FYI November 12, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1920 – Italy and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes sign the Treaty of Rapallo.
The Treaty of Rapallo was a treaty between the Kingdom of Italy and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (renamed Yugoslavia in 1929), signed to solve the dispute over some territories in the former Austrian Littoral in the upper Adriatic, and in Dalmatia.

The treaty was signed on 12 November 1920[1] in Rapallo, near Genoa, Italy. Tension between Italy and Yugoslavia arose at the end of World War I, when the Austro-Hungarian Empire dissolved and Italy claimed the territories assigned to it by the secret London Pact of 1915. According to the pact, signed in London on 26 April 1915 by the Kingdom of Italy and Triple Entente, in case of victory at the end of World War I, Italy was to obtain several territorial gains including former Austrian Littoral, Northern Dalmatia and notably Zadar (Zara), Šibenik (Sebenico), and most of the Dalmatian islands (except Krk and Rab).

These territories had an ethnically mixed population, with Slovenes and Croats composing over the half of the population of the region. The pact was therefore nullified with the Treaty of Versailles under pressure of President Woodrow Wilson, making void Italian claims on Northern Dalmatia. The objective of the Treaty of Rapallo was to find a compromise following the void created by the non-application of the London pact of 1915.

Content
At the conclusions of the discussions, the following territories were annexed to Italy:

the western parts of the former Duchy of Carniola: more than half of the region of Inner Carniola, with the municipalities of Idrija, Vipava, Šturje, Postojna, Št. Peter na Krasu and Ilirska Bistrica, and the Upper Carniolan municipality of Bela Peč/Weissenfels;
the whole territory of former Austrian Littoral, except for the municipality of Kastav and the island of Krk, which were ceded to the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes;
the former Dalmatian capital city of Zadar (known as Zara in Italian) and the small Dalmatian islands of Lastovo and Palagruža.

According to the treaty, the city of Rijeka (known as Fiume in Italian) would become the independent Free State of Fiume,[2] thus ending the military occupation of Gabriele d’Annunzio’s troops, begun by the Impresa di Fiume and known as the Italian Regency of Carnaro. This part of the treaty was revoked in 1924, when Italy and Yugoslavia signed the Treaty of Rome, which gave Fiume to Italy and the adjacent port of Sušak to Yugoslavia.

The treaty left a large number of Slovenes and Croats in Italy. According to author Paul N. Hehn, “the treaty left half a million Slavs inside Italy while only a few hundred Italians in the fledgling Yugoslav state”.[3] Indeed, according to the 1910 Austrian census 480,000 South Slavs (Slovenes and Croats) became citizens of the Kingdom of Italy, while around 15,000 Italians became citizens of the new Yugoslav state (around 13,000 in Dalmatia, and the rest in the island of Krk). According to the same census, around 25,000 ethnic Germans and 3,000 Hungarians also lived in the regions annexed to Italy with the Treaty, while the number of Italians living in the region was between 350,000 and 390,000.

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1528 – Qi Jiguang, Chinese general (d. 1588)
Qi Jiguang (November 12, 1528 – January 17, 1588),[1][2][3] courtesy name Yuanjing, art names Nantang and Mengzhu, posthumous name Wuyi, was a military general of the Ming dynasty. He is best known for leading the defense on the coastal regions against wokou pirate activities in the 16th century, as well as for the reinforcement of the Great Wall of China. Qi is also known for writing the military manuals Jixiao Xinshu and Record of Military Training (練兵實紀), which he based on his experience as a martial educator and defensive planner in the Ming military forces. He is regarded as a hero in Chinese culture.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
Stan Lee[1] (born Stanley Martin Lieber /ˈliːbər/, December 28, 1922 – November 12, 2018) was an American comic-book writer, editor, and publisher. He was editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics,[2] and later its publisher[3] and chairman,[4] leading its expansion from a small division of a publishing house to a large multimedia corporation.

In collaboration with several artists—particularly Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko—he co-created fictional characters including Spider-Man, the Hulk, Doctor Strange, the Fantastic Four, Daredevil, Black Panther, the X-Men, and—with co-writer Larry Lieber—the characters Ant-Man, Iron Man, and Thor. In doing so, he pioneered a more complex approach to writing superheroes in the 1960s, and in the 1970s challenged the standards of the Comics Code Authority, indirectly leading to it updating its policies.

Following his retirement from Marvel, he remained a public figurehead for the company, and frequently made cameo appearances in Marvel Cinematic Universe films. Meanwhile, he continued independent creative ventures into his 90s.

Lee was inducted into the comic book industry’s Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1995. He received a National Medal of Arts in 2008.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
By Stephanie Donovan: Blog Profiles: Baking Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Federal rule change would let farmers advertise for migrant workers online and abandon ads in local newspapers
 
 
By Heather Chapman: LED lighting advances drive indoor agriculture revolution
 
 
 
 
By Rafer Guzmán Newsday (TNS): ‘A Private War’ tells the story of war correspondent Marie Colvin
 
 
 
 
Sensitive-let’s ride our bikes through it~
GlacierHub Weekly Newsletter 11-12-18: Red Bull Media House’s film, “North of Nightfall,” follows the journey of four mountain bikers through the sensitive Canadian Arctic habitat.
 
 
 
 

The Passive Voice – Before Envelopes, People Protected Messages With Letterlocking and more ->
 
 
 
 
By messynessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCCXXII): Freddie Mercury’s First Band, Marie Antoinette’s Jewellery up for Auction, A Curious Hermitage on the Coast, That time Tom Hanks and Dan Aykroyd made a rap song and more ->
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Olivia Goldhill and Whet Moser, edited by Jessanne Collins, and produced by Luiz Romero – Psilocybin: Magic mushrooms meet the market Inbox x
 
 
 
 
By AMELIA LESTER: The Voice of the ‘Intellectual Dark Web’
Claire Lehmann’s online magazine, Quillette, prides itself on publishing ‘dangerous’ ideas other outlets won’t touch. How far is it willing to go?
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Bryan’s Workshop Bryan’s Workshop Hometalker Japan: Turn Your Hutch Into a Candy Hutch!
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes