FYI July 07, 08 & 09, 2022

On This Day

1456 – A retrial verdict acquits Joan of Arc of heresy 25 years after her execution.
The conviction of Joan of Arc in 1431 was posthumously investigated on appeal in the 1450s by Inquisitor-General Jean Bréhal at the request of Joan’s surviving family – her mother Isabelle Romée and two of her brothers, Jean and Pierre. The appeal was authorized by Pope Callixtus III.

The purpose of the retrial was to investigate whether the trial of condemnation and its verdict had been handled justly and according to ecclesiastical law. Investigations started in 1452, and a formal appeal followed in November 1455. On 7 July 1456, the original trial was judged to be invalid due to improper procedures, deceit, and fraud, and the charges against Joan were nullified.

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1730 – An estimated magnitude 8.7 earthquake causes a tsunami that damages more than 1,000 km (620 mi) of Chile’s coastline.
The 1730 Valparaíso earthquake occurred at 04:45 local time (08:45 UTC) on July 8. It had an estimated magnitude of 9.1–9.3 and triggered a major tsunami with an estimated magnitude of Mt  8.75,[2] that inundated the lower parts of Valparaíso.[4] The earthquake caused severe damage from La Serena to Chillan, while the tsunami affected more than 1,000 km (620 mi) of Chile’s coastline.[3]

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381 – The end of the First Council of Christian bishops convened in Constantinople by the Roman Emperor Theodosius I.[2]
The First Council of Constantinople (Latin: Concilium Constantinopolitanum; Greek: Σύνοδος τῆς Κωνσταντινουπόλεως) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) in AD 381 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius I.[1][2] This second ecumenical council, an effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom, except for the Western Church,[3] confirmed the Nicene Creed, expanding the doctrine thereof to produce the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed, and dealt with sundry other matters. It met from May to July 381[4] in the Church of Hagia Irene and was affirmed as ecumenical in 451 at the Council of Chalcedon.

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Born On This Day

1752 – Joseph Marie Jacquard, French merchant, invented the Jacquard loom (d. 1834)
Joseph Marie Charles dit (called or nicknamed) Jacquard (French: [ʒakaʁ]; 7 July 1752 – 7 August 1834) was a French weaver and merchant. He played an important role in the development of the earliest programmable loom (the “Jacquard loom”), which in turn played an important role in the development of other programmable machines, such as an early version of digital compiler used by IBM to develop the modern day computer.

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1538 – Alberto Bolognetti, Roman Catholic cardinal (d. 1585)[9]
Alberto Bolognetti (1538–1585) was an Italian law professor, bishop, diplomat, and cardinal. He was appointed by Pope Gregory XIII as a papal nuncio to Florence, Venice, and the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. In that last appointment, he persuaded King Stephen Báthory to adopt the Gregorian calendar. He was promoted to cardinal priest, but died before he could return to Rome for the ceremonies.

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1511 – Dorothea of Saxe-Lauenburg, queen consort of Denmark and Norway (d. 1571)[15]
Dorothea of Saxe-Lauenburg (9 July 1511 – 7 October 1571) was queen consort of Denmark and Norway by marriage to King Christian III of Denmark. She was known to having wielded influence upon the affairs of state in Denmark.[1]

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FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Vintage photos of Estonian frat students that participated in drag shows, 1870-1910
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: These hilarious 19th-century photos illustrate different levels of drunkenness, 1860s
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: These photos show cowboys and dudes as they round up cattle on the Montana Range, 1939
 
 
 
 
By Ernie Smith, Tedium: Whipped Cream, No Other Delights How whipped cream, of all things, helped to drive innovation in the food technology space. Henry Ford and the humble soybean had something to do with it.

 
 
 
 
Mike Force Podcast: Keelin Darby | EP. 077 | Mike Force Podcast
 
 
 
 

The History Guy: Bologna: A History
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Liebregts: Faux Rocks That Look Real
 
 
By Hey Jude: RadioGlobe – Spin to Search Over 15000 Web Radio Stations!
 
 

Recipes

Betty Crocker Kitchens: Cinnamon Toast Crunch™ Sheet-Pan Pancake
 
 
By Handy_Bear: Ratatouille (Confit Byaldi) From the Ratatouille Movie
 
 
By NirL: Delicious Stuffed Vegetables Recipe
 
 
By Henkeify: Easy and Delicious Ice Cream Sandwiches
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

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