Category: FYI

FYI

FYI September 16, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1880 – The Cornell Daily Sun prints its first issue in Ithaca, New York. The Sun is the nation’s oldest, continuously-independent college daily.
The Cornell Daily Sun is an independent daily newspaper published in Ithaca, New York by students at Cornell University and hired employees.

The Sun features coverage of the university and its environs as well as stories from the Associated Press and UWIRE. It prints on weekdays when the university is open for academic instruction as a tabloid-sized daily. In addition to these regular issues, The Sun publishes a graduation issue and a freshman issue, which is mailed to incoming Cornell freshmen before their first semester. The paper is free on campus and online.

Aside from a few full-time production and business positions, The Sun is staffed by Cornell students and is fully independent of the university. It operates out of its own building in downtown Ithaca. The Sun is currently the number one college newspaper in the United States, according to The Princeton Review.[1]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1880 – Clara Ayres, American nurse (d. 1917)
Clara Ayres (1880–1917) was an American nurse, who joined the United States Army during the First World War. Ayres and Helen Burnett Wood were the first two women to be killed while serving in the United States military, following an explosion on USS Mongolia on May 17, 1917.

Career
Clara Edith Work (later Ayres) was born on September 16, 1880, in Venice Township, Seneca County, Ohio. She was the eldest of three children of James and Mary Work. She was brought up in Attica within the Township. On September 30, 1903, she married grocery store owner Wayland D. Ayres, who died three years later from tetanus from a workplace injury. She attempted to run the store herself, but was eventually employed as a clerk at a dry foods store nearby.[1]

In 1910, she travelled to Chicago to study nursing at the school there. She graduated in 1913, and worked until 1917 as an instructor at the Cook County Hospital. That year she responded to the American Red Cross appeal for trained nurses for the First World War. She was accepted, and was transferred on board the USS Mongolia to travel to France. The day after sailing on May 17, the crew underwent a firing practice. The medical staff being transferred watched from near one of the guns, when it exploded, killing Ayres and fellow nurse Helen Burnett Wood.[1]

The ship transferred their bodies back to New York City. The two women were the first of their gender to be killed while serving in the United States military. Following a service by the Red Cross on May 23, Ayres’ body was taken back to Ohio where she was buried with military honors on May 26. A Bronze plaque honoring her was placed at the Chicago Training School for Nurses.[1] The deaths made national news, and the United States Navy was accused in the United States Congress of covering up how the women were killed.[2] A historical marker was placed near her grave in 2017.[3]

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

I had a Dodge Dart Sport 360 (no sunroof) that I called “Precious” as in precious and few are the moments it ran smoothly~
By Elizabeth Werth: It’s Time We Bring Back Car Advertisements from the 1970s
 
 
 
 
The Caffeinated Reviewer: Sunday Post #334 Pumpkin Spice Everything…
 
 
 
 
Perfectly DeStressed: I Was Lost in the Laundry. Did Anyone Even Notice I was Gone?
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life Magazine: To Catch a Witch By Heather Blake, Upside Down or Right Side Up, Arvada is a Lover Valley Animal Center: Jewels Murder on Lake Okeechobee: Mystery Short Story A Reel Catch By Lorraine Bartlett Sherlock Holmes & the Case of the Disappearing Diva By Gemma Halliday & Kelly Rey: Review/Giveaway/Interview Reedley High School’s Academic Decathlon 3 Doors Down and Collective Soul Ride Their Rock & Roll Express Tour Travellin’ Shoes By V.M. Burns: Review/Giveaway/Guest Post California Drinkin’ Part II Check out What’s Up this week on KRL News & Reviews!
 
 
 
 
Joan Reeves Sling Words: What Is a Clean Link & How Do You Make One?
 
 
 
 
Limecello: SHHM = Smithsonian Hispanic Heritage Month
 
 
 
 
Maria Popovas Brain Pickings: Walt Whitman on creativity, Toni Morrison on the deepest meaning of love, Martin Buber on what a tree can teach us about seeing each other fully
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls Breakfast Links: Week of September 10, 2018
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Fall Pumpkins, Pillows and a Wreath – Get Your Fall DIY On
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: These Are the Coolest PVC Pipe Ideas We’ve Ever Seen (Honestly) PVC is literally our favorite material. We SWEAR by it!
 
 
 
 
By briggs1108: Teardrop Trailer Tiny Home
 
 
 
 
By strooom: Steel and Glass Partition Wall
 
 
 
 
By TueBjørn: Fixing and Improving Old Greenhouse
 
 
 
 
By Penelopy Bulnick: Flexible 3D Print Masks
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Core3D: Dragon Hands
 
 
 
 
By seamster: How to Make Giant Halloween Spiders
 
 
 
 
Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: Festive Pumpkin Planters
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Everything Pretty: 53 Healthy Pumpkin Recipes and more ->


 
 

 
 

FYI September 15, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1616 – Joseph Calasanz opens the first modern public elementary school.
Joseph Calasanz, Sch.P. (Spanish: José de Calasanz; Italian: Giuseppe Calasanzio), (September 11, 1557 – August 25, 1648), also known as Joseph Calasanctius and Josephus a Matre Dei, was a Spanish Catholic priest, educator and the founder of the Pious Schools, providing free education to the sons of the poor, and the Religious Order that ran them, commonly known as the Piarists. He is honored as a saint by the Catholic Church.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1857 – Anna Winlock, American astronomer and academic (d. 1904)
Anna Winlock (born September 15, 1857 in Cambridge, Massachusetts; died January 4, 1904 in Boston[1]) was an American astronomer and daughter of Joseph Winlock and Isabella Lane. Like her father, she was a computer and astronomer. It is plausible that this connection allowed her to be among the first of the women to be known as “the Harvard Computers.” She was also a distinguished woman computer as she made the most complete catalogue of stars near the north and south poles of her era. She is also remembered for her calculations and studies of asteroids. In particular, she did calculations on 433 Eros and 475 Ocllo.

Early years

Winlock attended the Cambridge Schools as a child and began to develop an interest in both mathematics and the Greek language. Upon her graduation she received a letter from her principal expressing his appreciation for her Greek and of her character. Her father influenced her interest in astronomy. When she was twelve, she attended a solar eclipse expedition with her father in his homestate of Kentucky. In June 1875, Joseph died shortly after Winlock had graduated from primary school. Winlock quickly followed in her father’s footsteps becoming one of the first female paid staff members of the Harvard College Observatory.[2]


Harvard College Observatory

After the death of her father, it fell upon her to find financial support for her mother and four siblings, and soon she approached the Harvard College Observatory seeking a job in calculations. Specifically, she was capable of reducing volumes of unreduced observations, a decades worth of numbers in a useless state, that previously her father had left unfinished. The interim director of the observatory complained that he could not process the data, as “the condition of the funds is an objection to hiring anyone.” [3] Winlock presented herself to the observatory and offered to reduce the observations. Having been previously introduced to the principles of mathematical astronomy by her father she seemed like a capable asset to the observatory and could be paid less than half the prevailing rate for calculating at the time. Harvard was able to offer her twenty-five cents an hour to do the computations. Winlock found the conditions acceptable and took the position.[3]

In less than a year, she was joined at the observatory by three other women who also served as computers; they became known as Pickering’s Harem, gaining notoriety for leaving an uncomfortable example on the government computing agencies because of the women’s low wages and arduous work, even though it was of high quality.[4] Winlock found it important the work to be done in astronomy, especially for women. By her own development as a scientist and her lasting contributions to the stellar program of the observatory, she served as an example that women were equally capable as men of doing astronomical work.[5]

Major contributions

Through her thirty-year career at the Harvard College Observatory, Winlock contributed to the many projects the observatory faced. Her most significant work involved the continuous and arduous work of reducing and computing meridian circle observations. Five years earlier under the direction of her father, the observatory collaborated with multiple foreign observatories in a project for preparing a comprehensive star catalogue. The project was divided into sections or zones by circles parallel to the celestial equator. Winlock began to work on the section called the “Cambridge Zone” shortly after being hired on by the observatory. Working over twenty years on the project, the work done by her team on the Cambridge Zone contributed significantly to the Astronomische Gesellschaft Katalog, which contains information on more than one-hundred thousand stars and is used worldwide by many observatories and their researchers.[1][2] Besides her work on the Cambridge Zone, she also contributed to many independent projects. She supervised in the creation of the Observatory Annals (a collection of tables that provide the positions of variable stars in clusters) into 38 volumes.[2]

Death
Winlock’s death was unexpected. On December 17, 1904 she visited the Harvard College Observatory for what would be the last time, and she continued working through the holiday season. The last entry in her notebook of reductions was on New Years Day 1904. Three days later she died suddenly at the age of 47 in Boston, Massachusetts. A funeral service was held at St. John’s Chapel in Cambridge.[1][6]
 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

By Brigit Katz: Record-Breaking Distance Runner Diane Leather Never Let Lack of Opportunity Slow Her Down The first woman to run a mile in less than five minutes has died at age 85
 
 
Diane Leather obituary First woman to run a sub-five-minute mile, who had to wait years for the recognition she merited
 
 
Diane Leather Charles (7 January 1933 – 6 September 2018) was an English athlete who was the first woman to run a sub-5-minute mile.[1]
 
 
 
 
By Julie Muncy: The Sound Engineer Behind Star Trek: The Motion Picture and Tron Has Passed Away
 
 

Frank Serafine was a motion picture sound designer and sound editor, and composer. He was best known for his work as a Hollywood Supervising Sound Editor / Designer on such blockbusters as the Star Trek and Tron movies, Addams Family, The Fog, Poltergeist: The Other Side, RobotJox, Ice Pirates, Hoodwinked 2, Orgazmo, The Lawnmower Man, Virtuosity, Field of Dreams, Emmy-Winning Sound Design on The Day After and Oscar-Winning Sound Design for The Hunt for Red October. Frank died after being struck by an automobile while crossing Palmdale Boulevard in Palmdale, CA on September 12, 2018.

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By Elizabeth Werth: Desiré Wilson Proved She Was the Most Successful Woman in Racing by Winning in a Formula One Car
Desiré Randall Wilson (born 26 November 1953)[1] is a former racing driver from South Africa and one of only five women to have competed in Formula One.[2] Born in Brakpan,[1] she entered one Formula One World Championship Grand Prix in 1980 with a non-works RAM Racing-prepared Williams FW07, but failed to qualify.[3] She also raced in the 1981 non-world championship South African Grand Prix in a one off deal with Tyrrell Racing. This race was not part of the 1981 world championship due, in part, to the FISA–FOCA war.[4] She qualified 16th and, after a disastrous start where the car stalled, she moved up though the field in wet conditions, as conditions dried she fell back and damaged the car when it touched a wall while she was letting the race leader through.[5]

She became the only woman to win a Formula One race of any kind when she won at Brands Hatch in the short-lived British Aurora F1 Championship in 1980.[3] As a result of this achievement, she has a grandstand at Brands Hatch named after her.[5] Following her attempts in Formula One, Wilson participated in other disciplines including CART[6] and sports car racing.[5] In 1982, Wilson entered the Indianapolis 500, but failed to qualify. She did not qualify for 1983 and 1984 Indy 500s as well.[5]

She is married to fellow South Africa-native and road course architect, Alan Wilson.[2]

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By Elizabeth Werth: Yes, The U.S. Army Actually Developed a Flying Jeep with Guns
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Tom McKay: Watch the Last Delta II Rocket Carry ICESat-2 Into Space
 
 
 
 
National Science Foundation September 2018
 
 
NSF’s 10 Big Ideas
In 2016, NSF unveiled a set of “Big Ideas” — 10 bold, long-term research and process ideas that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of science and engineering. With its broad portfolio of investments, NSF is uniquely suited to advance this set of cutting-edge research agendas and processes that will require collaborations with industry, private foundations, other agencies, science academies and societies, and universities and the education sector. The Big Ideas represent unique opportunities to position our Nation at the cutting edge — indeed to define that cutting edge — of global science and engineering leadership and to invest in basic research and processes that advance the United States’ prosperity, security, health and well-being.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura Anne Ewbank: Before Food Trucks, Americans Ate ‘Night Lunch’ From Beautiful Wagons They were the ancestors of the modern diner.
 
 
 
 
Alaska Master Gardner Blog: Fuchsias , Good for more than one season in Fairbanks?
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy: The Secret Rooftop Farms you can Visit above Parisian Department Stores
 
 
By Francky Knapp: Sneaking into the Forbidden City with our Travel Heroine du Jour
 
 
 
 
By James Clear: Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds
Leo Tolstoy was even bolder: “The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow-witted man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid before him.”
 
 
 
 


Think about it~

Ozy: The Internet Could Become an Environmental Problem
 
 
Ozy: Volunteering Overseas May Do More Harm Than Good
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: 1955 Heavy Traffic on the Lodge Expressway Detroit, Michigan
 
 
 
 
By Joanne Guidoccio: Inspired by Jann Arden
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 


 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: Don’t Kick Your Old Crib to the Curb Before Seeing These 14 Ideas Just because your kids are older does not mean you have to get rid of their crib.
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
My Recipe Treasures: Oriental Chicken Salad, Pina Colada Pie, Pumpkin Cream Cheese Muffins and more->
 
 
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Dutch Apple Pie
 
 
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Beer Bread
 
 

 
 
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Homemade BBQ Sauce
 
 

 
 
 
 
Michael’s Test Kitchen: Lemon Cucumber Smoothie
 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 14, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1682 – Bishop Gore School, one of the oldest schools in Wales, is founded.
The Bishop Gore School (Welsh: Ysgol Esgob Gore) is a secondary school in Swansea in Wales, founded on 14 September 1682 by Hugh Gore (1613–1691), Bishop of Waterford and Lismore. It is situated in Sketty, close to Singleton Park and Swansea University. In December 2013 the school was ranked in the second highest of five bands by the Welsh Government, based on performance in exams, value added performance, disadvantaged pupils’ performance, and attendance.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1857 – Julia Platt, American embryologist and politician (d. 1935)
Julia Barlow Platt (14 September 1857 in San Francisco – 1935) was an American embryologist and politician.

Julia Platt received her undergraduate degree from the University of Vermont before moving to Cambridge to perform research at the Harvard Annex in 1887. During her time at Harvard, she challenged the anti-coeducational policies in place. In 1889, she left Harvard to take courses and do research at Woods Hole, Clark University, the University of Chicago, Bryn Mawr, the University of Freiberg, the Naples Zoological Station, and the University of Munich. She obtained her doctorate at Freiburg in 1898. She investigated embryogenesis, in particular the head development, from studying sharks and salamanders. Her most notable contribution to the field was her demonstration that neural crest cells formed the jaw cartilage and tooth dentine in Necturus maculosus (mudpuppy embryos), but her work was not believed by her contemporaries. Her claim went counter to the belief that only mesoderm could form bones and cartilage. Her hypothesis of the neural crest origin of the cranial skeleton gained acceptance only some 50 years later when confirmed by Sven Hörstadius and Sven Sellman.[1]

Unable to obtain a doctoral degree from Radcliffe or secure a university position, she said “if I cannot obtain the work I wish, then I must take up with the next best” and then became active in politics, including tearing down a fence to give the public access to the beach at Lover’s Point in Pacific Grove, California. In 1931, at the age of 74, she became mayor of Pacific Grove, California.[2] According to Steve Palumbi and Carolyn Sotka, her prescient pioneering setting up of a marine protected area was crucial to the recovery of the sea otter.[3]

Publications
Platt, J. B. (1890): “The Anterior Head-Cavities of Acanthias (Preliminary Notice)”, Zool. Anz. 13: 239
Platt, J. B. (1892): “Fibres connecting the Central Nervous System and Chorda in Amphioxus”, Anat. Anz. 7: 282-284
Platt, J. B. (1893): “Ectodermic Origin of the Cartilages of the Head”, Anat. Anz. 8: 506-509
Platt, J. B. (1894): “Ontogenetische Differenzirung des Ektoderms in Necturus”, Archiv mikr. Anat. 43: 911-966
Platt, J. B. (1894): “Ontogenetic Differentiations of the Ectoderm in Necturus” Anat. Anz. 9: 51-56
Platt, J. B. (1898): “The development of the cartilaginous skull and of the branchial and hypoglossal musculature in Necturus”, Morphol. Jahrb. 25: 377-464

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
Meg Jones, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Leader of Center for Veterans Issues in Milwaukee dies
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Now Available: UC Santa Cruz Library Digitizes Over 6,000 Photos From Pirkle Jones/Ruth-Marion Baruch Collection
 
 
By Gary Price: Ireland: A Day in the Dublin Central Library
“Some of those people who would be waiting [outside] would be people who would spend the whole day here,” says library assistant James Barry. “This is a traditional library and then it’s a social space and a safe space for people to be.”
 
 

 
 
 
 
Atlas Obsuvra: Behold, a massive knit map of the cosmos and more->
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Canine In Training
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: New TV series explores history of rural Georgia churches
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Daily webinars on farm safety scheduled next week, which is National Farm Safety and Health Week
 
 
 
 
By DC: 94-Year-Old Stroke Survivor Plays Jazz Piano for the First Time in Years
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday: Why We Say “OK”: The History of the Most Widely Spoken Word in the World
 
 

 
 
 
 
Knowledge of Wharton: Will New Regulations Avert Another Meltdown?
 
 
 
 
By Sarah Whitten: Domino’s free pizza gimmick goes awry in Russia after too many people get logo tattoos
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 30 Ideas Every Pet Owner Should Know Whether it is removing a stain or building a bed for Fido, every pet owner needs to see these ideas!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Useful Ways To Reuse Your Leftover Plastic Bottles Save all of those pesky plastic bottles to craft these useful projects for your life!
 
 
 
 
Melissa Woods Hometalker Saint Joseph, MN: Entertainment Center Turned Kids Closet Armoire Furniture Makeover
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Scrappy Geek: Cedar Plank Shrimp Over Alfredo Zoodles


 
 

 
 

FYI September 13, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1847 – Mexican–American War: Six teenage military cadets known as Niños Héroes die defending Chapultepec Castle in the Battle of Chapultepec. American troops under General Winfield Scott capture Mexico City in the Mexican–American War.
The Niños Héroes (Spanish: [ˈniɲos ˈeɾoes], Boy Heroes), also known as the Heroic Cadets or Boy Soldiers, were six Mexican teenage military cadets. These cadets died defending Mexico City’s Chapultepec Castle from invading U.S. forces in the 13 September 1847 Battle of Chapultepec, during the Mexican–American War. According to legend, in an act of bravery, Juan Escutia wrapped the Mexican flag around his body and jumped from the top of the castle in order to keep it from falling into the enemy’s hands.[2]

The Niños Héroes are a key part of Mexico’s patriotic folklore, commemorated by a national holiday on September 13. However, several modern Mexican historians claim that parts of the story are not factual.[2][3]


Read more ->

 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1755 – Oliver Evans, American inventor, engineer and businessman (d. 1819)
Oliver Evans (September 13, 1755 – April 15, 1819) was an American inventor, engineer and businessman born in rural Delaware and later rooted commercially in Philadelphia. He was one of the first Americans building steam engines and an advocate of high pressure steam (vs. low pressure steam). A pioneer in the fields of automation, materials handling and steam power, Evans was one of the most prolific and influential inventors in the early years of the United States. He left behind a long series of accomplishments, most notably designing and building the first fully automated industrial process, the first high-pressure steam engine, and the first (albeit crude) amphibious vehicle and American automobile.

Born in Newport, Delaware, Evans received little formal education and in his mid-teens was apprenticed to a wheelwright. Going into business with his brothers, he worked for over a decade designing, building and perfecting an automated mill with devices such as bucket chains and conveyor belts. In doing so Evans designed a continuous process of manufacturing that required no human labor. This novel concept would prove critical to the Industrial Revolution and the development of mass production. Later in life Evans turned his attention to steam power, and built the first high-pressure steam engine in the United States in 1801, developing his design independently of Richard Trevithick, who built the first in the world a year earlier. Evans was a driving force in the development and adoption of high-pressure steam engines in the United States. Evans dreamed of building a steam-powered wagon and would eventually construct and run one in 1805. Known as the Oruktor Amphibolos, it was the first automobile in the country and the world’s first amphibious vehicle, although it was too primitive to be a success as either.

Evans was a visionary who produced designs and ideas far ahead of their time. He was the first to describe vapor-compression refrigeration and propose a design for the first refrigerator in 1805, but it would be three decades until his colleague Jacob Perkins would be able to construct a working example. Similarly, he drew up designs for a solar boiler, machine gun, steam-carriage gearshift, dough-kneading machine, perpetual baking oven, marine salvage process, quadruple-effect evaporator, and a scheme for urban gas lighting, ideas and designs which would not be made reality until some time after his death. Evans had influential backers and political allies, but lacked social graces and was disliked by many of his peers. Disappointed and then angry at the perceived lack of recognition for his contributions, Evans became combative and bitter in later years, which damaged his reputation and left him isolated. Despite the importance of his work, his contributions were frequently overlooked (or attributed to others after his death) so he never became a household name alongside the other steam pioneers of his era.

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FYI

 
 
By Nick Douglas: How to Watch Live Footage of Hurricane Florence
 
 
By Gwen Ihnat: Big Beer sends a half-million cans of water for Hurricane Florence relief
 
 
 
 
By Clayton Purdom, Danette Chavez, Katie Rife, William Hughes, Alex McLevy, Erik Adams, and Gwen Ihnat: Walker, Slipnutz, and baseball: 11 essential Late Night With Conan O’Brien clips
 
 
 
 
By Gwen Ihnat: What’s the best-tasting supermarket brand coffee?
 
 
 
 
Steve Hill: I’ve got a new book out — it’s all about Mobile-First Journalism (the clue’s in the title)
 
 
 
 
New tools for parents and content for older kids in the YouTube Kids app
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Schools in Washington state get creative to help homeless students find a ride to school
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Study: Rural childhood makes future success more likely, but rural and urban areas need different strategies for kids
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Descend into Great Britain’s network of secret nuclear bunkers, Shrinking Peak The southern summit of Kebnekaise was the highest point in Sweden. Then it melted. detroit, michigan Monumental Kitty This feline raises a friendly paw at drivers barreling toward the freeway and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: A Well-Traveled Bookstore Since 2015, Rita Collins has piloted her mobile bookshop, filled with donated literature of all sorts, across the U.S. several times, From Plants to Tinctures We’ve put together a beginner’s guide to extracting flavors from herbs and flowers, Meet the ‘Radio Guy’ Steve Erenberg collects outdated medical devices, masks, and technology. He refers to his collection as a mix of tech and art and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Michelle Bruton: ‘The Dawn Wall’ Will Make Your Palms Sweat and Your Stomach Flip
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Robert Bowen: Information Overload: Every C5 Corvette Fact in One Place
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By ElkeMa: How to Swear Like Shakespeare
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 15 Reasons to Drop Everything and Buy Inexpensive Tile The next time you spot some sample tiles, you won’t be able to help yourself from grabbing a stack!
 
 
 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: DIY Bug Repellents & Traps
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By Adina Mayo: Bob’s Red Mill Paleo Pancake Mix Review
 
 
 
 
By jprussack: Backyard Pizza
 
 
 
 
By ModernFarmhouseKitchen: Pecan Bars


 
 

 
 

FYI September 12, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1848 – A new constitution marks the establishment of Switzerland as a federal state.
The rise of Switzerland as a federal state began on 12 September 1848, with the creation of a federal constitution in response to a 27-day civil war in Switzerland, the Sonderbundskrieg. The constitution, which was heavily influenced by the United States Constitution and the ideas of the French Revolution, was modified several times during the following decades and wholly replaced in 1999. The constitution represents the first time that the Swiss were governed by a strong central government instead of being simply a collection of independent cantons bound by treaties.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1739 – Mary Bosanquet Fletcher, Methodist preacher and philanthropist (d. 1815)
Mary Bosanquet Fletcher (12 September 1739 – 8 December 1815) was a Methodist preacher. Bosanquet is credited with convincing John Wesley (one of the founders of Methodism) to allow women to publicly preach.[1][2] She, along with her friend and fellow preacher Sarah Crosby, would become the most popular female preachers of their time.[3] Bosanquet was known as a “Mother in Israel,” a Methodist term of honor, for her work in spreading the religion across England.[4] Bosanquet was also quite involved in charity work throughout her life.

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

 
 
 
 
By Brian Kahn: Extreme Weather How to Track Hurricanes Like a True Weather Geek
 
 
 
 
By Frankie Schembri: If you’ve had anesthesia, you can likely thank this veterinarian who just won a top science prize
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Wikipedia Leads Effort to Create a Digital Archive of 20 Million Artifacts Lost in the Brazilian Museum Fire
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: FROM THE ARCHIVE | The Missing Piece Meets the Big O: Shel Silverstein’s Sweet Allegory for the Simple Secret of Love and the Key to Nurturing Relationships
 
 
 
 
By Tracy Clark Flory: Designing Women Creator Creatively and Inspiringly Tells Les Moonves to Go Fuck Himself
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Roundup: EU Parliament Approves Copyright Reform
 
 
By Gary Price: Cornell University: Seven Projects Will Receive 2018 Digitization Grants (Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences)
 
 
 
 
By Laura Hazard Owen: From “uncool uncle” to “fun” “best friend”: Why people are turning from Facebook to…other Facebook-owned things for news Facebook: “Sociopath,” “bipolar,” “uncool uncle,” “midlife crisis.” WhatsApp: “Best friend,” “sociable,” “fun,” “honest.”
 
 
 
 
By Christine Cube: New Rules for Fact Checking: Building Trust and Credibility with Your Audience
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Coalition aims to bring more broadband to rural America
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Hurricane Florence could make North Carolina pig-manure pools a health hazard, as previous hurricanes have
 
 
By Heather Chapman: TV and movies painting poorer picture of rural America
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #104)
 
 
 
 
Rob & Courtney M, Hometalk Team Hometalker Brooklyn, NY: Cabinet Kitchen Conversion Chalkboard Chart
 
 
 
 
Interesting. The “pot filler” over the stove makes me cringe. Plumbing, water leaks… oh my! So then you drag the heavy pot full of hot liquid across the cooktop and counter to the sink? Does her chandelier ever get greasy?
Jennifer Allwood Hometalker Kansas City, MO: Kitchen Backsplash Makeover
 
 
 
 
Huh, guess some of these folks do not live in earth shake or dusty areas.
By Hometalk Highlights: 13 Kitchen Paint Colors People Are Pinning Like Crazy You’ll want to re-paint your kitchen after seeing this.
 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 11, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1826 – Captain William Morgan, an ex-freemason is arrested in Batavia, New York for debt after declaring that he would publish The Mysteries of Free Masonry, a book against Freemasonry. This sets into motion the events that lead to his mysterious disappearance.
William Morgan (1774 – c. 1826) was a resident of Batavia, New York, whose disappearance and presumed murder in 1826 ignited a powerful movement against the Freemasons, a fraternal society that had become influential in the United States.[1] After Morgan announced his intention to publish a book exposing Freemasonry’s secrets, he was arrested on trumped-up charges.[2] He disappeared soon after, and was believed to have been kidnapped and killed by Masons from western New York.[3]

The allegations surrounding Morgan’s disappearance and presumed death sparked a public outcry and inspired Thurlow Weed and others to harness the discontent by founding the new Anti-Masonic Party in opposition to President Andrew Jackson’s Democrats.[4] It ran a presidential candidate in 1832 but was nearly defunct by 1835.[5]

Read more->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

 
 
1847 – Mary Watson Whitney, American astronomer and academic (d. 1921)
Mary Watson Whitney (September 11, 1847 – January 20, 1921) was an American astronomer and for 22 years the head of the Vassar Observatory where 102 scientific papers were published under her guidance.

Early life and education
Whitney was born in Waltham, Massachusetts in 1847. Her mother was Mary Watson Crehore and her father was Samuel Buttrick Whitney.[1] Her father was successful in real estate and wealthy enough to provide her with a good education for a woman at the time. She went to school in Waltham where she excelled in mathematics and graduated from the public high school in 1863. She was privately tutored for one year before she entered Vassar College in 1865, where she met the astronomer Maria Mitchell. During her time at Vassar College, her father died and her brother was lost at sea. She obtained her degree in 1868.[1]

In the years 1869 to 1870 she took some courses about quaternions and celestial mechanics by Benjamin Peirce (at Harvard). At the time, women could not be admitted to Harvard so she attended as a guest.[1] She obtained her master’s degree from Vassar in 1872, afterwards she went to Zürich for 3 years where she studied mathematics and celestial mechanics.[1]

Professional career
Returning to the US she became a teacher at her hometown high school until she became an assistant of Maria Mitchell in Vassar. In 1888 upon the retirement of Mitchell she became a professor and the director of the observatory there until she retired in 1915 for health reasons.[1]

During her career she concentrated on teaching and research related to double stars, variable stars, asteroids, comets, and measurements by photographic plates. Under her direction, 102 articles were published at the Vassar Observatory. In 1889 her mother and sister both became ill and Whitney moved them to the Observatory where she could care for them and continue her work part-time. When they died two years later, she resumed full-time work.[1] Whitney was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a charter member of the Astronomical and Astrophysical Society.[2]

Mary Whitney also believed that science provided strong career opportunities for women. She hoped women would soon become more active in practical chemistry, architecture, dentistry, and agriculture, which were more lucrative and, to Whitney, women were particularly well suited to. However, she also believed that scientific training would prepare them to be good mothers, falling into more traditional tropes of the early 20th century.[3]

Later life
Mary Whitney died in Waltham on January 20, 1921 of pneumonia.[2]

External links
Whitneygen.org
Works by Mary Watson Whitney at Open Library
 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

By Sam Roberts: Adam Clymer, Political Reporter, Editor and Pollster, Dies at 81
 
 
Adam Clymer (April 27, 1937 – September 10, 2018) was an American journalist. He was a prolific political correspondent for The New York Times.

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Vector’s World: And We Will Never Forget and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Harron Walker: One of Elizabeth Smart’s Kidnappers Will Be Released from Prison Early [Updated]
 
 
 
 
Where the animals go: wildlife tracking secrets revealed Award-winning geographer Dr James Cheshire and designer Oliver Uberti take us to the forefront of the animal tracking revolution, mapping the movements of animals on land, sky and sea – from Peru’s elusive jaguars to ant activity in a colony
 
 
 
 
Susan Mallery’s Tribute to Girls Who Wear Glasses
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Library Services and Programming: Urban Libraries Council (ULC) Announces 2018 Top Innovators and Honorable Mentions
 
 
 
 
By Maddie Stone: Three Freaky New Fish Species Discovered in One of the World’s Deepest Trenches
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Poll: 58% of rural Americans say lack of access to high-speed internet is a problem; 24% say it’s a major problem
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Ohio, Ky. and W.Va. struggle with clean-up of abandoned oil and gas wells; new laws in Ohio and W.Va. may help
 
 
 
 
A Redleg’s Rides: Trying a Directional Antenna for Boosting Cellular Data Signals
 
 
 
 

By Scotty Gilbertson: Fantastic Finster: 1973 Mercedes-Benzillac
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 16 Gorgeous Ways To Transform Your Blah Lamp Light up your home with a pretty lamp inspired by these ideas!
 
 
 
 
Michelle McCaughtry Tutorial Team Brainerd, MN: Incredible Art Using Unicorn Spit and Chains!
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
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By PliskinAJ: Making an Off Road Trailer
 
 
 
 

 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By In the Kitchen With Matt: Perfect Grilled Cheese Sandwich


 
 

 
 

FYI September 10, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1897 – Lattimer massacre: A sheriff’s posse kills 19 unarmed striking immigrant miners in Lattimer, Pennsylvania, United States.
The Lattimer massacre was the violent deaths of at least 19 unarmed striking immigrant anthracite coal miners at the Lattimer mine near Hazleton, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1897.[1][2] The miners, mostly of Polish, Slovak, Lithuanian and German ethnicity, were shot and killed by a Luzerne County sheriff’s posse. Scores more workers were wounded.[3] The massacre was a turning point in the history of the United Mine Workers (UMW).[4]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1839 – Isaac K. Funk, American minister and publisher, co-founded Funk & Wagnalls (d. 1912)
Isaac Kaufmann Funk (September 10, 1839 – April 4, 1912) was an American Lutheran minister, editor, lexicographer, publisher, and spelling reformer.[1] He was the co-founder of Funk & Wagnalls Company, the father of author Wilfred J. Funk (who founded his own publishing company “Wilfred Funk, Inc.”, and wrote the “Word Power” feature in Reader’s Digest from 1945 to 1962), and the grandfather of author Peter Funk, who continued his father’s authorship of “Word Power” until 2003.[2] Funk & Wagnalls Company published The Literary Digest, The Standard Dictionary of the English Language, and Funk & Wagnalls Standard Encyclopedia.

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1852 – Alice Brown Davis, American tribal chief (d. 1935)
Alice Brown Davis (September 10, 1852 – June 21, 1935) was the first female Principal Chief of the Seminole Tribe of Oklahoma, and served from 1922–1935, appointed by President Warren G. Harding.[1] She was of Seminole (Tiger Clan) and Scots descent. Her older brother John Frippo Brown had served as chief of the tribe and their brother Andrew Jackson Brown as treasurer.

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FYI

 
 
By Chris Eger: Sitka, KUIU founder Jason Hairston dead at 47
Jason Hairston, CEO of Dixon-based KUIU, started the company in 2010 as a result of a life-long passion for hunting after playing professional football with the San Francisco 49ers and Denver Broncos. The company announced this week that he took his own life after years of struggling with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease often found in those with repetitive brain trauma.
 
 
 
 
By Ben Halder: Lonely? Say It in Chinese This four-character idiom is poetic, precise and expresses a universal feeling.
 
 
 
 
By Alex McLevy: An obscure but enduring science fiction author finally gets his due
 
 
 
 
Chuck Wendig Terrible Minds: Macro Monday Has A Very Cool Thing To Show You
 
 
 
 
By Nick Firchau: How to Be a Good Dad Even if You Never Had One
 
 
 
 
By Chris Eger: The guns of late, great Burt Reynolds (PHOTOS)
 
 
 
 
By Chris Eger: Chasing away the riff raff via rock salt
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Don Summers: Exploring how to arm Texas teachers, schools (VIDEO)
 
 

 
 
Delancey Place: Today’s selection — from The Presidency of Richard Nixon by Melvin Small. The controversial ending of the Vietnam War:
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: How one Pan Am fan recreated the golden age of air travel, Kellogg’s ‘Travel Log’ Charles Kellogg, the vaudeville entertainer who could mimic birds, turned a California redwood into a mobile van and more ->
 
 
 
 
Life of a Conficted Teacher: Friday Thoughts: Don’t Tell Me What You Can’t Do……
 
 

 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy: 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCCXIV): Where Rivers Join, A 4000-Year-Old Desert Cemetery in China and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Savannah Tanbusch: Blog Profiles: Zoo Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: OxyContin makers own a second opioid company, and have patented an antidote for withdrawal symptoms
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Judge rules that West Virginia county can’t block gas pipeline compressor station with local zoning laws
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Unstable river bank could collapse, putting more than 600 million gallons of toxic coal ash into Wabash tributary
 
 
 
 
By Ayun Halliday: The New York Public Library Lets Patrons Check Out Ties, Briefcases & Handbags for Job Interviews
 
 
 
 
By John Baldoni: How to find gold in losing
 
 

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 

Celebrate & Decorate (Chloe Crabtree) Hometalker Kissimmee, FL: Make a Man-Eating Plant for Halloween!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: The 15 Coolest Ways to Reuse Pipes in Your Home Decor We know they’re useful for plumping, but did you know they also make great decor?
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 09, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1561 – The ultimately unsuccessful Colloquy of Poissy opens in an effort to reconcile French Catholics and Protestants.
The Colloquy at Poissy was a religious conference which took place in Poissy, France, in 1561. Its object was to effect a reconciliation between the Catholics and Protestants (Huguenots) of France.[1]

The conference was opened on 9 September in the refectory of the convent of Poissy,[1] the French king (aged 11) himself being present. It broke up inconclusively a month later, on 9 October, by which point the divide between the doctrines appeared irreconcilable.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1868 – Mary Hunter Austin, American author, poet, and critic (d. 1934)
Mary Hunter Austin (September 9, 1868 – August 13, 1934) was an American writer. One of the early nature writers of the American Southwest, her classic The Land of Little Rain (1903) describes the fauna, flora and people – as well as evoking the mysticism and spirituality – of the region between the High Sierra and the Mojave Desert of southern California.

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FYI

 
 
Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Sunday Interview – Getting to Know You with Hugh W. Roberts.
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: From Ireland to Australia, Fay Taylour Proved Women Didn’t Need Handicap Starts to Dominate a Race
 
 
Fay Taylour (5 April 1904 – 2 August 1983), known as Flying Fay, was an Irish motorcyclist in the late 1920s and a champion speedway rider. She switched to racing cars in 1931. She was interned as a fascist during the Second World War but after the war continued racing in the UK and America until she retired in the late 1950s.

Read more->
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: The Settrington Cup is Probably the Most Adorable Part of the Goodwood Revival
 
 

 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: What If Digital Is Antithetical to Learning?
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: The Difficult Art of Giving Space in Love: Rilke on Freedom, Togetherness, and the Secret to a Good Marriage, Like https://www.brainpickings.org/2018/09/06/you-belong-here-clark-arsenault/ on Facebook The Woman Who Smashed Codes: The Untold Story of Cryptography Pioneer Elizebeth Friedman and more->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Audrey Obscura: Free Online Glue Class
 
 
 
 
By Mastering Me: Easy Life-Saving Water Filter
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 12 Ideas to Make a Dresser Oh-So-Pretty! No one wants to put their pretty clothes in a not-so-pretty dresser. Use these 12 creative ideas to rejuvenate your dresser!
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Joan Reeves Saturday Share: Ingredient Substituions in Cooking
 
 
 
 
By Kitchen Mason: How to Make an Apple Berry Summer Fruit Crumble
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

FYI September 08, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1892 – The Pledge of Allegiance is first recited.
The Pledge of Allegiance of the United States is an expression of allegiance to the Flag of the United States and the republic of the United States of America. It was originally composed by Captain George Thatcher Balch, a Union Army Officer during the Civil War and later a teacher of patriotism in New York City schools.[5][6] The form of the pledge used today was largely devised by Francis Bellamy in 1892, and formally adopted by Congress as the pledge in 1942.[7] The official name of The Pledge of Allegiance was adopted in 1945. The most recent alteration of its wording came on Flag Day in 1954, when the words “under God” were added.[8]

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Born On This Day

 
 
1924 – Grace Metalious, American author (d. 1964)
Grace Metalious (September 8, 1924 – February 25, 1964) was an American author known for her controversial novel Peyton Place, one of the best-selling works in publishing history.

Early life
Marie Grace DeRepentigny was born into poverty and a broken home in the mill town of Manchester, New Hampshire. Writing from an early age, at Manchester Central High School, she acted in school plays. After graduation she married George Metalious in a Catholic church in Manchester in 1943, thus becoming a housewife and mother. The couple lived in near squalor but she continued to write. With one child, the couple moved to Durham, New Hampshire, where George attended the University of New Hampshire. In Durham, Grace Metalious began writing seriously. When George graduated, he took a position as principal at a school in Gilmanton, New Hampshire.[1]

Peyton Place
In the fall of 1954, at the age of 30, she began work on a manuscript about the dark secrets of a small New England town. The novel had the working title The Tree and the Blossom.[2] By the spring of 1955, she had finished a first draft. By her husband’s account, both Metaliouses regarded The Tree and the Blossom as an unwieldy title and decided to give the town a name which could be the book’s title. They first considered Potter Place (the name of a real community near Andover, New Hampshire). Realizing their town should have a fictional name, they looked through an atlas and found Payton (the name of a real town in Texas). They combined this with Place and changed the “a” to an “e”. Thus, Peyton Place was born, prompting her comment, “Wonderful—that’s it, George. Peyton Place. Peyton Place, New Hampshire. Peyton Place, New England. Peyton Place, USA. Truly a composite of all small towns where ugliness rears its head, and where the people try to hide all the skeletons in their closets.”[1] Other accounts cite her publishers as changing the name.[3]

Metalious found an agent, M. Jacques Chambrun, who submitted the draft manuscript to three major publishers. In the summer of 1955 Leona Nevler, a freelance manuscript reader, read it for Lippincott and liked it but knew it was too steamy for a major publisher to accept. She showed it to Kathryn G. (“Kitty”) Messner, president and editor in chief of the small firm Julian Messner. Messner immediately acquired the novel and asked Nevler to step in as a freelance editor for final polishing before publication.[4]

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FYI

 
 
Install a Wireless Security System in 4 Easy Steps

1. Go to a second-hand store and buy a pair of men’s used work boots, a really big pair.

2. Put them outside your front door on top of a copy of Guns and Ammo magazine.

3. Put a really big dog dish beside it.

4. Leave a note on your front door that says: Bubba, Big Mike, and I have gone to get more ammunition. Back in 30 minutes. Don’t disturb the pit bulls. They’ve just been wormed, and they’re a little cranky.
 
 
 
 
By William Hughes: R.I.P. Bill Daily, from The Bob Newhart Show and I Dream Of Jeannie
 
 
William Edward Daily Jr. (August 30, 1927 – September 4, 2018)[2][3] was an American actor, comedian and best known for his performances in various sitcoms, most notably astronaut Roger Healey on I Dream of Jeannie and commercial airline navigator Howard Borden on The Bob Newhart Show.

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By Craig Jenkins: The Perfectionist Mac Miller is finally making the music he’s always wanted to make
 
 
Malcolm James McCormick (January 19, 1992 – September 7, 2018),[1] known professionally as Mac Miller, was an American rapper, singer and record producer.

In early 2010, he signed a record deal with Pittsburgh-based indie record label Rostrum Records. He subsequently began recording his debut studio album Blue Slide Park, and released it on November 8, 2011. The album went on to debut at number one on the U.S. Billboard 200 chart, making it the first independently distributed debut album to top the chart since Tha Dogg Pound’s 1995 album, Dogg Food.

In early 2013, Miller launched REMember Music, his own record label imprint, named after a friend who died. Miller’s second album, Watching Movies with the Sound Off, was released on June 18, 2013. In January 2014, Miller announced he was no longer signed to Rostrum Records. In October 2014, it was reported Miller signed a record deal for him and his label REMember, with Warner Bros. Records. He was also a noted record producer under the pseudonym Larry Fisherman, producing music for SZA, Vince Staples, Lil B, Ab-Soul, Riff Raff, Smoke DZA and himself.

Miller died of an apparent drug overdose on September 7, 2018.

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By Gabe Fernandez: Liberty Punter Ejected For Spearing Army Player Head-First Like A Human Bullet Bill
 
 
 
 
Comments!
By Melanie Ehrenkranz: Woman Ignites Stick of Dynamite While Trying to Light Candle During Blackout
 
 
By Lauren Davis: This 1910 brochure explained how to farm with dynamite
 
 
 
 

Great commentary!

By Michael Harriott: Cops Cuff Black Teen Riding With White Grandmother Because Someone Thought He Was Robbing Her
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: Fishermen Find 10,000-Year-Old Skull and Antlers of Extinct Giant Elk
 
 
 
 
Darius Foroux: 10 Small Habits That Have A Huge Return On Life
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Enormous Camera In 1900, photographing an entire train required the world’s biggest camera, which weighed 1,400 pounds and required 15 people to operate.
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Ancient Egyptian Recipes, Hidden Gem of a Museum, Kvass a Slavic Favorite and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Decoding the Nepali Flag, Creating a Ghost, Escaped Pets in Florida and more ->
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Four Fun Friday Kodachrome Car Photograph Series No. 171
 
 
The Old Motor: Goodyear Four-Wheel-Steer-Four-Wheel-Drive Transit Bus
 
 
 
 
By Stella Guan: I Wanted Permanent Residency on My Own Terms — and Quickly How I navigated the green card process in eight months
 
 
 
 
By Josh S. Rose: Giving Back to the Community by Teaching the Trades
A welder and teacher, Jason Wasilewski runs the whole shop

 
 
 
 
By Tribune: Doctor uses CPR to save man’s life during their first date
 
 
 
 
By Janine Puhak: ‘Guac,’ ‘Zoodle,’ ‘Marg’ and ‘Hangry’ added to Merriam-Webster dictionary
 
 
 
 
Great!
By Emma Taggart: Man Comes Up With the Most Punderful Road Signs to Make Passersby Smile
 
 
 
 
The LeBron James Family Foundation teamed up with JPMorgan Chase to bring the latest technology into LeBron’s brand new public school in Akron.
 
 
 
 
By Adam Clarke: Mad Man’s Car: 1951 Muntz Jet Convertible
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Rebecca at Soap Deli News Blog: The 12 Best Outdoor Activities To Enjoy This Fall, Enjoy some fall fun with this DIY melt & pour soap, How to naturally manage fibromyalgia drug free and more ->
 
 
 
 
Missi Perez Hometalker Indianapolis, IN: Succulent Address or Welcome Sign Planter
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 11 Cleaners From Baking Soda To Make Your Home Sparkling Clean Try these amazing uses for baking soda in your home right now!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: 12 Bedroom Wall Ideas You’re SO Going to Fall For Grab a paint brush, or even a syringe, for these cool bedroom wall ideas.
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 20 Easy Concrete Projects You Absolutely CAN Do! Who knew you could make beautiful home decor from concrete? And these are SO easy!
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Everything Pretty – Pumpkin Spice: Latte’s, Soap, Face mask and more ->
 
 
 
 
My Recipes Treasures: Easy Chicken Pasta Primavera, Best Fudge Brownies and more->


 
 

 
 

FYI September 07, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1695 – Henry Every perpetrates one of the most profitable pirate raids in history with the capture of the Grand Mughal ship Ganj-i-Sawai. In response, Emperor Aurangzeb threatens to end all English trading in India.
Henry Every, also Avery or Evory (20 August 1659 – time of death uncertain, possibly 1699), sometimes erroneously given as Jack Avery or John Avery,[a] was an English pirate who operated in the Atlantic and Indian oceans in the mid-1690s. He probably used several aliases throughout his career, including Benjamin Bridgeman, and was known as Long Ben to his crewmen and associates.[b]

Dubbed “The Arch Pirate” and “The King of Pirates” by contemporaries, Every was infamous for being one of few major pirate captains to retire with his loot without being arrested or killed in battle, and for being the perpetrator of what has been called the most profitable pirate heist in history.[8] Although Every’s career as a pirate lasted only two years, his exploits captured the public’s imagination, inspired others to take up piracy, and spawned works of literature.

Every began his pirate career while he was first mate aboard the warship Charles II. As the ship lay anchored in the northern Spanish harbor of Corunna, the crew grew discontented as Spain failed to deliver a letter of marque and Charles II’s owners failed to pay their wages, and they mutinied. Charles II was renamed the Fancy and Every elected as the new captain.

His most famous raid was on a 25-ship convoy of Grand Mughal vessels was making the annual pilgrimage to Mecca, including the treasure-laden Ghanjah dhow Ganj-i-sawai and its escort, the Fateh Muhammed. Joining forces with several pirate vessels, Every found himself in command of a small pirate squadron, and they were able to capture up to £600,000 in precious metals and jewels,[8] equivalent to around £52m in 2010 prices, making him the richest pirate in the world. This caused considerable damage to England’s fragile relations with the Mughals, and a combined bounty of £1,000—an immense sum at the time—was offered for his capture by the Privy Council and the East India Company, leading to the first worldwide manhunt in recorded history.[9][c] Although a number of his crew were subsequently arrested, Every himself eluded capture, vanishing from all records in 1696; his whereabouts and activities after this period are unknown. Unconfirmed accounts state he may have changed his name and retired, quietly living out the rest of his life in either Britain or an unidentified tropical island, dying sometime after 1696. Colin Woodard stated that Every, in trying to launder his riches to currency, had been outsmarted by wealthy landowners and “died a poor beggar not being able to afford his own coffin.”[12][page needed] Others believe that Every’s treasure is unrecovered.

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Born On This Day

 
 
1885 – Elinor Wylie, American author and poet (d. 1928)
Elinor Morton Wylie (September 7, 1885 – December 16, 1928) was an American poet and novelist popular in the 1920s and 1930s. “She was famous during her life almost as much for her ethereal beauty and personality as for her melodious, sensuous poetry.”[1]

Life
Family and childhood

Elinor Wylie was born Elinor Morton Hoyt in Somerville, New Jersey, into a socially prominent family. Her grandfather, Henry M. Hoyt, was a governor of Pennsylvania. Her aunt was Helen Hoyt, a poet.[2] Her parents were Henry Martyn Hoyt, Jr., who would be United States Solicitor General from 1903 to 1909; and Anne Morton McMichael (born July 31, 1861 in Pa.). Their other children were:

Henry Martyn Hoyt (May 8, 1887, in Pa. – August 25, 1920 in New York City) who married Alice Gordon Parker (1885–1951)
Constance A. Hoyt (May 20, 1889, in Pa. – 1923 in Bavaria, Germany) who married Ferdinand von Stumm-Halberg on March 30, 1910, in Washington, D.C.
Morton McMichael Hoyt (April 4, 1899, in Washington, D.C. – August 21, 1949, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), three times married and divorced Eugenia Bankhead, known as “Sister” and sister of Tallulah Bankhead
Nancy McMichael Hoyt (born October 1, 1902, in Washington, D.C. – 1949) romance novelist who wrote Elinor Wylie: The Portrait of an Unknown Woman (1935). She married Edward Davison Curtis; they divorced in 1932.

Because of her father’s political aspirations, Elinor spent much of her youth in Washington, DC.[3] She was educated at Miss Baldwin’s School (1893–97), Mrs. Flint’s School (1897–1901), and finally Holton-Arms School (1901–04).[4] In particular, from age 12 to 20, she lived in Washington again where she made her debut in the midst of the “city’s most prominent social élite,”[3] being “trained for the life of a debutante and a society wife”.[5]

“As a girl she was already bookish—not in the languid or inactive sense but girded, embraced by books, between whose covers lay the word-perfect world she sought. She grew into a tall, dark beauty in the classic 1920s style. Some who knew her claimed she was the most striking woman they ever met.”[6]

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FYI

 
 
Today’s email was written by Natasha Frost, edited by Whet Moser, and produced by April Siese: Purple: The true colors of the world’s most powerful shade – No shrinking violet
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Bee careful: Your honey might be partly corn syrup
 
 
 
 
By Larry Grady: On PR Newswire: Frank Sinatra’s Landmark 1958 Album Expanded, Banana Republic Celebrates 40, Target Offers 2,500+ New and Exclusive Toys for the Holidays
 
 
 
 
By Alanis King: There’s Now a Bulletproof Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat With All-Wheel Drive
 
 
 
 
By George Dvorsky: NASA’s Curiosity Rover Takes a Stunning Selfie Under Dusty Martian Skies
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Yessenia Funes: Cute Blue Bird From Rio Now Believed to Be Extinct in the Wild
 
 
Spix’s macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii), also known as the little blue macaw, is a macaw native to Brazil. It is a member of Tribe Arini in the subfamily Arinae (Neotropical parrots), part of the family Psittacidae (the true parrots). It was first described by German naturalist Georg Marcgrave, when he was working in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, in 1638 and it is named for German naturalist Johann Baptist von Spix, who collected a specimen in 1819 on the bank of the Rio São Francisco in northeast Bahia in Brazil.

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By James Watkins: This Unlikely Tech Queen Wants to Build a New Global Hub in Kyrgyzstan
One of several artsy-looking signs on the wall reads “Dance like no one is watching. Encrypt like everyone is.”
 
 
 
 
By Ian Sample: British astrophysicist overlooked by Nobels wins $3m award for pulsar work Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell will donate the money to help students underrepresented in physics
 
 
 
 
By Josh Jones: Enter an Archive of William Blake’s Fantastical “Illuminated Books”: The Images Are Sublime, and in High Resolution
 
 
 
 
By Colin Marshall: How Breaking Bad Crafted the Perfect TV Pilot: A Video Essay
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Susan Karlin: A first look at the powerful final phase of the Flight 93 memorial This 10-story chimed instrument commemorating the victims of Flight 93 is an unprecedented feat of design and engineering.
 
 
National Park Service – Flight 93: September 9 Tower of Voices Dedication
 
 
By Adele Peters: The Ocean Cleanup vessel is on its way to clean up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch A new test in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch will show if the Ocean Cleanup system, designed by young inventor Boyan Slat, really works.
 
 
The Ocean Cleanup
 
 
 
 
By Daniel Terdiman: How this $1,300 tent won Burning Man

 
 
 
 
By J. C. Hu: Mission Unstoppable: Inside the All-Female Trek to the North Pole
 
 
 
 
By Sean Fennessey: Hal Ashby’s American Pictures: The Realistic Magic of the 1970s’ Finest Director
With a new documentary about the often overlooked filmmaker about to hit theaters, we revisit the life and work of a true original whose vision hasn’t aged a day
 
 
William Hal Ashby (September 2, 1929 – December 27, 1988)[1] was an American film director and editor[2][3] associated with the New Hollywood wave of filmmaking.

Before his career as a director Ashby edited films for Norman Jewison, notably The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming (1966), which earned Ashby an Oscar nomination for Best Editing, and In the Heat of the Night (1967), which earned him his only Oscar for the same category.

Ashby received a third Oscar nomination, this time for Best Director for Coming Home (1978). Other films directed by Ashby include The Landlord (1970), Harold and Maude (1971), The Last Detail (1973), Shampoo (1975), Bound for Glory (1976) and Being There (1979).

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Ideas

 
 
Lisa Yax Sayers Hometalker Girard, PA: Hole in the Wall
 
 
 
 
Rebecca D. Dillon Hometalker Roanoke, VA: DIY Geode Soap
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes