Category: FYI

FYI

FYI June 15, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1936 – First flight of the Vickers Wellington bomber.
The Vickers Wellington was a British twin-engined, long-range medium bomber. It was designed during the mid-1930s at Brooklands in Weybridge, Surrey, led by Vickers-Armstrongs’ chief designer Rex Pierson; a key feature of the aircraft is its geodetic airframe fuselage structure, principally designed by Barnes Wallis. Development had been started in response to Air Ministry Specification B.9/32; issued in the middle of 1932, this called for a twin-engined day bomber capable of delivering higher performance than any previous design. Other aircraft developed to the same specification include the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley and the Handley Page Hampden. During the development process, performance requirements such as for the tare weight changed substantially, as well as the powerplant for the type being swapped.

The Wellington was used as a night bomber in the early years of the Second World War, performing as one of the principal bombers used by Bomber Command. During 1943, it started to be superseded as a bomber by the larger four-engined “heavies” such as the Avro Lancaster. The Wellington continued to serve throughout the war in other duties, particularly as an anti-submarine aircraft. It holds the distinction of being the only British bomber to be produced for the duration of the war and of being produced in a greater quantity than any other British-built bomber. The Wellington remained as first-line equipment when the war ended, although it had been increasingly relegated to secondary roles. The Wellington was one of two bombers named after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, the other being the Vickers Wellesley.

A larger heavy bomber aircraft designed to Specification B.1/35, the Vickers Warwick, was developed in parallel with the Wellington; the two aircraft shared around 85% of their structural components. Many elements of the Wellington were also reused in a civil derivative, the Vickers VC.1 Viking.

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Born On This Day

1894 – Nikolai Chebotaryov, Ukrainian-Russian mathematician and theorist (d. 1947)
Nikolai Grigorievich Chebotaryov (often spelled Chebotarov or Chebotarev, Russian: Никола́й Григо́рьевич Чеботарёв, Ukrainian: Микола Григорович Чоботарьов) (15 June [O.S. 3 June] 1894 – 2 July 1947) was a noted Russian and Soviet mathematician.[1] He is best known for the Chebotaryov density theorem.[2]

He was a student of Dmitry Grave, a famous Russian mathematician.[3] Chebotaryov worked on the algebra of polynomials, in particular examining the distribution of the zeros. He also studied Galois theory and wrote an influential textbook on the subject titled Basic Galois Theory. His ideas were used by Emil Artin to prove the Artin reciprocity law.[4] He worked with his student Anatoly Dorodnov on a generalization of the quadrature of the lune,[5] and proved the conjecture now known as the Chebotaryov theorem on roots of unity.

Early life
Nikolai Chebotaryov was born on 15 June 1894 in Kamianets-Podilskyi, Russian Empire (modern-day Ukraine). He entered the department of physics and mathematics at Kiev University in 1912. In 1928 he became a professor at Kazan University, remaining there for the rest of his life. He died on 2 July 1947. He was an atheist.[6] On 14 May 2010 a memorial plaque for Nikolai Chebotaryov was unveiled on the main administration building of I.I. Mechnikov Odessa National University.[7]

 
 
 
 

FYI

Alabama:
By Heather Chapman: Ala. town council bans press, which editor calls ‘flat illegal’
 
 
 
 

Alabama:
By Christine Schmidt: With its Facebook Watch news show, Alabama’s Reckon wants to make a national audience care about local news
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Broadband providers and users in the Upper Midwest invited to offer perspectives in June 19 listening session
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: FCC chair calls for increase for rural telemedicine fund
 
 
 
 
By Andrew P. Collins: This 200,000-Mile Air-Cooled Porsche 911 Has The Best And Worst Craigslist Ad
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Where the “no ending a sentence with a preposition” rule comes from, Capturing Old London, Iceland’s Tomatoes, The Largest U.S. Hooverville and more ->
 
 
 
 

By Emma Tucker: 7 Moscow restaurants with instagramable interiors
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: An Open Letter to Jeff Bezos, Amazon comes under fire for removal of book reviews, How One Video Game Helped Me Overcome Writer’s Block and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Emily Conover: In her short life, mathematician Emmy Noether changed the face of physics – Noether linked two important concepts in physics: conservation laws and symmetries
 
 

wiki: Amalie Emmy Noether[a] (German: [ˈnøːtɐ]; 23 March 1882 – 14 April 1935) was a German mathematician known for her important contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. She invariably used the name “Emmy Noether” in her life and publications.[a]

She was described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl and Norbert Wiener as the most important woman in the history of mathematics.[1][2] As one of the leading mathematicians of her time, she developed the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. In physics, Noether’s theorem explains the connection between symmetry and conservation laws.[3]

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Two Nerdy History Girls: Friday Video: Wilma Rudolph, the Unstoppable
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 


 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 14, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1822 – Charles Babbage proposes a difference engine in a paper to the Royal Astronomical Society entitled “Note on the application of machinery to the computation of astronomical and mathematical tables”.
A difference engine is an automatic mechanical calculator designed to tabulate polynomial functions. The name derives from the method of divided differences, a way to interpolate or tabulate functions by using a small set of polynomial coefficients. Most mathematical functions commonly used by engineers, scientists and navigators, including logarithmic and trigonometric functions, can be approximated by polynomials, so a difference engine can compute many useful tables of numbers.

The historical difficulty in producing error-free tables by teams of mathematicians and human “computers” spurred Charles Babbage’s desire to build a mechanism to automate the process.

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Born On This Day

1900 – Ruth Nanda Anshen, American writer, editor, and philosopher (d. 2003)
Ruth Nanda Anshen (June 14, 1900 – December 2, 2003) was an American philosopher, author and editor. She was the author of several books including The Anatomy of Evil, Biography of An Idea, Morals Equals Manners and The Mystery of Consciousness: A Prescription for Human Survival.
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FYI

 
 
 
 

By Adam Clark Estes: The Very Best Beginner Drone
 
 
 
 
By Patrick Redford: Pair Of Port-A-Potties Departs This Earthly Plane
 
 
 
 
By Jennings Brown: Sheriff Says Campers Burning Poop in a Hole Started 500-Plus Acre Fire
 
 
 
 
By Maggie Taylor: Radiotopia Launches ‘ZigZag’
Welcome to ZigZag, our brand new podcast about changing the course of capitalism, journalism and women in technology.

Produced by Manoush Zomorodi and Jen Poyant, formerly of Note to Self, and in partnership with Civil, the show is a first-hand account of their experiences quitting salaried jobs in public radio to co-found a media company.
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: The Passive Voice – Words-to-be-read are losing ground to words-to-be-heard, a new stage of digital content evolution
 
 
 
 
By Sean Hayes, Tenor: 31st anniversary of the GIF: give your terminal some personality with Tenor GIF for CLI
 
 
 
 

By Melissa Patrick: People with positive attitudes about aging likely to live longer, have better health; rural populations tend to be older
 
 
 
 
By Jared Newman: Amazon’s Ring Alarm security system undercuts Nest and ADT
 
 
 
 
Ducks eating watermelon is one of the strangest things you’ll ever see (Video)

 
 
 
 
Dad and baby jump in to help a nervous ballerina (Video)

 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
 
 
Debbie HometalkerGlen Mills, PA: Pretty Sliding Barn Door. It Slides Behind a Dresser.
 
 
 
 
By Kara S. Hometalker Jersey City, NJ: Custom Stained Glass
 
 
 
 
Andrew @ ScrappyGeek.com Hometalker Enfield, NH: We Built Steps on a Slope
 
 
 
 
By bekathwia: Free Online Jewelry Class
 
 
 
 
By Jessyratfink: How to Repot Container Plants
 
 
 
 
By Licheness: Ziplock Toilet Paper Dispenser – Camping and Canoeing
 
 
 
 
By Techgenie: How to Fix Any Remote at Home


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 13, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1514 – Henry Grace à Dieu, at over 1,000 tons the largest warship in the world at this time, built at the new Woolwich Dockyard in England, is dedicated.
Henry Grace à Dieu (“Henry Grace of God”), also known as Great Harry, was an English carrack or “great ship” of the King’s Fleet in the 16th century. Contemporary with the Mary Rose, Henry Grace à Dieu was even larger. The Great Harry was Henry VIII’s flagship. She had a large forecastle four decks high, and a stern castle two decks high. She was 165 feet (50 m) long, weighing 1,000–1,500 tons and having a complement of 700–1,000 men. It is said that she was ordered by Henry VIII in response to construction of the Scottish ship Michael, launched in 1511.
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Born On This Day

1923 – Lloyd Conover, American chemist and inventor (d. 2017)
Lloyd Hillyard Conover (June 13, 1923 – March 11, 2017) was an American chemist and the inventor of tetracycline. For this invention, he was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.[1] Conover was the first to make an antibiotic by chemically modifying a naturally produced drug.[2] He had close to 300 patents to his name.
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FYI

By Kelli Kennedy, Associated Press: Coaches killed in Florida shooting to receive ESPY awards
 
 
 
 
By Bryan Menegus: On Amazon’s Time
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: Here’s How You Can Watch (And Stream) All Of The 2018 24 Hours Of Le Mans
 
 
 
 
By Reid McCarter: Your attention, please: The Minnesota skyscraper raccoon is safe
 
 
 
 
By Christine Schmidt: A definitive playbook: How to DIY a local nonprofit news outlet
 
 
 
 

David Spangenthal Google Cloud Account Executive: Find a blood drive near you on World Blood Donor Day June 14th
 
 
 
 
By Al Cross: Ky. editor who takes stands and tackles tough subjects wins award for public service through community journalism
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Interior official met repeatedly with coal-industry lobbyists before canceling study on health effects of strip mining
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Poisoned newspaper owner files civil suit against suspects

 
 
 
 
By Zat Rana: Elon Musk: Sustaining Motivation
 
 
 
 
By Zat Rana: J.K. Rowling: Dealing with Failure
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: National Academies of Science Releases “Sexual Harassment of Women Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine” Report
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Digital Collections: American Foundation for the Blind Launches First Fully Accessible Digital Archive of the Helen Keller Collection (More than 160,000 Artifacts)
 
 
 
 
By Adweek Staff: 10 Writers and Editors Who Are Changing the National Conversation The authors, novelists, curators and essayists you should know
 
 
 
 

By Kayleigh Donaldson: Book Stuffing, Bribery and Bullying: The Self-Publishing Problem Plaguing Amazon
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: An island’s spiritual history, documented in haunting photographs, Skeleton Man Walking Skeleton Dinosaur and more ->
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Josh Jones: Enter a Digitized Collection of 38,000 Pamphlets & Periodicals From the French Revolution
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Josh Jones: The Causes & Prevalence of Suicide Explained by Two Videos from Alain de Botton’s School of Life
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Nancy Craigmiles Hometalker: My Stenciled Porch!
 
 
 
 
Alicia W Hometalker Middletown, PA: Not a Lattice Privacy Screen
 
 
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: To Grandma’s House we go! (Wednesday Link Party #91)
 
 
 
 
The Interior Frugalista: Talk Of The Town Party 127
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 12, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1817 – The earliest form of bicycle, the dandy horse, is driven by Karl von Drais.
The dandy horse is a human-powered vehicle that, being the first means of transport to make use of the two-wheeler principle, is regarded as the forerunner of the bicycle. Powered by the rider’s feet on the ground in lieu of the pedals of later bicycles, the dandy horse was invented by Karl Drais—who called it a Laufmaschine (German: [ˈlaʊfmaˌʃiːnə], “running machine”)—in Mannheim, Germany, and patented in France in February 1818. It is also known as a draisine (German: [dʁaɪˈziːnə] (About this sound listen), a term now used primarily for light auxiliary railcars regardless of their form of propulsion), the French form draisienne (French: [drɛzjɛn], or by the broader designation velocipede.
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Born On This Day

1888 – Zygmunt Janiszewski, Polish mathematician and academic (d. 1920)

While Janiszewski best remembered for his many contributions to topological mathematics in the early 20th century, for the founding of Fundamenta Mathematicae, and for his enthusiasm for teaching young minds, his loyalty to his homeland during World War I perhaps gives the greatest insight into his psyche. The orphans’ shelter that he set up during the war doubtlessly saved many lives, and is perhaps his greatest contribution to the world.
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FYI

Condolences
By Chris Thompson: Bode Miller’s 19-Month-Old Daughter Dies After Drowning Incident In Swimming Pool
 
 
 
 
By Alanis King: Watch How A Virtual Race Track Is Built
 
 
 
 
By Ken Saito: I Met Japan’s Highway Racers In The Middle Of The Sea
 
 
 
 
By Kelly Faircloth: This Bear in a Swimming Pool Is a Big Summer Mood
 
 
 
 
By Alanis King: Here’s Just How Well (Or Poorly) Current Midsize SUVs Will Protect Front Passengers In A Crash
 
 
 
 
By Erin Marquis: My First Drive After Cancer
 
 
 
 
By Paul Maroon: Ask an indie rock veteran: Is 45 too old to start a band?
 
 
 
 
By Dimitrios Mitsopoulos Popular Mechanics: All the Nuclear Missile Submarines in the World in One Chart
 
 
 
 
Rebecca at Soap Deli News: Ten Tips for Getting Your Mojo Back & A Lush Inspired Massage Bar
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: This map shows 42 sites of British suffragette protest and sabotage, Guardian of the Gulch, Yacht Aqueduct and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Charles Chu: Alone and Self-Obsessed: Why are we getting more and more depressed?
 
 
 
 
By David at Raptitude: Two Ways to Stop Caring What Others Think
Firstly, we need to recognize that it’s impossible to be fairly judged. Nobody will ever understand you perfectly. You will continually be both underestimated and overestimated, shortchanged and given undue credit.
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Web Archiving: Webrecorder Adds New Tools and Features in Latest Release
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Washington State Library Announces Launch of “Primarily Washington” a New Educational Resource
 
 
 
 
The Tim Ferriss Show Transcripts: Seth Godin on How to Think Small to Go Big
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Imagine, if you will… these drawings done by Scott Adams (Dilbert), Gary Larson (The Far Side), Berkeley Breathed (Bloom County)?
Via Atlas Obscura Josh Jones: Visualizing Dante’s Hell: See Maps & Drawings of Dante’s Inferno from the Renaissance Through Today
 
 
 
 
By Stephen Guise: I Can’t Believe How Quickly Home Automation Has Changed My Life (Amazon Echo Alexa, Hue Light Bulbs, and the Power of Routine)
 
 
 
 
By JR Raphael: 18 Gmail settings that will change how you think about your inbox Make your inbox more efficient and effective with these easily overlooked options.
 
 
 
 
From Debra Lynn Dadd: *SURVEY*, insect repellent, stuffed toys, nail polish, and much more…
 
 
 
 
By Rachel Becker: Why repeating words sound like music to your brain
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk Hits: 15 Genius Hacks to Keep Pests Away While You Camp
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 15 Fabulous Fire Pits For Your Backyard
 
 
 
 
By Cll7568214 Tutorial Team: Vertical Sunshine Garden
 
 
 
 
By Dale N. Hometalker Richmond, TX: Backyard Redo
 
 
 
 
By MadeByBarb: Super Cleanse Scrubber Soap Made in a Crock Pot
 
 
 
 
By Penelopy Bulnick: Pieced Crochet Dishcloth/Washcloth
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes



 
 

 
 

FYI June 11, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1748 – Denmark adopts the characteristic Nordic Cross flag later taken up by all other Scandinavian countries.
The Nordic Cross flag is any of certain flags bearing the design of the Nordic or Scandinavian cross, a cross symbol in a rectangular field, with the center of the cross shifted towards the hoist.

All of the Nordic countries except Greenland have adopted such flags in the modern period, and while the Scandinavian cross is named for its use in the national flags of the Scandinavian nations, the term is used universally by vexillologists, in reference not only to the flags of the Nordic countries.[1]

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Born On This Day

1815 – Julia Margaret Cameron, Indian-Sri Lankan photographer (d. 1879)
Julia Margaret Cameron (née Pattle; 11 June 1815 Calcutta – 26 January 1879 Kalutara, Ceylon) was a British photographer.[1] She became known for her portraits of celebrities of the time, and for photographs with Arthurian and other legendary or heroic themes.

Cameron’s photographic career was short, spanning eleven years of her life (1864–1875). She took up photography at the relatively late age of 48, when she was given a camera as a present.[2] Her style was not widely appreciated in her own day: her choice to use a soft focus and to treat photography as an art as well as a science, by manipulating the wet collodion process, caused her works to be viewed as “slovenly”, marred by “mistakes” and bad photography. She found more acceptance among pre-Raphaelite artists than among photographers.[3] Her work has influenced modern photographers, especially her closely cropped portraits.[4] Her house, Dimbola Lodge, on the Isle of Wight is open to the public.

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FYI

By Michael Ballaban: The NXT 360 Is The Next-Gen Humvee
 
 
 
 
Car colors: Where’s the Fire Red and Speeding Ticket Blue. Drive as fast as you can afford.
By Alanis King: The New Mazda Miata Will Have 181 HP And A 7,500-RPM Redline
 
 
 
 
By Nick Martin: Finally, There’s Video Of The Mizzou Arena Joyride
 
 
 
 
By Dan Neilan: Elon Musk starts fixing L.A.’s traffic by handing out flamethrowers
 
 
 
 
By Yessenia Funes: Let’s Call Gang Violence What It Is: Pollution

 
 
 
 
Fangirl Nation Live with Narrator Erin Bennett!: 8 p.m. EDT/ 7 p.m. CDT/ 6 p.m. MDT/ 5 p.m. PDT at the Cozy Mystery Corner Facebook page for a live chat with narrator Erin Bennett.
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Rediscovering lost literary treasures of the American Midwest, The Newspaper Archives of Black Chicago, The Future of the National Dish and more ->
 
 
 
 
Suffragette march.png Suhair Khan Program Manager, Google Arts & Culture: The Suffragettes and the Road to Equality on Google Arts & Culture
 
 
 
 
By Wendy Minter: Blog Profiles: Breakfast Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Rural funders urge philanthropists to let communities lead
 
 
 
 

Glacier Hub Weekly Newsletter 06-11-18: Meet the writers of GlacierHub, 2017/2018 edition. This year, our writers hail from across four continents.
 
 
 
 
By Zat Rana: There Are Two Ways to Read — One Is Useless
 
 
 
 
Open Culture Colin Marshall: Watch Anthony Bourdain’s Free Show, Raw Craft Where He Visits Craftsmen Making Guitars, Tattoos, Motorcycles & More (RIP)
 
 
 
 
Messy Nessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today Vol. (Vol. CCXCI): A Welsh Island for sale (for less than an average one bedroom flat in London), Aida Overton Walker, a star of the black vaudeville circuit.,This old church built on top of the 17th century graveyard (which now hides in the basement), Abandoned Masonic Hall, Bannack, Montana and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

By Hometalk Hits: 16 Ways to Showcase Your Herb Garden
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: These Coffee Table Ideas Will Inspire You To Make Your Own
 
 
Jenna Lantern Lane Designs Jenna Lantern Lane Designs Hometalker Granville, OH: DIY Marbled Vases
 
 
Chas’ Crazy Creations: Easy Frisbee Golf For Your Backyard!
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 10, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

671 – Emperor Tenji of Japan introduces a water clock (clepsydra) called Rokoku. The instrument, which measures time and indicates hours, is placed in the capital of Ōtsu.

A water clock or clepsydra (Greek κλεψύδρα from κλέπτειν kleptein, ‘to steal’; ὕδωρ hydor, ‘water’) is any timepiece in which time is measured by the regulated flow of liquid into (inflow type) or out from (outflow type) a vessel where the amount is then measured.

Water clocks are one of the oldest time-measuring instruments.[1] Where and when they were first invented is not known, and given their great antiquity it may never be. The bowl-shaped outflow is the simplest form of a water clock and is known to have existed in Babylon and in Egypt around the 16th century BCE. Other regions of the world, including India and China, also have early evidence of water clocks, but the earliest dates are less certain. Some authors, however, claim that water clocks appeared in China as early as 4000 BCE.[2]

Some modern timepieces are called “water clocks” but work differently from the ancient ones. Their timekeeping is governed by a pendulum, but they use water for other purposes, such as providing the power needed to drive the clock by using a water wheel or something similar, or by having water in their displays.

The Greeks and Romans advanced water clock design to include the inflow clepsydra with an early feedback system, gearing, and escapement mechanism, which were connected to fanciful automata and resulted in improved accuracy. Further advances were made in Byzantium, Syria and Mesopotamia, where increasingly accurate water clocks incorporated complex segmental and epicyclic gearing, water wheels, and programmability, advances which eventually made their way to Europe. Independently, the Chinese developed their own advanced water clocks, incorporating gears, escapement mechanisms, and water wheels, passing their ideas on to Korea and Japan[citation needed].

Some water clock designs were developed independently and some knowledge was transferred through the spread of trade. These early water clocks were calibrated with a sundial. While never reaching a level of accuracy comparable to today’s standards of timekeeping, the water clock was the most accurate and commonly used timekeeping device for millennia, until it was replaced by more accurate pendulum clocks in 17th-century Europe.

A water clock uses a flow of water to measure time. If viscosity is neglected, the physical principle required to study such clocks is Torricelli’s law. There are two types of water clocks: inflow and outflow. In an outflow water clock, a container is filled with water, and the water is drained slowly and evenly out of the container. This container has markings that are used to show the passage of time. As the water leaves the container, an observer can see where the water is level with the lines and tell how much time has passed. An inflow water clock works in basically the same way, except instead of flowing out of the container, the water is filling up the marked container. As the container fills, the observer can see where the water meets the lines and tell how much time has passed.

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Born On This Day

Seems like the things she is for would cancel each other out?

1835 – Rebecca Latimer Felton, American educator and politician (d. 1930)
Rebecca Ann Latimer Felton (June 10, 1835 – January 24, 1930) was an American writer, lecturer, reformer, and politician who became the first woman to serve in the United States Senate, though only serving for one day.[1][2] She was the most prominent woman in Georgia in the Progressive Era, and was honored by appointment to the Senate. She was sworn in November 21, 1922, and served just 24 hours. At 87 years, nine months, and 22 days old, she was the oldest freshman senator to enter the Senate. To date, she is also the only woman to have served as a Senator from Georgia. Her husband William Harrell Felton was a member of the United States House of Representatives and Georgia House of Representatives and she ran his campaigns. She was a prominent society woman; an advocate of prison reform, women’s suffrage and educational modernization; a white supremacist and slave owner; and one of the few prominent women who spoke in favor of lynching. Bartley reports that by 1915 she “was championing a lengthy feminist program that ranged from prohibition to equal pay for equal work.”[3]

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FYI


 
 
 
 
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255
 
 
 
 
If you need help, please call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). The International Association for Suicide Prevention and Befrienders Worldwide also can provide contact information for crisis centers around the world.
 
 
 
 
List of suicide crisis lines: Crisis line organizations by country
 
 
 
 

The Havok Journal Thomas Knight: I Wish You Could See Your Suicide.
I wish you could see your suicide. I wish someone like you sees this and makes a different choice.
 
 
 
 
By Rachel Zimmerman: I Know The Devastation Suicide Leaves Behind. I Wish I Didn’t
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
By Angela Helm: South Fulton, Ga.’s Entire Criminal Justice System Is Run by Black Women
 
 
 
 
By Johnny: The Japanese Mini Truck Garden Contest is a Whole New Genre in Landscaping
 
 
 
 
By Eugene S. Robinson: Giving a Graduation Speech to People Glad to See You Go
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: Arizona Memory Project Adds Three New Digital Collections
 
 
 
 
By Gary Price: New Online: American Archives of Public Broadcasting Announces Five New Special Collections
 
 
 
 
By Nate Hoffelder: Kindle Unlimited Cheat Chance Carter’s eBooks Have Been Removed From Amazon
 
 
 
 
Kings River Life: “Instinct: TV Review/Interview With Cast Member Sharon Leal” from Kings River Life Magazine, plus 11 more
 
 
 
 
The Bohemian Blog: Ciudad Nuclear: Exploring Cuba’s Half-Abandoned ‘Nuclear City’
 
 
 
 
By Sam Kyle: The 5 Stages of Tribal Belonging
But here’s the key point: If you believe that you are the average of the people you hang around, than you need to surround yourself with people who are like who you want to be. You need to consider that when it comes to building the life you want opposites don’t attract. Being a miserable grump will only attract other cranky assholes. Someone who is generally disposed to thinking that life is great does not want to hang with someone who whines all the time about how much life sucks.
 
 
 
 
By Tenelle Porter: The Benefits of Admitting When You Don’t Know
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: Breakfast Links Week of June 04, 2018
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Nature and joy, the paradoxical psychology of why frustration is necessary for love, William James on the 4 qualities of transcendent consciousness
 
 
 
 

By Jamie Palmer: 1973 Crown Bus… RV… Transporter…?
 
 
 
 

By Josh Mortenson: Off Road Bug: 1971 VW Veep
 
 
 
 

By Jeff Lavery: Alaskan Pair: 1969 Rover 2000TC

Ideas

By khoiland: Dried Flower Petal Wood Burned World Map
 
 
 
 
By YouLab: Flower Crystallization
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

The Happy Foody: Black Forest Gâteau
 
 
 
 
By Tye Rannosaurus: Slow Cooker Chili Con Carnage
 
 
 
 
By Penelopy Bulnick: Jell-O Marshmallow Fondant
 
 
 
 
By Audrey Obscura: Watermelon Jerky
 
 
 
 
By handy_woman: Make a Mold to Cast Boiled Eggs
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

907 Updates June 10, 2018

By Tegan Hanlon: Anchorage man charged with manslaughter in fatal Mat-Su boating collision
 
 
 
 
By Beth Bragg: Rosie Brennan and Anna Dalton dueled for the Run for Women victory and took down the course record along the way
 
 
 
 
By Tegan Hanlon: Black bear injures hunter near bait station off Parks Highway
 
 
 
 
By Charles Wohlforth: From wilderness to an urban ER, a doctor’s journey through Alaska’s best and worst
 
 
 
 
By Ned Rozell: What it’s like to run circles for 24 hours around the land of no night
 
 
 
 
Iditarod musher’s camp offers vets camaraderie
 
 
 
 
Volunteers work to spruce up Chester Creek Trail
 
 
 
 
Moms Everyday Alaska: How to check yourself for skin cancer

FYI June 09, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1954 – McCarthyism: Joseph Welch, special counsel for the United States Army, lashes out at Senator Joseph McCarthy during hearings on whether Communism has infiltrated the Army giving McCarthy the famous rebuke, “You’ve done enough. Have you no sense of decency, sir, at long last? Have you left no sense of decency?”
Joseph Nye Welch (October 22, 1890 – October 6, 1960) was an American lawyer who served as the chief counsel for the United States Army while it was under investigation for Communist activities by Senator Joseph McCarthy’s Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, an investigation known as the Army–McCarthy hearings. His confrontation with McCarthy during the hearings, in which he famously asked McCarthy “At long last, have you left no sense of decency?” is seen as a turning point in the history of McCarthyism.

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Born On This Day

1836 – Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, English physician and politician (d. 1917)
Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (9 June 1836 – 17 December 1917) was an English physician and suffragist, and the first woman to openly qualify in Britain as a physician and surgeon, and the first woman to do so since James Barry.[1] She was the co-founder of the first hospital staffed by women, the first dean of a British medical school, the first female doctor of medicine in France, the first woman in Britain to be elected to a school board and, as Mayor of Aldeburgh, the first female mayor and magistrate in Britain.

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FYI

 
 

By William Hughes: R.I.P. Danny Kirwan, former Fleetwood Mac guitarist

 
 
 
 
Excellent!
By Chris Thompson: Cool Dads Stephen Colbert And Patrick Wilson Deliver Surprisingly Earnest National Anthem Performance

 
 
 
 

Scroll down through the comments for the Miata Camino!
By Elizabeth Werth: My Hot Take Of The Day Is That Big Pickup Trucks Are A Plague And Should Not Be Sold For Daily Driving
 
 
 
 
By Elizabeth Werth: The Women’s Champion Of The 1927 Monte Carlo Rally Was The Endurance Driving Champion Of The World
 
 
 
 
By Dennis Young: College Runner Who Almost Burned To Death Reaches NCAA Final Two Years Later
 
 
 
 
Library Journal By LJ: Big Easy Reads
 
 
 
 
By Jared Brey: How Library Systems Can Help Address Affordable Housing Crises
 
 
 
 
By Scott Myers: Saturday Hot Links

 
 
 
 
By Adele Peters: Why Panera’s experiment with pay-what-you-want dining failed
 
 
 
 
25iq: Business and Investing Lessons from Rebecca Lynn (Canvas Ventures)
 
 
 
 
The Old Motor: Gasoline Station Series: Phillips 66 and Violet Ray Filling Stations, Noontime Traffic Jam on the Schuylkill Expressway, Joan Cuneo Early Tourist and Race Car Driver Visits Vermont, and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Tracy W Hometalker Orland Park, IL: An Old Refrigerator Gets a New Look With WALLPAPER!
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 30 Stunning Ways To Use Metallic Paint (No Experience Necessary!)
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 08, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1783 – Laki, a volcano in Iceland, begins an eight-month eruption which kills over 9,000 people and starts a seven-year famine.
Laki or Lakagígar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure in the south of Iceland, not far from the canyon of Eldgjá and the small village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur. Lakagígar is the correct name, as Laki mountain itself did not erupt, as fissures opened up on each side of it. Lakagígar is part of a volcanic system centered on the volcano Grímsvötn and including the volcano Thordarhyrna.[1][2][3] It lies between the glaciers of Mýrdalsjökull and Vatnajökull, in an area of fissures that run in a southwest to northeast direction.

The system erupted violently over an eight-month period between June 1783 and February 1784 from the Laki fissure and the adjoining volcano Grímsvötn, pouring out an estimated 42 billion tons 14 km3 (3.4 cu mi) of basalt lava and clouds of poisonous hydrofluoric acid and sulfur dioxide compounds that contaminated the soil, leading to the death of over 50% of Iceland’s livestock population, and the destruction of the vast majority of all crops. This led to a famine which then killed approximately 25% of the island’s human population.[4] The lava flows also destroyed 20 villages.

The Laki eruption and its aftermath caused a drop in global temperatures, as 120 million tons of sulfur dioxide was spewed into the Northern Hemisphere. This caused crop failures in Europe and may have caused droughts in North Africa and India.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1852 – Guido Banti, Italian physician and pathologist (d. 1925)
Guido Banti (8 June 1852 – 8 January 1925) was an Italian physician and pathologist.[1] He also performed innovative studies on the heart, infectious diseases and bacteriology, splenomegaly, nephrology, lung disease, leukaemia and motor aphasia. He gave his name to Banti’s disease.[2]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 

Great comments! For fun a few years ago we looked at the Honda S2000. The piece of fluff sales gal talked it about having a “race car start”…the ignition switch was in line with the radio switch.~
By David Tracy: Chrysler Pacifica Commercial Appears To Show Actor Using Transmission Shift Knob To Adjust Volume
 
 
 
 
By David Tracy: How Special Paint On The Hood Of The World War II Jeep Protected Soldiers’ Lives
 
 
 
 
By David Nield: How to Download Absolutely Everything You Can Find on the Web
 
 
 
 
By Chris Thompson: An Emotional T.J. Oshie Describes Winning The Cup In Front Of Father, Suffering Dementia
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Double Dutch Dog
 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: Short Stuff

Vector’s World Short Stuff


 
 
 
 
Vector’s World: A one act play
 
 
 
 

Medium Matt Holt: Packaging a Go application for macOS
 
 
 
 
What About ‘Whataboutism’? If everyone is guilty of something, is no one guilty of anything?
 
 
 
 
By Joe Concha: Political media pays tribute to Fox’s Charles Krauthammer after revelation that he only has ‘a few weeks to live’
 
 
 
 
By Morgan Gstalter: Former head of rogue Baltimore police unit sentenced to 25 years in prison
 
 
 
 
Nieman Lab Nancy Watzman: How can we restore trust in news? Here are 9 takeaways from Knight-supported research
 
 
 
 
Kristin Appenbrink Editorial Lead, Voyager in Google Earth: Explore the high seas in VR and Google Earth on World Oceans Day
 
 
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Quick hits: the history of hillbilly TV; a photo essay of life in former coal boomtowns; supporting rural LGBTQ seniors
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Why is a “pepper” different from “pepper”?,Amelia Earhart’s Club for Female Aviators, The Great Mural Wall of Topeka and more ->
 
 
 
 
Wow, glass is so sturdy and such a good insulator~
By Emma Tucker: 5 prefab homes you can build in under 24 hours Move in by nightfall
Huh~
Kasita assembled in 24 hours
From $139,000 (excluding land, installation, shipping and taxes)
Simple living is the philosophy of Kasita – a micro home inspired by its founder’s year-long voluntary stay in a dumpster. Thankfully there’s nothing dumpster-like about the cabin’s light-filled interiors – spanning 374 sq ft – which are kitted out with minimalist storage units and wooden floors. It’s positioned as a solution to the housing crisis, and can be installed within 24 hours of delivery.
 
 
 
 
Two Nerdy History Girls: Friday Video Getting Dressed in the 14th Century
 
 
 
 
By Jackie Turner: Bananas have died out once before–don’t let it happen again
 
 
Panama disease is a plant disease of the roots of banana plants. It is a type of Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc). The pathogen is resistant to fungicide and cannot be controlled chemically. Read more ->
 
 
 
 
Messy Nessy: Inside New York’s Greatest, Liveable Cabinet of Curiosities
 
 
 
 

Ideas

Everything Pretty: Homemade Bug Repellent Candle Melt Recipe
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 17 Benches You Can Build This Summer
 
 
 
 
By Hometalk Hits: 15 Unbelievable Ways People Paint Their Walls
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes


 
 

 
 

FYI June 07, 2018


 
 

 
 
 
 

On This Day

1776 – Richard Henry Lee presents the “Lee Resolution” to the Continental Congress. The motion is seconded by John Adams and will lead to the United States Declaration of Independence.
Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732 – June 19, 1794) was an American statesman from Virginia best known for the Lee Resolution, the motion in the Second Continental Congress calling for the colonies’ independence from Great Britain. He was a signatory to the Articles of Confederation, and his “resolution for independency” of June 1776 led to the United States Declaration of Independence, which Lee signed. He also served a one-year term as the President of the Congress of the Confederation, and was a United States Senator from Virginia from 1789 to 1792, serving during part of that time as the second President pro tempore of the upper house.

He was a member of the Lee family, a historically influential family in Virginia politics.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

Born On This Day

1831 – Amelia Edwards, English journalist and author (d. 1892)
Amelia Ann Blanford Edwards (7 June 1831 – 15 April 1892), also known as Amelia B. Edwards,[1] was an English novelist, journalist, traveller and Egyptologist. Her most successful literary works included the ghost story “The Phantom Coach” (1864), the novels Barbara’s History (1864) and Lord Brackenbury (1880), and the Egyptian travelogue A Thousand Miles up the Nile (1877). In 1882, she co-founded the Egypt Exploration Fund. She also edited a poetry anthology [2] published in 1878. Her address in London was 19 Wharton Street, Islington.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

FYI

By Paul Maroon: Sharing a room with Stewart Lupton of Jonathan Fire*Eater
 
 
 
 
By Sam Barsanti: David Spade pays tribute to sister-in-law Kate Spade
 
 
 
 
By Alanis King: Safety Tests For F1 Helmets Include Being Hit By Air Rifles, Hammers And 155 MPH Projectiles
 
 
 
 
By Jason Torchinsky: No Biggie, I’m Just Taking A Ride In The Worst Car Ever With My Buddy Jay Leno
 
 
 
 
By Nick Martin: Gator, Tied Up And Pissed Off, Owns The Hell Out Of His Asshole Captors
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Surprising Roadside Hotels, Unconventional 1931 Map of Chicago and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Jessica Wildfire: Take a rock star’s approach to life Harness your spunk to fight through the rough patches.
 
 
 
 
By Charles Chu: Books that changed my life
 
 
 
 
By Ashawnta Jackson: This woman shattered the gender barrier in pro baseball
 
 
 
 

By Adele Peters: Here’s yet another business benefit of hiring refugees
 
 
 
 
By Eillie Anzilotti: Indigenous people in the Amazon are using drones to save their land
 
 
 
 
By Rina Raphael: The U.S. Army calculates exact amount of coffee necessary for alertness
A recent study found a shockingly high prevalence of sleep disorders among active duty military personnel. (Huh, who’d thunk Soldiers, especially those in combat zones do not sleep deeply or have pleasant dreams~~
 
 
 
 
Same subject, different writer:
By Kate Bernot: Army-developed algorithm predicts exactly when you should consume caffeine
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
Ann Hometalker Medford, OR: Faux Wood Grain Looks So Cool On a Glass Table
 
 
 
 
By charliecadin: Wine Cork Surfboard
 
 
 
 
By darthoros: Plastic Bottle Mosquito Trap
 
 
 
 
By dtrewen: WSPR (Weak Signal Propagation Reporter) Stand Alone Beacon
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 

Recipes

By Penelopy Bulnick: Unicorn Rainbow Cookies Recipe