FYI October 13, 2017


1773 – The Whirlpool Galaxy is discovered by Charles Messier.
The Whirlpool Galaxy, also known as Messier 51a, M51a, and NGC 5194, is an interacting[7] grand-design[8] spiral galaxy with a Seyfert 2 active galactic nucleus[9] in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral galaxy.[10] Recently it was estimated to be 23 ± 4 million light-years from the Milky Way,[3] but different methods yield distances between 15 and 35 million light-years. Messier 51 is one of the best known galaxies in the sky.[11] The galaxy and its companion, NGC 5195,[12] are easily observed by amateur astronomers, and the two galaxies may even be seen with binoculars.[13] The Whirlpool Galaxy is also a popular target for professional astronomers, who study it to further understand galaxy structure (particularly structure associated with the spiral arms) and galaxy interactions.

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1952 – Mundo Earwood, American singer-songwriter and guitarist (d. 2014)
Raymond “Mundo” Earwood (October 13, 1952 – April 21, 2014) was an American country music singer-songwriter. Earwood’s eponymous debut album was released by Excelsior Records in 1981. His most successful single, “Things I’d Do for You”, reached the Top 20 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart in 1978. For a time, he also recorded as Mundo Ray.

Biography
Earwood was born in Del Rio, Texas. After graduating high school in Corpus Christi, he enrolled in San Jacinto Junior College but soon moved to Houston where he hired a band, and began playing for $8 at any venue that would book him. Earwood released several records on a small Houston label. His manager took him to Nashville to cut his first major national release, “Behind Blue Eyes”, which was initially released on Earwood’s own label, Raywood, and eventually sold to the Royal American label, where it spent eight weeks at #1 on the Houston radio charts, six months total on the Houston charts, and a long tenure on the national charts.

He went on to release “Let’s Hear it for Loneliness”, “Lonesome Is a Cowboy” and “I Can Give You Love”. In 1978, “Things I’d Do For You” soared to #18 on the Billboard country chart.[2] This period also produced “Fooled Around and Fell in Love”, “Angelene”, and “My Heart is Not My Own”. During his career, he appeared on the Billboard charts 23 times.

Mundo Earwood was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and a fibrous histiocytoma tumor in 2013, which led to his death at the age of 61.[3][4]

Website: www.mundoearwood.net

 
 
 
 


By Brian Mastre: New tool used to detect child abuse

 
 
 
 
Project Harmony
Project Harmony grew out of the vision of several Omaha community professionals and advocates to create a better system of protection for abused and neglected children. The vision was to not only create an integrated response system but also to develop a single child friendly location where all the professionals would come together to serve each child. They wanted the child to have to tell his or her story only once. They envisioned a system with joint accountability where no child would fall through the cracks. Project Harmony opened its doors in 1996.
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy: 5 Places You Really Shouldn’t Get Stuck on Friday 13th
3. On an Arctic Island abandoned by Eskimos
This is King Island, and these are the improbable cliff-hanging houses of Ukivok that a displaced community once called home. In 1959, the Bureau of India Affairs made the decision to close King Island’s only school at the heart of the village. There was a large boulder on top of the rocky island that they believed was ready to fall and crush the school in its path. With the children left without a school, families were forced to seek education for them on the mainland and given no choice but to move from their homes and start a new way of life. The last natives left their homeland in 1970.
 
 
 
 
Brenda Novak: 9 Book Advertising Tactics I’ve Tried… And Which Ones Worked!
 
 
 
 
By Steven Bell: Let’s Commit to Making Library Webinars Better | From the Bell Tower
 
 
 
 
By Rachel Paxton: 8 Kids’ Books Filled with Girl Power to Inspire the Young Women in Your Life
 
 
 
 

“I kind of joke [that] Form5 is a one-man, one-hand show.” [Photo: courtesy Form5 Prosthetics]


By Ben Paynter: This 18-Year-Old Makes Innovative Prosthetics From Recycled Plastic
Aaron Westbrook was born with only one hand. Several years ago, while a freshman at New Albany High School in Ohio, he tried out his first prosthetic. It didn’t fit well, and cost about $40,000, a somewhat staggering sum, considering he would eventually outgrow it. “That’s when I realized that there was a really big issue with prosthetics right now,” he says. “They’re too expensive and they’re just plain inefficient.”
Form5 Prosthetics, Inc.
 
 
 
 
By Sean Captain: Born Out Of The Chaos Of Hurricane Harvey, The American Black Cross Is Reinventing Disaster Relief
 
 
 
 
By Bethany Corriveau Gotschall: A Brief History of the ‘Danse Macabre’
 
 
 
 
By Stella: Sick Grandma Brings ‘The Rock’ Cutout To Hospital, And Here’s What He Does When He Finds Out
Johnson happily obliged, and while we don’t have any updates on whether or not Judy has seen the video, we’re sure she’ll be over the moon when she does. “Stay strong Judy, you sexy tiger. We’re all sending you and your family love and light during this time and I’m an extremely grateful man this email reached my eyes,” The Rock further wrote. Say what you will about celebrities, but every now and then, they use their fame to do some serious good.
 
 
 
 
By Hendy: Never underestimate the awesomeness of science (17 GIFs)
 
 
 
 
By Bob: Animals that will hit you right in the funny bone (35 Photos)
 
 
 
 
By Ryan F. Mandelbaum: Magic Mushroom Chemical Appears to Physically Change Depressed Brains
 
 
 
 

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The Authors’ Billboard: Halloween by Mona Risk

Did you know that one quarter of all the candy sold annually in the U.S. is purchased for Halloween?  Yes, October is the cruelest month for our molar teeth. Today, Americans spend an estimated $6 billion annually on Halloween, making it the country’s second largest commercial holiday.   It is hard to imagine that 100 years ago, Halloween looked quite different from the candy debauch of today. Halloween origin: Halloween is thought to have originated with the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain, when people would light bonfires and wear costumes to ward off roaming ghosts. In the eighth century, Pope Gregory III designated November 1 as a time to honor all saints and martyrs; the holiday, All Saints’ Day, incorporated some of the traditions of Samhain. The evening before was known as All Hallows’ Eve and later Halloween.   History of Halloween: At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties focused on games, foods of the season and festive costumes. Parents were encouraged by newspapers and community leaders to take anything “frightening” or “grotesque” out of Halloween celebrations. Because of these efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious Continue Reading →

Source: Halloween by Mona Risk – The Authors’ Billboard

FYI October 12, 2017


1799 – Jeanne Geneviève Labrosse was the first woman to jump from a balloon with a parachute, from an altitude of 900 meters.
Jeanne Geneviève Garnerin (1775–1847), née Labrosse,[1] was a French balloonist and parachutist. She was the first to ascend solo and the first woman to make a parachute descent (in the gondola), from an altitude of 900 meters on 12 October 1799

Labrosse first flew on 10 November 1798, one of the earliest women to fly in a balloon.[Note 1] She was the wife of André-Jacques Garnerin, a hydrogen balloonist and inventor of the frameless parachute.

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1893 – Velvalee Dickinson, American spy (d. 1980)
Velvalee Dickinson (born October 12, 1893 – died ca. 1980), was convicted of espionage against the United States on behalf of Japan during World War II. Known as the “Doll Woman”, she used her business in New York City to send information on the United States Navy to contacts in Argentina via steganographic messages. She was finally caught when one of her contacts in Buenos Aires moved and her messages were returned.[1]

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The Rural Blog Heather Chapman: Farmers looking to space to limit crop damage
 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog Heather Chapman: Childhood trauma can cause long-lasting harm to rural adults; help less available in rural areas
 
 
 
 
By Emma Upton: Street View goes to the “top of the world”


 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Library of Congress Releases Papers of Ulysses S. Grant (in Original Format) Online
 
 
 
 
By Adele Peters: These Cold-Weather Container Farms Let Produce Grow In The Arctic
The Growcer
 
 
 
 
By Chris Eger: Green Beret to accept Medal of Honor for all who served in Laos
 
 
 
 
By Jennifer Cruz: Car dealership gives new ride to veteran who stole truck to take Vegas victims to hospital (VIDEO)
 
 
 
 
By Adam Clark Estes: The 11 Best Tiny Houses You Can Buy on Amazon
 
 
 
 
By Rhett Jones: Drone Video Shows Postal Worker Still Delivering Mail in Neighborhood Ravaged by Wildfire

 
 
 
 
By Clayton Purdom: Feel true terror with this vintage clip of Gerard Butler auditioning to be Dracula
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 


 
 

FYI October 11, 2017


1767 – Surveying for the Mason–Dixon line separating Maryland from Pennsylvania is completed.
The Mason–Dixon line, also called the Mason and Dixon line or Mason’s and Dixon’s line, was surveyed between 1763 and 1767 by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon in the resolution of a border dispute involving Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Delaware in Colonial America. It is still a demarcation line among four U.S. states, forming part of the borders of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and West Virginia (originally part of Virginia before 1863).

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1872 – Emily Davison, English educator and activist (d. 1913)
Emily Wilding Davison (11 October 1872 – 8 June 1913) was a suffragette who fought for votes for women in the United Kingdom in the early twentieth century. A member of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU) and a militant fighter for her cause, she was arrested on nine occasions, went on hunger strike seven times and was force fed on forty-nine occasions. She died after being hit by King George V’s horse Anmer at the 1913 Epsom Derby when she walked onto the track during the race.

Davison grew up in a middle-class family, and studied at Royal Holloway College, London, and St Hugh’s College, Oxford, before taking jobs as a teacher and governess. She joined the WSPU in November 1906 and became an officer of the organisation and a chief steward during marches. She soon became known in the organisation for her daring militant action; her tactics included breaking windows, throwing stones, setting fire to postboxes and, on three occasions, hiding overnight in the Palace of Westminster—including on the night of the 1911 census. Her funeral on 14 June 1913 was organised by the union. A procession of 5,000 suffragettes and their supporters accompanied her coffin and 50,000 people lined the route through London; her coffin was then taken by train to the family plot in Morpeth, Northumberland.

Davison was a staunch feminist and passionate Christian, and considered that socialism was a moral and political force for good. Much of her life has been interpreted through the manner of her death. She gave no prior explanation for what she planned to do at the Derby and the uncertainty of her motives and intentions has affected how she has been judged by history. Several theories have been put forward, including accident, suicide, or an attempt to pin a suffragette banner to the king’s horse; none has ever been proven.

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By Air Force Airman 1st Class Kaylee Dubois, 633rd Air Base Wing: Face of Defense: Army Helicopter Pilot Teaches New Generation of Aviators
The once young boy from Argentina with a dream of flying found his place in a nation that allowed him to experience the world. Now he prides himself in protecting that nation, giving back to fellow countrymen who fueled his desire to serve.
“There’s nothing like flying in the U.S.,” Basabilbaso said. “The people you meet when stopping for fuel or at a temporary duty station are like no others; genuine Americans who never fail to thank us for what we do.”
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

By Anne Victoria Clark: The Rock Test: A Hack for Men Who Don’t Want To Be Accused of Sexual Harassment
It’s as clear cut as this: Treat all women like you would treat Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson.
 
 
 
 
By Scott Neuman: Nobel Goes To American Richard Thaler For Work In Behavioral Economics
 
 
 
 
By Anne Easton: In Oprah’s New Show, Mass Incarceration Hits Home
 
 
 
 

Excellent!
By Bob: Man sends a perfect letter 14 years in the making
 
 
 
 
By Kristen Lee: What It Takes To Launch One Of The Toughest Off-Road Races In America
Rebelle Rally
 
 
 
 
By Starre Julia Vartan: How to Plan a Trip to See an Aurora
 
 
 
 

By Andrew Liszewski: Watch a Pack of Adorable Arctic Fox Pups Destroy a Documentary Filmmaker’s Camera

 
 
 
 
Twisted Sifter: 12 Amazing Highlights from the 2017 Nat Geo Nature Photographer of the Year Contest
 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
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