FYI May 25, 2022

On This Day

1878 – Gilbert and Sullivan’s comic opera H.M.S. Pinafore opens at the Opera Comique in London.
H.M.S. Pinafore; or, The Lass That Loved a Sailor is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and a libretto by W. S. Gilbert. It opened at the Opera Comique in London, on 25 May 1878 and ran for 571 performances, which was the second-longest run of any musical theatre piece up to that time. H.M.S. Pinafore was Gilbert and Sullivan’s fourth operatic collaboration and their first international sensation.

The story takes place aboard the Royal Navy ship HMS Pinafore. The captain’s daughter, Josephine, is in love with a lower-class sailor, Ralph Rackstraw, although her father intends her to marry Sir Joseph Porter, the First Lord of the Admiralty. She abides by her father’s wishes at first, but Sir Joseph’s advocacy of the equality of humankind encourages Ralph and Josephine to overturn conventional social order. They declare their love for each other and eventually plan to elope. The Captain discovers this plan, but, as in many of the Gilbert and Sullivan operas, a surprise disclosure changes things dramatically near the end of the story.

Drawing on several of his earlier “Bab Ballad” poems, Gilbert imbued this plot with mirth and silliness. The opera’s humour focuses on love between members of different social classes and lampoons the British class system in general. Pinafore also pokes good-natured fun at patriotism, party politics, the Royal Navy, and the rise of unqualified people to positions of authority. The title of the piece comically applies the name of a garment for girls and women, a pinafore, to the fearsome symbol of a warship.

Pinafore’s extraordinary popularity in Britain, America and elsewhere was followed by the similar success of a series of Gilbert and Sullivan works, including The Pirates of Penzance and The Mikado. Their works, later known as the Savoy operas, dominated the musical stage on both sides of the Atlantic for more than a decade and continue to be performed today. The structure and style of these operas, particularly Pinafore, were much copied and contributed significantly to the development of modern musical theatre.

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Born On This Day

1048 – Emperor Shenzong of Song (d. 1085)
Emperor Shenzong of Song (25 May 1048 – 1 April 1085), personal name Zhao Xu, was the sixth emperor of the Song dynasty of China. His original personal name was Zhao Zhongzhen but he changed it to “Zhao Xu” after his coronation. He reigned from 1067 until his death in 1085.[citation needed]

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FYI

 
 
NASA: Astronomy Picture of the Day
 
 

By Egill Bjarnason, Hakai Magazine: It’s 10 PM. Do You Know Where Your Cat Is? In Iceland, traditionally a land of cat lovers, bans and curfews are redefining the human relationship with domestic cats.

In April, Akureyri—the largest municipality in the country’s north, with a population of 19,000 people and some 2,000 to 3,000 cats—decided to ban their feline residents from night roaming outside. Neighboring Húsavík banned cats several years ago from going outdoors day and night. Other Icelandic towns are considering bans as the issue of free-roaming cats increasingly makes its way from online forums to local politics, with the arguments generally falling into two categories. Some people—the “no animals in my backyard” or NAIMBY-ists—proclaim free-roaming cats are nuisances that should be confined like any other pet. Others think beyond the anthropocentric: cats kill birds and disrupt ecosystems.
 
 
 
 

Leadership freak: 4 Hard Things Leaders Do
 
 
 
 
Rare Historical Photos: Misleading vintage ads about the dietary benefits of sugar, 1950s-1960s
 
 
 
 

By Colin Marshall, Open Culture: How Korean Things Are Made: Watch Mesmerizing Videos Showing the Making of Traditional Clothes, Teapots, Buddhist Instruments & More
 
 
 
 

Ernie Smith, Tedium: By Andrew Egan: Inventing Daylight On the evolution and growth of fluorescent colors in modern culture—especially in bright, neon, DayGlo form.

 
 
 
 

Quartz Obsession: A brief history of automats
 
 
 
 

By Cory Max Montoya, Beyond Bylines Blogs We Love: 6 Skincare Vloggers Your Skin Will Thank You For This Summer & Beyond

 
 
 
 

Another School Shooting in a Place where teachers and staff were banned from carrying guns: Robb Elementary School in the Uvalde, Texas CISD
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

Atlas Obscura: Digging into the history of strawberry curry and more ->
 
 
Homemade on a Weeknight: Jalapeno Dill Dressing
 
 
Just the Recipe: Paste the URL to any recipe, click submit, and it’ll return literally JUST the recipe- no ads, no life story of the writer, no nothing EXCEPT the recipe.
 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

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Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

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