FYI March 02, 2018


 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1877 – U.S. presidential election, 1876: Just two days before inauguration, the U.S. Congress declares Rutherford B. Hayes the winner of the election even though Samuel J. Tilden had won the popular vote on November 7, 1876.
The United States presidential election of 1876 was the 23rd quadrennial presidential election, held on Tuesday, November 7, 1876. It was one of the most contentious and controversial presidential elections in American history, and is known for being the catalyst for the end of Reconstruction. After a controversial post-election process, Republican nominee Rutherford B. Hayes defeated Democrat Samuel Tilden.

After President Ulysses S. Grant declined to seek a third term, Congressman James G. Blaine emerged as the front-runner for the Republican nomination. However, Blaine was unable to win a majority at the 1876 Republican National Convention, which settled on Governor Hayes of Ohio as a compromise candidate. The 1876 Democratic National Convention nominated Governor Tilden of New York on the second ballot.

The results of the election remain among the most disputed ever, although it is not disputed that Tilden outpolled Hayes in the popular vote. After a first count of votes, Tilden won 184 electoral votes to Hayes’s 165, with 20 votes from four states unresolved. In the case of Florida, Louisiana, and South Carolina, each party reported its candidate had won the state, while in Oregon one elector was replaced after being declared illegal for being an “elected or appointed official”. The question of who should have been awarded these electoral votes is the source of the continued controversy. An informal deal was struck to resolve the dispute: the Compromise of 1877, which awarded all 20 electoral votes to Hayes. In return for the Democrats’ acquiescence to Hayes’s election, the Republicans agreed to withdraw federal troops from the South, ending Reconstruction. The Compromise effectively ceded power in the Southern states to the Democratic Redeemers, who proceeded to disenfranchise black voters in subsequent years.

The 1876 election is one of five presidential elections in which the person who won the most popular votes did not win the election, and the only such election in which the popular vote winner received a majority (rather than a plurality) of the popular vote. To date, it remains the election that recorded the smallest electoral vote victory (185–184) and the election that yielded the highest voter turnout of the eligible voting age population in American history, at 81.8%.[1][2] It was also the first presidential election since 1856 in which the Democratic candidate won the popular vote.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1901 – Grete Hermann, German mathematician and philosopher (d. 1984)
Grete (Henry-)Hermann (March 2, 1901 – April 15, 1984) was a German mathematician and philosopher noted for her work in mathematics, physics, philosophy and education. She is noted for her early philosophical work on the foundations of quantum mechanics, and is now known most of all for an early, but long-ignored refutation of a no-hidden-variable theorem by John von Neumann. The disputed theorem and the fact that Hermann’s critique of this theorem remained nearly unknown for decades are considered to have had a strong influence on the development of quantum mechanics.

Mathematics
Hermann studied mathematics at Göttingen under Emmy Noether, where she achieved her Ph.D. in 1926. Her doctoral thesis, “Die Frage der endlich vielen Schritte in der Theorie der Polynomideale” (in English “The Question of Finitely Many Steps in Polynomial Ideal Theory”), published in Mathematische Annalen, is the foundational paper for computer algebra. It first established the existence of algorithms (including complexity bounds) for many of the basic problems of abstract algebra, such as ideal membership for polynomial rings. Hermann’s algorithm for primary decomposition is still in contemporary use.[1]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Matt Novak: Navy SEALs Call Bullshit on Fox News Report That They Couldn’t Get Through Trump’s Border Wall
 
 
 
 
By Christina Ayele Djossa: The First (Documented) Black Woman to Serve in the U.S. Army
 
 
 
 
By Justin T. Westbrook: Comment Of The Day: Just A Suggestion Edition
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: Here’s Exactly How The 2019 GMC Sierra’s Six-Way Tailgate Works
 
 
 
 
Into the Wilds of Utah, In Search of Tiny Owls
 
 
 
 
By Darmon Ritcher: A Visit to Chernobyl as It Transforms Into a Solar Farm
 
 
 
 

Timeline: How a woman who couldn’t cook invented the layout of the modern kitchen
 
 
 
 
By Dan Colman: New York City Buskers Sound Just Like the Beatles
 
 
 
 
By Dan Colman: Judd Apatow Teaches the Craft of Comedy: A New Online Course from MasterClass
https://youtu.be/V_TF-Bbovrg
 
 
 
 
By Gaby Perla: 2018 Google North America Public Policy Fellowship now accepting applications
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Now Available Online: National Library of Medicine Strategic Plan 2017–2027
 
 
 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes


Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars

 
 

Widget not in any sidebars