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Kindle December 17, 2018

$1.99
The Ski House Cookbook: Warm Winter Dishes for Cold Weather Fun Kindle Edition
by Tina Anderson (Author), Sarah Pinneo (Author)
What could be better than standing on top of a mountain, snow sparkling, the slopes calling? Not much, except perhaps skiing down to a warm, home-cooked meal that comes together effortlessly.The Ski House Cookbook makes it all possible with 125 recipes that will keep you on the slopes or winding down with friends afterward, not stuck at the stove. Here are easy and delicious meals designed with minimum prep times for often limited home-away-from-home kitchens, from quick-cooking roasts, sautés, and other fast meals to slow-cooker dishes and recipes that can be made in advance and frozen. And, to get you in the right frame of mind, each recipe is coded with a difficulty rating that corresponds to the familiar green dots, blue squares, and black diamonds of the slopes
 
 
 
 
$1.99
The Summer of New Beginnings: A Magnolia Grove Novel Kindle Edition
by Bette Lee Crosby (Author)
Aspiring journalist Meghan Briggs has always been the responsible one in the family. So when her father passes away unexpectedly, leaving behind his at-risk business, she steps up to save his legacy—even if that means putting her own dreams on hold.

Tracy couldn’t be more different from her sister. She’s always been the rebellious type, without much direction in life. But in the wake of her latest romantic disaster, she finds herself moving back home as a single mother.

As Tracy experiences the difficulties of new motherhood, Meghan faces her own struggle: trying not to fall for the stray puppy she rescued. This is no time for attachments—not to the adorable “Sox,” whose owner is bound to turn up any day, and certainly not to the handsome new vet in town. But as the summer unfolds, she discovers that, like Sox, she may need rescuing, too.

As both sisters navigate unexpected challenges and exciting new relationships, they’ll find that putting the past to rest can make way for beautiful new beginnings.
 
 
 
 
$1.99
Death in Paradise (Jesse Stone Novels Book 3) Kindle Edition
by Robert B. Parker (Author)
The local cops haven’t seen anything like this, but Jesse’s L.A. past has made him all too familiar with floaters. This girl hadn’t committed suicide; she hadn’t been drowned: she’d been shot and dumped, discarded like trash. Before long it becomes clear that she had a taste for the wild life; and her own parents can’t be bothered to report her missing, or even admit that she once was a child of theirs. All Jesse has to go on is a young man’s school ring on a gold chain, and a hunch or two.

Filled with magnetic characters and the muscular writing that are Parker’s trademarks, Death in Paradise is a storytelling masterpiece.
 
 
 
 
Free
It Must Be Magic: Mystery of Love, Book 3 Kindle Edition
by Jennifer Skully (Author), Jasmine Haynes (Author)
Everyone believes in carpe diem… don’t they?

For flower shop clerk Lili Goodweather, that’s what life is all about–savoring the precious moments and all the beauty the world has to offer. So it breaks her heart when 12-year-old Erika Rutland can no longer see the magic in everyday moments.

No, not everyone believes in carpe diem… or telepathic communication with animals.

A firm believer in all things practical, widower Tanner Rutland doesn’t want his daughter’s mind filled with Lili’s fanciful tales—especially her claims that she can communicate with cats. And worse, that his daughter’s cat Fluffy has witnessed a murder. When Lili asks him to help search for the dead body that just absolutely has to be out in the redwoods—she claims—he’s forced to confront whether Lili is just plain crazy or her gift with animals is real.

FYI December 17, 2018

On This Day

 
 
497 BC – The first Saturnalia festival was celebrated in ancient Rome.
Saturnalia was an ancient Roman festival in honour of the god Saturn, held on 17 December of the Julian calendar and later expanded with festivities through to 23 December. The holiday was celebrated with a sacrifice at the Temple of Saturn, in the Roman Forum, and a public banquet, followed by private gift-giving, continual partying, and a carnival atmosphere that overturned Roman social norms: gambling was permitted, and masters provided table service for their slaves.[1] A common custom was the election of a “King of the Saturnalia”, who would give orders to people and preside over the merrymaking. The gifts exchanged were usually gag gifts or small figurines made of wax or pottery known as sigillaria. The poet Catullus called it “the best of days”.[2]

Saturnalia was the Roman equivalent to the earlier Greek holiday of Kronia, which was celebrated during the Attic month of Hekatombaion in late midsummer. It held theological importance for some Romans, who saw it as a restoration of the ancient Golden Age, when the world was ruled by Saturn. The Neoplatonist philosopher Porphyry interpreted the freedom associated with Saturnalia as symbolizing the “freeing of souls into immortality”. Saturnalia may have influenced some of the customs associated with later celebrations in western Europe occurring in midwinter, particularly traditions associated with Christmas, the Feast of the Holy Innocents, and Epiphany. In particular, the historical western European Christmas custom of electing a “Lord of Misrule” may have its roots in Saturnalia celebrations.

Read more ->

Born On This Day

 
 
1778 – Humphry Davy, English chemist and physicist (d. 1829)
Sir Humphry Davy, 1st Baronet PRS MRIA FGS FRS (17 December 1778 – 29 May 1829) was a Cornish chemist and inventor,[1] who is best remembered today for isolating, using electricity, a series of elements for the first time: potassium and sodium in 1807 and calcium, strontium, barium, magnesium and boron the following year, as well as discovering the elemental nature of chlorine and iodine. He also studied the forces involved in these separations, inventing the new field of electrochemistry. In 1799 Davy experimented with nitrous oxide and became astonished that it made him laugh, so he nicknamed it “laughing gas”, and wrote about its potential anaesthetic properties in relieving pain during surgery.[2]

Berzelius called Davy’s 1806 Bakerian Lecture On Some Chemical Agencies of Electricity[3] “one of the best memoirs which has ever enriched the theory of chemistry.”[4] Davy was a baronet, President of the Royal Society (PRS), Member of the Royal Irish Academy (MRIA), and Fellow of the Geological Society (FGS). He also invented the Davy lamp and a very early form of arc lamp.

He joked that his assistant Michael Faraday was his greatest discovery.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Jason Torchinsky: Guy in Parked Truck Takes Alarming Video of High Speed Chase Slamming Into Him
 
 
By Kristen Lee: Run for the Hills If You Encounter Any of These Car-Buying Red Flags

“Never Used to Plow” (NameIwillRegret)
Yeah okay, buddy. That’s totally not mounting hardware, right?

“Simple Fix” (skeffles)
If it was so simple, then the seller would have fixed it already!
 
 
By Raphael Orlove: Ken Block Is Having a Good Time
 
 
 
 
By Patrick Redford: Katie Compton Is An All-Time American Athlete
This is now Compton’s 15th consecutive cyclocross national championship. She started winning them when she was 25. Now, she’s 40 and she still hasn’t lost the streak. This has easily been the most difficult season of Compton’s career, as she’s struggled with severe allergies that have limited her breathing and a nasty stomach bug. None of it mattered on Saturday in Louisville. She was perfect.

 
 
By Patrick Redford: Kelly Slater Pulled Off A Miraculous Mid-Wave Recovery After Falling Off His Board
 
 
 
 
By Dennis Romero: Hemp industry expected to blossom under new Farm Bill “This is a cultural shift,” said one purveyor of cannabidiol, CBD, a compound derived from hemp.
 
 
 
 
By David Barden: Camp Fire Cleanup Workers Fired After Posting Disgraceful Photos Bigge Crane and Rigging apologized for the “egregious insult” caused by its employees “during an already devastating time.”
Bigge Crane and Rigging apologized to the residents of Paradise and Butte County, describing the Facebook posts as “an egregious insult during an already devastating time.”

“We have identified three participants in this abhorrent event and their employment has been terminated,” the company wrote in a statement posted to Facebook Saturday. “Bigge expects its employees and contractors to work with the utmost integrity and professionalism.”

One of the photos in question included a deceased cat with a beer bottle placed in its mouth.

“Dude… I was just chilling with my homies, having a couple of cold ones, and BAM… damn fire breaks out,” the caption read.
 
 
 
 
By WCMH: Retired police K-9 dumped at animal shelter has new home
 
 
 
 
By WFLA 8 On Your Side Staff: Sneaky parrot uses Amazon Alexa to shop while owner is away
 
 
 
 

By Christine Cube – Blog Profiles: Public Speaking Blogs
 
 
 
 
By Lesley McClurg: Medical Detectives: The Last Hope For Families Coping With Rare Diseases
 
 
 
 
By Gemma Tarlach: Pterosaur Feathers Deepen Debate Over Their Evolution
 
 
By Heather Chapman: First-of-its-kind federal report shows GDP figures for all U.S. counties; that and another report show rural areas lagging
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Volunteers help rural elderly get health care, and more
 
 
By Heather Chapman: Rural school principals have some of the hardest jobs, and some of the highest turnover rates, in education
For example, Matthew Snyder is the new principal of the elementary, middle and high schools in Cheraw, Colorado (pop. 252). He’s also the district superintendent, the maintenance director, a substitute teacher, and soon will be a fill-in bus driver. He grew up in a farming town in northern Colorado and told Preston that, although he was daunted at the prospect of filling so many roles in Cheraw, his brother encouraged him to try it. The job turned out to be very hard, but Snyder said he hopes that’s just because he’s new. “The light at the end of the tunnel for me is I’m hoping this is just adjusting,” he told Preston.

A nationwide initiative aims to help multitasking principals like Snyder. Mark Shellinger, a former dual superintendent-principal in rural Alaska, runs a group called the National SAM Innovation Project. It operates in Colorado and 22 other states “to help principals better plan their days and train colleagues to assume more of their schools’ management tasks,” Preston reports.
 
 
 
 
By Shoshanna Solomon: Israeli moon-bound craft to carry Holocaust survivor story, and best of humanity – The Times of Israel
 
 
 
 
By Minyvonne Burke: Officer makes heartfelt plea to speeders after catching teen driving 100 mph “They thought they were invincible too. They weren’t,” the officer posted.
An Ohio officer’s Facebook message to an 18-year-old he clocked going 100 mph on a highway is gaining speed on social media.

In an open letter posted on the North Ridgeville Police Department’s Facebook page, an officer wrote in a Facebook message intended for the teen that their reckless driving could have killed them or “some innocent person who was minding their own business doing nothing else wrong but being in front of you.”

“I’d like to believe that you were minutes away from creating an unspeakable Christmas tragedy when I stopped you,” the post read.

According to a photo of the ticket accompanying the open letter, the teen was traveling 100 mph in a 65 mph zone in the city of North Ridgeville.

The officer went on to write that they have witnessed dozens of car crashes related to speeding that left other teenagers dead or with “broken” bodies.
 
 
 
 

By James Clear: 55 Popular Books Summarized in 3 Sentences or Less
 
 
 
 
Open Culture: Pristine Footage Lets You Revisit Life in Paris in the 1890s: Watch Footage Shot by the Lumière Brothers, A Short Video Introduction to Hilma af Klint, the Mystical Female Painter Who Helped Invent Abstract Art and more ->
 
 
 
 
By David Buck: The Bagdasarian Effect How one man’s discovery of a clever sound effect gave us one of the most enduring novelty musical acts of all time, Alvin and the Chipmunks.
 
 
 
 
By Sophia Akram: A Madcap Detective Podcast With a Yeti
Why you should care
Because old-school British comedy is still damned funny.
 
 
 
 
By MessyNessy 13 Things I Found on the Internet Today (Vol. CCCXXXII): This Incredible antique lover’s Parisian atelier is for sale, The world’s shortest underwater bridge, Hitler’s formerly abandoned resort town of Prora finally opened for business in 2017, The Nellie Bly Virtual Reality Experience and more ->
 
 
 
 

Ideas

The Interior Frugalista: Something for your sweet tooth, Recap of the 12 Days Of Christmas 2018 event and more ->
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
Gems In the Attic: A Gift Box Filled with Holiday Recipes – Heart Attack Potatoes, Three-Ingredient Fudge and more->
 
 
Scrappy Geek: Hatfield® Ham and Smoked Gouda Grilled Cheese Sandwiches – Holiday Leftover Recipe!


 
 

 
 

907 Updates December 17, 2018

By Bryan Dunagan: 4.2 aftershock registered near Big Lake
 
 
 
 
By Leroy Polk: Anchorage gamer made bomb threats on Twitter, ‘pledged allegiance to ISIS,’ charges say
This week, Gavin Lee Casdorph, an Anchorage gamer who was 19 at the time, was arrested for “willfully and maliciously making threats and conveying false information concerning an attempt to kill individuals and damage and destroy buildings by means of an explosive.”
 
 
 
 
By Kalinda Kindle: UAA student makes history as first deaf commencement speaker
 
 
 
 
Marion Owen: Cranberry salsa recipe and 8 curious facts about cranberries
 
 
 
 
Suzanne Downing, Editor Must Read Alaska: HOW ALASKA’S VOTER TURNOUT HIT A NEW LOW, DUNLEAVY BUDGET, On Sunday, Alaska surpassed 50,000 earthquakes for 2018, the most ever recorded in the state in a given year. and more->

Military December 17, 2018

By Katie Lange: Medal of Honor Monday: Army Pfc. William A. Soderman

William Adolph Soderman (March 20, 1912 – October 20, 1980) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military’s highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions during the Battle of the Bulge in World War II.

Read more->
 
 
 
 
By Paul Szoldra: Pentagon Identifies Soldier Who Died In ‘Non-Combat Related Incident’ In Afghanistan
 
 
 
 
The Canadian Press: Former Navy SEAL Zinke Resigns as Interior Secretary amid Numerous Probes
 
By Don Pogreba: His Former Commander Exposes Ryan Zinke’s Navy SEAL Career and Defective “Moral Make-up”
 
 
 
 
By Brian Niemietz, New York Daily News: A 90-Year-Old US Army Vet With Same Name As A Terrorist Can’t Fly Or Get Packages
Holiday travel would be a lot easier for 90-year-old army veteran David Mayer if he didn’t keep getting confused for ISIS terror suspect Akhmed the One-armed.
 
 
 
 
By SSG Jay Rogers: Christmas: Not Always the Most Wonderful Time of the Year
 
 
 
 
The Angry Staff Officer Ethics: the Leader’s Struggle
 
 
 
 
By Sean Mclain Brown: How this Navy Corpsman BBQ’d His Way to Successful Entrepreneur
 
 
 
 

 
 

Quotes December 17, 2018

Courtesy of Gretchen Rubin

 
 
 
 

“Energy is Eternal Delight.”

“Man has no Body distinct from his Soul; for that call’d Body is a portion of Soul discern’d by the five Senses.”
William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
 
 
 
 
“Gardening is one of the rewards of middle age, when one is ready for an impersonal passion, a passion that demands patience, acute awareness of a world outside oneself, and the power to keep on growing through all the times of drought, through the cold snows, toward those moments of pure joy when all failures are forgotten and the plum tree flowers.”
May Sarton, Plant Dreaming Deep
 
 
 
 
“Seeing them come and go [from the graveyard], and come and stay, I began to be moved by a compassion that seemed to come to me from outside. I never said to myself that it was happening. It just came to me, or I came to it. As I buried the dead and walked among them, I wanted to make my heart as big as Heaven to include them all and love them and not be distracted. I couldn’t do it, of course, but I wanted to.”
Wendell Berry, Jayber Crow
 
 
 
 
“Hold to the now, the here, through which all future plunges to the past.”
James Joyce, Ulysses
 
 
 
 
“Nothing is so exhausting as indecision, and nothing is so futile.”
Bertrand Russell
 
 
 
 
“Touch has its ecstasies.”
Helen Keller, The World I Live In
 
 
 
 
“Life is a train of moods like a string of beads, and as we pass through them, they prove to be many-colored lenses which paint the world their own hue, and each shows only what lies in its focus.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Experience,” from The Complete Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson
 
 
 
 
It’s all I have to bring today—
This, and my heart beside—
This, and my heart, and all the fields—
And all the meadows wide—
Be sure you count—should I forget
Some one the sum could tell—
This, and my heart, and all the Bees Which in the Clover dwell.
Emily Dickinson, “It’s all I have to bring today”

Music December 17, 2018

 
 
 
 

FYI December 16, 2018

On This Day

 
 
1901 – Beatrix Potter privately publishes The Tale of Peter Rabbit. It goes on to sell over 45 million copies worldwide.
The Tale of Peter Rabbit is a British children’s book written and illustrated by Beatrix Potter that follows mischievous and disobedient young Peter Rabbit as he is chased about the garden of Mr. McGregor. He escapes and returns home to his mother, who puts him to bed after dosing him with tea. The tale was written for five-year-old Noel Moore, son of Potter’s former governess Annie Carter Moore, in 1893. It was revised and privately printed by Potter in 1901 after several publishers’ rejections, but was printed in a trade edition by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1902. The book was a success, and multiple reprints were issued in the years immediately following its debut. It has been translated into 36 languages,[1] and with 45 million copies sold it is one of the best-selling books of all time.[2]

Since its release the book has generated considerable merchandise for both children and adults, including toys, dishes, foods, clothing, and videos. Potter was one of the first to be responsible for such merchandise when she patented a Peter Rabbit doll in 1903 and followed it almost immediately with a Peter Rabbit board game.

Read more ->

Born On This Day

 
 
1869 – Bertha Lamme Feicht, American electrical engineer (d. 1943)
Bertha Lamme Feicht (December 16, 1869 – November 20, 1943) was an American engineer. In 1893, she became the first woman to receive a degree in engineering from the Ohio State University.[1] She is considered to be the first American woman to graduate in a main discipline of engineering other than civil engineering.[2]

She was born Bertha Lamme on her family’s farm in Bethel Township near Springfield, Ohio on December 16, 1869.[3] After graduating from Olive Branch High School in 1889,[3] she followed in her brother, Benjamin G. Lamme’s footsteps and enrolled at Ohio State that fall.[2]
Bertha Lamme Feicht’s diploma from Ohio State

She graduated in 1893 with a degree in mechanical engineering with a specialty in electricity.[1][2][3] Her thesis was titled “An Analysis of Tests of a Westinghouse Railway Generator.”[2] The student newspaper reported that there was an outbreak of spontaneous applause when she received her degree.[3] She was then hired by Westinghouse[2] as its first female engineer.[4] She worked there until she married Russell S. Feicht, her supervisor and fellow Ohio State alumnus, on 14 December 1905.[2][3]

She had one child, Florence, born in 1910, who became a physicist for the U.S. Bureau of Mines.[2]

Bertha Lamme Feicht died in Pittsburgh on 20 November 1943[2] and was buried in Homewood Cemetery.

Her husband Russell died in April 1949.[4]

Some of her personal effects, including her slide rule, T-square, and diploma, are housed in the collections of the Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh.[2][3] The Westinghouse Educational Foundation, in conjunction with the Society of Women Engineers, created a scholarship named for her in 1973.[5]
 
 
 
 

FYI

 
 
By Dom Consentino: Bill Fralic Was A Real-Life Incredible Hulk

William P. Fralic Jr. (October 31, 1962 – December 14, 2018) was a professional American football offensive guard for the Atlanta Falcons and Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL) from 1985 to 1993. He played college football for the University of Pittsburgh.

Read more ->
 
 
 
 
By Catie Keck: HQ Trivia and Vine Co-Founder Colin Kroll Found Dead in New York Apartment
 
 
 
 
By Emily Alford: Saturday Night Social: Duke the Blind Sea Lion Has Absolutely Still Got It
 
 
 
 
By Sandra Brooke, Florida State University: Huge previously-undetected coral reef off US East Coast
 
 
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Medieval Bake-Off With only a list of ingredients, bakers set forth to imagine the taste of a forgotten medieval cake. 27 Unusual Collections. Midnight Munchies and more ->
 
 
Atlas Obscura By Karuna Eberl: The Tiny Florida Butterfly That Refuses to Become Extinct Miami blues have returned from the dead. Twice.
 
 
Atlas Obscura: Venilale Tunnels These underground shelters dug by the Japanese during World War II later helped East Timor achieve its independence.
 
 
 
 
By Carly Stern: Before There Was Miss Universe … There Was Miss Subways
Some Miss Subways studied physics; others dreamed of becoming performers. One 1941 winner, Mona Freeman, later appeared in more than 20 films, while in 1976, the contest’s final winner, Heide Hafner, was an amateur pilot who used the platform to draw attention to women in aviation. Still, the ad copy was written by men and often framed the women in ways they wouldn’t describe themselves. One example? The copy for Enid Berkowitz Schwarzbaum, who won Miss Subways in 1946 while studying for an art degree at Hunter College, claimed she was willing to “settle for an M.R.S.”
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Pay-to-Play Publishing Amazon Targets Unprofitable Items, With a Sharper Focus on the Bottom Line Well Facebook, Amazon struggle in fight against fake reviews The Measures That Matter
 
 
 
 
Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings: Emily Dickinson’s Electric Love Letters to Susan Gilbert – Hermann Hesse on Hope, the Difficult Art of Taking Responsibility, and the Wisdom of the Inner Voice – An Illustrated Celebration of the Rebels, Visionaries, and Fiercely Courageous World-Changers Who Won Women Political Power
 
 
 
 
By WZTV: ‘Adulting Day’ teaches Kentucky high schoolers how to pay bills, cook, change tires
 
 
 
 
NASA for the Pantagraph: Photos: Remembering Apollo and our adventures to the moon
 
 
 
 
Utah NBC: One state set to drop blood-alcohol limit to .05, strictest in country
UTAH, (NBC) – Utah will impose the country’s strictest limit for alcohol consumption later this month — just in time for New Year’s Eve.

The law, which was passed in March 2017 by Gov. Gary Herbert, will define driving under the influence as having a “blood or breath alcohol concentration of .05 grams or greater,” which is lower than the nationwide standard of .08.

It also states that a person with a blood-alcohol concentration level of .05 or higher who “operates a motor vehicle in a negligent manner causing the death of another” will have committed an automobile homicide, a felony.

The law will take effect Dec. 30.

The National Transportation Safety Board has been recommending for years that states lower make this change, saying in a 2013 report that “more than 100 countries have already established per se BAC limits at or below 0.05.” Utah is the first state to follow this advice.

An average-sized man reaches a .05 blood-alcohol level by having more than two standard drinks in the first hour and over one drink each hour thereafter, according to a police agency in Australia, which has a .05 blood-alcohol limit.
 
 
 
 

Ideas

 
 
By Hometalk Highlights: Top 12 Ways To Organize Your Bedroom Closet
 
 
Erin Reed: 3 DIY Glitter Ornament Balls Using Dollar Tree Supplies – Kitty, Unicorn, & Narwhal
 
 
By Elaina M: Instructables Holiday Ornament – Icosahedron
 
 


 
 

 
 

Recipes

 
 
By ButterMyBiscuits: Chicken, Bacon, and Monterey Jack Cheese Pithivier


 
 

 
 

907 Updates December 16, 2018

By Jeff Bridges: Wasilla teens fall through ice on Mud Lake
 
 
 
 
By Dave Leval: Son receives Distinguished Service Cross on behalf of his father
 
 
 
 
KTOO Public Media: Schools’ need for technology outpacing funding for faster internet, Kenai borough plans improvements in earthquake response and more ->
 
 
 
 
KTVA: Fairbanks high school changing admissions practices
 
 
 
 
By Shawn Wilson: Feeding feathered friends: Williwaw Elementary students learn responsibility in caring for chickens

Military December 16, 2018

By Paul Szoldra: Trump Says He’ll Review Case Of Maj. Matthew Golsteyn, Green Beret Charged With Murdering Suspected Taliban Bomb-Maker
“At the request of many, I will be reviewing the case of a ‘U.S. Military hero,’ Major Matt Golsteyn, who is charged with murder,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “He could face the death penalty from our own government after he admitted to killing a Terrorist bomb maker while overseas.”
 
 
 
 
By Amy Bushatz, Military.com: Fallen Soldier Given Second-Highest Award For ‘Extraordinary Heroism’ During 2009 Afghan Battle
JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska — More than nine years after the Battle of Kamdesh claimed eight lives and left 27 injured, a soldier killed there received a posthumous medal upgrade Saturday to the nation’s second highest honor, the Distinguished Service Cross.

Army Staff Sgt. Justin Gallegos, 27, had been posthumously awarded the Silver Star for his actions at Combat Outpost Keating, the location of the assault by Taliban insurgents that led to one of the bloodiest battles of the war in Afghanistan.”
 
 
 
 
By Mike Kilen: Wounded Horses, Iowa Veterans Work Together to Heal
 
 
 
 
By Matthew Cox: Conditions Improving for a US Return to Libya, Marine Commander Says
The commander of a special Marine Corps task force said Friday that conditions on the ground are improving for the return a U.S. diplomatic mission to Libya, six years after a devastating attack on the American consulate in Benghazi left four Americans dead.

Col. Adam Chalkley, commander of Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force-Crisis Response Africa — the unit created as a result of the Sept. 11, 2012 Benghazi attack that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans — said he spent much of his time on a recent six-month deployment helping to ensure there would be no repeat of that tragedy.
 
 
 
 
By Christopher Woody, Business Insider: Coast Guard Passed On Arctic Exercise Amid Fears Its Garbage Icebreaker Would Require Russia’s Help
“I said, ‘Au contraire, it’s a 40-year-old ship. We’re cannibalizing parts off its sister ship just to keep this thing running, and I can’t guarantee you that it won’t have an catastrophic engineering casualty as it’s doing a freedom of navigation exercise, and now I’ve got to call on Russia to pull me out of harm’s way. So this is not the time to do it,’” Zukunft said.
 
 
 
 
By WJW-TV Cleveland: Watch Airport Travelers Stop To Sing ‘Star Spangled Banner’ To The Children Of Fallen Service Members

Quotes December 16, 2018

Courtesy of Claudia Hall Christian Everyday Kindness

 
 
 
 
It’s pretty simple, really. Just be kind.
 
 
 
 
Be kind. It may be the rose in someone’s day.
 
 
 
 
It’s summer somewhere in the world right now. Be kind. Share spring no matter what it’s like outside.
 
 
 
 
Tired of being the same as everyone else? Want to stand out in a crowd? Be kind.
 
 
 
 
Exhausted from chasing your dream? Remember to be kind to you. Your dreams will happen faster.
 
 
 
 
Why is this happening? Why is everything so weird? Why? Why? Why? Stuck on the Island of Why? Give yourself the gift of patience. You deserve your own kindness.
 
 
 
 
Plant kindness. Grow a wonder-filled life.