Word of the Day

National Day Calendar

Shorpy

Alaska Safety, Road & Weather Information and ADF&G Cameras

LexisNexis Community Crime Map

 
Quick View of  Traffic Cameras, Road Conditions, etc.
 
 
Alaska Weather Links
Weather Camera’s including FAA, Observation & Forecast Links, NWS Forecasts, Satellite & Radar Imagary, Other
 
 
Weather Underground
 
 
Tim Kelley: Crust Outlook Alaska
 
 

Virtual Viewing Webcams: Trail & Wildlife

FYI July 27 & 28, 2021

On This Day

1663 – The English Parliament passes the second Navigation Act requiring that all goods bound for the American colonies have to be sent in English ships from English ports. After the Acts of Union 1707, Scotland would be included in the Act.

The Navigation Acts, or more broadly the Acts of Trade and Navigation, was a long series of English laws that developed, promoted, and regulated English ships, shipping, trade, and commerce between other countries and with its own colonies. The laws also regulated England’s fisheries and restricted foreigners’ participation in its colonial trade.[1] While based on earlier precedents, they were first enacted in 1651 under the Commonwealth. The system was reenacted and broadened with the restoration by the Act of 1660, and further developed and tightened by the Navigation Acts of 1663, 1673, and 1696.[2] Upon this basis during the 18th century, the Acts were modified by subsequent amendments, changes, and the addition of enforcement mechanisms and staff. Additionally, a major change in the very purpose of the Acts in the 1760s – that of generating a colonial revenue, rather than only regulating the Empire’s trade – would help lead to major rebellions,[3] and significant changes in the implementation of the Acts themselves.[4] The Acts generally prohibited the use of foreign ships, required the employment of English and colonial mariners for 75% of the crews, including East India Company ships. The Acts prohibited colonies from exporting specific, enumerated, products to countries other than Britain and thoar countries’ colonies, and mandated that imports be sourced only through Britain. Overall, the Acts formed the basis for English (and later) British overseas trade for nearly 200 years, but with the development and gradual acceptance of free trade, the Acts were eventually repealed in 1849. The laws reflected the European economic theory of mercantilism which sought to keep all the benefits of trade inside their respective Empires, and to minimize the loss of gold and silver, or profits, to foreigners through purchases and trade. The system would develop with the colonies supplying raw materials for British industry, and in exchange for this guaranteed market, the colonies would purchase manufactured goods from or through Britain.

The major impetus for the first Navigation Act was the ruinous deterioration of English trade in the aftermath of the Eighty Years’ War, and the associated lifting of the Spanish embargoes on trade between the Spanish Empire and the Dutch Republic. The end of the embargoes in 1647 unleashed the full power of the Amsterdam Entrepôt and other Dutch competitive advantages in European and world trade. Within a few years, English merchants had practically been overwhelmed in the Baltic and North sea trade, as well as trade with the Iberian Peninsula, the Mediterranean and the Levant. Even the trade with English colonies (partly still in the hands of the royalists, as the English Civil War was in its final stages and the Commonwealth of England had not yet imposed its authority throughout the English colonies) was “engrossed” by Dutch merchants. English direct trade was crowded out by a sudden influx of commodities from the Levant, Mediterranean and the Spanish and Portuguese empires, and the West Indies via the Dutch Entrepôt, carried in Dutch ships and for Dutch account.[5]

The obvious solution seemed to be to seal off the English markets to these unwanted imports. A precedent was the Act the Greenland Company had obtained from Parliament in 1645 prohibiting the import of whale products into England, except in ships owned by that company. This principle was now generalized. In 1648 the Levant Company petitioned Parliament for the prohibition of imports of Turkish goods “…from Holland and other places but directly from the places of their growth.”[6] Baltic traders added their voices to this chorus. In 1650 the Standing Council for Trade and the Council of State of the Commonwealth prepared a general policy designed to impede the flow of Mediterranean and colonial commodities via Holland and Zeeland into England.[7]

Following the 1696 act, the Acts of Trade and Navigation were generally obeyed, except for the Molasses Act 1733, which led to extensive smuggling because no effective means of enforcement was provided until the 1760s. Stricter enforcement under the Sugar Act 1764 became one source of resentment of Great Britain by merchants in the American colonies. This, in turn, helped push the American colonies to rebel in the late 18th century, even though the consensus view among modern economic historians and economists is that the “costs imposed on [American] colonists by the trade restrictions of the Navigation Acts were small.”[8]

Read more ->

 
 
1571 – La Laguna encomienda, known today as the Laguna province in the Philippines, is founded by the Spaniards as one of the oldest encomiendas (provinces) in the country.
The encomienda (Spanish pronunciation: [eŋkoˈmjenda] (About this soundlisten)) was a Spanish labor system that rewarded conquerors with the labor of particular groups of conquered non-Christian people. The laborers, in theory, were provided with benefits by the conquerors for whom they labored, the Catholic religion being a principal benefit. The encomienda was first established in Spain following the Christian conquest of Moorish territories (known to Christians as the Reconquista), and it was applied on a much larger scale during the Spanish colonization of the Americas and the Spanish Philippines. Conquered peoples were considered vassals of the Spanish monarch. The Crown awarded an encomienda as a grant to a particular individual. In the conquest era of the sixteenth century, the grants were considered to be a monopoly on the labor of particular groups of indigenous peoples, held in perpetuity by the grant holder, called the encomendero, and their descendants.[1]

Encomiendas devolved from their original Iberian form into a form of “communal” slavery. In the encomienda, the Spanish Crown granted a person a specified number of natives from a specific community but did not dictate which individuals in the community would have to provide their labor. Indigenous leaders were charged with mobilizing the assessed tribute and labor. In turn, encomenderos were to ensure that the encomienda natives were given instruction in the Christian faith and Spanish language, and protect them from warring tribes or pirates; they had to suppress rebellion against Spaniards, and maintain infrastructure. The natives provided taxes in the form of metals, maize, wheat, pork, or other agricultural products.

With the ousting of Christopher Columbus in 1500, the Spanish Crown had him replaced with Francisco de Bobadilla.[2] Bobadilla was succeeded by a royal governor, Fray Nicolás de Ovando, who established the formal encomienda system.[3] In many cases natives were forced to do hard labor and subjected to extreme punishment and death if they resisted.[4] However, Queen Isabella I of Castile forbade slavery of the native population and deemed the indigenous to be “free vassals of the crown”.[5] Various versions of the Laws of the Indies from 1512 onwards attempted to regulate the interactions between the settlers and natives. Both natives and Spaniards appealed to the Real Audiencias for relief under the encomienda system.

Encomiendas had often been characterized by the geographical displacement of the enslaved and breakup of communities and family units, but in Mexico, the encomienda ruled the free vassals of the crown through existing community hierarchies, and the natives remained in their settlements with their families.[6]

Read more ->
 
Laguna, officially the Province of Laguna (Tagalog: Lalawigan ng Laguna; Spanish: Provincia de la Laguna), is a province in the Philippines located in the Calabarzon region in Luzon. Its capital is Santa Cruz and the province is situated southeast of Metro Manila, south of the province of Rizal, west of Quezon, north of Batangas and east of Cavite. Laguna hugs the southern shores of Laguna de Bay, the largest lake in the country. As of the 2020 census, the province’s total population is 3,382,193 [4]. It is also currently the seventh richest province in the country.[5]

Laguna is notable as the birthplace of José Rizal, the country’s national hero. It is also famous for attractions like Pagsanjan Falls, the University of the Philippines Los Baños and the University of the Philippines Open University in Los Baños, the hot spring resorts of Calamba on the slopes of Mount Makiling, Pila historic town plaza, Taytay Falls in Majayjay, the wood carvings and papier-mâché created by the people of Paeté, the annual Sampaguita Festival in San Pedro, the turumba of Pakil, the tsinelas footwears from Liliw, the Pandan Festival of Luisiana, the Seven Lakes of San Pablo, and the Nagcarlan Underground Cemetery in Nagcarlan.

This province is a part of Greater Manila Area.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1853 – Elizabeth Plankinton, American philanthropist (d. 1923)
Elizabeth Ann[4] or Anne[5] Plankinton (July 27, 1853 – 1923) was an American philanthropist in the early 20th century, the daughter of Milwaukee businessman John Plankinton. She was also known as “Miss Lizzie” and the people of Milwaukee called Plankinton the “municipal patroness” because of her generosity. She made a large donation that built the first YWCA in Milwaukee. She also purchased an elaborate large-scale pipe organ for the newly constructed city auditorium.

She supported local artists and artisans. One of her notable gifts was the 1885 statue of George Washington that was ultimately placed in Milwaukee’s Monument Square. It is nine feet tall and sits on a twelve-foot base. This was the first piece of public art for the city and was sculpted by her fiancé.

Plankinton had a three-bedroom mansion built for her in an upscale Milwaukee neighborhood as a wedding gift from her father. Her fiancé abandoned her for a dancer from Minneapolis. Distraught, Plankinton lost interest in the mansion. It stood empty for a decade and was eventually purchased by a widow.

Read more ->

 
 
1857 – Ballington Booth, English-American activist, co-founded Volunteers of America (d. 1940)
Ballington Booth (July 28, 1857 – October 5, 1940) was a British-born American Christian minister who co-founded Volunteers of America, a Christian charitable organization, and became its first General (1896-1940). He was a former officer in The Salvation Army.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

 
 
 
 

Ideas

By JPGrox: 3D Printed Dog Puzzle Using Tinkercad

 
 
By Gammawave: Multi Tier Fountain
 
 

Recipes

By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Stress Less with These All-in-One Dinners
 
 
BY KATHY HESTER, FOOD TALK DAILY: Lavender Syrup With Coconut Sugar for Coffee, Tea, or Other Drinks
 
 
By Michele Brosius, Food Talk Daily: Homemade Coffee Whipped Cream

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

907 Updates July 27 & 28, 2021

KTOO Alaska’s Public Media: A dozen women have accused former Juneau-area chiropractor Jeffrey Fultz of sexual abuse and more ->
In early 2021, the Indian Health Services established a hotline for callers to report suspected child abuse or sexual abuse by calling 1-855-SAFE-IHS (855-723-3447) or submitting a complaint online IHS.gov website. The hotline may be used to report any type of suspected child abuse within the IHS, or any type of sexual abuse regardless of the age of the victim. The person reporting by phone or online may remain anonymous.

Locally, people can call AWARE in Juneau at 907-586-1090.
 
 
 
 
KTUU Alaska’s News Source: Troopers recover, identify 2 dead from plane crash in Chugach State Park; Pedestrian dies at hospital after collision with motorcycle; 1st Black police chief voted in on APD’s 100-year anniversary; Anchorage Assembly commits to using facilitator to reach agreement with Bronson administration on homelessness plan and more ->
 
 
 
 
KTOO Alaska’s Public Media: Kotzebue couple charged with assaulting and starving children in their care; Assistant Alaska attorney general investigated for racist social media posts leaves job; LISTEN: Former Juneauite working for international watchdog group talks women’s rights, US troops leaving Afghanistan and more ->
 
 
 
 
KYUK Public Media for Alaska’s Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta: Bethel City Offices Could Be Using Satellite Internet By The End Of 2021; ADF&G Coordinating Salmon Deliveries To Yukon River Communities and more ->
 
 
 
 
Alaska Native News: Alaska National Guard participates in DoD’s largest unclassified cyber defense exercise; This Day In Alaska History; July 27th, 1912, July 28th, 1899 and more ->
 
 
 
 
Fairbanks News Webcenter 11: Alaska State Troopers: Fatal Four-Wheeler Crash Kills 12-Year Old Boy; Arson Claims the Seventh Building in Community Outside of Fairbanks According to Troopers; Arson Claims the Seventh Building in Community Outside of Fairbanks According to Troopers One of the victims of the arson warned the community against vigilante justice saying it wouldn’t bring closure.; Alaska Federation of Natives President attends White House voter rights discussion and more ->
 
 
 
 
KSTK: Alaska Bearfest 2021 starts tomorrow and more ->
 
 
 
 
KFSK: Federal worker from Petersburg recounts time at the U.S. border with unaccompanied immigrant teens and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Nichole Tucker, Targeted Oncology: Managing PARP Inhibitor Toxicities and Other Challenges in Community-Based Gynecologic Oncology
 
 
 
 
KRBD: Feds to consider protections for Southeast Alaska’s wolves and more ->
 
 
 
 
Craig Medred: Flawed rescue?
 
 
 
 
Suzanne Downing, Editor, Must Read Alaska: Wednesday Newsletter – How Anchorage government grew under Berkowitz & Quinn-Davidson; ‘For Coach Barnhart,’ East High Thunderbirds rally to come-back victory after learning mid-game of coach’s death; BLUE ANGELS BACK IN ALASKA FOR EIELSON AIR SHOW and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Carey Seward, Only In Your State Alaska: This Scenic Highway In Alaska Is Absolutely Stunning And You Need To Take It
 
 
By Courtney, Only In Your State Alaska: 30 Hilariously Accurate Memes About Alaska

Military July 27 & 28, 2021

Military.com: Former Airman Who Leaked Details of Drone Program Sentenced, Will Serve Prison Time; VA Makes ‘Error’ in Using Gender-Neutral Motto in Official Government Notice; Congress Rebuffs Air Force’s Plan to Retire Older Aircraft, Putting A-10 Move on Hold; The US Military Couldn’t Stop the Heroin Trade from Funding the Taliban. But Synthetic Opioid Producers Might. And more ->
 
 
 
 
Task & Purpose: The predictable collapse of the Afghan Air Force is happening in real time None of this is surprising.; Air Force’s top enlisted leader gets wrecked by subordinates in Mario Kart “I’m not one to shy away from a challenge, but … I’ve also
never played Mario Kart before this week.” And more ->

 
 
 
 
DoD: Face of Defense: Swimming Toward Gold and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Quotes July 27 & 28, 2021

“You’re entitled to your own opinion if you keep your opinion to yourself. If you decide to say it out loud, then I think you have a responsibility to be open to changing your mind in the face of better logic or stronger data. I think if you’re willing to voice an opinion, you should also be willing to change that opinion.”
Adam Grant on rethinking your position
 
 
 
 
I love to think about chance — about how one little overheard word, one pebble in a shoe, can change the universe.
Anne Tyler,
writer
 
 
 
 
Throw away the light, the definitions, and say what you see in the dark.
It is not everyday that the world arranges itself into a poem.
Wallace Stevens,
poet
 
 
 
 
Laughter is life-giving. It makes you breathe.
Kristin Chenoweth,
actor, singer
 
 
 
 
“I would rather walk with a friend in the dark, than alone in the light.”
Helen Keller
 
 
 
 
“The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.”
Charles Dickens
 
 
 
 
“The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.”
Ernest Hemingway
 
 
 
 
“The real problem is not whether machines think, but whether men do.”
B.F. Skinner
 
 
 
 
Striving for success without hard work is like trying to harvest where you haven’t planted.
David Bly – Politician-Retired Teacher
 
 
 
 
I attribute my success to this: I never gave or took an excuse.
Florence Nightingale – 1820-1910 – Social Reformer-Founder of Modern Nursing-Organized Care for Wounded Soldiers at Constantinople
 
 
 
 
“The bosom of America is open to receive not only the Opulent and respected Stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges.”
George Washington
 
 
 
 
Always believe something wonderful is about to happen.
Unknown

Music July 27 & 28, 2021

Dolly Parton, Sent From Above
 
 
 
 

FYI July 26, 2021

On This Day

1775 – The office that would later become the United States Post Office Department is established by the Second Continental Congress. Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania takes office as Postmaster General.
The United States Post Office Department (USPOD; also known as the Post Office or U.S. Mail) was the predecessor of the United States Postal Service, in the form of a Cabinet department, officially from 1872 to 1971. It was headed by the postmaster general.

The Postal Service Act, signed by U.S. president George Washington on February 20, 1792, established the department. Postmaster General John McLean, in office from 1823 to 1829, was the first to call it the Post Office Department rather than just the “Post Office.” The organization received a boost in prestige when President Andrew Jackson invited his postmaster general, William T. Barry, to sit as a member of the Cabinet in 1829.[1] The Post Office Act of 1872 (17 Stat. 283) elevated the Post Office Department to Cabinet status.[2]

During the American Civil War (1861–1865), postal services in the Confederate States of America were provided by the Confederate States of America Post-office Department, headed by Postmaster General John Henninger Reagan.

The Postal Reorganization Act was signed by President Richard Nixon on August 12, 1970. It replaced the cabinet-level Post Office Department with the independent United States Postal Service on July 1, 1971. The regulatory role of the postal services was then transferred to the Postal Regulatory Commission.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1926 – Dorothy E. Smith, Canadian sociologist[5]
Dorothy Edith Smith CM (born July 6, 1926) is a Canadian sociologist with research interests in a variety of disciplines, including women’s studies, feminist theory, psychology, and educational studies, as well as in certain subfields of sociology, such as the sociology of knowledge, family studies, and methodology. Smith founded the sociological sub-disciplines of feminist standpoint theory and institutional ethnography.

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

By Tia Ghose – Assistant Managing Editor, Live Science: Steven Weinberg, Nobel Prize-winning physicist, has died
 
 
 
 
By James Clear: 3-2-1: How to find opportunities, and what it takes to improve
 
 
 
 
By Wickersham’s Conscience: Return of Bird of the Week: Rusty Blackbird
 
 
By Wickersham’s Conscience: Return of Bird of the Week: Tricolored Blackbird
 
 
 
 
By Oscar Duran, Beyond Bylines: Blog Profiles: Food Blogs, Volume 4
 
 
 
 
STORIES FROM NORTHERN CANADA AND ALASKA: Harriet Pullen, Queen of Skagway
 
 
 
 
By Open Culture: Epidemics in Western Society Since 1600: A Free Online Course from Yale University
 
 
 
 
By Tim Suddard, Grass Roots Motor Sports: Miata Mod Squad: Boosted Miatas Compared
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Publishers Weekly: Reading Beyond Neurodivergent Sterotypes
 
 
The Passive Voice, From Book Riot: The Goodreads Bot Problem
 
 
 
 
I like to write junk…: McCLEARY BEAR FESTIVAL OR BUST “We laughed all the way to Astoria, knowing that we’d just made history in McCleary, as being the two biggest idiots to ever hit town.”
 
 
 
 
Wickersham’s Conscience: Field Notes: Cress Creek Nature Trail
 
 
 
 
Zillow Anchorage: 6730 Reedyke Cir, Anchorage, AK 99507

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

HALO, Huffman/O’Malley & Rabbit Creek Community Councils Present
Firewise Saturday
11AM-3PM July 31, 2021
Trinity Presbyterian Church
12310 Lorrain St., Anchorage (Huffman & Lorrain)
Featuring
Team Rubicon
A national volunteer organization active in Alaska wildfire response designed by our nation’s Veterans who unite in response to wildfires, disasters and humanitarian crises across the nation. www.TeamRubiconUSA.org

Mini Seminars, Demonstrations and Displays including:

AFD Firewise Program
DIY Firewise Home Evaluation
Team Rubicon Alaska
Chainsaw Techniques, Care and Maintenance
Home Evacuation Preparation
Alaska Division of Forestry and “Spruce the Moose”
AFD Brush Fire Apparatus
Tree Care & Pruning
Chugach Electric’s Dangerous Trees Program for Homeowners

Demonstrations and Displays including:

Alaska Division of Forestry and mascot Spruce the Moose
AFD Brush Fire Apparatus
AFD Station Crew
Tree Care & Pruning
Chugach Electric’s Dangerous Trees Program for Homeowners

Thank You to Participants, including:
Spruce the Moose from the Alaska Division of Forestry, Forester John See (Ret.), Paul’s Tree Service, Anchorage Fire Department, Tall Trees, State of Alaska Department of Forestry, Greatland Trees, Rabbit Creek Community Council, Huffman/O’Malley Community Council, and Team Rubicon

For more resources, visit, https://bit.ly/NeighborhoodResilience or join us at Firewise Saturday. For more information about this event, contact Katie Nolan at presidenthalo@gmail.com or Ky at ky@kyholland.com (907 727 2735).

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

The Yummy Bowl
 
 
Ruby Williams, Bogalusa, Louisiana, Taste of Home: Sausage and Vegetable Skillet
 
 
By Betty Crocker Kitchens: Best Recipes to Spice up Dinnertime
 
 
Taste of Home Slow Cooker & Casseroles Mexican foods
 
 
By Kristie Collado, The Food Network: 7 Kids Birthday Party Treats That Are Better Than Cake
 
 
By Jesse Szewczyk, The Kitchn: I’ve Made Hundreds of Batches of Cookies — This Is Hands-Down the Best Recipe
 
 
By Sweet Girl Treats, Food Talk Daily: Unicorn Cheesecake

 
 
DamnDelicious
 
 


 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

907 Updates July 26, 2021

KTUU Alaska’s News Source: California driver dies after crashing into 2 vehicles on Sterling Highway and more ->
 
 
 
 
KYUK Public Media for Alaska’s Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta: Akiak To Become First Y-K Delta Community With High-Speed, Broadband Internet and more ->
 
 
 
 
Alaska Native News: This Day In Alaska History July 26th, 1950 and more ->
 
 
 
 
KINY: Tlingit Stamp release ceremony to be held Friday and more ->
 
 
 
 
By Suzanne Downing, Editor, Must Read Alaska: Monday Newsletter for July 26, 2021
 
 
 
 
Craig Medred: Humpies go home!
 
 
 
 
By Natalie Clunan, Only In Your State Alaska: 7 Scenic Rail Trails In Alaska That Are Downright Picture Perfect

Military July 26, 2021

DoD: Medal of Honor Monday: Marine Corps Gen. Louis Wilson Jr.
 
 
 
 
Task & Purpose: This US soldier just set a new shooting record at the Olympics “We are very fortunate to be here to be able to compete.” And more ->
 
 
 
 
Military.com: A $500 Rip It? How Grilled Cheese and Energy Drinks Fueled the Afghanistan Withdrawal; Dallas Towing Company to Pay $50,000 for Illegally Selling Cars Belonging to Service Members and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

NSFW

 
 
 
 
NSFW

Quotes July 26, 2021

Courtesy of Claudia Hall Christian Everyday Kindness

 
 
 
 
“The fear of death follows from the fear of life. One who lives life fully is prepared to die at any time.”
Edward Abbey
 
 
 
 
“A kind gesture can reach a wound that only compassion can heal.”
Steve Maraboli
 
 
 
 
There are a lot of people who you might be… unfond of, especially these days. Just so you know — it is possible to be kind to someone you are not fond of. “Kindness is in our power, even when fondness is not.”
Samuel Johnson
 
 
 
 
“No one has yet realized the wealth of sympathy, the kindness and generosity hidden in the soul of a child. The effort of every true education should be to unlock that treasure.”
Emma Goldman
 
 
 
 
It’s normal to feel sad. The kindest thing you can do is to allow yourself to feel your own grief.
 
 
 
 
Our days are filled with chaos, anxiety, and overwork. It’s important that we find peace in our every day even if it’s just a moment to take a breath.
 
 
 
 
Your kindness generates beauty — inside you and the person you’re kind to. Be kind. Create gorgeous beauty among the green of life.
 
 
 
 
You’ll never remember the days you spent toiling away.

Get out and enjoy your life.
 
 
 
 
Feeling out of balance? It’s likely that you are burdened by too many things. Maybe it’s time to let something go. Never to carry more than you can balance.
 
 
 
 
Yes, I’ve heard it to. “Everything’s back to normal!!” Whee!! Do you want everything to go back to “normal”? Listen, the road ahead is wide open. Where do you want to your life to go?
 
 
 
 
What if — just for today — we focus on what we give to others, rather than what we get from others. We’ll feel better.
 
 
 
 
Just be nice!
It’s not that hard.
Just be nice, even when it’s hard.
 
 
 
 
There’s a lot of ugly around.

Turn away from the drama machine.

Find some beauty in your every day.

Focus on beauty.
 
 
 
 
Be kind to everyone, including you.

Kindness will beautify your entire life.

Be kind.

Live in beauty.
 
 
 
 
Symmetry — what you give out comes back to you. Be kind — to everyone, all the time — it will come back to you.
 
 
 
 
Be kind. Bring beauty into your life.
 
 
 
 
You are loved.
 
 
 
 
Kindness is the song of this universe. Break out into song as often as possible.

Music July 26, 2021