Quotes November 30, 2020

Quotes courtesy of Lori Deschene/Tiny Buddha

 
 
“If you think there’s something missing from your life, it’s probably you.”
Robert Holden

“Forgiving someone doesn’t mean that their behavior was ‘OK.’ What it does mean is that we’re ready to move on. To release the heavy weight. To shape our own life, on our terms, without any unnecessary burdens. Forgiveness is pure freedom—and forgiveness is a choice.”
Dr. Suzanne Gelb

Your Strength

1. You’ve survived every challenge life has thrown at you, and there have been a lot.

2. You’ve done your best in every situation, based on where you were at that time in your life, where you’ve come from, and the resources at your disposal.

3. You’ve acknowledged and worked on weaknesses—maybe not always, and maybe not without some resistance. But you’ve made progress countless times when it would have been easier to stay stuck where you were.

4. You’ve risen back up after failure and rejection. You could have given up when you were laid off, or passed up for the job, or told “It’s not you, it’s me…,” but you licked your wounds, got through it, and put yourself back out there instead.

5. You’ve forgiven, the ultimate test of one’s strength. You may not be ready to forgive everyone who’s hurt you, but you have done it before, even though it was hard.

6. You’ve apologized. It’s not always easy to admit mistakes, but you’ve done it. You’ve owned your part, acknowledged pain caused, and vowed to do better going forward.

7. You’ve tried things outside your comfort zone, whether that means taking a new job overseas or saying hello when you would have preferred to stare at your feet.

8. You’ve faced a fear at some point. It may have seemed small to you, but any time you do something that scares you, it’s huge!

9. You’ve adapted to change, often without having chosen it, and have grown through the experience.

10. You’ve solved problems that could have crippled you and have helped other people with their problems while grappling with your own.

Your Kindness

11. You have good intentions. You might think you sometimes do the wrong things, but your heart’s generally in the right place.

12. You’ve made someone feel appreciated, and maybe many someones, by acknowledging their efforts and thanking them for what they’ve done.

13. You’ve made someone’s day, probably without even realizing it, by listening, understanding, or simply being thoughtful and kind.

14. You make people laugh—maybe even at your laugh, because you cackle or snort or sound like Beavis. (Too young for the reference? Google it!)

15. You look out for the people you love. When you say you care, you mean it, and you back it up with actions.

16. You smile at people. It might seem insignificant, but your smile has likely been someone’s lighthouse on a dark, scary day.

17. You remember the important things—or at least some of them. That “Happy birthday” card or call or text? It was a simple acknowledgement that helped someone feel valued and loved.

18. You ask people how they’re doing. You might not always get an honest response, but you’re willing to receive it.

19. You treat people how you’d like to be treated more often than not. Sometimes you slip up—you’re only human, after all! But you do your best to be a decent human being who treats other people with respect.

20. You’ve given second chances when you knew someone really needed it.

Your You-ness

21. You have many positive qualities, whether you realize it or not. Maybe you’re adventurous or brave or creative or dependable—or all of the above. You could probably go through the whole alphabet and list twenty-six amazing qualities for each letter that you possess. (Or at least twenty-five—X is tough!)

22. You’re passionate about something, whether it’s your work, a hobby, a dream for the future, or your family, and that passion is both admirable and contagious.

23. You have unique quirks that make you interesting, endearing, and fun to be around. Maybe you have a passion for Steampunk, or you talk to your plants, or you collect something weird, like umbrella sleeves.

24. You have eclectic taste and have likely introduced other people to many things they’ve come to enjoy—bands, movies, books, restaurants, the list goes on and on.

25. You’re beautifully messy, like all human beings, and your emotions give you empathy, depth, and many other gifts you may not even recognize.

26. You’re creative in your own way—everyone is! Maybe you bake or write or make cool things out of wine corks or scrabble pieces or rocks.

27. You have your own kind of smarts—book smarts, street smarts, emotional intelligence, maybe even all three.

28. You have a voice that has soothed someone, even if it sounds like Sofia Vergara’s, simply because it’s yours.

29. You are physically a work of art. Seriously. Our culture has long promoted a one-size-fits-all definition of beauty (though, thankfully, that seems to be changing), but there’s beauty to be found in every unique combination of body and facial features. Big noses, asymmetrical eyes, crooked smiles—every last of one of them, beautiful!

30. You are mentally fascinating. Just think of all the outlandish, complex, crazy thoughts that go through your mind each day.


Your Journey

31. You’ve amassed a vast assortment of experiences that have given you insight and a unique perspective. No one else sees the world exactly like you!

32. You’ve healed and grown through all your ups and downs, becoming stronger and wiser every day.

33. You’ve done some interesting things in your time. If our lives really do flash before our eyes before we die, yours definitely won’t be boring!

34. You’ve learned what matters to you throughout the years, and you’ve tried your best to honor those things.

35. You’ve started over when it was hard, whether it was a new direction, a new job, a new location, or a new relationship.

36. You’ve found and/or created opportunities for yourself, and possibly in fields that aren’t easy to break into.

37. You’ve adulted: you’ve fed yourself, done laundry, cleaned your house, paid your bills, and done countless other responsible things—often when you would have preferred to lie under a blanket fort eating cereal from an oversized bowl.

38. You’ve built a treasure chest of amazing memories through the years, and you recognize them for the gold they are.

39. You’re the co-star in many other people’s favorite memories.

40. You’ve made it to where you are right now. And here you are, strong, kind, uniquely you, and worth celebrating.

Music November 30, 2020

FYI November 29, 2020

On This Day

1830 – November Uprising: An armed rebellion against Russia’s rule in Poland begins.
The November Uprising (1830–31), also known as the Polish–Russian War 1830–31[3] or the Cadet Revolution, was an armed rebellion in the heartland of partitioned Poland against the Russian Empire. The uprising began on 29 November 1830 in Warsaw when the young Polish officers from the local Army of the Congress Poland’s military academy revolted, led by lieutenant Piotr Wysocki. Large segments of the peoples of Lithuania, Belarus, and the Right-bank Ukraine soon joined the uprising. Although the insurgents achieved local successes, a numerically superior Imperial Russian Army under Ivan Paskevich eventually crushed the uprising.[4][5][6] The Russian Emperor Nicholas I decreed that henceforth Russian-occupied Poland would lose its autonomy and become an integral part of the Russian Empire. With Warsaw remaining little more than a military garrison, its university closed.[7]

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1873 – Suzan Rose Benedict, American mathematician and academic (d. 1942)
Suzan Rose Benedict (November 29, 1873 – April 8, 1942) was the first woman awarded a Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Michigan and had a long teaching career at Smith College.[1]

Read more ->

 
 
1876 – Nellie Tayloe Ross, American educator and politician, 14th Governor of Wyoming (d. 1977)
Nellie Davis Tayloe Ross (November 29, 1876 – December 19, 1977) was an American politician, the 14th governor of Wyoming from 1925 to 1927 and director of the United States Mint from 1933 to 1953. She was the first woman to be sworn in as governor of a U.S. state, and remains the only woman to have served as governor of Wyoming.[1]

Ross was born in St. Joseph, Missouri[2] to James Wynns Tayloe, a native of Tennessee, and Elizabeth Blair Green, who owned a plantation on the Missouri River. Her family moved to Miltonvale, Kansas in 1884, and she graduated from Miltonvale High School in 1892. She attended a teacher-training college for two years and taught kindergarten for four years.

On September 11, 1902, Ross married William B. Ross, whom she had met when visiting relatives in Tennessee in 1900. William B. Ross was governor of Wyoming from 1923 to his death on October 2, 1924. Ross succeeded her late husband’s successor Frank Lucas as governor when she won the special election, becoming the first female American governor on January 5, 1925. She was a staunch supporter of Prohibition during the 1920s. She lost re-election in 1926 but remained an active member of the Democratic Party.

In 1933, Ross became the first female Director of the United States Mint. Despite initial mistrust, she forged a strong bond with Mary Margaret O’Reilly, the Assistant Director of the Mint and one of the United States’ highest-ranking female civil servants of her time. Ross served five terms as Director, retiring in 1953. During her later years, she wrote for various women’s magazines and traveled. Ross died in Washington, D.C., at the age of 101.

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FYI

Condolences to all who love him during this heartbreaking time.
 
 

 
 
Wayne Templar:
“Always use the green cross code, because I won’t be there when you cross the road”. I wonder how may kids growing up in the 70s wouldn’t have made it to adulthood without this guy? R.I.P.
 
 
David Charles Prowse MBE (1 July 1935 – 28 November 2020) was an English bodybuilder,[1] weightlifter and character actor in British film and television. Worldwide, he was best known for physically portraying Darth Vader in the original Star Wars trilogy (with the character’s voice being performed by James Earl Jones); in 2015, he starred in a documentary concerning that role, entitled I Am Your Father. Prior to his role as Vader, Prowse had established himself as a prominent figure in the UK as the first Green Cross Code man, a character used in road safety public information aimed at children.[2][3][4]

Read more ->

 
 
 
 
The Rural Blog: Tim Crews, a rural editor-publisher who fought for open government and went to jail to protect sources, dies at 77
 
 
 
 
By Susanne Matthews, The Author’s Billboard: Commercials: Beautiful Christmas Thoughts and So Much More
 
 
 
 
By Gwen Romack, Kings River Life: From Rescue Dog to Writer – Spreading Laughter When We Need It Most
 
 
 
 
The Passive Voice: Scourge of the Elites
 
 
The Passive Voice: Best books of 2020
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Recipes

By CutterLight: Salmon Cheddar Bisque with Morels
 
 
By Elizabethinmn: Nut Goodie Thumbprints
 
 
By Momos75: Pistachio and Salted Caramel Brownie Cookies
 
 
By sun.: Sparkly Chocolate Coffee Crinkle Cookies
 
 
By Ddupla27: Iced Sweet Potato Cookies With Roasted Pecans!


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

907 Updates November 29, 2020

KTUU Alaska’s News Source: 1 man dead after traffic collision Sunday morning; Anchorage alcohol tax goes into effect in February. Here’s where the funds are set to go; Business owners turn to beachwear to increase sales and more ->
 
 
 
 
Fairbanks News Webcenter 11: Alaska Native small business owners invite you to shop small this holiday season and more ->
 
 
 
 

Mountain View Post: Thanksgiving in Mountain View

Military November 29, 2020

Military.com: Carrier Nimitz Returns to Gulf as Iran Makes Threats and more ->
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

In this episode we sit down with Craig Harrison, a former sniper in the British Army. Craig takes us through his career including his first kill, his most dangerous mission and how he broke the world record for the longest kill. Craig also takes us through his post-army life and how his PTSD continues to impact on him.

Quotes November 29, 2020

Courtesy of Gretchen Rubin Moment of Happiness

 
 
“The whole language of writing for me is finding out what you don’t want to know, what you don’t want to find out. But something forces you anyway.”
James Baldwin, The Paris Review
 
 
 
 
“In the Hall of Gems at the Museum of Natural History in New York, I once stood in front of a huge piece of sulfur so yellow I began to cry.”
Diana Ackerman, A Natural History of the Senses
 
 
 
 
“But then one regrets the loss even of one’s worst habits. Perhaps one regrets them the most. They are such an essential part of one’s personality.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray
 
 
 
 
“Why some things—a word, a glance, a scene glimpsed from a window, a random memory, a fragrance, a conversational anecdote, a fragment of music, or of a dream—have the power to stimulate us to intense creativity while most others do not, we are unable to say.”
Joyce Carol Oates, The Faith of a Writer
 
 
 
 
“Those who are not grateful soon begin to complain of everything.”
Thomas Merton, Thoughts in Solitude
 
 
 
 
“How oft, amid those overflowing streets,
Have I gone forward with the crowd, and said
Unto myself, “The face of every one
That passes by me is a mystery!”
William Wordsworth, The Prelude
 
 
 
 
“To walk is something much larger than a list of advantages you can read in an ad for vitamins…Why do we walk? Where do we walk from and what is our destination? We all have our own answers. Even if you and I walk next to each other, we can experience the walk differently.”
Erling Kagge, Walking One Step at a Time
 
 
 
 
“I realized I was as happy as I’d ever been in my life. It was the happiness of the right-before, when everything is potential and no branch on the tree of possibility has yet been closed off by action.”
Dawn Drzal, The Bread and the Knife
 
 
 
 
“Of course reading and thinking are important but, my God, food is important too. How fortunate we are to be food-consuming animals. Each meal should be a treat and one ought to bless every day which brings with it a good digestion and the precious gift of hunger.”
Iris Murdoch, The Sea, the Sea
 
 
 
 
“‘Safe! safe! safe!’ the pulse of the house beats wildly. Waking, I cry ‘Oh, is this your buried treasure? The light in the heart.'”
Virginia Woolf, Haunted House
 
 
 
 
“The thankful receiver bears a plentiful harvest.”
William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
 
 
 
 

Music November 29, 2020

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

FYI November 28, 2020

On This Day

1785 – The first Treaty of Hopewell is signed, by which the United States acknowledges Cherokee lands in what is now East Tennessee.
The Treaty of Hopewell was signed by the Choctaw at the foothills of the Smoky Mountains on January 3, 1786. The ceded area amounted to 69,120 acres, and the compensation to the Choctaw took the form of protection by the United States.[1] To elaborate, the plenipoteniaries were Benjamin Hawkins, Andrew Pickens and Joseph Martin representing the U.S. while representing the Choctaw were 13 small medal and 12 medal and gorget captains.

Read more ->

 
 

Born On This Day

1910 – Elsie Quarterman, American ecologist and academic (d. 2014)
Elsie Quarterman (November 28, 1910 – June 9, 2014) was a prominent plant ecologist. She was a Professor Emerita at Vanderbilt University.

Quarterman was born on November 28, 1910 in Valdosta, Georgia. She earned a B.A. from Georgia State Women’s College (now Valdosta State University) in 1932 and earned an M.A. in botany from Duke University in 1943. She completed her PhD at Duke University in 1949 with Henry J. Oosting. During her graduate work and afterward, she also collaborated extensively with Catherine Keever.

Quarterman is best known for her work on the ecology of Tennessee cedar glades. These herb-dominated plant communities on the shallow soils of limestone outcrops are globally rare habitats and contain many endemic plant species. She is also credited with rediscovering the native Tennessee coneflower, Echinacea tennesseensis, which was thought to be extinct, in 1969.[1][2] Conservation efforts for the coneflower were successful, and it was delisted as an endangered species in 2011.[3]

She supervised seven doctoral students, including Stewart Ware, a plant ecologist at the College of William and Mary, and Carol and Jerry Baskin, professors at the University of Kentucky.[4]

Read more ->

 
 

FYI

Mike Croissant: Shot at and Missed – The Story of Guyon Phillips
 
 
 
 
STORIES OF THE FAR NORTH: Young Black Officers
 
 
 
 
I read a dark mystery with excellent, descriptive writing:

“In every county, township, or parcel, regardless of population or relevance, there is high pressure, low pressure, and the force of greed between.”

“BOOZE HAD him by the balls. Pruett knew it. His conscience told him to ignore the negative; that circumstances allowed him to make significant concessions. But there wasn’t much denying the reality that the bitch was back. Pruett only too gladly let her right through the front door, though the one thing he’d forgotten was that her grip rivaled any vise he ever owned.”

“But being aware and being capable were two different things. One of the many challenges of the addict is the paralyzing terror resiliency faces when eclipsed by the towering shadow of NEED.”


R.S. Guthrie, Blood Land

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
NSFW

Recipes

Betty Crocker Kitchens: All-You-Can-Eat Apps!
 
 
Taste of Home: 60 Christmas Cookies from Grandma’s Recipe Box and more ->


 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

E-book Deals:

 

BookGorilla

The Book Blogger List

BookBub

The Book Junction: Where Readers Go To Discover Great New Fiction!

Books A Million

Digital Book Spot

eBookSoda

eBooks Habit

FreeBooksy

Indie Bound

Love Swept & The Smitten Word

Mystery & Thriller Most Wanted

Pixel of Ink

The Rock Stars of Romance

Book Blogs & Websites:

Alaskan Book Cafe

Alternative-Read.com

Stacy, Carol RT Book Reviews

Welcome to the Stump the Bookseller blog!

Stump the Bookseller is a service offered by Loganberry Books to reconnect people to the books they love but can’t quite remember. In brief (for more detailed information see our About page), people can post their memories here, and the hivemind goes to work. After all, the collective mind of bibliophiles, readers, parents and librarians around the world is much better than just a few of us thinking. Together with these wonderful Stumper Magicians, we have a nearly 50% success rate in finding these long lost but treasured books. The more concrete the book description, the better the success rate, of course. It is a labor of love to keep it going, and there is a modest fee. Please see the How To page to find price information and details on how to submit your Book Stumper and payment.

Thanks to everyone involved to keep this forum going: our blogging team, the well-read Stumper Magicians, the many referrals, and of course to everyone who fondly remembers the wonder of books from their childhood and wants to share or revisit that wonder. Isn’t it amazing, the magic of a book?

907 Updates November 28, 2020

KTUU Alaska’s News Source: Alaskan from Noorvik named 2021 Rhodes Scholar; Chugiak firefighters respond to structure fire; Outdoor Downtown Christmas Market features local vendors; Alaska online sales tax offers a ‘tiny bright spot’ of revenue for some local communities and more ->
 
 
 
 

Alaska Native News: Alaska Earthquake Center receives USGS funding and more ->
 
 
 
 
Fairbanks News Webcenter 11: Sci-Friday: New project intends to turn spruce beetle killed forest into greenhouse fuel; Despite COVID-19, Fairbanks Black Friday shoppers rise and shine to get annual deals and more ->
 
 
 
 
Craig Medred: COVID-19 refuge
 
 
 
 
The Nome Static, November 2020 (PDF Layout)
 
 
 
 

Military November 28, 2020

DOD: DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty and more ->
 
 
 
 
Military.com: New M240 Machine Gun Suppressor Gets Rave Reviews from Army Maneuver in Test and more ->
 
 
 
 
Task & Purpose: We salute this heroic military working dog for taking out the gunman who pinned his team down during a fierce firefight; The Marine Corps is on the hunt for a kamikaze drone swarm to back up grunts on the battlefield; 11 of the best military books we read this year and more ->