 
 
 
 
By Andy Greene, Rolling Stone: Me and the Monkee: A Final Visit With Michael Nesmith As one ‘Rolling Stone’ writer got to know Nesmith over the past decade, the Reluctant Monkee surprised him again and again. By the very end of his life, the man who was legendarily disgruntled over the Monkees’ prefab ways had come to love the band as much as anyone

 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, Andrew Marvel, To His Coy Mistress: But at my back I always hear Time’s wingèd chariot hurrying near
 
PG’s Note: In 1641, two years after Marvel completed his BA at Cambridge, his father drowned in “the Tide of Humber”—the estuary at Hull made famous by To his Coy Mistress.
 
 
The Passive Voice, From The Millions: The Hotel of the Idle Moon
 
 
 
 
By Alex Tanzi, Bloomberg News: ‘Great Retirement’ in U.S. Is Driven by Older Female Baby Boomers

 
 
 
 
By Greg Vanourek: What Leads to Happiness?

 
 
 
 
By Harry Baker, Live Science: Hungry badger accidentally unearths hundreds of ancient Roman coins in Spain The coins came from multiple locations across the Roman Empire.
 
 
By Patrick Pester, Live Science:n Enormous sea dragon fossil from 180 million years ago discovered in England It’s the biggest and most complete fossil of its kind ever discovered in the U.K.

 
 
 
 


 
 
By Eric Barker, Barking Up The Wrong Tree: “Because being selfless may be the most effective way to be selfish,”
 
 
 
 

By Mita Mallick, Harvard Business Review: When Being Indispensable Backfires
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Homemade on a Weeknight: Slow Cooker Pineapple Chicken
 
 

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 15, 2022

On This Day

1582 – Truce of Yam-Zapolsky: Russia cedes Livonia to the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth.[4]
The Truce or Treaty of Yam-Zapolsky (Ям-Запольский) or Jam Zapolski, signed on 15 January 1582 between the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Tsardom of Russia, was one of the treaties that ended the Livonian War.[1] It followed the successful Livonian campaign of Stephen Báthory, culminating in the siege of Pskov.

The truce was concluded with help of papal legate Antonio Possevino and was signed for the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth by King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania Stefan Batory and for Russia by Tsar Ivan the Terrible, and established a ten-year truce.

In the terms of the treaty, Russia renounced its claims to Livonia and Polotsk but conceded no core Russian territories as Batory returned the territories his armies had been occupying (particularly, he gave up on the siege of Pskov and left the town of Velikiye Luki. The truce was extended for twenty years in 1600, when a diplomatic mission to Moscow led by Lew Sapieha concluded negotiations with Tsar Boris Godunov. The truce was broken when the Poles invaded Muscovy in 1605.

One of the principal negotiators on the Polish side was Krzysztof Warszewicki.[2]

 
 

Born On This Day

1850 – Sofia Kovalevskaya, Russian-Swedish mathematician and physicist (d. 1891)[30]
Sofya Vasilyevna Kovalevskaya (Russian: Софья Васильевна Ковалевская), born Korvin-Krukovskaya (15 January [O.S. 3 January] 1850 – 10 February 1891), was a Russian mathematician who made noteworthy contributions to analysis, partial differential equations and mechanics. She was a pioneer for women in mathematics around the world – the first woman to obtain a doctorate (in the modern sense) in mathematics, the first woman appointed to a full professorship in northern Europe and one of the first women to work for a scientific journal as an editor.[1] According to historian of science Ann Hibner Koblitz, Kovalevskaya was “the greatest known woman scientist before the twentieth century”.[2]: 255 

Historian of mathematics Roger Cooke writes:

… the more I reflect on her life and consider the magnitude of her achievements, set against the weight of the obstacles she had to overcome, the more I admire her. For me she has taken on a heroic stature achieved by very few other people in history. To venture, as she did, into academia, a world almost no woman had yet explored, and to be consequently the object of curious scrutiny, while a doubting society looked on, half-expecting her to fail, took tremendous courage and determination. To achieve, as she did, at least two major results of lasting value to scholarship, is evidence of a considerable talent, developed through iron discipline.[3]: 1 

Her sister was the socialist Anne Jaclard.

There are several alternative transliterations of her name. She herself used Sophie Kowalevski (or occasionally Kowalevsky) in her academic publications.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Veronica Yvette Greenfield[1] (née Bennett; August 10, 1943 – January 12, 2022), known professionally as Ronnie Spector, was an American singer who formed the girl group the Ronettes in 1957 with her elder sister, Estelle Bennett, and their cousin, Nedra Talley. Ronnie fronted the group while record producer Phil Spector produced the majority of their recording output. The two were married in 1968 and separated in 1972.

Bennett sang lead on the Ronettes’ string of hits in the early-to-mid–1960s, including “Be My Baby” (1963), “Baby, I Love You” (1963), “The Best Part of Breakin’ Up” (1964) and “Walking in the Rain” (1964). In 1964, she launched a solo career with the single “So Young”. After 1980 she released five studio albums: Siren (1980), Unfinished Business (1987), Something’s Gonna Happen (2003), Last of the Rock Stars (2006) and English Heart (2016). Bennett also recorded one extended play, She Talks to Rainbows (1999). In 1986, her career revived when she was featured on Eddie Money’s song “Take Me Home Tonight”.

Bennett was sometimes referred to as the original “bad girl of rock and roll”.[2][3] In 1990, she published a memoir, Be My Baby: How I Survived Mascara, Miniskirts, and Madness, Or, My Life as a Fabulous Ronette.[4] In 2007, she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Ronettes.[5]

Read more ->

 
 

 
 
 
 
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: The Bialetti Moka Express: The History of Italy’s Iconic Coffee Maker, and How to Use It the Right Way
 
 
 
 
The Backyard Naturilist: Birds Need Water in Winter
 
 
Mike’s Backyard Nursery: How to Propagate Grapes from Hardwood Cuttings.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Chipotle Chicken Taco Salads
 
 

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 14, 2022

On This Day

1939 – Norway claims Queen Maud Land in Antarctica.[11]

Queen Maud Land (Norwegian: Dronning Maud Land)[note 1] is a roughly 2.7-million-square-kilometre (1.0-million-square-mile)[4] region of Antarctica claimed by Norway as a dependent territory.[5] It borders the claimed British Antarctic Territory 20° west and the Australian Antarctic Territory 45° east. In addition, a small unclaimed area from 1939 was annexed on 12 June 2015.[6] Positioned in East Antarctica, it makes out about one-fifth of the continent, and is named after the Norwegian queen Maud of Wales (1869–1938).

In 1930, the Norwegian Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen was the first person known to have set foot in the territory. On 14 January 1939, the territory was claimed by Norway. On 23 June 1961, Queen Maud Land became part of the Antarctic Treaty System, making it a demilitarised zone. It is one of two Antarctic claims made by Norway, the other being Peter I Island. They are administered by the Polar Affairs Department of the Norwegian Ministry of Justice and Public Security in Oslo.

Most of the territory is covered by the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, and a tall ice wall stretches throughout its coast. In some areas further within the ice sheet, mountain ranges breach through the ice, allowing for birds to breed and the growth of a limited flora. The region is divided into, from West to East, the Princess Martha Coast, Princess Astrid Coast, Princess Ragnhild Coast, Prince Harald Coast and Prince Olav Coast:

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1862 – Carrie Derick, Canadian botanist and geneticist (d. 1941)[31]
Carrie Matilda Derick (January 14, 1862 – November 10, 1941)[2] was a Canadian botanist and geneticist, the first female professor in a Canadian university, and the founder of McGill University’s Genetics Department.[3][4]
Early life and education
Born in the Eastern Townships in Clarenceville, Canada East (now Quebec) in 1862, Derick was educated at the Clarenceville Academy (a Montreal grammar school).[3][5][6] She began teaching by the age of fifteen.[5][6] Derick later received teacher training at the McGill Normal School, graduating in 1881 as a Prince of Wales Gold Medal winner.[2][7] She then went on to become a school teacher in Clarenceville and Montreal, and later serving as a principal (at the age of nineteen) of the Clarenceville Academy.[5][6][2][8]

In 1889, Derick pursued a B.A. from McGill University, and graduated in 1890, at the top of her class in natural science with first-class honours, the highest GPA (94%) that year, and received the Logan Gold Medal.[3][5][6][2][7][8] Her graduating class included two other notable Canadian women: Elizabeth Binmore and Maude Abbott. She began teaching at the Trafalgar Institute for Girls in 1890, while also working part-time as McGill’s first female botany demonstrator.[3][6][2]

In 1891, Derick began her master’s program at McGill under David Penhallow and received her M.A. in botany within four years (1896), while holding two simultaneous jobs.[3][2][1] She then attended the University of Bonn, Germany, in 1901 and completed the research required for a Ph.D. but was not awarded an official doctorate since the University of Bonn did not give women Ph.D. degrees at the time.[3][6][2][9]

Derick also studied at Harvard University for three summers, the Royal College of Science, London in 1898, and the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts for seven summers.[6][2][7]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Ayun Halliday, Open Culture: The Origins of the Word “Gaslighting”: Scenes from the 1944 Film Gaslight
 
 
 
 
By Jim Robbins Photographs by Melissa Groo, Smithsonian: This Wonder Bird Flies Thousands of Miles, Non-Stop, as Part of an Epic Migration The more scientists learn about the Hudsonian godwit, the more they’re amazed—and worried
 
 
 
 
By Emma Colton, Fox News: Homeless man who helped rescue cop, children in fiery crash wished he could do more ‘It’s not about color, it’s about helping one another,’ Johnny Walker said
 
 
 
 

NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Ideas

By huplescat: Changing the Shape of Catch Lights in Photography
 
 
By Hypathie: Exquisite Rainbow Stories
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Air Fryer Pop-Tarts
 
 
New Life On A Homestead: 51 Pear Recipes for Smoothies and Desserts
 
 
By Kelli Foster, The Kitchn: 40 Easy Slow Cooker Chicken Dinners to Make Tonight
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 12 & 13, 2022

On This Day

1616 – The city of Belém, Brazil is founded on the Amazon River delta, by Portuguese captain Francisco Caldeira Castelo Branco.
Belém ([beˈlẽj];[2] Portuguese for Bethlehem; initially called Nossa Senhora de Belém do Grão Pará, in English Our Lady of Belém of Pará)[3] often called Belém of Pará,[4] is a Brazilian city, capital and largest city of the state of Pará in the country’s north. It is the gateway to the Amazon River with a busy port, airport, and bus/coach station. Belém lies approximately 100 km upriver from the Atlantic Ocean, on the Pará River, which is part of the greater Amazon River system, separated from the larger part of the Amazon delta by Ilha de Marajó (Marajo Island). With an estimated population of 1,499,641 people — or 2,491,052, considering its metropolitan area — it is the 11th most populous city in Brazil, as well as the 16th by economic relevance. It is the second largest in the North Region, second only to Manaus, in the state of Amazonas.

Founded in 1616 by the Kingdom of Portugal, Belém was the first European colony on the Amazon but did not become part of Brazil until 1775. The newer part of the city has modern buildings and skyscrapers. The colonial portion retains the charm of tree-filled squares, churches and traditional blue tiles. The city has a rich history and architecture from colonial times. Recently it witnessed a skyscraper boom.

Belém is also known as the Metropolis of the Brazilian Amazon region or the Cidade das Mangueiras (City of Mango Trees) due to the vast number of those trees found in the city. Brazilians often refer to the city as Belém do Pará (“Belém of Pará”) rather than just Belém, a reference to an earlier name for the city, Santa Maria de Belém do Grão Pará, and also to differentiate it from a number of other towns called Belém in Brazil, as well as the city of Bethlehem in the West Bank of Palestine. It is named after Santa Maria de Belém in Lisbon, also better known by its shortened name, Belém.

Belém is served by two airports: Val de Cans International Airport, which connects the city with the rest of Brazil and other cities in South America, North America (USA) and Europe (Lisbon) and Brig. Protásio de Oliveira Airport (formerly called Júlio César Airport) dedicated to general aviation. The city is also home to the Federal University of Pará and the Pará State University.

Read more ->
 
 
1939 – The Black Friday bushfires burn 20,000 square kilometers of land in Australia, claiming the lives of 71 people.
The Black Friday bushfires of 13 January 1939, in Victoria, Australia, were part of the devastating 1938–1939 bushfire season in Australia, which saw bushfires burning for the whole summer, and ash falling as far away as New Zealand. It was calculated that three-quarters of the State of Victoria was directly or indirectly affected by the disaster, while other Australian states and the Australian Capital Territory were also badly hit by fires and extreme heat. As of 3 November 2011, the event was one of the worst[clarification needed] recorded bushfires in Australia, and the third most deadly.[1]

Fires burned almost 2,000,000 hectares (4,900,000 acres) of land in Victoria, where 71 people were killed, and several towns were entirely obliterated. Over 1,300 homes and 69 sawmills were burned, and 3,700 buildings were destroyed or damaged.[2] In response, the Victorian state government convened a Royal Commission that resulted in major changes in forest management. The Royal Commission noted that “it appeared the whole State was alight on Friday, 13 January 1939”.[3]

New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory also faced severe fires during the 1939 season. Destructive fires burned from the NSW South Coast, across the ranges and inland to Bathurst, while Sydney was ringed by fires which entered the outer suburbs, and fires raged towards the new capital at Canberra.[4] South Australia was also struck by the Adelaide Hills bushfires.


Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1673 – Rosalba Carriera, Italian painter (d. 1757)[14]
Rosalba Carriera (12 January 1673[1][2] – 15 April 1757) was a Venetian Rococo painter. In her younger years, she specialized in portrait miniatures. It is for this that she was able to build a career in portraiture. Carriera would later become known for her pastel work, a medium appealing to Rococo styles for its soft edges and flattering surfaces. She is remembered as one of the most successful women artists of any era.[3]

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1810 – Ernestine Rose, American suffragist, abolitionist, and freethinker (d. 1892)[16]
Ernestine Louise Rose (January 13, 1810 – August 4, 1892)[1] was a suffragist, abolitionist, and freethinker who has been called the “first Jewish feminist.”[2] Her career spanned from the 1830s to the 1870s, making her a contemporary to the more famous suffragists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Largely forgotten in contemporary discussions of the American women’s rights movement, she was one of its major intellectual forces in nineteenth-century America.[3] Her relationship with Judaism is a debated motivation for her advocacy.[4] Although less well remembered than her fellow suffragists and abolitionists, in 1996, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame, and in 1998 the Ernestine Rose Society was founded to “revive the legacy of this important early nineteenth century reformer by recognizing her pioneering role in the first wave of feminism.”[5]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Sandra’s Alaska Recipes: SANDRA’S HEALTHY PAISLEY MINI MUFFIN PB TREATS

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 11, 2022

On This Day

1569 – First recorded lottery in England.[4]
A lottery is a form of gambling that involves the drawing of numbers at random for a prize. Some governments outlaw lotteries, while others endorse it to the extent of organizing a national or state lottery. It is common to find some degree of regulation of lottery by governments. The most common regulation is prohibition of sale to minors, and vendors must be licensed to sell lottery tickets. Although lotteries were common in the United States and some other countries during the 19th century, by the beginning of the 20th century, most forms of gambling, including lotteries and sweepstakes, were illegal in the U.S. and most of Europe as well as many other countries. This remained so until well after World War II. In the 1960s, casinos and lotteries began to re-appear throughout the world as a means for governments to raise revenue without raising taxes.

Lotteries come in many formats. For example, the prize can be a fixed amount of cash or goods. In this format, there is risk to the organizer if insufficient tickets are sold. More commonly, the prize fund will be a fixed percentage of the receipts. A popular form of this is the “50–50” draw, where the organizers promise that the prize will be 50% of the revenue.[citation needed] Many recent lotteries allow purchasers to select the numbers on the lottery ticket, resulting in the possibility of multiple winners.


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Born On This Day

1931 – Mary Rodgers, American composer and author (d. 2014)
Mary Rodgers (January 11, 1931 – June 26, 2014) was an American composer, author, and screenwriter, most famous for her novel Freaky Friday, which served as the basis of a 1976 film starring Jodie Foster, for which she wrote the screenplay, as well as three other versions. Her best-known musicals were Once Upon a Mattress and The Mad Show, and she contributed songs to Marlo Thomas’ successful children’s album Free to Be… You and Me.

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FYI

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Tuesday, January 11, 2022
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. DLXXXV): An Artist’s Utopian Vision from the Early 1900s; . An Historic Gatehouse for Sale might be Britain’s smallest Home; Pluto Lamps, Victorian Gas Lamps that sold hot cups of coffee, tea and cocoa; A Shoe-fitting fluoroscope, an active x-ray machine that was used in shoe stores to see how well shoes fit; Nobody Ever Remembers The Second-Worst Nuclear Incident That Happened 30 Years Before Chernobyl; Another French Chateau needs new Co-Owners; Would You have Partied at the Exorcist Lounge? (Detroit 1976); When the US made cartoons in the 1970s to prepare the country to switch to the metric system and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Olivia Campbell, Smithsonian Magazine: Part of Being a Domestic Goddess in 17th-Century Europe Was Making Medicines Housewives’ essential role in health care is coming to light as more recipe books from the pre-Industrial Revolution era are digitized.
 
 
 
 
By Barry Lopez, Orion: The Leadership Imperative

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Show Me Joe: How to Photograph Birds in Flight the Easy Way
 
 
By Donnalteris: Foggy Forest Painting Technique
 
 
By andersvoss: Recycled Vertical Planter
 
 
 
 

Recipes

Homemade on a Weeknight: Eggs Benny Casserole
 
 
Sandra’s Alaska Recipes: SANDRA’S MINI STUFFED ARTICHOKE AND PARM YUKON GOLD POTATOES
 
 
By Rhonda | Fun Country Life, Food Talk Daily: Homemade Tuna Noodle Casserole
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 5-Star Casseroles Everyone Will Love
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Better-For-You Chocolate Cupcakes
 
 
By Sugar Hi: Hand Painted Sugar Cookies
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 10, 2022

On This Day

1927 – Fritz Lang’s futuristic film Metropolis is released in Germany.[20]
Metropolis is a 1927 German expressionist science-fiction drama film directed by Fritz Lang, and written by Thea von Harbou in collaboration with Lang[5][6] from von Harbou’s 1925 novel of the same name. Intentionally written as a treatment, it stars Gustav Fröhlich, Alfred Abel, Rudolf Klein-Rogge, and Brigitte Helm. Erich Pommer produced it in the Babelsberg Studios for Universum Film A.G. (UFA). The silent film is regarded as a pioneering science-fiction movie, being among the first feature-length movies of that genre.[7] Filming took place over 17 months in 1925–26 at a cost of more than five million Reichsmarks,[8] or the equivalent of about €19,000,000 in 2020.[9]

Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder, the wealthy son of the city master, and Maria, a saintly figure to the workers, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes in their city and bring the workers together with Joh Fredersen, the city master. The film’s message is encompassed in the final inter-title: “The Mediator Between the Head and the Hands Must Be the Heart”.

Metropolis met a mixed reception upon release. Critics found it visually beautiful and powerful – the film’s art direction by Otto Hunte, Erich Kettelhut, and Karl Vollbrecht draws influence from opera, Bauhaus, Cubist, and Futurist design,[10] along with touches of the Gothic in the scenes in the catacombs, the cathedral and Rotwang’s house[3] – and lauded its complex special effects, but accused its story of being naive.[11] H. G. Wells described the film as “silly”, and The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction calls the story “trite” and its politics “ludicrously simplistic”.[3] Its alleged Communist message was also criticized.[12]

The film’s long running time also came in for criticism. It was cut substantially after its German premiere. Many attempts have been made since the 1970s to restore the film. In 1984, Italian music producer Giorgio Moroder released a truncated version with a soundtrack by rock artists including Freddie Mercury, Loverboy, and Adam Ant. In 2001, a new reconstruction of Metropolis was shown at the Berlin Film Festival. In 2008, a damaged print of Lang’s original cut of the film was found in a museum in Argentina. Per the opening explanation: “…The material was heavily damaged and, because it had been printed on 16mm film stock, does not have the full-aperture silent picture ratio. …In order to maintain the scale of the restored footage, the missing portion of the frame appears black. Black frames indicate points at which footage is still lost.” After a long restoration process that required additional materials provided by a print from New Zealand, the film was 95% restored and shown on large screens in Berlin and Frankfurt simultaneously on 12 February 2010.

Metropolis is now widely regarded as one of the greatest and most influential films ever made, ranking 35th in Sight & Sound’s 2012 critics’ poll.[13] In 2001, the film was inscribed on UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register, the first film thus distinguished.[14]

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Born On This Day

1827 – Amanda Cajander, Finnish medical reformer (d. 1871)[44]
Mathilda Fredrika “Amanda” Cajander, née Nygren (10 January 1827 – 23 February 1871),[1] was a Finnish deaconess and a pioneer within medical care in Finland.

Life
Cajander married the doctor Anders Cajander in 1848 and had two children. In 1856, by the age of 29, however, she was widowed and her children had died.[2] After this loss, Cajander moved to train as a deaconess at the Evangelical Deaconess Institute in Saint Petersburg.[3] The wealthy Finnish philanthropist Aurora Karamsin was familiar with the institute and when she decided to open a deaconess institution in Helsinki she invited Cajander to be its first principal.[4] The institute opened in December 1867,[5] during the great Famine of 1866–68. To begin with, the institute was modest – a small hospital with eight beds, an orphanage and an asylum – and aimed to primarily help women and children and to care for the sick.[4]

In 1869 Cajander founded a children’s home in Helsinki.[6]

She is buried in the Hietaniemi Cemetery in Helsinki.[7]

Legacy
Cajander and Karamsin are considered the first Christian philanthropists in Finland, and are credited with introducing the new idea of women having a vocation to work for the church.[4] The first deaconess educated in Finland became Cecilia Blomqvist. The secular nursing profession for women in Finland did not start until the nursing courses of Anna Broms in the 1880s.

 
 

FYI

The New York Times: 52 Places for a Changed World The 2022 list highlights places around the globe where travelers can be part of the solution.
 
 
 
 
By Thomas Curwen Staff Writer Photography by Allen J. Schaben, The Los Angeles Times: ‘There’s no room for error’: The humble tugboat’s crucial role in easing a global crisis
 
 
 
 
By Paula Cocozza, The Guardian: Always wanted to write? Booker winner George Saunders on how to get started
 
 
 
 
KarmaTube: The Log – Year 2
There are some things we see without seeing, but in them a whole world is held unto themselves. For the last couple of years, wildlife photographer Robert Bush Sr. has had a trail camera situated above a stream in the Pennsylvania wilderness. The “log” videos are mesmerizing and entertaining, as we observe how integral this log is to the life of the forest. What appears to be just a log is so much more…a dinner table, a roadway, a hunting post, a courting place, and a way to find home
 
 
 
 

By Laura Geggel, Live Science: ‘Truly remarkable’ fossils are rare evidence of ancient shark-on-shark attacks
 
 
 
 
NPR: This heroic dog traversed the interstate to lead police to her injured owner
 
 
I doubt there will be a problem finding housing for Tinsley while her (former?) owner is incarcerated for driving drunk. Condolences on the death of the passenger’s dog.
The driver of the vehicle has been charged by Vermont State Police with driving under the influence, with other charges pending. In a press release, officials said 31-year-old Cameron Laundry, who has been identified in media reports as Tinsley’s owner, “was intoxicated and sustained minor injuries.” The passenger suffered “serious injuries,” and his dog — a bulldog — was found dead at the scene.
 
 
 
 
The Horizons Tracker: It’s Important To Listen To Those Who Think Differently
 
 
 
 

Recipes

Coleen’s Recipes: BISCUITS FOR TWO

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 09, 2022

On This Day

1349 – The Jewish population of Basel, believed by the residents to be the cause of the ongoing Black Death, is rounded up and incinerated.[3]

The Basel Massacre

With the spread of the Black Death in the 14th century, there were pogroms against Jews triggered by rumours of well poisoning. Already at Christmas 1348, before the plague had reached Basel, the Jewish cemetery was destroyed and a number of Jews fled the city. In January 1349, there was a meeting between the bishop of Strasbourg and representatives of the cities of Strasbourg, Freiburg and Basel to coordinate their policy in face of the rising tide of attacks against the Jews in the region, who were nominally under imperial protection.

The pogrom was committed by an angered mob and was not legally sanctioned by the city council or the bishop. The mob captured all remaining Jews in the city and locked them into a wooden hut they constructed on an island in the Rhine (the location of this island is unknown, it was possibly near the mouth of the Birsig, now paved-over). The hut was set alight and the Jews locked inside were burned to death or suffocated.

The number of 300 to 600 victims mentioned in medieval sources is not credible; the entire community of Jews in the city at the time was likely of the order of 100, and many of them would have escaped in the face of persecution in the preceding weeks. A number of 50 to 70 victims is thought to be plausible by modern historians. Jewish children appear to have been spared, but they were forcibly baptized and placed in monasteries. It appears that also a number of adult Jews were spared because they accepted conversion.[3]

Similar pogroms took place in Freiburg on 30 January, and in Strasbourg on 14 February. The massacre had notably taken place before the Black Death had even reached the city. When it finally broke out in April to May 1349, the converted Jews were still blamed for well poisoning. They were accused and partly executed, partly expulsed. By the end of 1349, the Jews of Basel had been murdered, their cemetery destroyed and all debts to Jews declared settled.[4]

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Born On This Day

1892 – Eva Bowring, American lawyer and politician (d. 1985)
Eva Kelly Bowring (January 9, 1892 – January 8, 1985) was a U.S. Senator from Nebraska. Bowring was born in Nevada, Missouri. In 1928, she married Arthur Bowring. They made their home at the Bowring Ranch near Merriman in Cherry County, Nebraska.[1]

Bowring was active in Republican politics in Nebraska. She was appointed to the United States Senate by Governor Robert B. Crosby to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Dwight Griswold, making her the first woman to represent Nebraska in the Senate. She served from April 16, 1954, to November 7, 1954. Bowring was the fourth of six Senators to serve during the fifteenth Senate term for Nebraska’s Class 2 seat, from January 3, 1949 to January 3, 1955.

After her service in the Senate, Bowring continued ranching near Merriman. She served part-time on the Board of Parole of the Department of Justice from 1956 to 1964. She died in 1985, only one day before her 93rd birthday. After her death, Bowring Ranch was donated to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, becoming Bowring Ranch State Historical Park.

 
 

FYI

Rare Historical Photos: These photographs capture the American struggle during The Great Depression, 1929-1940
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Vintage pictures of bizarre vending machines you never knew existed, 1920-1960
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Vintage color photos show WWII air cadets in training at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, 1942
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Gritty photos capture the urban decay and the street life of New York City in the 1970s
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Prize Patrol Immortality Why Publishers Clearing House, a famously low-odds way of becoming rich beyond your wildest dreams, suddenly wants to pass down your winnings … if you win.
 
 
 
 
Cal Newport: A Pastor Embraces Slowness
 
 
 
 
The Marginalian by Maria Popova: The secret of superhuman strength, Jane Goodall on the meaning of wisdom and the deepest source of hope, a lyrical Japanese illustrated ode to water
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Durn, Smithsonian Magazine: Did a Viking Woman Named Gudrid Really Travel to North America in 1000 A.D.? The sagas suggest she settled in Newfoundland and eventually made eight crossings of the North Atlantic Sea.
 
 
 
 
BY MATT HAINES, gambit: The delicious history of a cake fit for a king

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Air Fryer Beef Jerky
 
 
By Kitchen Mason: Easy One Dish Vegetable Pasta Bake {Video Tutorial Included}
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 19 Recipes That Prove Your Skillet Is a Dinnertime Hero
 
 
By Homemade on a Weeknight: Sausage & Veg Soup #slowcooker
 
 
By Homemade on a Weeknight: Kitchen Sink Treats
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 08, 2022

On This Day

1900 – President William McKinley places Alaska under military rule.[19]
Alaska (/əˈlæskə/ (About this soundlisten); Aleut: Alax̂sxax̂; Inupiaq: Alaasikaq; Alutiiq: Alas’kaaq; Yup’ik: Alaskaq;[4] Tlingit: Anáaski) is a state located in the Western United States on the northwest extremity of North America. A semi-exclave of the U.S., it borders the Canadian province of British Columbia and the territory of Yukon to the east and share a maritime border with the Russian Federation’s Chukotka Autonomous Okrug to the west, just across the Bering Strait. To the north are the Chukchi and Beaufort seas of the Arctic Ocean, while the Pacific Ocean lies to the south and southwest.

Alaska is by far the largest U.S. state by area, comprising more total area than the next three largest states (Texas, California, and Montana) combined. It represents the seventh largest subnational division in the world. It is the third-least populous and the most sparsely populated state, but by far the continent’s most populous territory located mostly north of the 60th parallel, with a population of 736,081 as of 2020—more than quadruple the combined populations of Northern Canada and Greenland.[3] Approximately half of Alaska’s residents live within the Anchorage metropolitan area. The state capital of Juneau is the second-largest city in the United States by area, comprising more territory than the states of Rhode Island and Delaware. The former capital of Alaska, Sitka, is the largest U.S. city by area.

Alaska was occupied by various indigenous peoples for thousands of years before the arrival of Europeans. The state is considered the entry point for the settlement of North America by way of the Bering land bridge. The Russians were the first Europeans to settle the area beginning in the 18th century, eventually establishing Russian America, which spanned most of the current state. The expense and difficulty of maintaining this distant possession prompted its sale to the U.S. in 1867 for US$7.2 million (equivalent to $133 million in 2020), or approximately two cents per acre ($4.74/km2). The area went through several administrative changes before becoming organized as a territory on May 11, 1912. It was admitted as the 49th state of the U.S. on January 3, 1959.[5]

While it has one of the smallest state economies in the country, Alaska’s per capita income is among the highest, owing to a diversified economy dominated by fishing, natural gas, and oil, all of which it has in abundance. United States armed forces bases and tourism are also a significant part of the economy; more than half the state is federally owned public land, including a multitude of national forests, national parks, and wildlife refuges.

The indigenous population of Alaska is proportionally the highest of any U.S. state, at over 15 percent.[6] Close to two dozen native languages are spoken, and Alaskan Natives exercise considerable influence in local and state politics.

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Born On This Day

1859 – Fanny Bullock Workman, American mountaineer, geographer, and cartographer (d. 1925)[83]
Fanny Bullock Workman (January 8, 1859 – January 22, 1925) was an American geographer, cartographer, explorer, travel writer, and mountaineer, notably in the Himalayas. She was one of the first female professional mountaineers; she not only explored but also wrote about her adventures. She set several women’s altitude records, published eight travel books with her husband, and championed women’s rights and women’s suffrage.

Born to a wealthy family, Workman was educated in the finest schools available to women and traveled in Europe. Her marriage to William Hunter Workman [de] cemented these advantages, and, after being introduced to climbing in New Hampshire, Fanny Workman traveled the world with him. They were able to capitalize on their wealth and connections to voyage around Europe, North Africa, and Asia. The couple had two children, but Fanny Workman was not a motherly type; they left their children in schools and with nurses, and Workman saw herself as a New Woman who could equal any man. The Workmans began their travels with bicycle tours of Switzerland, France, Italy, Spain, Algeria and India. They cycled thousands of miles, sleeping wherever they could find shelter. They wrote books about each trip and Fanny frequently commented on the state of the lives of women that she saw. Their early bicycle tour narratives were better received than their mountaineering books.

At the end of their cycling trip through India, the couple escaped to the Western Himalaya and the Karakoram for the summer months, where they were introduced to high-altitude climbing. They returned to this then-unexplored region eight times over the next 14 years. Despite not having modern climbing equipment, the Workmans explored several glaciers and reached the summit of several mountains, eventually reaching 23,000 feet (7,000 m) on Pinnacle Peak, a women’s altitude record at the time. They organized multiyear expeditions but struggled to remain on good terms with the local labor force. Coming from a position of American privilege and wealth, they failed to understand the position of the native workers and had difficulty finding and negotiating for reliable porters.

After their trips to the Himalaya, the Workmans gave lectures about their travels. They were invited to learned societies; Fanny Workman became the first American woman to lecture at the Sorbonne and the second to speak at the Royal Geographical Society. She received many medals of honor from European climbing and geographical societies and was recognized as one of the foremost climbers of her day. She demonstrated that a woman could climb in high altitudes just as well as a man and helped break down the gender barrier in mountaineering.

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FYI

People: Betty White’s Life in Photos The beloved actress died the morning of Dec. 31, two weeks ahead of what would have been her 100th birthday on Jan. 17. Celebrate her life by revisiting some of her most memorable moments that prove she truly was the First Lady of Television
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Writers in the Storm: Embracing the Mystery: Deep POV
 
 
 
 
Gastro Obscura: The quiet rescue of America’s forgotten fruit; The most beloved cereal you’ve never heard of; 23 dives where the vibe is unbeatable and more ->
 
 
Atlas obscura: The harrowing story of a surprising cave rescue; Eduard Bohlen Shipwreck and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Mike’s Backyard Nursery: How to Make Homemade Plant Propagation Flats.
 
 
 
 

Recipes

By Lena Abraham, Delish: Best-Ever Cabbage Hash Browns
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Betty’s Best Pasta Recipes
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

FYI January 07, 2022

On This Day

1782 – The first American commercial bank, the Bank of North America, opens.[7]
The Bank of North America was the first chartered bank in the United States, and served as the country’s first de facto central bank.[1] Chartered by the Congress of the Confederation on May 26, 1781, and opened in Philadelphia on January 7, 1782,[2][3][4] it was based upon a plan presented by US Superintendent of Finance Robert Morris on May 17, 1781,[5] based on recommendations by Revolutionary era figure Alexander Hamilton. Although Hamilton later noted its “essential” contribution to the war effort, the Pennsylvania government objected to its privileges and reincorporated it under state law, making it unsuitable as a national bank under the federal Constitution. Instead Congress chartered a new bank, the First Bank of the United States, in 1791, while the Bank of North America continued as a private concern.

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Born On This Day

1815 – Elizabeth Louisa Foster Mather, American writer (d.1882)[53]
Elizabeth Louisa Foster Mather (writing as, E. Louisa Mather; January 7, 1815 – February 5, 1882) was a 19th-century American writer. She wrote essays, stories and poems for 40 years on religious subjects, capital punishment, and woman’s suffrage.

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FYI

NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day Ecstatic Solar Eclipse
 
 
 
 
By Scottie Andrew, CNN: How to start — and finish — a puzzle (in GIFs)
 
 
 
 

The Cube Rule: Is a hot dog a sandwich? Is a Pop-Tart a ravioli? The Cube Rule seeks to end this debate once and for all.
 
 
 
 
Alfread is an iOS app that helps you organize and read all the articles you’ve saved. iPhone only, iPad version coming soon.
 
 
 
 
By Trung T. Phan, The Hustle: He was facing life in prison. Now, he’s the CEO of the ‘Instagram for the Incarcerated.’ Marcus Bullock, the founder and CEO of Flikshop, wants to be the poster child for second chances.
 
 
 
 
By Elissa Nadworny, NPR Alaska Public Media: How Do I Get This Out? Your Guide To Stain Removal
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice, From Kristine Kathryn Rusch: Contracts: Traditional Publishing
 
 
 
 

Alaska Health Fair: Happy Holidays!
 
 
 
 
via Reddit: Shower Thoughts

“To an early human, obtaining food is exercise. To a modern human, burning excess food is exercise.”
“The loss of your dog is exactly the kind of thing your dog would’ve helped you through.”
“Google-ing something truly is a skill. Some people are much better and faster at finding more accurate results than others.”
“If someone with ADHD gained the power of telekinesis they would constantly be dropping things.”
“From the sun’s point of view, there are no shadows.”
“If you lose one leg your BMI goes down. If you lose 2 legs your BMI goes up.”
“In 1998 we made 2 animated movies about ants and then just decided that was enough.”
“The fact that someone had to come up with a superstition to keep people from walking under ladders is probably a pretty good sign that we’ve always been dumb.”
“History makes a lot more sense when you realize we are the most sober generation there has ever been.”
“The blanket needs you to be warm. Without you, it’s just a cold piece of fabric on the floor.”
 
 
 
 
NSFW

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Loaded Air Fryer Totchos
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: 13 Crowd-Pleasing Game-Day Recipes
 
 
Sally’s Baking Addiction: Biscuit & Vegetable Pot Pie (Casserole)
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?