FYI November 28, 2019

On This Day

1843 – Ka Lā Hui (Hawaiian Independence Day): The Kingdom of Hawaii is officially recognized by the United Kingdom and France as an independent nation.
The Hawaiian Kingdom (a.k.a. Kingdom of Hawaiʻi) originated in 1795 with the unification of the independent islands of Hawaiʻi, Oʻahu, Maui, Molokaʻi, and Lānaʻi under one government. In 1810, the whole Hawaiian Islands became unified when Kauaʻi and Niʻihau joined the Hawaiian Kingdom voluntarily. Two major dynastic families ruled the kingdom: the House of Kamehameha and the House of Kalākaua.

The Kingdom won recognition from major European powers. The United States became its chief trading partner. The U.S. watched over the Kingdom lest some other power (such as Britain or Japan) threaten to seize control. Hawaii was forced to adopt a new constitution in 1887 when King Kalākaua was threatened with violence by the Honolulu Rifles, a white, anti-monarchist militia, to sign it. Queen Liliʻuokalani, who succeeded Kalākaua in 1891, tried to abrogate the 1887 constitution and promulgate a new constitution, but was overthrown in 1893, largely at the hands of the Committee of Safety, a group of residents consisting of Hawaiian subjects and foreign nationals of American, British and German descent, many of whom were educated in the U.S., lived there for a time and identified strongly as American.[11]. Hawaii became a republic until the United States annexed it using The Newlands Resolution which was a joint resolution passed on July 4, 1898, by the United States Congress creating the Territory of Hawaii.

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Born On This Day

1861 – Adina Emilia De Zavala, American teacher, historian and preservationist of Texas history (d. 1955)
Adina Emilia De Zavala (November 28, 1861 – March 1, 1955) was an American teacher, historian and preservationist of Texas history. Her efforts led to saving the Alamo Long Barrack Fortress for future generations. She was born to Augustine De Zavala (originally de Zavala),[1] son of Lorenzo de Zavala, the first Vice President of the Republic of Texas. Adina’s mother Julia Tyrrell De Zavala was born in Ireland. In 1994, Recorded Texas Historic Landmark Marker number 86 was placed at Alamo Plaza to honor De Zavala.[2] In 2008, Texas Historical marker number 15124 was placed in St. Mary’s Cemetery to honor De Zavala’s contributions to Texas.[3]

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FYI

Atlas Obscura: Why President Coolidge once pardoned a raccoon and more ->
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Living and Loving Through Loss: Beautiful Letters of Consolation from Great Artists, Writers, and Scientists
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: The Illustrated Version of “Alice’s Restaurant”: Watch Arlo Guthrie’s Thanksgiving Counterculture Classic and more ->
 
 
 
 
By James Clear: 3 ideas, 2 quotes, 1 question (November 28, 2019)
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Care About Journalism? Maybe You Should Cancel Your Newspaper and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By bennelson: DIY Solar Garage

Recipes