FYI August 03, 2021

On This Day

1342 – The Siege of Algeciras commences during the Spanish Reconquista.
The siege of Algeciras (1342–1344) was undertaken during the Reconquest of Spain by the Castillian forces of Alfonso XI assisted by the fleets of the Kingdom of Aragon and the Republic of Genoa. The objective was to capture the Muslim city of Al-Jazeera Al-Khadra, called Algeciras by Christians. The city was the capital and the main port of the European territory of the Marinid Empire.

The siege lasted for twenty one months. The population of the city, about 30,000 people including civilians and Berber soldiers, suffered from a land and sea blockade that prevented the entry of food into the city. The Emirate of Granada sent an army to relieve the city, but it was defeated beside the Río Palmones. Following this, on 26 March 1344 the city surrendered and was incorporated into the Crown of Castile. This was one of the first military engagements in Europe where gunpowder was used.

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Born On This Day

1918 – Sidney Gottlieb, American chemist and theorist (d. 1999)
Sidney Gottlieb (August 3, 1918 – March 7, 1999) was an American chemist and spymaster who headed the Central Intelligence Agency’s 1950s and 1960s assassination attempts and mind-control program, known as Project MKUltra.[1]

Early years and education

Gottlieb, the son of Hungarian Jewish immigrant parents, was born in the Bronx in 1918. He attended the City College of New York and Arkansas Tech University before receiving his undergraduate degree in chemistry magna cum laude from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1940. He subsequently received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology. A stutterer since childhood, Gottlieb earned a master’s degree in speech therapy from San Jose State University after retiring from the CIA. He had a club foot, which kept him out of service in World War II but did not prevent his pursuit of folk dancing, a lifelong passion.[2]

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FYI

By Kirsten Grieshaber, The Times of Israel: 100-year-old alleged former Nazi guard to stand trial in Germany Suspect is charged with 3,518 counts of accessory to murder, stands accused of working for SS at the Sachsenhausen camp in 1942-1945
 
 
 
 
August 05, 2021, 6pm: Alaska Women Speak Celebration
The Writer’s Block Bookstore & Cafe
3956 Spenard Rd, Anchorage, AK 99517
Celebrate the essays, poetry, photos, and art in this engaging anthology, a legacy of 25 years of the Alaska Women Speak journal. Join contributors and editors for an evening of readings, discussion, and refreshments.
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Morley Bay Yukon
 
 
 
 
By Rocky Parker, Beyond Bylines: August 2021 Events for Journalists, Bloggers
 
 
 
 
By Ashley Strickland, CNN: Michigan’s Lake Huron sinkhole is a window into how Earth’s earliest forms of life diversified
 
 
 
 
No fins, house paint (blah) blue…
By Jonathan M. Gitlin, ARS Technica: Cadillac saves its best for last: The 2022 CT4-V Blackwing Cadillac’s Blackwings are its swan song to the gasoline performance-car era.
 
 
 
 
Al Cross and Heather Chapman at The Rural Blog: Rural clinics have grants to persuade locals to get vaxed; they could collaborate with other providers and newspapers; FCC plugs loopholes that let telecoms companies use rural broadband subsidies for urban areas
 
 
 
 
Make a Living Writing: 5 Ways to Get Your Flaky Freelance Client to Pay Up
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From MSN News: The infantilization of Western culture
 
 
The Passive Voice: Here’s a Quarter
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Publishers Weekly: How Two Authors Brought a Book on Birthing Into the World
 
 
 
 
Fireside Books presents Shelf Awareness for Readers for Tuesday, August 3, 2021
 
 
 
 
ILSR’s Community Broadband Initiative: Recently in Community Networks… Week of 8/02
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Kevr102: Concrete Framed Water Feature With Planter
 
 
By StrangeSpecies: How to Make Your Pet a Durable Snuffle Mat
 
 
By JackmanWorks: Pallet Wood Segmented Candles
 
 

Recipes

By Gene Gerrard, The Spruce Eats: Porchetta: Stuffed and Rolled Italian Pork Roast
 
 
By Amelia Rampe, The Kitchn: How To Grill Romaine (and Make It the Star of a Meal)
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Effortless Late-Summer Dinner Ideas
 
 
By Donna Gribbins, Shelbyville, Kentucky, Taste of Home: Chicken Taco Pockets
 
 
By Cynthia Gerken, Naples, Florida Taste of Home: Tex-Mex Chicken Strips
 
 
By Sue Stezel, Taste of Home: 5-Star Recipes from Our Community Cooks
 
 
By Julie Myers, Taste of Home: 24 New Ways to Make S’mores

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

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Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?