Category: FYI

FYI

FYI May 17, 2020

On This Day

1863 – Rosalía de Castro publishes Cantares Gallegos, the first book in the Galician language.
María Rosalía Rita de Castro (Galician pronunciation: [rosaˈli.ɐ ðɪ ˈkastɾʊ]; 24 February 1837 – 15 July 1885), was a Spanish romanticist writer and poet.

Writing in Galego and Spanish, after the period known as the Séculos Escuros (lit. Dark Centuries), she became an important figure of the Galician Romantic movement, known today as the Rexurdimento (“Renaissance”), along with Manuel Curros Enríquez and Eduardo Pondal. Her poetry is marked by saudade, an almost ineffable combination of nostalgia, longing and melancholy.

She married Manuel Murguía, a member of the important literary group known as the Royal Galician Academy, historian, journalist and editor of Rosalía’s books. The couple had seven children: Alexandra (1859–1937), Aura (1868–1942), twins Gala (1871–1964) and Ovidio (1871–1900), Amara (1873–1921), Adriano (1875–1876) and Valentina (stillborn, 1877). Only two of Rosalía’s children married, Aura in 1897 and Gala in 1922; neither they nor their siblings left any children, and thus, today there are no living descendants of Rosalía de Castro and her husband. Their son Ovidio was a promising painter, his career cut short by early death.

Rosalía published her first collection of poetry in Galician, Cantares gallegos [gl] (“Galician Songs”), on 17 May 1863. This date, 17 May, is now known as the Día das Letras Galegas (“Galician Literature Day”), and commemorates Rosalía’s achievement by dedicating, every year, this special day to a different writer, who must also write in the Galician language, since 1963. Día das Letras Galegas is an official holiday in the Autonomous Community of Galicia.

Relative poverty and sadness marked Rosalía’s life, in spite of this, she had a strong sense of commitment to the poor and to the defenseless. She was a strong opponent of authoritative abuse or abuse of authority and an ardent defender of women’s rights. Rosalía suffered from uterine cancer and died in Padrón, province of A Coruña, Spain, on 15 July 1885.

She is buried in the Panteón de Galegos Ilustres, a pantheon (mausoleum) in the Convent of San Domingos de Bonaval in Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

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Born On This Day

1794 – Anna Brownell Jameson, Irish-English author (d. 1860)
Anna Brownell Jameson (17 May 1794 – 17 March 1860) was the first Anglo-Irish art historian. Born in Ireland, she migrated to England at the age of four, becoming a well-known British writer and contributor to nineteenth-century thought on a range of subjects including early feminism, art history (particularly sacred art), travel, Shakespeare, poets, and German culture. Jameson was connected to some of the most prominent names of the period including Fanny Kemble, Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and Robert Browning, Harriet Martineau, Ottilie von Goethe (the daughter-in-law of Goethe), Lady Byron, Charles and Elizabeth Eastlake, and Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon.

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FYI

By Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Advice on Life and Creative Integrity from Calvin and Hobbes Creator Bill Watterson “The truth is, most of us discover where we are headed when we arrive.”
 
 
 
 

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NSFW

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

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Recipes

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FYI May 16, 2020

On This Day

1866 – The United States Congress establishes the nickel.[6]
A nickel is a five-cent coin struck by the United States Mint. Composed of 75% copper and 25% nickel, the piece has been issued since 1866. Its diameter is .835 inches (21.21 mm) and its thickness is .077 inches (1.95 mm). Due to inflation, the purchasing power of the nickel continues to drop, and currently the coin represents less than 1% of the federal hourly minimum wage. In 2018, over 1.26 billion nickels were produced at the Philadelphia and Denver mints.

The silver half dime, equal to five cents, had been issued since the 1790s. The American Civil War caused economic hardship, driving gold and silver from circulation; in response, in place of low-value coins, the government at first issued paper currency. In 1865, Congress abolished the five-cent fractional currency note after Spencer M. Clark, head of the Currency Bureau (today the Bureau of Engraving and Printing), placed his own portrait on the denomination. After the successful introduction of two-cent and three-cent pieces without precious metal, Congress also authorized a five-cent piece consisting of base metal; the Mint began striking this version in 1866.

The initial design of the Shield nickel was struck from 1866 until 1883, then was replaced by the Liberty Head nickel. The Buffalo nickel was introduced in 1913 as part of a drive to increase the beauty of American coinage; in 1938, the Jefferson nickel followed. In 2004 and 2005, special designs in honor of the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition were issued. In 2006, the Mint reverted to using Jefferson nickel designer Felix Schlag’s original reverse (or “tails” side), although a new obverse, by Jamie Franki, was substituted. As of the end of FY 2013, it cost more than nine cents to produce a nickel;[1] the Mint is exploring the possibility of reducing cost by using less expensive metals.

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Born On This Day

1862 – Margaret Fountaine lepidopterist and diarist (d.1940)
Margaret Elizabeth Fountaine (16 May 1862 – 21 April 1940),[1] was a Victorian lepidopterist who published in The Entomologist’s Record and Journal of Variation. She is also known for her personal diaries, which were edited into two volumes by W. F. Cater for the popular market and published posthumously.

She was an accomplished natural history illustrator and had a great love and knowledge of butterflies, travelling and collecting extensively through Europe, South Africa, India, Tibet, America, Australia and the West Indies, publishing numerous papers on her work. She raised many of the butterflies from eggs or caterpillars, producing specimens of great quality, 22,000 of which are housed at the Norwich Castle Museum and known as the Fountaine-Neimy Collection. Her four sketch books of butterfly life-cycles are held at the Natural History Museum in London. The butterfly genus Fountainea was named in her honour.

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FYI

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Recipes

My Recipe Treasures: Best Fluffy Pancakes
 
 
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FYI May 15, 2020

On This Day

221 – Liu Bei, Chinese warlord, proclaims himself emperor of Shu Han, the successor of the Han dynasty.
Liu Bei (About this soundpronunciation (help·info); Mandarin pronunciation: [ljou pei]; 161 – 10 June 223),[1] courtesy name Xuande, was a warlord in the late Eastern Han dynasty who founded the state of Shu Han in the Three Kingdoms period and became its first ruler. Despite early failings compared to his rivals and lacking both the material resources and social status they commanded, he gathered support among disheartened Han loyalists who opposed Cao Cao, the warlord who controlled the Han central government and the figurehead Emperor Xian, and led a popular movement to restore the Han dynasty through this support. Liu Bei overcame his many defeats to carve out his own realm, which at its peak spanned present-day Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Hunan, and parts of Hubei and Gansu.

Culturally, due to the popularity of the 14th-century historical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Liu Bei is widely known as an ideal benevolent, humane ruler who cared for his people and selected good advisers for his government. His fictional counterpart in the novel was a salutary example of a ruler who adhered to the Confucian set of moral values, such as loyalty and compassion. Historically, Liu Bei, like many Han rulers, was greatly influenced by Laozi. He was a brilliant politician and leader whose skill was a remarkable demonstration of Legalism. Liu Bei’s somewhat Confucian tendencies were also dramatized compared to his rival states’ founders, Cao Pi and Sun Quan, who both ruled as pure Legalists. His political philosophy can best be described by the Chinese idiom “Confucian in appearance but Legalist in substance” (儒表法里; 儒表法裡; rú biǎo fǎ lǐ; ju2 piao3 fa3 li3), a style of governing which had become the norm after the founding of the Han dynasty.[a]

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Born On This Day

1759 – Maria Theresia von Paradis, Austrian pianist and composer (d. 1824)
Maria Theresia von Paradis (also von Paradies) (May 15, 1759 – February 1, 1824), was an Austrian musician and composer who lost her sight at an early age, and for whom Mozart may have written his Piano Concerto No. 18 in B-flat major.

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FYI

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Ideas

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Recipes

By Jessie McKenney, Twodot, Montana, Taste of Home: 40-Minute Hamburger Bun


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 14, 2020

On This Day

1608 – The Protestant Union, a coalition of Protestant German states, is founded to defend the rights, land and safety of each member against the Catholic Church and Catholic German states.[1]
The Protestant Union (German: Protestantische Union), also known as the Evangelical Union, Union of Auhausen, German Union or the Protestant Action Party, was a coalition of Protestant German states. It was formed on May 14, 1608 by Frederick IV, Elector Palatine in order to defend the rights, land and safety of each member. It included both Calvinist and Lutheran states, and dissolved in 1621.

The union was formed following two events. Firstly, the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II and Bavarian Duke Maximilian I reestablished Catholicism in Donauwörth in 1607. Secondly, by 1608, a majority of the Imperial Diet had decided that the renewal of the 1555 Peace of Augsburg should be conditional upon the restoration of all church land appropriated since 1552. The Protestant princes met in Auhausen, and formed a coalition of Protestant states under the leadership of Frederick IV on May 14, 1608. In response, the Catholic League organized the following year, headed by Duke Maximilian.[1]

Members of the Protestant Union included the Palatinate, Neuburg, Württemberg, Baden-Durlach, Ansbach, Bayreuth, Anhalt, Zweibrücken, Oettingen, Hesse-Kassel, Brandenburg, and the free cities of Ulm, Strasbourg, Nuremberg, Rothenburg, Windsheim, Schweinfurt, Weissenburg, Nördlingen, Schwäbisch Hall, Heilbronn, Memmingen, Kempten, Landau, Worms, Speyer, Aalen and Giengen.[2]

However, the Protestant Union was weakened from the start by the non-participation of several powerful German Protestant rulers, notably the Elector of Saxony. The Union was also beset by internal strife between its Lutheran and Calvinist members.[3]

In 1619, Frederick V of the Palatinate accepted the crown of Bohemia in opposition to Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand II. On July 3, 1620, the Protestant Union signed the Treaty of Ulm (German: Ulmer Vertrag), declaring neutrality and declining to support Frederick V.[4] In January 1621, Ferdinand II imposed an imperial ban upon Frederick V and moved his right to elect an emperor to Maximilian. Electoral Palatinate also lost the Upper Palatinate to Bavaria. The Protestant Union met in Heilbronn in February and formally protested Ferdinand’s actions. He ignored this complaint and ordered the Protestant Union to disband its army. The members of the union complied with Ferdinand’s demand under the Mainz accord in May, and on May 14, 1621, it was formally dissolved.[5]

A new separate union without connection to this one emerged twelve years later, the Heilbronn League. It allied some Protestant states in western, central and southern Germany, and fought against the Holy Roman Emperor under the guidance of Sweden and France, which were at the same time parties to that league.

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Born On This Day

1794 – Fanny Imlay, daughter of British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft (d. 1816)
Frances “Fanny” Imlay (14 May 1794 – 9 October 1816), also known as Fanny Godwin and Frances Wollstonecraft, was the illegitimate daughter of the British feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and the American commercial speculator and diplomat Gilbert Imlay. Wollstonecraft wrote about her frequently in her later works. Fanny grew up in the household of anarchist political philosopher William Godwin, the widower of her mother, with his second wife and their combined family of five children. Fanny’s half-sister Mary grew up to write Frankenstein and married Percy Bysshe Shelley, a leading Romantic poet, who composed a poem on Fanny’s death.

Although Gilbert Imlay and Mary Wollstonecraft lived together happily for brief periods before and after the birth of Fanny, he left Wollstonecraft in France in the midst of the Revolution. In an attempt to revive their relationship, Wollstonecraft travelled to Scandinavia on business for him, taking the one-year-old Fanny with her, but the affair never rekindled. After falling in love with and marrying Godwin, Wollstonecraft died soon after giving birth in 1797, leaving the three-year-old Fanny in the hands of Godwin, along with their newborn daughter Mary.

Four years later, Godwin remarried and his new wife, Mary Jane Clairmont, brought two children of her own into the marriage, most significantly—from Fanny Imlay and Mary Godwin’s perspective—Claire Clairmont. Wollstonecraft’s daughters resented the new Mrs Godwin and the attention she paid to her own daughter. The Godwin household became an increasingly uncomfortable place to live as tensions rose and debts mounted. The teenage Mary and Claire escaped by running off to the Continent with Shelley in 1814. Fanny, left behind, bore the brunt of her stepfather’s anger. She became increasingly isolated from her family and committed suicide in 1816.

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FYI

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Ideas

By inkybreadcrumbs: Starting a Scrap Garden

 
 

Recipes


 
 
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FYI May 13, 2020

On This Day

1780 – The Cumberland Compact is signed by leaders of the settlers in the Cumberland River area of what would become the U.S. state of Tennessee, providing for democratic government and a formal system of justice.[2]
The Cumberland Compact was both based on the earlier Articles of the Watauga Association composed at present day Elizabethton, Tennessee and is a foundation document of the Tennessee State Constitution. Signed on May 13, 1780, by early settlers led to the Cumberland River area by James Robertson and John Donelson, where they settled Fort Nashborough, which would later become Nashville, Tennessee.

The only surviving copy the Cumberland Compact was discovered in 1846 inside a trunk that once belonged to Samuel Barton. The copy in Tennessee State Archives is slightly damaged. Other than this the document is intact and legible.

The Cumberland Compact was composed and signed by 256 colonists. One colonist, James Patrick of Virginia, was illiterate and marked his name with an “X”. This constitution called for a governing council of 12 judges who would be elected by the vote of free men 21 years of age or older. Unique to the times, the Compact included a clause that these judges could be removed from office by the people. Government salaries were to be paid in goods. Governors are paid 1,000 deer skins, secretaries are paid 450 otter skins, county clerks are paid 500 raccoon skins, and the constables are paid one mink skin for every warrant served. All males sixteen or older were subject to militia duty.

The compact did establish a contract and relationship between the settlers of the Cumberland region and limited the punishment that could be meted out by the judicial system. Serious capital crimes were to be settled by transporting the offending party to a location under the direct jurisdiction of the State of North Carolina for a proper trial. The compact remained in effect until Tennessee became a state.

Frontier law was brutal and effective. In 1788, at the first court session in Nashville Andrew Jackson was granted permission to practice law. He was immediately handed the job of prosecuting attorney. In 1793, Judge John McNairy sentenced Nashville’s first horse thief, John McKain, Jr., to be fastened to a wooden stock one hour for 39 lashes, his ears cut off and cheeks branded with the letter “H” and “T”. The first female convicted of stealing soap and thread was stripped to the waist and publicly whipped nine lashes. By 1800, the first divorce was granted between May and Nathaniel Parker. Henry Baker became the first capital punishment case in Davidson County with the first death sentence of “hanged by the neck until he is dead” for stealing a horse. These records survive in a heavy leather bound book in the care of the circuit court clerk.

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Born On This Day

1887 – Lorna Hodgkinson, Australian educator and educational psychologist (d. 1951)

Lorna Myrtle Hodgkinson (13 May 1887 – 24 March 1951) was an Australian educator and educational psychologist who worked with intellectually disabled children. She was the first woman to receive a Doctor of Education degree from Harvard University. She called out the poor system in Australia and her reputation was ruined by the minister responsible.

Early life
Hodgkinson was born on 13 May 1887 in South Yarra, a suburb of Melbourne, to Ada Josephine (née Edmiston) and Albert James Hodgkinson, a sugar planter.[1] The family later moved to Lennox Head, New South Wales,[2] and after her father’s death, Lorna and her mother moved again to Perth. After studying at the Perth Girls’ School, she began working as a student teacher in 1903.[1]

Career
Hodgkinson became an assistant at the Perth Infants’ School in 1907 and started a class for children with intellectual disabilities. She left Perth in 1912 to move to Sydney, where she taught at various public schools until 1915. In 1917 she began working at May Villa in Parramatta, teaching intellectually disabled girls who were wards of the state. She was granted paid leave in 1920 to study at Harvard University; she received a Master of Education degree in 1921 and her Doctorate of Education in 1922.[1][3] With her doctoral thesis, “A State Program for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Atypical Children in Public School Systems”,[1] she became the first woman to receive the degree of Doctor of Education from Harvard.[4]

When Hodgkinson returned from Harvard to Sydney in 1922, she took up a position created for her by the NSW Department of Education: Superintendent of the Education of Mental Defectives.[4] In 1923 she testified before the Royal Commission on Lunacy Law and Administration that the system for caring for intellectually disabled children was mismanaged; her comments sparked protests from the public and a ministerial inquiry was ordered by minister Albert Bruntnell. Hodgkinson was accused of falsifying her educational record in order to gain admission to Harvard, and after the inquiry found against her on all accounts, she was suspended for “disgraceful and improper conduct in making false statements and pretences”. She was demoted to normal public teaching in 1924, but she refused to take up her new position and was dismissed. The dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education later wrote a statement to confirm her abilities and achievements.[1]

After being publicly humiliated, Hodgkinson left the public education system and founded the Sunshine Institute, a residential school for intellectually disabled children, in the Sydney suburb of Gore Hill. She worked there for the rest of her career, building the school up from six to sixty pupils.[1][2] She gave lectures on “mental hygiene” on the radio, wrote for The Sydney Morning Herald, and addressed the Women’s Reform League and the Australian Racial Hygiene Congress.[1]

Death
Hodgkinson died of cancer at Gore Hill on 24 March 1951. The Sunshine Institute was later renamed the Lorna Hodgkinson Sunshine Home,[1] and is still in operation as Sunshine.[5]
 
 

FYI

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Does tech writing interest you? If so, check the Season of Docs projects for 2020 and consider taking part.
 
 
 
 
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By Katie Hunt, CNN: How the world’s most dangerous bird got its unique feathers
 
 
 
 
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Ideas

The Kitchen Garten: Homemade Hummingbird Food
 
 
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Recipes

By Maura: Easy Lemon Corn Cake Recipe


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 12, 2020

On This Day

1588 – French Wars of Religion: Henry III of France flees Paris after Henry I, Duke of Guise, enters the city and a spontaneous uprising occurs.
The French Wars of Religion were a prolonged period of war and popular unrest between Catholics and Huguenots (Reformed/Calvinist Protestants) in the Kingdom of France between 1562 and 1598. It is estimated that three million people perished in this period from violence, famine, or disease in what is considered the second deadliest religious war in European history (surpassed only by the Thirty Years’ War, which took eight million lives).[1]

Much of the conflict took place during the long regency of Queen Catherine de’ Medici, widow of Henry II of France, for her minor sons. It also involved a dynastic power struggle between powerful noble families in the line for succession to the French throne: the wealthy, ambitious, and fervently Catholic ducal House of Guise (a cadet branch of the House of Lorraine, who claimed descent from Charlemagne) and their ally Anne de Montmorency, Constable of France (i.e., commander in chief of the French armed forces) versus the less wealthy House of Condé (a branch of the House of Bourbon), princes of the blood in the line of succession to the throne who were sympathetic to Calvinism. Foreign allies provided financing and other assistance to both sides, with Habsburg Spain and the Duchy of Savoy supporting the Guises, and England supporting the Protestant side led by the Condés and by the Protestant Jeanne d’Albret, wife of Antoine de Bourbon, King of Navarre, and her son, Henry of Navarre.

Moderates, primarily associated with the French Valois monarchy and its advisers, tried to balance the situation and avoid open bloodshed. This group (pejoratively known as Politiques) put their hopes in the ability of a strong centralized government to maintain order and harmony. In contrast to the previous hardline policies of Henry II and his father Francis I, they began introducing gradual concessions to Huguenots. A most notable moderate, at least initially, was the queen mother, Catherine de’ Medici. Catherine, however, later hardened her stance and, at the time of the St. Bartholomew’s Day massacre in 1572, sided with the Guises. This pivotal historical event involved a complete breakdown of state control resulting in series of riots and massacres in which Catholic mobs killed between 5,000 and 30,000 Protestants over a period of weeks throughout the entire kingdom.

At the conclusion of the conflict in 1598, the Protestant Henry of Navarre, heir to the French throne, converted to Catholicism and was crowned Henry IV of France. He issued the Edict of Nantes, which granted Huguenots substantial rights and freedoms though this did not end Catholic hostility towards them or towards him, personally. The wars of religion threatened the authority of the monarchy, already fragile under the rule of Catherine’s three sons and the last Valois kings: Francis II, Charles IX, and Henry III. This changed under the reign of their Bourbon successor Henry IV. The edict of Nantes was revoked later in 1685 with the Edict of Fontainebleau by Louis XIV of France. Henry IV’s wise governance and selection of able administrators did leave a legacy of a strong centralized government, stability, and economic prosperity that has gained him the reputation as France’s best and most beloved monarch, earning him the designation “Good King Henry”.

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Born On This Day

1903 – Faith Bennett, British actress and ATA pilot during WWII (d. 1969) [19]
Faith Margaret Ellen Bennett (1903–1969) was a British actress and ATA pilot.[1][2]

Biography
Bennett was born Margaret Ellen Riddick[3] on 12 May 1903 in London, England.[1] One of her brothers died during the First World War.[1][3]

In 1930, she married film writer Charles Alfred Selwyn Bennett, and over the course of the 1930s she starred in multiple British films under the stage name Faith Bennett.[1] Bennett took flying lessons alongside her acting career, earning both a British aviator’s certificate and an American flying license (the couple moved to the U.S. briefly while Charles worked for Universal Studios).[1]

In July 1941, after divorcing Charles, Bennett joined the ATA.[1] She received her training and was assigned to No. 5 Ferry Pilot Pool (F.P.P.) in December that year, and only two days later was forced to make a crash landing due to poor weather and a stalled engine.[1] Bennett sustained “slight injuries”, and was afterwards assigned to the Training Ferry Pool.[1] She remained with the ATA until July 1945.[1]

Bennett married fellow ATA pilot Herbert Henry Newmark in 1946.[1][3]

Bennett died in 1969.[1][3]

The British Women Pilots’ Association named the Faith Bennett Navigation Cup after her, and the trophy is still awarded annually to women pilots of special merit.[1][4]

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FYI

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The Passive Voice: Barking Dog Nocturnal
 
 
 
 
By James Breakwell: The Most Uncertain Choice
Surprisingly, our offspring have taken a few halting steps toward self-sufficiency. All four of them can now operate a microwave to heat up leftovers. Note I didn’t include the word “safely.” My nine-year-old, Betsy, even uses the stovetop. She can make grilled cheese, macaroni, and ramen, which gives her more culinary skills than the average college student. I still sometimes burn grilled cheese and I’m almost thirty-five. My seven-year-old, Mae, recently volunteered to do the dishes. We’ve hit the part of quarantine where children are so bored they willingly take on chores, assuming those chores are new and different and don’t actually benefit the family in any way. Mae can sort of rinse off the dishes before they go in the dishwasher as long as an adult is nearby to supervise her and there’s nothing good on TV. If you don’t have to immediately redo whatever your child just did, are they even really helping?
 
 
 
 
Fast Company Compass: Scientists are racing to design a face mask that can rip coronavirus apart; Credit card companies are tracking shoppers like never before: Inside the next phase of surveillance capitalism; ‘We may have to rethink the toilet seat altogether’: How the coronavirus could change bathrooms for the better and more ->
 
 
 
 
Alexandra McKay, vice president of programs, Rasmuson Foundation: New grant awards include COVID-19 response projects
 
 
 
 

Chuck Wendig Terrible Minds: Disjecta Membra: 7
Hell is other people, now. Officially. Sartre knew what was up.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By ch00k: Alka-Seltzer Rockets

 
 

Recipes

By In The Kitchen With Matt: Homemade Powdered Sugar
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Hack Your Biscuits From Breakfast to Dessert
 
 
By FOOD by Lyds: Focaccia Bread | Easy Bread Recipe for Beginners


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 11, 2020

On This Day

868 – A copy of the Diamond Sutra is printed in China, making it the oldest known dated printed book.[1]
The Diamond Sūtra (Sanskrit: Vajracchedikā Prajñāpāramitā Sūtra) is a Mahāyāna (Buddhist) sūtra from the Prajñāpāramitā sutras or ‘Perfection of Wisdom’ genre. Translated into a variety of languages over a broad geographic range, the Diamond Sutra is one of the most influential Mahayana sutras in East Asia, and it is particularly prominent within the Chan (or Zen) tradition,[1] along with the Heart Sutra.

A copy of the Tang-dynasty Chinese version of the Diamond Sūtra was found among the Dunhuang manuscripts in 1900 by Daoist monk Wang Yuanlu and sold to Aurel Stein in 1907.[2] They are dated back to 11 May 868.[3] It is, in the words of the British Library, “the earliest complete survival of a dated printed book.”[4]

It is also the first creative work with an explicit public domain dedication, as its colophon at the end states that it was created “for universal free distribution.”[5]

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Born On This Day

1905 – Lise de Baissac, Mauritian-born SOE agent, war hero (d. 2004)[60]
Lise Marie Jeanette de Baissac MBE (11 May 1905 – 29 March 2004)[1][2] was born in Mauritius of French descent and British nationality. She was a heroine of the Special Operations Executive during the Second World War, a special agent who risked her life running her own operations; she was awarded several gallantry awards after the war.[3]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

CBS News: Forget “murder hornets,” experts say — this is the real “murder insect”
 
 
 
 
BBC News US & Canada: Coronavirus: South Dakota Sioux refuse to take down ‘illegal’ checkpoints
 
 
 
 
By NBC 10 News: Owner closes Cape Cod ice cream shop rather than serve rude customers
“Now I open the doors to a whole new world, with gloves and masks and we’re running around like chickens, and people are like, where’s my ice cream! I’m not a trauma center, it’s ice cream,” Lawrence told WFXT.
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tanbusch, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Animal Crossing Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Jesse Haines Director, Grow with Google: Free virtual digital skills training from Grow with Google
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Watchdog report: SBA didn’t tell lenders to prioritize rural businesses for relief loans, so they got shortchanged; USDA, HHS and CDC officials to discuss rural health-care tools and resources for pandemic in free webinar Tuesday and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Wander: Natascha McElhone Reads Hermann Hesse’s 100-Year-Old Love Letter to Trees in a Virtual Mental Health Walk Through Kew Gardens
 
 
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Stinson V77 Reliant, N715FB; accident occurred September 14, 2016 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota and more ->
 
 
Kathryn’s Report: Loss of Control in Flight: Robinson R44 II, N511CC; accident occurred April 19, 2018 at Chena Marina Airport (AK28), Fairbanks, Alaska
 
 
 
 
Today’s email was written by Amrita Khalid, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by Tori Smith. Quartz Daily Obsession: Rainbows: The shine after the storm
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CDXCXII): BBC TV Set Designs; “The Drunk Basket,” when bars in 1960s Istanbul would hire someone to carry drunk people back home; A Talented Cellist who’s be giving Concerts from her Paris Rooftop and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones, Open Culture: Little Richard Burst Into the “Then-Macho World of Rock” and “Changed it Forever”
 
 
 
 
patrickisanavajo: Quarantined Natives Part 2 – Natives React #19
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Ideas

By Rebekah White, New Life On A Homestead: 20 Ways to Water Your Houseplants
 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Chocolate Covered Katie: Cauliflower Alfredo Sauce
 
 
By Sue Stetzel, Taste of Home: The Best Slow Cooker Recipes from Every State


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 10, 2020

On This Day

1773 – The Parliament of Great Britain passes the Tea Act, designed to save the British East India Company by reducing taxes on its tea and granting it the right to sell tea directly to North America. The legislation leads to the Boston Tea Party.[3]
The Tea Act 1773 (13 Geo 3 c 44) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain. The principal objective was to reduce the massive amount of tea held by the financially troubled British East India Company in its London warehouses and to help the financially struggling company survive. A related objective was to undercut the price of illegal tea, smuggled into Britain’s North American colonies. This was supposed to convince the colonists to purchase Company tea on which the Townshend duties were paid, thus implicitly agreeing to accept Parliament’s right of taxation. Smuggled tea was a large issue for Britain and the East India company, since approximately 86% of all the tea in America at the time was smuggled Dutch tea.

The Act granted the Company the right to directly ship its tea to North America and the right to the duty-free export of tea from Britain, although the tax imposed by the Townshend Acts and collected in the colonies remained in force. It received the royal assent on May 10, 1773.

Colonists in the Thirteen Colonies recognized the implications of the Act’s provisions, and a coalition of merchants, smugglers, and artisans similar to that which had opposed the Stamp Act 1765 mobilized opposition to delivery and distribution of the tea. The company’s authorised consignees were harassed, and in many colonies successful efforts were made to prevent the tea from being landed. In Boston, this resistance culminated in the Boston Tea Party on December 16, 1773, when colonists (some disguised as Native Americans, since they identified themselves as “Americans” and no longer considered themselves British subjects[1]) boarded tea ships anchored in the harbour and dumped their tea cargo overboard. Parliamentary reaction to this event included passage of the Coercive Acts, designed to punish Massachusetts for its resistance, and the appointment of General Thomas Gage as royal governor of Massachusetts. These actions further raised tensions that led to the eruption of the American War of Independence in April 1775.

Parliament passed the Taxation of Colonies Act 1778, which repealed a number of taxes (including the tea tax that underlaid this act) as one of a number of conciliatory proposals presented to the Second Continental Congress by the Carlisle Peace Commission. The commission’s proposals were rejected. The Act effectively became a “dead letter”, but was not formally removed from the books until passage of the Statute Law Revision Act 1861.

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Born On This Day

1893 – Tonita Peña, San Ildefonso Pueblo (Native American) artist (d. 1949)
Tonita Peña (born May 10, 1893 in San Ildefonso – died September 9, 1949 in Santo Domingo Pueblo[1]) born as Quah Ah (meaning white coral beads) but also used the name Tonita Vigil Peña and María Antonia Tonita Peña.[2] Peña was a renowned Pueblo artist, specializing in pen and ink on paper embellished with watercolor.[1] She was a well-known and influential Native American artist and art teacher of the early 1920s and 1930s.[2]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Rob Tannenbaum, The New York Times: Betty Wright, Soul Singer Who Mentored a New Generation, Dies at 66 She had her first hit, “Clean Up Woman,” when she was only 17 and became a key player in the Miami funk sound of the 1970s.
 
 
 
 
By David Nield, Wired: How to Set Your Social Media to Control Who Sees What Pick who sees your tweets, Facebook posts, and Instagram stories—and choose what you want to see, too.
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Jill Nystul, One Good Thing: 12 Ways That WD-40 Is The Ultimate Problem Solver WD-40 is the new duct tape.
 
 

Recipes

By Tye Rannosaurus: Copycat Fishy Green Ale From Universal Harry Potter World
 
 
Taste of Home: Breakfast Pizza Skillet


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 09, 2020

On This Day

1386 – England and Portugal formally ratify their alliance with the signing of the Treaty of Windsor, making it the oldest diplomatic alliance in the world which is still in force.
The Treaty of Windsor is the diplomatic alliance signed between Portugal and England on 9 May 1386 at Windsor and sealed by the marriage of King John I of Portugal (House of Aviz) to Philippa of Lancaster, daughter of John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster.[1] With the victory at the Battle of Aljubarrota, assisted by English archers, John I was recognized as the undisputed King of Portugal, putting an end to the interregnum of the 1383–1385 Crisis.[1] The Treaty of Windsor established a pact of mutual support between the countries.[1]

This document is preserved at the Portuguese National Archives.[2]

Historian Matthew Winslett says, “This treaty has been the cornerstone of both nations’ relations with each other ever since.”[3]

 
 

Born On This Day

1746 – Gaspard Monge, French mathematician and engineer (d. 1818)[6]
Gaspard Monge, Comte de Péluse (9 May 1746[2] – 28 July 1818[3]) was a French mathematician, the inventor of descriptive geometry[4] (the mathematical basis of technical drawing), and the father of differential geometry.[5] During the French Revolution he served as the Minister of the Marine, and was involved in the reform of the French educational system, helping to found the École Polytechnique.

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FYI

Richard Wayne Penniman (December 5, 1932 – May 9, 2020), better known as Little Richard, was an American singer, songwriter, and musician. He was an influential figure in popular music and culture for seven decades. Nicknamed “The Innovator, The Originator, and The Architect of Rock and Roll”, Penniman’s most celebrated work dates from the mid-1950s, when his charismatic showmanship and dynamic music, characterized by frenetic piano playing, pounding back beat and raspy shouted vocals, laid the foundation for rock and roll. Penniman’s innovative emotive vocalizations and uptempo rhythmic music also played a key role in the formation of other popular music genres, including soul and funk, respectively.[1] He influenced numerous singers and musicians across musical genres from rock to hip hop; his music helped shape rhythm and blues for generations to come.[2][3]

“Tutti Frutti” (1955), one of Penniman’s signature songs, became an instant hit, crossing over to the pop charts in both the United States and overseas in the United Kingdom. Richard’s next hit single, “Long Tall Sally” (1956), hit No. 1 on the Billboard Rhythm and Blues Best-Sellers chart. His performances during this period resulted in integration between whites and blacks in his audience. In 1962, during a five-year period in which Richard abandoned rock and roll music for born again Christianity, concert promoter Don Arden persuaded him to tour Europe. During this time, Arden had The Beatles open for Penniman on some tour dates, capitalizing on his popularity. Richard advised the Beatles on how to perform his songs and taught the band’s member Paul McCartney his distinctive vocalizations.

Penniman is cited as one of the first crossover black artists, reaching audiences of all races. His music and concerts broke the color line, drawing blacks and whites together despite attempts to sustain segregation. His contemporaries, including Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Bill Haley, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Everly Brothers, Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran, all recorded covers of his works. Taken by his music and style, and personally covering four of Penniman’s songs on his own two breakthrough albums in 1956, Presley told Penniman in 1969 that his music was an inspiration to him and that he was “the greatest”.

Penniman was honored by many institutions. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as part of its first group of inductees in 1986. He was also inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. He was the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Recording Academy and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Rhythm and Blues Foundation. In 2015, Penniman received a Rhapsody & Rhythm Award from the National Museum of African American Music for his key role in the formation of popular music genres and helping to bring an end to the racial divide on the music charts and in concert in the mid-1950s changing American culture significantly. “Tutti Frutti” was included in the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress in 2010, which stated that his “unique vocalizing over the irresistible beat announced a new era in music”.

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The Awesomer: Minor-to-Major Metal; Günther; Somebody to Love (A Capella); How a Tank Works and more ->

High Country News: Who really paid for land-grant universities?; The pioneer of ruin and more ->

 
 
 
 
No idea why he insults Lou Gehrig

The Homeless Editor: When the storyteller becomes the story
 
 
 
 

By Rodrigo García, Opinion The New York Times: A Letter to My Father, Gabriel García Márquez Not a day goes by that I don’t come across a reference to your novel “Love in the Time of Cholera.” It’s impossible not to speculate about what you would have made of all this.
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Books-A-Million re-opens bookstores with curbside pick-up, staff in PPE, telephone experts, and cosmetic cases in beautiful floral prints
From The New Publishing Standard:

America’s second-largest bookstore chain, Books-A-Million, is readying for Mother’s Day (Sunday, May 10 in USA) and is opening all but a handful of its 200 stores across the country, the exceptions being states or counties where full lockdown continues.

In a press release Books-A-Million CEO Terrance G. Finley said,

We are extremely appreciative of the support we have received from our customers during these difficult times. Through online ordering; the buy online, pick-up in store option; and curbside pick-up, our guests have continued to seek out great books, educational materials, puzzles and toys.

Now that we are able to welcome our customers back to the stores in time for Mother’s Day, our booksellers stand ready to share the rich assortment of new books and products that we have been curating over the past weeks.
 
 
 
 

Open Culture: Building Your Resilience: Finding Meaning in Adversity–Take a Free & Timely Course Online
 
 
 
 
49 Writer’s Blog: Writing the Distance: Meezie Hermansen
 
 
 
 

Kathryn’s Reports: Cessna A185E Skywagon, N185SZ: Incident occurred May 05, 2020 in Knik River, Butte, Alaska
 
 
 
 

 
 

Ideas

Cari @ Everything Pretty: Dandelion Oil DIYs

 
 
By Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead: How to Make Amish Black Drawing Salve

Recipes

Little House Big Alaska: Homemade Roti Recipe
 
 
Food Network: 0 Mother’s Day Breakfast and Brunch Recipes
 
 
By Faith Durand, The Kitchn: Our 20 Most Popular Brunch Recipes
 
 
By JNill Nystul, One Good Thing: 13 Extra Simple 3-Ingredient Recipes That Will Save Your Sanity
 
 
Taste of Home: This Slow-Cooker Recipe Is a WFH (Working From Home) Must-Have


 
 

 
 

 
 

FYI May 08, 2020

On This Day

589 – Reccared I opens the Third Council of Toledo, marking the entry of Visigothic Spain into the Catholic Church.[2]
The Third Council of Toledo (589) marks the entry of Visigothic Spain into the Catholic Church, and known for codifying the filioque clause into Western Christianity.[1][2] The council also enacted restrictions on Jews, and the conversion of the country to Catholic Christianity led to repeated conflict with the Jews.[3]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1903 – Mary Stewart, Baroness Stewart of Alvechurch, British politician and educator (d. 1984)
Mary Elizabeth Henderson Stewart, Baroness Stewart of Alvechurch, JP (née Birkinshaw: 8 May 1903 – 28 December 1984) was a British politician and educator. She was a Baroness in her own right and the wife of Labour Foreign Secretary, Michael Stewart.

Early life and education
The daughter of commercial traveller Herbert Birkinshaw and Isabella née Garbutt, Mary was born in Bradford. The family moved when she was four and she was educated at King Edward VI High School for Girls (KEHS) Birmingham, and Bedford College, University of London, graduating with a BA in philosophy in 1928. She taught psychology and sociology to Workers’ Educational Association students.[1]

Career
During World War II, Stewart served with the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF) at locations around the country. After the war she took an interest in education and psychology and Barbara Wooton encouraged her to become a magistrate in the juvenile courts. She worked for the Workers’ Educational Association, as a tutor until 1964. She became a member of the Fabian Society Executive, serving as Chairman in 1963–64. She wrote papers on the Fabian’s behalf arguing that juveniles should be dealt with more leniently. In 1964 she published a short paper titled “Unpaid Public Service” which looked at the role of volunteers on committees. She argued that expenses should be paid and that these committees should meet in the evenings.[1]

She was also involved in local hospitals, schools and she became the chair the East London Juvenile Court magistrates.[1]

House of Lords
Stewart was created a life peer as Baroness Stewart of Alvechurch, of Fulham in Greater London on 15 January 1975.[2] She was introduced to the House of Lords on 28 January 1975.[3] She made her maiden speech on 26 March 1975 during a debate on direct grant grammar school.[4]

Personal life
She married an advertising clerk named Robert Godfrey Goodyear in 1931, but they were divorced in 1941. She then married Michael Stewart two months later on 26 July 1941.[1] She and her second husband, were one of the few couples who both held titles in their own right.

Stewart died on the 28 December 1984.[5]

 
 

FYI

The Rural Blog: Facebook names 20 people, including journalists, to a ‘Supreme Court’ as ultimate arbiters for allowed content and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Igor Bonifacic, Engadget: Facebook’s redesigned website finally starts rolling out to everyone The new interface is now the default for all Facebook users.
 
 
 
 

Ernie at Tedium: The Internet’s Many Branches
 
 
 
 
By Ted Mills, Open Culture: Robert Fripp Releases Free Ambient Music to Get You Through the Lockdown: Enjoy “Music for Quiet Moments”
 
 
 
 

49 Writers Blog: Writing the Distance: Vivian Faith Prescott
 
 
49 Writers Blog: Writing the Distance: Kathy Trump
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Caylin Harris, Food Network: 8 Clever Ideas for Hosting a Virtual Mother’s Day Party Add a little festivity to your Zoom hang with Mom.
 
 
Tara Dodrill, New Life On A Homestead: 14 DIY Natural Air Freshener Recipes
 
 

Recipes

By Laurie Dixon, Taste of Home: 33 of Our Cheesiest Slow-Cooker Recipes
 
 

Food Network: The Best Cookies and Bars