Tag: Images. Shorpy

Shorpy January 22, 2017

Reader submitted photo’s

Apparently, The Eyebrow of Doom IS hereditary. John G. Muckey was my first cousin 5X removed

 

1943 My grandfather Thomas A. Hawkins and his Navy peers in their enlistment group photo, about 1943. Grandpa is two persons directly above the officer on the right. He enlisted in the Construction Battalion and was separated in 1953 as a Boatswain’s Mate (Stevedore) Petty Officer First Class. This photo was taken either in Columbia or Charleston, S.C., where he entered).

 

 

1945 This is a newspaper photo of my husband’s grandmother’s bowling team. It was taken in Illinois, but I’m not sure of the town where Smitty’s Tavern was located – probably either Libertyville or Grayslake.

 

A thrift store find from the same metal box as Dressed to Smoke. The majority of the slides in this unusual collection are portraits of women; they tend to be a bit on the exotic side.

 

Shorpy January 18, 2017

THE SIGNAL LANTERNS OF
PAUL REVERE
DISPLAYED IN THE STEEPLE OF THIS CHURCH APRIL 18 1775 WARNED THE COUNTRY OF THE MARCH OF BRITISH TROOPS TO
LEXINGTON AND CONCORD.
Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1909. “Christ Church (Old North).” 8×10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company.

 

September 1939. “A grey day in New York City, looking northeast from University Place.” Medium format acetate negative by Marion Post Wolcott.

Shorpy January 14, 2017

 

Washington, D.C., circa 1898. “Gettig, Chas. (New York baseball player).” Charlie Gettig, who played for the Giants. 5×7 inch glass negative

 

 

Cleveland circa 1900. “Perry-Payne Building, Superior Avenue.” This fine old structure, completed in 1888, survives today as an apartment building; the Brown Jug next door has, alas, evaporated along with its “Fine Old Whiskies.” 8×10 inch dry plate glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company

 

 

Shorpy January 10, 2017

August 13, 1957. “Tamarack Lodge, Greenfield Park, New York. Lobby to fountain.” Large-format acetate negative by Gottscho-Schleisner.

Shorpy January 09, 2017

At 548 feet, Philadelphia City Hall, completed in 1901 with its clock tower topped by a statue of William Penn, is the world’s tallest masonry building.
Philadelphia circa 1912. “Market Street west from Eleventh, with view of City Hall.” 8×10 inch glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company